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The results of all responses on TWC’s 2018-2019 Year-End Teacher Survey and Year-End Teacher Update have been tabulated and reviewed. It is always good to get feedback from the many folks using our program. The feedback they provide and the insights they share are always helpful! Let’s see what we learned.

Some Basic Background . . .

If you recall, for this year’s Mid-Year and Year-End Teacher Surveys, we focused our attention on our new adopters — those folks who received the program and began using it within the past year. The Year-End Teacher Update went to those who’d been using the program longer. As a number of the questions appeared on both the Year-End Teacher Survey and the Year-End Teacher Update, the combined responses are included here. For the results for the questions just on the Year-End Teacher Survey, be on the lookout for another post this summer!

Who did we survey?

Of all the folks surveyed, 31% responded, and they identify themselves as below.

  • 79% – classroom teachers
  •  4% – afterschool/OST staff
  •  4% – administrators
  •  2% – resource staff
  • 1.5% – curriculum coordinators
  • 1% – wellness professionals
  • 8.5% – other

Among the latter, parents, board members, nurses, instructional technology facilitators, library/media staff, PE teachers, and a STEM specialist are represented.

When asked how many years they had been working at their school/site, the responses were as below.

  • 24% – 1 to 3 years
  • 22% – 4 to 6 years
  • 20% – 16 to 24 years
  • 17% – 10 to 15 years
  • 12% – 7 to 9 years
  • 5% – more than 25 years
Using TWC . . . How, When, and Where?

Among those who responded, we learned that 84% use the program during the school day; 12% use it in an afterschool or out-of-school time setting. The remainder use it for a combination of the two, for homeschooling, or were unable to use it this year.

And . . . how long have they been using The Walking Classroom?

  • 46% – less than one year
  • 15% – three years
  • 12% – four years
  • 12% – two years
  • 11% – more than five years
  • 4% – one year

As far as frequency, 48% of the respondents use The Walking Classroom once a week. 35% use it twice a week. The remaining 17% use the program three or more times per week, with 6% using it every day!

And, how many listens to each podcast? We learned that 54% of the respondents listen to each podcast once, 38% listen twice, and 8% listen three or more times.

What about the Benefits?

For the first time, we asked folks on both the Mid-Year Teacher Survey and the Year-End Teacher Survey how evident they found various benefits of The Walking Classroom in their implementation of the program. The responses are listed in descending order, with those at the top receiving the highest percentage of “very” evident. Interestingly, even the benefit at the bottom was identified as “very” evident by 52% of the respondents.

  • Increases physical activity – 89%
  • Fosters health literacy and healthy habits – 77%
  • Builds core content knowledge – 71%
  • Addresses different learning styles
  • Aligns with standards
  • Differentiates instruction
  • Enhances social-emotional learning
  • Develops character values
Resources and More . . .

It’s good to see that our adopters make us of the resources we provide. We learned that 81% make use of the Teacher or Discussion Guide; 57% have completed the online training, and a significant percentage use the electronic quizzes available through our Adopter Resources page.

Speaking of the Adopter Resources page, be on the lookout for some improvements.  When you log in later this summer, things will look a little different. You will see some updates that will make the page a bit more user-friendly. Even better, it will be searchable too! You will now be able to find podcasts by title, character value, health literacy message, and even by theme!

If you are an adopter and still haven’t explored the many “extras” available on the Adopter Resources page, let me know. I will provide you with the information you need to get access to the electronic quizzes, supplemental videos, and PowerPoint slide decks for each podcast!

Challenges, Anyone?

Most adopters (81%) report no challenges incorporating The Walking Classroom, but the remaining respondents cite several different obstacles. We learned that these include time, technical difficulties, content alignment, student behavior, or physical issues.

In response to these concerns, keep an eye on those shared stories on our blog! In relating their own experiences, adopters often provide some tips for triumphing over these (and other) troubles.

What Else?

What more can we do for our adopters? Most adopters (91%) did not cite a need for additional resources. Of those who shared ideas, 71% suggested additional content, with most interested in adding more grade levels, differentiation, alternate languages, or specific topics like music, math, or expanded science topics.

The remaining 29% were interested in additional resources, like alternate assessments, differentiated quizzes, question stems, additional kid-friendly resources (like worksheets or guided notebooks), or further ideas for extending the lesson beyond the podcast. If you have created any of these resources or have some ideas of your own, feel free to share. Other adopters would be thrilled!

Finally, a Great Big Thanks!

Thanks to all of you who took the time to respond and share your feedback. We appreciate it immensely, and we look forward to using it to make The Walking Classroom even better!

Continued Happy Trails to you!

The post What We Learned: Year-End Results appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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Meet Walking Classroom Ambassador Tanya Robinson-Freeman. Mrs. Robinson-Freeman uses The Walking Classroom with her third through fifth grade health and physical education students at Union Intermediate School in North Carolina. She has worked in education for 14 years, and is starting her fifth year with The Walking Classroom.

What are your memories of yourself when you were the age of your students?

My love for reading is what I remember most.

What led you to become an educator?

I love learning, being educated, and educating others. I was a teacher long before I became one.

Share your educational philosophy in one to three sentences.

I believe every student is a learner and can be successful, and that a test score does not determine a child’s educational achievement(s). I think students should leave me/my class better than they were when they came into it.

School should be a place where students are excited to attend, so much so that they don’t want to be late or miss a day. Whatever it takes, I’m ALL in! I want my students to think about and ask, “What am I missing?”

What is your favorite content area/topic to teach? Why?

I enjoy teaching health, physical education, and science. I am fascinated with the human body and what it is capable of.

What is your favorite podcast or Walking Classroom memory and why?

I have a few favorite podcasts. If I had to choose, it would be either Heart & Circulatory System (Complete-#128, 4-#6, STEM-#31) or Dr. Christiaan Barnard (Complete-#154, 4-#20, STEM-#44).

What is your best teaching memory?

I would pull a rabbit out of my hat if I had to, but as we prepared for the EOG’s, I placed inspirational posters around the school. One of my students walked up to me to thank me for hanging the posters.  She shared with me how the posters encouraged her to do well. I could see the look on her face; she was sincere.  I do it every year now.

What advice would you give to a new teacher?

Practice self-care and carve out time to reflect and re-energize.

What do you like to do in your spare time?

I love to read, do yoga, go for walks, or spend time with family.

Name something you’d like to cross off your bucket list.

I want to go to Africa.

Congratulations and welcome to 2019 Walking Classroom Ambassador Tanya Robinson-Freeman!

The post Ambassador Profile: Tanya Robinson-Freeman appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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The Walking Classroom by A Walking Classroom Adopter - 6d ago

In June 2018 when granted a set of Walking Classroom materials, my role changed from fourth grade teacher to AIG facilitator for our school. I wondered how The Walking Classroom would fit in with this new role. Little did I know then that this resource was exactly what I needed!

Recently, during a brainstorming session with students, I learned many had developed an appreciation for what I love about the Walking Classroom: equity through personalization.

What does that sound like in the language of fourth and fifth graders?

  • “I really like having my own device, it makes me feel special.”
  • “Being able to rewind and fast forward helps in case a plane flies by.” (Disclaimer: Our school is in the RDU flight path.)
  • “I like that when it finishes, I can repeat it because on the second time I can try to remember the words from the first time.”
  • “Sometimes if I get confused, I can rewind one or two minutes and try again.”
  • “I get my own headphones, so only I can listen to the device on my pace.”

As an enrichment specialist, I work with all fourth and fifth graders as part of their specials rotation. In class after class, the above comments were repeated. Students voiced an appreciation for personalization that had not come up through our content-specific lessons.

Then I realized the program had come full circle. After all, it was this potential for personalization that had originally interested me in The Walking Classroom as a resource!

With The Walking Classroom, every student has a device. More importantly, every student has the power to use the device in a way that best works for him/her. Because of this, students control the pacing of their learning. Providing students with voice and choice in their learning contributes to the greater social/emotional needs and goals offered through The Walking Classroom.

The equity this resource provides directly aligns with the primary motivation behind the Enrichment special. This special is designed to provide access to ALL students in crosscutting concepts and ideas that span the curriculum.

While differentiating for gifted students, I wanted to find ways to allow ALL students access to higher level learning and thinking opportunities. I hoped that this special would provide students skills that could be applied across the curriculum, thus enabling higher levels of understanding and application.

Using The Walking Classroom as part of the specials rotation has done that! This wonderful resource has provided both a philosophical match and a content match. It brings equity to the learning experience AND it covers what I am responsible for teaching!

Happy Trails!

Lindsey Hensler
AIG Teacher
Cedar Fork Elementary

Want to comment on this story? Add your comments below!
Are you a Walking Classroom teacher? We would love to hear!

The post This Resource Was Exactly What I Needed! appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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Looking for engaging activities for out-of-school time? Pick an appealing podcast (or two) to keep your kids on the move (and learning too!). After all, just because the school year is done doesn’t mean something educational can’t be part of the fun! Go ahead and create your own out-of-school time units, relying on those podcasts with a common focus, America’s past-time or past times!

Take advantage of the opportunities afforded by the natural groupings of topics and stretch your study to a week or two. Delve deeper with supplemental resources and hands-on activities where you can!

Hit a Home Run by Honing in on America’s Past-time!

Take a cue from one of our afterschool adopters and build a unit around baseball. You could even track your progress as you journey by incorporating a visual.

Use an image of a baseball diamond and chart your journey from podcast to podcast (or base to base in this case!) by marking with a dotted line or by placing a sticker on the appropriate place at the completion of each podcast. All done? Why then, with that newfound knowledge, you’ve gone way beyond a base hit!

  • Negro Baseball League (Complete-#121, 5-#4)
  • “Casey at the Bat” (Complete-#29, 5-#5)
  • “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” (Complete-#30, 5-#6)
  • “Who’s on First?” (Complete-#122, 5-#19)

For some visual follow-up, it might be fun to share a related video clip or two. “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” and “Who’s on First?” prove to be particularly popular!

Poke into Past Presidents . . .

It doesn’t have to be an election year; learning about past Presidents can be enlightening anytime! Between Program 4 and Program 5, you’ve got your pick!

  • Barack Obama (Complete-#125, 4-#12)
  • George Washington (Complete-#71, 4-#86)
  • Abraham Lincoln (Complete-#83, 5-#54)
  • FDR, Parts 1 & 2 (Complete-#118 & Complete-#119, 5-#89 & 5-#90)

And why not support your study of our nation’s former leaders with a tale or two about their youth? David Stabler’s cleverly crafted Kid Presidents: True Tales of Childhood from America’s Presidents provides a perspective that helps kids connect with these famous figures!

. . . or Explore Other Prominent Figures from Past Times!

No need to limit yourself to the traditional choices! You can also look into those folks who’ve explored in other ways, traversing new frontiers of their own with accomplishments in art or innovation.

  • Neil Armstrong (Complete-#152, 5-#82)
  • Henry Ford (Complete-#112, 4-#89)
  • Thomas Edison (Complete-#162, 5-#16, STEM-#9)
  • Albert Einstein (Complete-#163, 5-#17, STEM-#10)
  • Johannes Gutenberg (Complete-#51, 5-#23)
  • Galileo Galilei (Complete-#165, 5-#24, STEM-#5)
  • Leonardo DaVinci (5-#26, STEM-#4)
  • Rene Magritte (Complete-#31, 5-#84)
  • Salvador Dali (Complete-#32, 5-#85)
. . .  and Tie Things Together!

Maybe you’d prefer not to identify the “theme” of your unit, but rather have your crew make connections on their own! After all, students do enjoy a bit of sleuthing now and then! Assign four different podcasts to four different small groups. Walk, listen, and learn! Then allow each group to share some basics. Guide them to respond to the following in imparting their information:

  • Who was the focus of your podcast?
  • When and where did this person live?
  • What did this person do?
  • Why is this person significant?

Incorporate a visual element! Have each group record their responses on individual posters, then mount those to the wall around a central poster. After everyone has shared their individual information, take some time to make “connections” linking commonalities in a visual and/or tactile way. List details shared by two or more of the figures on the central poster, then draw lines (or use yarn) to connect those to the individual posters which share them! Note: You may end up with a rather large cobweb of connections!

With The Walking Classroom, there are so many paths (and podcasts) you can choose for your “past” poking,  you’re sure to find a suitable selection to satisfy your audience!

How have you implemented The Walking Classroom in your afterschool program (or other out-of-school time venture)? We’d love to hear more!

The post OST Ideas: America’s Past-time or Past Times! appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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Meet Walking Classroom Ambassador Kim Collazo. A STEM teacher, Kim uses the STEM Program with her fourth and fifth graders at Robbins Elementary in North Carolina. Mrs. Collazo has worked in education for 28 years, and 2019-2020 will be her fourth year with The Walking Classroom. Having first used the program in 2014 with her fifth grade class; Mrs. Collazo has used it with her STEM students for the past couple of years.

What are your memories of yourself when you were the age of your students?

I remember playing outside a lot and exploring the creek and cow pasture behind my house. I was always interested in science and set up various “laboratories” to perform my experiments!

What led you to become an educator?

My father was a lifelong science teacher. He had a big impact on my decision to become an educator. In college, courses in human development and psychology led me to pursue further education classes where I could connect everything I learned. And finally, I was placed with an awesome veteran teacher for my student teaching experience. That instilled in me an even greater love of working with young children.

Share your educational philosophy in one to three sentences.

Education is the stepping stone for many children to achieve their greatest potential in life. It is our calling as educators to provide relevant, challenging activities that promote curiosity and independence. Our classrooms should be filled with opportunities for our children to create rather than consume, share globally rather than just turn in, and develop a love of learning that will help them to be successful in this ever changing society.

What is your favorite content area/topic to teach? Why?

Science and engineering. I have always loved science. As humans, the more we understand the world around us, the better we will become at preserving and enhancing our own lives and the lives of every other living thing. In addition, science and engineering by nature are very hands-on subjects and that is how I feel we learn best.

What is your favorite podcast or Walking Classroom memory, and why?

My favorite Walking Classroom memory was when one of my fifth graders, whom I had a hard time connecting with inside the classroom, came jogging up shortly into our third or fourth walk and started walking beside me. She didn’t say a word, nor did she even look at me. From then on, she chose to walk beside me as we listened to the podcasts each week. It changed our relationship in immeasurable ways.

What is your best teaching memory?

There have been so many wonderful memories over 28 years. One of my favorites was when my fifth graders were studying erosion. We were working through it PBL style where each group had chosen an erosion issue they found on our campus. They documented the issue with digital photos and video, hypothesizing the causes.

Then, they had to develop a solution, prepare a digital presentation, and present it to several audiences, including our district school board. One of the groups successfully pressed the board to create a $25,000 line item in the district budget. The erosion problem, which had existed for many years, was fixed. Our campus was made much more beautiful thanks to the convincing research, factual information, and suggestions of our group of ten year olds. Their excitement to see the real difference they had made will forever remain one of the favorite experiences in my career.

What advice would you give to a new teacher?

Teaching is one of the most challenging jobs in the world. Some days are awesome and some days are very difficult. Remember that you are not alone. Even the most veteran teachers go through this ebb and flow. Seek guidance and advice from others, and don’t feel guilty when you need to take some “sharpening the saw” time for yourself. You will be a better teacher by taking care of yourself.

What do you like to do in your spare time?

In my spare time I love to read, share ideas with other educators on Twitter, and go for motorcycle rides with my husband, preferably to the beach!

Name something you’d like to cross off your bucket list.

One of the biggest things on my bucket list is to go out west and see the beautiful national parks we have right in our own country.

Congratulations and welcome to 2019 Walking Classroom Ambassador Kim Collazo!

The post Ambassador Profile: Kim Collazo appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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The Walking Classroom by A Walking Classroom Adopter - 1w ago

I am a reading coach at a small school in northeast Florida. Our fourth and fifth grade students were struggling with reading, especially in the areas of vocabulary and comprehension. Since I plan the lessons for the afterschool tutoring program, I searched the web for ideas, and found The Walking Classroom.

I purchased the Walking Classroom for our afterschool tutoring program, and began using it in August of 2018. Our students were scoring at a third grade level (one to two years behind) on our diagnostic assessments in August. The program was easy to implement, and the students really enjoyed the walking, discussions, and the listening to the podcasts.

One of the challenges I noticed at the beginning was that the students weren’t able to remember everything they were listening to while walking. I decided to make them a “big idea” page to hold in their hands. This would help them remember what they were listening for, and guide them once the podcast was over to have something to discuss with a partner.

I love the additional resources The Walking Classroom provides, in the form of PowerPoints and videos to go with along with the lessons. Since podcasts are so auditory, my visual learners really needed (and benefitted from) the extra visual resources. When many of our struggling students tested at the winter diagnostics, they were scoring on grade level. We are thrilled with The Walking Classroom!

Natalie Faucher
Reading Coach
Bryceville Elementary

Want to comment on this story? Add your comments below!
Are you a Walking Classroom teacher? We would love to hear!

The post Struggling Reading Students Score with TWC! appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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As they always do, our year-end teacher and student surveys provided us with lots of useful data. A big thanks to the nearly 300 teachers and more than 3400 students who took the time to respond! You are among our most valuable resources!

From the survey results, we find out how The Walking Classroom is working for all of our adopters. We get fresh ideas for resources, and gain some practical tips from new and seasoned adopters. In addition, we find out which podcasts are the students’ top picks as fan favorites! After a quick tally of those responses, here are this year’s most popular podcasts (among students, at least!).

But First, a Few Words . . .

This year, the Year-End Student Survey was administered only to students in those classes in their first year using the program. As the Complete Program was rolled out in August 2018, nearly all of these students spent the year walking, listening, and learning with this new program.

The podcasts in the top 10% (top seventeen for the Complete Program, and the top seven for the STEM Program) are listed below in ascending order, so the most popular of the favorites in each program is listed last. Note: In some cases, the same podcast appears on both Programs, and thus, on both lists.

From the Complete Program. . .

Interestingly, there were not too many changes from previous years’ favorites, with only two podcasts moving up the list to bump two others down!

  • Human Body’s Slimy Shields (Complete-#127, 4-#4, STEM-#129)
  • Skin (Complete-#126, 4-#5, STEM-#30) – first time in the top podcast picks!
  • Heroic Dogs and Horses (Complete-#44, 4-#37) – first time in the top podcast picks!
  • Hurricanes (Complete-#150, 4-#28, STEM-#13)
  • Slave Life and Rebellions (Complete-#76, 5-#47) – first time in the top podcast picks!
  • Tornadoes (Complete-#149, 4-#31, STEM-#14)
  • Food Chains (Complete-#130, 4-#42, STEM-#33) – last year’s #1 among the STEM podcasts!
  • Sun, Stars and Galaxies (Complete-#144, 4-#78, STEM-#26)
  • Boston Tea Party (Complete-#62, 4-#53) – first time in the top podcast picks!
  • Volcanoes (Complete-#138, 4-#76, STEM-#19)
  • Take Me Out to the Ball Game (Complete-#30, 5-#6)
  • Idioms (Complete-#3, 4-#7, 5-#3) – the top pick for the past two years!

and, entering the top five favorites

  • Barack Obama (Complete-#125, 4-#12)
  • Rosa Parks (Complete-#124, 4-#65)
  • Negro Baseball League (Complete-#121, 5-#4)
  • Similes and Metaphors (Complete-#4, 4-#11, 5-#72)

Finally, the top vote-getter (with a significant lead — 23% more votes — over the others!):

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Complete-#123, 4-#64)
    From the STEM Program . . .
    • Human Body’s Slimy Shields (Complete-#127, 4-#4, STEM-#129)
    • Skin (Complete-#126, 4-#5, STEM-#30)- first time in the top podcast picks!
    • Hurricanes (Complete-#150, 4-#28, STEM-#13)
    • Tornadoes (Complete-#149, 4-#31, STEM-#14)
    • Food Chains (Complete-#130, 4-#42, STEM-#33) – last year’s #1 on the STEM list!
    • Sun, Stars and Galaxies (Complete-#144, 4-#78, STEM-#26)

    and, the top vote-getter

    • Volcanoes (Complete-#138, 4-#76, STEM-#19) – in the top two the past two years!
    Other Nuggets of Note

    While not making the top podcast picks above, those early podcasts in both programs, Welcome to TWC (Complete-#1, 4-#1, 5-#1, STEM-#1) and Introduction to TWC (Complete-#2, 4-#3, 5-#2, STEM-#3), were still rather popular among the students.

    These two podcasts are clearly memorable and absolutely worth a listen. They provide lots of valuable information to help get you started!

    A Final Point

    NOTE: If you are changing positions or schools and did not let us know by responding to the Year-End Teacher Survey or Year-End Teacher Update sent out in April, be sure to update us as soon as possible. We want to be sure our records are current, so that we can continue to provide you (or whoever is using the program!) with the resources and support to have a positive experience!

    Happy Trails!

    What podcasts are a hit with your students and you? We’d love to know!

    The post Finding Favorites: Students’ Top Podcast Picks! appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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    With summer starting, for out-of-school time adopters, the fun has just begun! These folks, active in camps and other summer programs, continue to walk on — listening and learning loads along the way. How can out-of-school time staff keep the excitement alive? Start summer off right. Theme it, and get set to stroll!

    Watch the Weather

    Summer brings its own array of interesting weather phenomena sure to intrigue your legions of listeners. The Walking Classroom presents a nice grouping of weather-related topics to investigate. Just take your pick!

    • Meteorology (Complete-#147, 5-#11, STEM-#11)
    • Hurricanes (Complete-#150, 4-#28, STEM-#13)
    • Water Cycle (Complete-#148, 4-#30, STEM-#12)
    • Tornadoes (Complete-#149, 4-#31, STEM-#14)
    • Gabriel Fahrenheit (Complete-#164, 4-#25, STEM-#6)

    And, if the actual weather is keeping you indoors, there are plenty of great weather-related activities you can do inside to engage your audience! You can even make your own thermometers!

    Knock One out of the Park

    What better focus for your listening than the podcasts celebrating America’s pastime? You too can hit a home run with your crew, entertaining (and educating!) them with several podcasts about the game of baseball!

    • “Casey at the Bat” (Complete-#29, 5-#5)
    • “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” (Complete-#30, 5-#6)
    • Negro Baseball League (Complete-#121, 5-#4)
    • “Who’s on First?” (Complete-#122, 5-#19)

    Looking for a creative outlet on a rainy day? Give your kids the chance to turn pro and make their own baseball cards. Note: This is a great partner activity, as it provides an opportunity to get to know one another better. You can determine the “statistics” you want them to share and even create a template to guide them.

    . . . or Wing it with Wordplay!

    While science and sports podcasts are both sure ways to please kids, you can always head down a different path! Enjoy some verbal voyaging by exploring figurative expressions.

    • Idioms (Complete-#3, 4-#7, 5-#3)
    • Simile and Metaphor (Complete-#4, 4-#11, 5-#72)

    These two podcasts, always among the most popular for students, regularly elicit laughter and prompt additional language experimentation, as kids try to one-up each other with funny phrases and creative constructions of their own!

    Looking for a follow-up activity? Distribute a stack of index cards and have kids write an idiom on each card. Then use the deck to play your own game of Pictionary, charades, or pick your own similarly entertaining activity!

    How do you make those summer Fridays fun? We’d love to hear!

    The post Fun Choice Friday: Start Summer off Right! appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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    The Walking Classroom by A Walking Classroom Adopter - 2w ago

    The Walking Classroom has really motivated my students to get up and move. To fill in some of the required P.E. minutes, we used to begin each morning with a run. Originally, there were daily complaints from some of the students. Those same students beg to walk now! They are more aware of their daily activity as well.

    This program has been a wonderful addition to my classroom. For the past four years, I have taught a fourth/fifth grade split class. I love that the Walking Classroom is one way that all of my students can come together as a group and do the same activities. We walk on a consistent basis and then have discussions about the walk afterward. The Walking Classroom allows them to work across the grade levels, which I love!

    Each student has a reflective journal for notes at the end of the walk. This year we have included a digital piece. Students started the year taking the online quizzes and now create their own quizzes to share with classmates.

    Additionally, they are making a digital scrapbook of their walks using Google Slides. They turn each walk into a slide with information they learned so they will have a collection of information at the end of the year.

    The program has also sparked wonderful discussions about healthy choices that are simple to make daily. I love that the Walking Classroom allows me to introduce my students to topics that I otherwise would not have an opportunity to address.

    Parents have such positive things to say as well. It is great to hear how many students go home and share about their walks!

    Kathleen Butler
    4th/5th Grade Teacher
    Spring Valley Elementary

    Want to comment on this story? Add your comments below!
    Are you a Walking Classroom teacher? We would love to hear!

    The post Motivated to Get Up and Move! appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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    I use The Walking Classroom with my fifth grade homeroom students to teach social studies, science and language arts. because the program covers plenty of concepts. And, since I have a class filled with English Language Learners, the chance to practice listening skills at the same time is awesome!

    Just as I enjoy walking while listening to podcasts, so do my students. My students enjoy walking while listening to the Walking Classroom lessons!

    After listening to the podcast, we often stay outside and discuss its content. Then, when we return to class, students complete the comprehension quizzes provided by The Walking Classroom. Using the quizzes is helpful because the results give me data on who is getting the information. In addition, the quizzes reveal who needs to continue to learn to listen better.

    The Walking Classroom allows students who have different strengths (like listening) to shine. It also provides other students (those who need to work on their listening) with a way to practice. This way, they too can grow their listening skills.

    The Walking Classroom has made a real difference in my classroom of English Language Learners!

    Joy Poole
    5th Grade Teacher
    St. Elmo Elementary

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    The post English Language Learners Practice Listening! appeared first on The Walking Classroom.

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