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My 4th year expat-anniversary is coming soon and although it sounds like a short amount of time, it feels like I’ve been here longer. Oddly enough, I guess you could say that the longer I’m here, the more Mexican I become. Now I am able to experience what it means to be Mexican abroad by how much our culture and cuisine is appreciated outside of Mexico.

If you’re a Mexican living in a foreign country or planning to do so in a near future, here are the 10 things you will miss about Mexico when you live abroad.

1| The endless sunshine
Europe’s winter albeit magical, can get quite frustrating quickly. When I was living in Mexico, I used to avoid the sun and day-dream about the sight of clouds. Now, the whole opposite happens. I miss Mexico’s sunshine so much!

2| Warm and friendly people
I used to find small talk annoying, but every time I go back to Mexico now I realize how endearing it is. Now that I have a little baby to accompany me wherever I go, it is unavoidable to meet a couple of new friends every time we go out.

3| Spontaneous social gatherings
Most Europeans like to prepare for things ahead, that is why social gatherings are usually planned weeks in advance. This gets specially tricky when you’re newly acquainted because you can’t seem to match your calendars together at the beginning. In Mexico, the opposite is true.

Although you can plan things in advance for special events, most friendly get-together are more spontaneous as in one phone call away, “Hey, are you home? I’m headed there right now” is pretty much the norm every time I go home. Doing something like this in Europe might even be considered disrespectful in some cultures. I miss those spontaneous calls, even if I do understand why disrupting someone’s routine can be quite rude.

Sunshine, friends & last minute trips: my favorite things!

4| The smell of fresh tortillas
This is going to sound weird but, I invite you to spend some time at a tortilleria next time you go to Mexico. It’s like something resembling the smell of fresh bread just a little bit more intense. You can thank me later.

5| Sugar in your lemonade
As far as I knew, lemonade always had sugar. You could order lemonade without sugar in a restaurant but that probably means you’re on a special diet that limits your sugar intake. Well apparently, all Europeans follow this diet. If you order a sugar in your lemonade here, you will get extra small sugar packets for you to add them by yourself. And that, ladies is gentlemen, is NOT how lemonade is made.

6| Ice in your drinks
And while we are on the subject of drinks, why is ice not a thing in Europe? Look, I get it that it is often cold but people still get ice cream during winter. And restaurants rarely have air conditioning during the summer, so how come you never get ice in your drink unless you ask for it?!

All the things I miss in one: ice & sugary Jamaica, fresh tuna & ceviche and ugly delicious street food!

7| Delicious and affordable street food
I will get controversial right now, but I think that for a country’s cuisine to be considered excellent the street food has to be good. I remember being deeply disappointing in France because most of the local street food were cold baguettes. So I never could got why French cuisine is so renowned and expensive when it’s not easily accessible. Any street foodstand that you visit in Mexico will be delicious, I guarantee it and that is what makes its cuisine extremely valuable in my eyes.

8| The taste of fresh fruits and vegetables
The endless sunshine makes it possible to have fresh produce all year long. The variety of the fruits is also quite spectacular. Here I haven’t been able to get fresh chilies, guayabas or jicamas and my heart feels heavy.

vegans look away! this T-bone steak may not be suited for your eyes!

9| Carne Asada for any occasion
Is your birthday coming up? Then have a carne asada. Is it almost time to celebrate Christmas? Then let’s have a Christmas Eve Eve carne asada. Are you moving to a different country? Is it Mother’s Day? Are you on vacation? Is it Sunday? Are you a normal human being? Then, let’s have a carne asada! Any excuse is a good excuse to grill some Sonoran steak and invite your friends over.

10| Multicultural heritage & history
Mexico is a melting pot. Every one of us has some degree of indigenous and Spanish roots. But did you know that the Dutch, Italian and French also tried to get a piece of Mexico? Let’s not forget about the inflow of African slaves that are part of our history too. As well as the immigration waves that came after the World Wars in Europe, the Middle East civil wars and the Chinese who settled in Mexico looking for stability.

All these cultures brought along their cuisines and traditions making Mexico the great multicultural integrated country we are today. Even if we all came from different places, and might not look ‘sterotypically’ Mexican, we still call Mexico our home. Like Chabela Vargas, the great Mexican rancheras singer used to say every time reporters reminded her that she was born in Costa Rica: “We Mexicans get to be born wherever the hell we want!”.

The post 10 things you will miss about Mexico when you live abroad appeared first on The Sunny Side of This.

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Slovenia changed my life for the better. Positively impacting how I see and treat the environment, my mental health and the seasons. Even though I did struggled at times, it taught several amazing things. I want to share with you my 7 most valuable lessons I learned while living in Slovenia.

Because life is very different there than it was while I was living in Mexico. And now that we’ve settled in Brussels quite a bit, I find myself longing for those hiking weekends we used to have while we lived in Slovenia. Who would’ve thought.

1| Taking care of Nature is cultural
The only way for people to take care of nature is to teach them to do so when they are young. But the subject can’t only be taught in classrooms, you need to go out into the wild. This is precisely what Slovenian’s elementary schools do with their pupils. As soon as they are mature enough for a night away from home, some schools take you to dedicated camping sites to learn about the native plants and animals of the region. The program is called šola v naravi and literally translates to school in nature. If this is taught as a subject at school is because nature is vital for the Slovenian culture.

Also, when hiking in Slovenia, everyone knows which plants to collect for teas or food and which ones to avoid. I find it amazing how this knowledge is passed through generations by parents and elders who make the effort to pass on the tradition of hiking and playing outside from a really young age. I love watching how much families enjoyclimbing up the hills all together during the weekends, you even often saw babies being carried by their parents. I hope we take on this impressive hobby in Belgium too!

2| Hiking is good for the soul
Slovenians have a tradition of hiking during the weekends and I won’t lie, it took me a while to embrace this. Actually, at the beginning I found it kid of odd. Like, who in their right minds would want to voluntarily put themselves through the risk and dangers it entails? But now I get it. Breathing the fresh air, feeling so small, and revitalizing your lungs and heart and mind with every inhale is just so powerful. There’s also something majestic about being somewhere almost “untouched” by man kind. It makes you feel like you belong.

Don’t think I’ll become an alpinist quite soon but believe it or not, I want those weekends back. Hiking is not only a great workout, it’s essential for the mind. One woman I met explained it pefectly, “going hiking is about letting go of expectations and just being yourself”.

3| The key to staying healthy is by building your own garden
Something else that I love about Slovenia is the fact that almost everyone takes care of their own garden. They not only plant flowers and trees but seasonal fruits and vegetables too. I feel lucky I grew up with something similar in Mexico because my grandparents had a lot of fruit trees in our backyard and we were able to pick fresh mandarins, lemons and oranges but unfortunately, it’s something that is almost impossible to do in the cities nowadays.

In Slovenia, we would often be gifted fresh and organic produce from our friends and family throughout the year, and let me tell you, the flavor was significantly better than what we bought in the store. Not only do Slovenians have access to better food because they grow it themselves, research points out that gardening keeps you active and reduces your stress level helping you prevent heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and other associated lifestyle diseases. Another amazing hobby to have!

4| Preparing in advance for the colder months is essential
I come from Mexico, and from the desert, so I never really knew what real winter was like. Until I arrived to Slovenia, with nothing to aid me for the colder months. I thought I might buy what I needed closer to December but my husband would often remind me that we needed to do it as soon as September. The temperatures can drop at any given moment! I know that for some of you this seems obvious, but for someone who has spend a lot of Christmases in short sleeves, this was not the case.

Early autumn also calls for log cutting and the preservation of fruits and vegetables for the rest of the year. Obviously, now you can buy all the food you need for the winter because the supermarkets import most of it but the culture of preservation and the dishes that accompany this, is still pretty much alive.

5| Making your own things from scratch is extremely rewarding
Now you know that Slovenians love to grow their own food, but they also love making almost everything from scratch. They love making their own bread, sunflower bread being my favorite, and pastry dough for their national desserts like potica. But what you may not know is that they also make their own liquors and wines!

This one pictured above was made by my father-in-law. It is very common in Slovenia to have your own vineyard, so don’t be surprised if a Slovenian ever invites you to theirs. The grape-picking is often done in late September by the whole family and it ends with a huge feast as a a reward for the hard work. They even have a holiday to celebrate the end of wine fermentation. It’s St. Martin’s Day and you celebrate by eating duck and drinking the last batch of the old wine to welcome the new one!

6| Nothing blooms all year
Where I come from, we don’t have spring, summer, fall or winter. We just have hot and less hot. Living in a place where the seasonal changes are so distinguishable where you can see and feel the difference between winter and spring was so striking to me. Even the air smells different. Fall and winter smell like a fireplace. Spring smells like fresh drizzle. And the summer smells like grass.

Events like the blossoming of zvončki and trobentice signal the start of spring, they are small flowers that blossom at the very sight of warmer weather. And that little things, signals a fresh start for the whole community. People start being more active and going outside, and the gloom and doom of winter dissipates. To give you an idea, when the Narcissi fields sprout in Golica, people will hike 1,835 m just to see them.  For someone whose default mode is to expect the weather to stay the same for a long period of time, witnessing the change of seasons is a reminder to be more patient with myself because not everything blooms all year and there is always a time and place for things.

7| If you don’t know something, you need to dig deep and study
Most of my time in Slovenia was spend studying for my Master’s degree. The program required us to attend class every day from 9 am to 5 pm or later for a whole year, with 4 weeks of scattered vacations in between. After class, we mostly had to do team work and pull frequent all-nigthers. It was intense.

The competition among our peers was high too. They would spend the whole day at school even on the weekends, until they understood the topic completely. Even though it sounds like a vigorous schedule, most of my classmates took it slow or at their own pace with several coffee breaks in between. I was so impressed with their work ethic and how devoted they were about learning everything.

I learned that if you don’t understand, or know about something at all, the only way to master it is by prioritizing study time. Even though it doesn’t sound fun or easy and you have to sacrifice a couple of weekends for a lifetime of rewards.

The post The 7 most valuable lessons I learned while living in Slovenia appeared first on The Sunny Side of This.

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Sunny weekends are for taking a much necessary break from the busy pace of city life. The Japanese Garden of Hasselt, Belgium offers just that: the perfect spot to escape the stress of your modern lifestyles and to get your Zen back.

Located in the heart of the capital of Limburg and right besides one of the busiest highways, you will feel like you’ve enter a calm and remote place where the noise of the cars dissolves and you can only hear the peaceful river streams and mini cascades.

The whole garden was designed to be perfectly in sync with the sound of the flowing water.  You may hear a bong every now and then too. Guests are allowed to hit the bong placed strategically at the end of the garden.

The plants were carefully picked to fit the region’s particular seasons and environment. But all the flora come all the way from Japan and have adapted to the weather of Hasselt. There is even a Cherry Blossom Festival which attracts a lot of crowds from the area.

This small but powerful cascade can be heard all over the garden.

You can also go inside a traditional ceremonial and tea house in the center of the garden set up by the shore of the river. It was designed to symmetrically reflect on the water, like a mirror. The whole garden is laid out according to the principles of Sakuteiki, an 11th-century manual of landscape design. Every element in the Japanese garden has a symbolic meaning and is arranged in relation to the other the features.

This is also the largest Japanese garden in Europe, covering 2.5 hectares in the northeast of the city. It opened on 20 November 1992, as a gift from Hasselt’s sister-city of Itami, Japan. The sister-city partnership dates back to 1985, but the cultural exchange changed in 1991 when Hasselt gave Itami a carillon, a musical instrument made up of bells and found in towers across Flanders symbolizing the independence of Flemish cities. Then Itami decided to gift Hasselt a traditional Japanese garden. The landscape architect was Inoue Takayuki and it took a year and a half to build, with Japanese crafts people traveling to Hasselt to complete the bulk of the work.

For entrance fees and information on how to get there, you can visit this website for more information.

Although walking inside the garden only takes around 15 minutes, time stands by and you can spend a lot of time just taking pictures of the gorgeous scenery and learning about the Japanese culture as you read your guide alongside the path of the garden. There is also a rest area with tables and chairs in the end where you can sit down and enjoy the fresh air.

I was extremely surprised about the fact that you could find an authentic Japanese Garden in Belgium. We really enjoyed it as a family and look forward to visiting many times in the next years. This is where you’ll definitely find your Zen in Belgium

SAVE THIS MAP ON YOUR PHONE & USE IT OFFLINE WHEN YOU NEED IT!

The post This is where you’ll find your Zen in Belgium ✌️ appeared first on The Sunny Side of This.

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More than 130 participants dedicated their entire weekend to chocolate and cocoa at this year’s Salon du Chocolat, the world’s biggest chocolate expo. Chocolatiers, chefs, pastry chefs and young talents gathered at Tour & Taxis in Brussels for a celebration of Belgian chocolate in all its forms.

From live chocolate workshops by some of the most celebrated chocolatiers, chocolate making classes for kids and a glamorous fashion show with chocolate as the main craze, there was nothing short of jaw-dropping displays of passion at the event.

THE FASHION SHOW

The fashion show gathered inspiration from different cultures, occasions, and eras. Chocolate versions of a Carnival Queen, The Flintstones, an Egyptian pharaoh, the Queen of Hearts, a wedding dress, a chocolate Alchemist and a dress inspired by Peruvian’s prints (the theme of this year’s edition) were some of the most memorable of the show.

photos by Nicolas Rodet

photos by Nicolas Rodet

photos by Nicolas Rodet

MEXICAN CHOCOLATE

Mexican inspired chocolate by The High Five Company, a bean-to-bar chocolate distributor, was also present. Their Taza brand was inspired after a trip to Oaxaca where the creator was able to witness how artisanal chocolate was made. Taza imports the cacao beans from Mexico but manufactures it in the USA.

The process of this brand still mantains some of the traditional aspects of the process like the use of a stone windmill to grind the cacao beans. This enables the producer to add less sugar to the final product, and allowing the consumer to have a more pure taste of the chocolate.


I was shocked when I saw the Chipotle and Guajillo chili flavors because those chilis are spicy!! They taste surprisingly well with the chocolate though. And don’t despair, they also come in sweet flavors too like vanilla, salted almond and cinnamon.  More traditional flavors are also part of the line like coffee, cacao and dark chocolate.

These discs resemble the Abuelita bars we have in Mexico. These discs are placed inside a pot with warm milk and then served as hot chocolate.

Traditionally, you would use a molinillo to mix the chocolate in the milk and create a froth and then placing it in a ceramic jug to keep the beverage warm. The molinillo is a traditional Mexican turned wood whisk held between the palms of your hands and rotated by rubbing the palms together.

Here I’m not holding it correctly, but I wanted to show you the detailed design of the molinillo.

(There is also a popular Mexican nursery rhyme signs about chocolate and molinillos that gets stuck in my head every time I used these words)

REAL PASSION FOR CHOCOLATE

Chocolate is even used to make impressive sculptures!!!

Would you rather eat this or keep it as decoration in your house?

Let’s not forget that you could also get free samples from some of the best companies in the industry like Neuhaus and Leonidas. Which obviously puts a happy face on anybody!

We will see a new trend of chocolate coming soon that focuses more in the experience. Beans-to-bar concept chocolate are the latest tendency. This stores grind and produce their chocolates in-house, making it possible to have fresh chocolate bars every time you visit.

Beers and wine parings in chocolate will also be the new affair among foodies. Get ready for sommeliers to start introducing this concept in fine dining soon, if you’ve been lucky already to experience it.

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Before January ends, I will like to update you on my blogging goals for 2018. I was on a motivational high from all the new year energy back when I wrote them!

Now that high has worn off, and I find myself struggling to start even the simplest of tasks.

I feel that what is pushing me back is the fact that my day is quite unpredictable. Some days I get more sleep than others or I have more energy or things don’t actually run late.

But we all know humans are not a perfect machines and that our lives don’t look the same every day. So why am I stuck trying to achieve the unattainable?

It was so refreshing when I heard about ThirdLove’s campaign to encourage women to think about the new year in a different way and I wanted to share the anti-resolution I want to keep. The bra and lingerie company has always had a large focus on empowering and inspiring women, which fits right in with the goals I’ve set for myself this year.

What am I sick of promising myself that I have never been able to accomplish?

I want to stop avoiding things that I want to do just because they are hard or scary. I tend to avoid going into the unknown because I am afraid of failing or because I feel I don’t have what it takes so I don’t even try it out.

I think that a big problem is that I don’t think I will ever get there. Like I see my goals and dreams as this huge tall mountain that I will never be able to reach.

My best friend from Mexico pointed out something really interesting when I told her this. She said,

“You are seeing this as the ultimate destination. You think that by accomplishing all your dreams you will finally find happiness. But it doesn’t work that way. You already have happiness in this moment, you just don’t hold on to it. Working for what you want is continuous process that never ends.”

I need to put my feelings in a bag and get to work. If it were easy, then I guess everybody else would be doing it. Right?

I just really want to change my life around. And I am starting by doing something I have never done before.

By admitting that I have fears, that I have failed before, and that I don’t have things figured out. That anything that I have ever done in my life that was worth while was actually really hard. That there are other sacrifices that I need to make. And that I need to let go of what is easy and comfortable to finally do something that I will be proud of accomplishing.

What are you letting go of in 2018?

The post In 2018, I’m letting go of… (goals update) appeared first on The Sunny Side of This.

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Brussels hosts some of the main bodies of the European Union and various International organizations like NATO. And compared to other major European capitals, like London, Amsterdam or Paris, Brussels is rather affordable. These factors make it a buzzing and attractive city for expats.

We feel very lucky of being part of this International community but, like in any expat tale, our immersion to Belgium has not been without difficulties. Here are some of the things we expected of Brussels before moving, but we kind of changed our minds about after living here for a year. Expectation vs. Reality: what is it like living in Brussels as an expat?

1| EXPECTATION: Belgian treats are the best

Belgium is known for its waffles, fries, beers and, let us not forget, its amazing chocolates! As soon as you arrive to Brussels, you want to have the ultimate foodie experience and taste every single specialty that crosses your path. Only to find out that after a couple of days, your pants will start to hurt a little bit in the belly area.

REALITY: They are but will make you fat.

Yes, Belgian treats are certainly unique and delicious but also loaded with carbs. Fries (which originated here and not in French by the way!) are deep fried AND covered in different flavored mayos. Waffles are whisked with loads of butter and sugar. And even though those hand crafted chocolates are amazing, you might want to limit yourself with a couple of pralines a day.

2| EXPECTATION: I will go to ALL museums

One of the major perks of living in a city like Brussels is the amount of International expositions happening all year long. Plus, its museums are specialized in particular areas of the arts and they are concentrated in its majority at Mont des Arts, Brussel’s art district. Quite the scene for art lovers and connoisseurs.

REALITY: ‘When is the free museum day? Oh, yesterday.’

Well, the museums are not cheap. Good news is that some museums are free all year round (though they are quite specialized and in my humble opinion not so interesting but hey! Save them for a rainy day). Other museums are free some days of the month. You can check the FAQ of Brussels Museums here.

3| EXPECTATION: I won’t let the rain bring me down

Everybody warns you that it rains a lot in Brussels. In your mind, you are ready to adapt. Surely they sells umbrellas and you have your trusty raincoat with you, right? If people live and go to work there every day, it must mean that it is not impossible to bare.

REALITY: Only goes out if extremely necessary

Rain gets old pretty quickly here in Brussels. You have two kinds of rain in Brussels, one that lasts the whole day and another one that will sort of caught you off-guard because the weather forecast didn’t register it but it will be a small cloud that just drizzles for a while and leaves. But rain is not so much of an issue as the wind is. Sometimes extreme winds come together with rain or snow making it extremely annoying and even dangerous at times.

4| EXPECTATION: I will taste all the amazing Belgian beers

Did you know that Belgian beer is listed as a UNESCO intangible cultural heritage for humanity? Belgians treat their beer seriously and so. The choices are endless and unique like the Lambic beer, which is made from wild yeast of the region, Flemish red beers, and Stout beers. Some beers taste sweet, others will give you a sour aftertaste. But every one is unique in their own way, from the ingredients to the manufacturing process, to the way it is served! Think of Kwak for example.

REALITY: One beer will give you the worst hangover ever

Beers in Belgium have a lot more alcohol than most wines. I’m talking like 14%-20% alcohol in some extreme cases. But since the beer tastes strong but refreshing, you don’t really realize that the alcohol level could be compared to those of strong liquors. I once young and naïve once and didn’t think much of the consequences of drinking lots of Belgian beers, please learn from my mistakes.

5| EXPECTATION: Being the European Capital, in a bilingual country, surely most people will speak English too

Belgium is divided by the Flemish-speaking in the North and the French-speaking region in the South. Brussels is the capital of the country and therefore bilingual. It hosts a lot of American and British companies besides the well-known International organizations like the European Commission, European Parliament and NATO. One of the biggest perks is actually finding great healthcare services in your mother tongue, because several clinics are founded with foreigners in mind. For example, there are German-focused facilities (German is also an official language in Belgium) and even Japanese, Italian, Polish, Russian, Russian doctors gathered in their own language speaking clinics. You can even find doctors and therapists who speak Spanish. At the hospital where I gave birth, despite French being the dominant language, most students now speak English and Spanish too. I don’t know if you can find something so special like this anywhere else in the world.

REALITY: Most people only speak French

Despite the fact that a lot of the major governmental and private services are in English, I find it very odd that people in the restaurant industry – other than those who work at buzzing city center- don’t speak English. Particularly in the European Quarters sector. If you don’t speak French is hard to navigate stores to be honest. I also find it odd that a lot of schools who offer English in the curriculum don’t speak English themselves. What is good though, is that most people don’t mind if you don’t speak perfect French and will help you out if you don’t understand something.

These are some of the major reality checks expats living in Brussels will experience in their first year in the city. Join me today on my Facebook Live event to discuss even more funny stories and experiences. I would love to hear about your cultural shocks!

It will take place tommorrow, January 27th, at 9 pm UCT+1! Click here to follow the Gacebook page and join the fun!

See you then! xx

The post EXPECTATION vs. REALITY: The honest truth about living in Brussels as an expat appeared first on The Sunny Side of This.

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Nothing like a goal post to start off the new year right!

Unlike this time last year, where I didn’t have any solid plans for the blog, I find myself inspired and excited for what lies ahead. I actually have a couple of big projects I want to undertake (which make me both ecstatic and scared at the same time).

Besides having a brighter outlook on things, this time around, I also have a plan.

I call this plan: “Less Talking and More Doing”.

Because for the longeeeeeeeest time, I only talked about where I wanted to take this blog but never did a single thing about it. Obviously, becoming a mom and being an expat puts a strain in the amount of time I have during the day but I will stop making excuses for myself, roll my sleeves and get to work.

Procrastination, it was nice to meet you. But this girl is going places.

WHY I WANT TO ATTEND THE BLOGGERS’ RETREAT

Imagine my delight when I saw that The Travel Hack and Twins That Travel announced this year’s dates for The Bloggers’ Retreat. The place to learn all about what it takes to make it in this industry.

I would love to learn from the best while meeting inspiring bloggers who, I can only imagine, are in the same boat as me. Feeling hopeful & energetic yet confused and overwhelmed. I miss the camaraderie that working on a same project brings. I learn best when I share and listen.

What’s more, they opened a competition for a chance to win The Golden Ticket to the event, which means that you will get to attend the whole event completely for free. And this is my entry for the event! Send me all the good vibes!

I think The Bloggers’ Retreat will give me the right tools to launch the next stage for this blog. Particularly with the projects I want to accomplish.

BLOGGING GOALS:

So now to the good stuff. What can you expect from The Sunny Side of This in 2018? (BTW, you are welcome to hold me accountable at any time after reading this!)

Embark on what challenges me

It’s super easy to get caught up in the social media game. Although I agree that numbers and diversifying to video platforms is important, I need to remember why I even started this in the first place. And it was to write. Even though being a Youtuber is the coolest thing right now, I know that I will use it as another excuse to not sit down and do what I meant to do all along: which is to write a book. I’m not saying that starting a YouTube channel is not challenging, or that I might not do it in some future, but since I only have so many hours in the day, I will concentrate on doing what I know best and taking it to another level.

This includes photography as well. I want to capture more moments and less Instagram type images that end up looking like what everybody else is doing. I want to look back and remember the reasons why I had such an amazing time. Like when you look back at your parents pictures, and the minute they see them they know exactly the feeling and story behind it.

Write more in-depth posts, consistently

This is one of the things that I very excited about actually. I want to write more of my expat stories and observations. But since I don’t want to generalize things, I want to do more in-depth research for things like traditions, food and culture, and feminism.

I get asked a lot in Mexico about what is it like to be a woman in Europe, since it is perceived as a more equal society for women. And although I have A LOT to say about it, I want to take a more journalistic approach to the matter. Mainly because a lot of you guys might not know about the particular issues Mexico is facing at the moment and I don’t want to paint the wrong picture. The main topics I want to touch upon are: safety, education, career and motherhood. If you want me to tackled on a specific topic let me know.

Produce high quality travel guides

It’s been a long time coming but I need to share with you all my knowledge about Slovenia and Sonora, Mexico. I did a mini Instagram poll and a lot of you would like to know more about traveling to the driest state in Mexico and I am all for it.

Since it is particularly hard to find information about it now, I’ll make it my mission to make it as accessible and knowledgeable for you. It’s been on my mind to publish one since I stumble across several Lonely Planet guides that said “it is really dry and there’s nothing to do, skip it if you can”.

Saaaay what?! Listen, I know it is not the cultural center of the Universe but there’s a lot to discover in a state right in the middle of the most diverse deserts in the world!

I am happy to announce that they will be available in Spanish too. I hope that by going to The Bloggers’ Retreat I get the chance to learn how to make and launch my own product. It is actually the class that I am the most excited (and ready) for!

“Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.” – Robert Louis Stevenson  (fellow travel writer FYI ;-))

In the era of immediate gratification, patience is the most expensive virtue. I intend to make a daily habit of celebrating the small victories whether or not the external forms of validation recognize it or not a.k.a the Instagram Algorithm.

I want to take this daily practice to every other aspect in my life also.  And I will come back to this post when I feel overwhelmed or defeated. Because there will be obstacles and life can get crazy. I want to wake up every day and do this whether I had a good night’s sleep or the perfect day planned out ahead of me.

Let’s get to work. Thank you for making it at the end of this post!

Promise to keep reinventing and delivering value to this tiny space that started as a diary in my room back at home, to a project that’s been help me achieve some pretty amazing things.

The post My blogging goals for 2018, and why I want to attend The Bloggers’ Retreat ✍️ appeared first on The Sunny Side of This.

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