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We absolutely adore this wonderful and cosy old house in the beautiful region of Dalarna in Sweden. Here at Nordique, Camilla Dahlin - the owner of the house, has told us more about her dream home and life on the countryside!

Camilla: I live with my partner Erik and my teenage son Wilmer and our two fluffy cats in a small house in the countryside. I have two jobs, I work for the Swedish Transport Administration as a process manager, and I also work as a wedding photographer - adorafoto.com.

I was born in and spent all my childhood in this small place in the Dalarna countryside called Gustafs. The name comes from an old competition between two small neighbouring villages, where the one that built a church first would get to name the place after King Gustaf of Sweden!

I moved when I finished school and about ten years ago I was looking for a house for me and my son. I looked everywhere and one day I passed this house that is only 500 metres from my parents house. I remember thinking that this house would be so perfect for us. A month later I couldn’t believe it, but it was up for sale!

I went there to look at it and it was so beautiful with three ceramic chimneys, a wood stove in the kitchen, old floors, a beautiful staircase and lots of big windows that allow the light. Outside there was this beautiful front porch that made the house look like a small gingerbread house.

I was totally in love with it even though the kitchen and bathroom was really old and not functional at all. After we moved in, it has been transformed to a very special place that we are proud to call our home.

The house was probably built sometime around 1890 and the owner ran the old village bike shop out in the small barn next to the house. The house is placed in the middle of an very open countryside area in Dalarna, a plateau where the best land for farming is. The river Dalälven runs only a kilometre away from the house and it is surrounded by rolling fields where farmers grow their crops.

It is an absolutely beautiful area and a couple of years ago we built a porch on the back of the house that really lets us enjoy the view from our house in the summer. Fields, old farms and a huge mountain clad with forest. A place where we smell the newly cut grass from the fields and watch animals like rabbits, foxes, badgers , birds of prey, deers and sometimes even elks. We once even saw a wolf. Here we listen to chirps and cuckoos and happy larks and the sounds of swallows that swoosh around our house, all while watching beautiful sunsets and the huge sky turning red and pink and purple and blue.

Dalarna (or Dalecarlia as it is often called abroad) is county placed in the middle of Sweden and is often referred to as the heart of Sweden. It is visited by lots of tourists every year as it is utterly beautiful with farmland, hills, blue mountains and lots of lakes and old red houses.

It is also full of traditions and folklore. The wooden and beautifully painted horse ”the Dalahäst” is from Dalarna and is often used as a typical symbol for Sweden. Around midsummer Dalarna is the place to visit to see traditional midsummer celebrations where the locals put on their traditional folk dresses and dance around the midsummer pole to traditional fiddle music. It doesn’t get more Swedish that that!



The village of Gustafs is mostly known for it´s special spicy sausage made from horse meat…. It´s called Gustafskorv and is traditionally eaten on locally made hard flat bread like Skedvibröd and with a beer. Unusual but it tastes great, I promise!

The house is old and has such a beautiful soul. I don´t want to go against that soul when decorating, but I am also not the kind of person that likes to have only antiques in a house. To me, interior design should also show modern influences and try to express the personalities of the people living there. So we mix, and match and move things around and replace. We have lots of old furniture from my parents’ old farm, but also lots of things from IKEA and modern design.

For me it is important that a home feels cosy and relaxed and light. Lots of blankets and pillows and I want to choose things that I will love for a long time, and don´t have to replace. Some decisions are made quickly, some can take years to complete. And I have a ground rule - things should be comfortable and practical. No hard designer sofas or expensive kitchen utilities that we’ll never use because they are hard to use.



See more of Camilla’s wonderful home at: @greatshotsbynumber10

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Danish jewellery brand Louise Kragh was founded in 2004 by Louise Kragh herself, and released in four annual collections. The pieces are all handmade, designed and produced at their headquarter in Aarhus, Denmark, and sold in Denmark as well as internationally, both online and in more than 400 stores around the world. The style of the brand goes from the elegant and colourful to the more raw and simple jewellery design, embracing both the natural and colourful as well as the more graphic and simple look, with pearls being some of Louise Krag´s most important classics. The team focus on being close to the production, from the first idea to the actual making of the jewellery. All the pieces are made in materials chosen with great care, with the brand only using Sterling silver 925 and goldplatings of high quality. The materials are continuously tested and obey the hard, Danish demands. Furthermore, Louise Kragh is a member of Ædelmetalkontrollen (noble metal control) in Denmark.

Who is Louise Kragh?

I am a 46 years old woman who is educated as a fashion designer. More important I am also a mother of 2 girls and a wife to my husband. And of course a woman who loves jewellery and colours!



How would you describe the brand?

The finest materials, expert craftsmanship and beautiful designs have all been the essence of the Louise Kragh brand since the very beginning in 2004. All of our pieces are made in Denmark and the materials of the jewellery are chosen with care. We only use sterling silver 925, from 18 to 24 carat gold-plating, real diamonds, gemstones, and freshwater pearls of AAA-quality. And of course our hand rolled porcelain pendants. For me it means everything to have my production in Denmark - in that way we also keep all the knowledge in-house which makes me and my staff better craftsmen - I really like that. And because we use the porcelain pendants we do not look similar to other jewellery brands, which also means a lot to me.



Who is your typical customer?

I think it is a woman who likes quality and colours. I also hope that it is a woman who treasure that our jewellery is handmade in Denmark and not one pendent is similar in shape and colour.


Who would you love see wearing your pieces?

There are a lot of emotions attached to a piece of jewellery. A lot of women get jewellery as a gift and when you need to mark specials occasions. So when I see a woman wearing my jewellery I get proud and often think about her "story". That means more to me then to see my jewellery on a famous person.


Where is the jewellery made?

We have most of our production in Denmark. This is where we make all our pendants and put together our silver pieces to be a finished Louise Kragh jewellery.


How important is sustainability for you?

That is really important to me - both in my business life and as a private person.

The silver and gold used are always recycled, as this is precious material. The fresh water pearls are naturally made and by that naturally sustainable. The porcelain pearls are handmade here in Denmark and they are made by sustainable pottery clay and glace. Along with Japan, Denmark has the most strict regulations of clay and glace in the world. The jewelry boxes are made in Denmark out of recycled and sustainable materials. (FSC certification)


Where do you find your inspiration?

For me I think my inspiration comes from my everyday life. Small glimpse of things you hardly notice but somehow keep in your memory. I also find great inspiration in my workshop. When I make the porcelain or the jewellery I think of new ways to use the pearls, porcelain or silver parts. I really like to use my hands and to play around with the materials. But mostly new designs come from drawing and drawing and drawing until I finally can pick the one style I like the most.


What pieces are your top sellers?

Our Leaf collection sells really well because of its simplicity. Another line is our Unik collection, which is a true Louise Krag line. I paint every pendent by hand and all pendants are unique in the shape and pattern.






What countries do you sell the most to?

China is a really interesting marked for us right now. I think they like the simplicity of the jewellery as the same time it has a uniqueness because it is handmade.



How would you describe the typical Danish style?

I think Danish women have a really cool style - simple yet still with a twist.

Get your Louise Kragh pieces at www.louisekraghjewelry.com


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Meet Rasmus and Karoline - a Danish couple who loves to travel and explore the world! Here they have shared with us their journey together and how they got to develop their passion for travel and realise the importance of eco-friendly travelling.

Let’s start with a introduction - tell us more about yourselves!

We are a couple from Denmark, and we have been together for four years. We have travelled all around the world to exotic destinations, but leaving a carbon footprint for many years. Now we’ve decided it´s time to change - and we want to prove that it's possible to change travel habits without compromising on either quality, luxury or great holiday experiences.

We are both passionate travellers and we want to make sure that we are able to show our future kids as many incredible places as we have been lucky enough to see. This is why we have decided to write an eco-friendly travel blog. In the beginning of our relationship Rasmus made travel books of our best memories from our holidays. They also included names of cities, restaurants, bars etc. This quickly led to friends and family who asked for our tips and recommendations, which is why we ended up making a website with all the recommendations instead of handing out our travel books all the time. This was the inspiration for the name of our blog - The Travel Book.

Your adventures have taken you across the globe - what are your most memorable experiences?

We feel very fortunate and lucky to have seen as much of the world as we already have. The most memorable experience is most definitely our trip to a small island outside of the coast of Madagascar called Nosy Bee. The nature was untouched and the locals was not familiar with tourists. This gave us the best cultural learnings and most magnificent experiences - some also a bit scary.

What are your favourites things to do when you go out exploring the world?

We do our absolute best to get a true experience of the country we visit. This includes getting to know their culture by talking to locals and trying their food and following their traditions.
Rasmus is a very passionate photographer/videographer and he love to get lost in the wilderness or cities with his camera gear.

What do you always pack in your travel bags?

We are terrible at packing light which means we often travel with several bags. Even though we sometimes travel like backpackers we never pack like backpackers! Rasmus is a gear and gadget-geek which means we always bring at least 1-2 bags filled with only with camera equipment.

What is your favourite Nordic country to visit?

We travelled around Norway and Sweden for a month in April 2019 and we absolutely fell in love with Norway. On a daily basis we had to stop, look at each other and go ´WOW´. The diversity between the absolutely mind-blowing nature, cute small villages and beautiful cities was perfect.



Favourite Nordic food?

Karoline is vegan so often we eat vegan meals which is never an issue to find in the Nordic countries. But for Rasmus, it has to be freshly caught smoked salmon or a classic local moose stew!

Give us some tips on what not to miss when considering to visit the Nordic region, any hidden gems?

Our biggest learning has definitely been to drive around on our adventures instead of flying to destinations. To begin with we did it because we had a mission only to fly once in 2019. But on our Nordic Adventure around Norway and Sweden we quickly realised how much more we experienced while driving around. We got to see the country in a completely new way and learned so much more by stopping in smaller cities and drove to nature places you are only able to reach with a car.

The list is long of places we could recommend but here is a few: Hardangervidda, Telemark and Odda in Norway plus Orbaden and Värmland in Sweden.

In recent years, the Nordic countries have become more of a destination to travel to - why do you think it has increased so much in popularity?

It is always nice to look at pictures of dreamy white beaches and crystal blue water in Asia, but we have the feeling of when you have seen a few of the best you have seen it all. The Nordic countries has a very unique landscape and a very popular cuisine that makes these countries very attractive to visit. For us the nature and landscape reminds of a bit of New Zealand but is way easier to visit for Europeans than a 30 hours flight to New Zealand!

How has travelling changed you life?

We are both very lucky and fortunate that our parents has taking us travelling since we were infants. This is most likely also why we both are so passionate about travelling.
We believe that by exploring cultures, trying other traditions and listening and learning from people from other countries we can become better people with more respect for one another.

What adventures are next?

Since our Nordic Adventure around Norway and Sweden was such a big success - we have decided to do a similar trip this summer around our home country Denmark.
We are both born and raised in Denmark but we know way to little about our own history, culture and the life outside of the capital Copenhagen.
So we will drive around Denmark for 4-5 weeks in a hybrid car and stay in eco-friendly accommodations. Besides that we will look to use Danish companies who are making a sustainable difference.

Follow Rasmus and Karoline’s adventures at:

Website: www.thetravelbook.world

Instagram: @thetravelbook

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Tech-coordinator and freelance photographer Kevin Angelsø is originally from a small town called Ølstykke, but has been living in Copenhagen for 6 years. Not difficult to understand why, Kevin is totally in love with the city and more than enjoys the fact of not being dependent on cars and public transport, some call it the city of bicycles.

When did you find your love for photography?

I bought my first DSLR back in 2011 but I was horrible at using it so I actually gave up and just let it sit on a bookshelf to collect dust until April 2018.


What equipment do you use?

I'm a simple guy so I just use a decent Canon 750D and my 24mm and 50mm prime objectives (no zoom). I have never been a fan of buying gear for the sake of it. People often think that their photography skills will increase if they just get "the right gear" but that is quite a misassumption. A lot of gear looks impressive but the truth is that you don't need 50% of it unless you're out shooting penguins on the South Pole for BBC or National Geographic.




How does social media affect your work?

Social media has a pretty big role in my work. It's obviously great for inspiration, displaying your work and getting to know other photographers but it can also be a tricky, deceiving friend. It's a little too easy to get caught up in likes, follows and how other photographers are doing - as in every niche. I think it's healthy to stand back sometimes and just go with the flow and stop caring and overthinking when it comes to social media.


How does your average day look like?

I usually wake up around 8 am. Then I spend about 20 minutes getting ready before I ride my bicycle 7 km to work where my first task of the day is to get a cup of coffee. I absolutely love biking to and from work with the rest of Copenhagen. It's a free workout and a great way to wake up. I usually go on photo-walks during the evenings, as I'm horrible at getting up early for that sunrise.

What inspires you?

Peter McKinnon - among other Youubers - has been a huge inspiration to me. Also, the hope of being able to do this full time and be my own boss is what drives me!


What motto do you live by?

Worry less, live more. I'm an over thinker so from time to time I literally have to remind myself to worry less and live more.

What makes Denmark so unique?

Honestly - rugbrød, our collective love for bicycles and the amount of shoreline for a country our size. Whenever I'm traveling rugbrød is what I miss the most.




What is your favourite Danish:

Spot?

The top of Rundetårn outside of rush hour! You get a 360-degree view over the Copenhagen rooftops and the entrance fee is really, really cheap (about 3-4 euro).

Restaurant?

I really recommend Pasta du Nord. Delicious, affordable and something else than just another fast-food joint. I can also recommend Alabama Social and PS Bar & Grill if you intend to spend the whole evening out.

Café?

Definitely Mad & Kaffe on Vesterbro. They make incredible brunch but if you're not an early bird you will probably have to wait in line to get a table Saturday morning so be sure to set your alarm.




Bar?

I'm one of the few rare Danes who don’t drink so I can't really recommend any.

Food?

My favourite food is definitely burgers. The last few years we've seen a lot of burger joints pop up in Copenhagen and it's exactly what I've been waiting for. Before these we had to choose between McDonalds/Burger King and the a-little-too-fancy-café-burger with a stick down the middle to keep it all together, served along with a knife and a fork - which shouldn't be necessary to eat a burger in my opinion.

Building?

The Marble Church (Frederik's Church). It's huge, breath-taking and it's really something else compared to the standard architecture in Copenhagen. Unfortunately it's quite difficult to shoot because it's squeezed in between other buildings. The most common spot to shoot this church from is from Amalienborg.

Area?

The area around Fælledparken, Trianglen and Sortedamssøen is really recommendable for taking walks, drinking coffee, enjoying the sun and just relax.

Word?

'Ligeglad' which essentially means 'careless' but it's not quite as strong. It's something I need to be more of as en over thinker.

See more of Kevin´s work here

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This stunning cottage renovation was designed by Gothenburg-based architecture firm Fabel Arkitektur. Located in the south of Sweden, we love the incredible interior design of this cottage. In particular the coupling of the dark, robust natural materials of the cottage with the oversized windows and gorgeous Scandi minimalism. What a dream home!

Words from the architect: “Many years ago, a log cabin was moved to this place, a natural site in southern Sweden. The cottage was rebuilt and was extended as the years went by and architectural ideals changed. The building is located high up on a mountain in the middle of the forest with a fantastic lake view. When we at Fabel Arkitekter first came here in 2016, it was difficult to see from within the rooms what nice relationship with nature the building has. We tried to correct that as part of our renovation designs.

After the refurbishment, the rooms in different ways have direct contact with the surroundings, regardless of whether it is grand view or a rock wall just outside the window.

The layout is divided between a social space downstairs and a private area upstairs. At the back of the property, the side facing the mountain, are guest rooms and offices. The open-plan box designed living space features a modern, stylish kitchen, bathroom and a beautiful, minimalistic fireplace.

This living space allows you to move around the different features of the home and divides the open plan design into different individual rooms. The choice of materials is kept simple. There is a lot of wood, concrete and glass and the division between the materials is unfussy and without unnecessary details. One section of this wall divider incorporates the old log cabin - this is where the kitchen furniture is located

Architects website: fabelarkitektur.se

All photos by Emanuel Cederqvist.

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Meet David, a fashion, portrait and commercial photographer based in Helsinki! Here he shares his journey in this exciting industry and his work - As well as giving us some great tips what not to miss when visiting the Finnish capital.

“I love working with people and telling authentic stories, whether that is in editorial, documentary or commerce. I enjoy fashion photography for its never ending hunger to be extraordinary”

Tell us about your journey to photography!

David: My journey to photography has been a road with a few turns – I started off studying Media Engineering with a focus on Audio Technology. I have always liked playing around with gear and didn’t think of myself as artistic or particularly creative. At the university we got introduced to photography and video from an engineering perspective and I started creating videos for fun, mostly being interested in creating a clean image more than a compelling story. Growing up in Germany, I’ve become a bit of a hopeless perfectionist and it has taken me a few years to let go and focus more on story and emotions instead of technicalities. Imperfections make things believable and authentic. Knowing the tools is only the foundation, after that it is good to focus on what is actually important. During the past years I’ve put more time and effort into still photography, as I feel it is one of the most simple and compressed ways to tell a story. These days I work 50/50 as a Director of Photography (DoP) and as a still photographer – both worlds fascinate and inspire me in terms of storytelling, lighting and composition.


Tell us more of the type of photography you enjoy shooting - what projects do you normally work with?

I love working with people and telling authentic stories, whether that is in editorial, documentary or commerce. I enjoy fashion photography for its never ending hunger to be extraordinary. In my portraits as in life, I like to listen and find a certain calmness in my subjects – that’s the moment when I most connect with them.




What equipment to you use?

My general work horse is a Nikon D810 with a set of primes. Most of my personal projects are shot on medium format film – these days it’s a Mamiya 645 Super, but there’s also a Pentax 67 on my shelf. Lately I got obsessed about colours and a well exposed film just gives me those lifelike tones which I’m often craving from a digital sensor.


What has been your most exciting shoot so far?

I am part of a book project funded by the Finnish Kone foundation where two authors and myself travel Finland’s neighbour countries and explore their public sauna culture. Last summer (2018) we travelled for roughly two weeks through Russian Karelia and got to experience the local banyas (saunas) and meet their visitors. Documenting this project has been the most exciting photo assignment for me so far and the project is still ongoing – this summer we’re planning to visit Belarus. Full steam ahead.




What is your biggest achievement up to date?

That’s a tough question, I’m not a guy for awards – I suppose my biggest achievement is that I was able to make photography my profession and that I get the chance to collaborate with so many talented and creative people.



What do you normally do on your day off in Helsinki?

Cycle along the shore, islands and parks and go to a public sauna in the evening.


Give us your top things to do in Helsinki!
  • Talvipuutarha (Winter Garden) -I love to visit the public winter garden, that’s one of the places where I can just let my thoughts drift and relax after an exhausting week.

  • A visit to one of Helsinki’s public saunas. Arlan Sauna, Kotiharjun Sauna and Kulttuurisauna are my favourites, but there is plenty more, and each have their own special ambience worth experiencing.

  • Eat a salmon soup at Marja Nätti’s bistro in Hakaniemen Halli. Most people have an opinion on where to get the best creamy salmon soup, for me it’s that one.

  • Visit the museums - Go see what’s up in Ateneum, Kiasma or Amos Rex.

Website: jkbdavid.com

Instagram: @jkbdavid

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“This Rhubarb soup is an incredibly wonderful summer treat for warmer days and is even more perfect served with a dollop of ice cream or sour cream.

If you happen to have any leftover rhubarb that you haven’t used yet- this is the perfect dish to make. This can in fact be served warm as well in autumn if you have a couple of stalks in your freezer.”

By Norwegian foodie Therese Elstad at My Nordic Kitchen

Hot or Cold Rhubarb Soup

Cook 20 min

Yield 6

Ingredients

250 g rhubarb stalks

1 litre water

200 g sugar

1 tbsp corn starch/ potato flour

0,5 decilitre water

Instructions

Roughly chop the rhubarb stalks and bring to a saucepan together with sugar and water.

Bring to a boil and let simmer until the rhubarb has 'fallen apart' and the sugar has been dissolved.

Dilute the corn starch in water and add to the soup, constantly stirring until the soup has thickened.

Serve at once together with a dollop of ice cream or let cool down in the fridge over night (or until cold) and serve with a dollop of vanilla yogurt.


To see more of Therese´s fantastic work, go to www.mynordickitchen.no

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Nordique has this week spoken with talented photographer Eetu Kannel from Lappeenranta in eastern Finland. Eetu specialises in photographing the native wildlife in the beautiful Finnish forests. We were delighted to hear about his passion for photography, and are also very pleased to be able to share some of Eetu’s incredibly wildlife photographs!

Eetu: “My first contact with photography was around 10 years ago when I got a pocket camera for my birthday. With this camera I photographed pretty much everything! I got seriously into nature photography when my mom gave me her old DSLR-camera. After that there was no turning back.”

A Fox cub cuddling with it’s mother. One of my personal favourites.

My passion for wildlife photography

“During my first six months of nature photography I mostly took landscape photos. One winter I started to visit a nearby bird feeder where I found some small birds and squirrels to pose in front of my camera. Soon I realised that photographing animals is much more enjoyable for me than landscapes. During the spring of 2018 I took my first fox photos and since then I have almost exclusively photographed animals.”

A Tawny owl baby I photographed while I spent the day with local bird ringers.

“I’ve always been an animal lover and since I was a kid I’ve enjoyed spending time outdoors. I think that nature photography is a great hobby and offers the chance to capture unforgettable moments and encounters with beautiful wild animals.”

A Crested tit I photographed by a bird feeder near my home.

“While photographing wild animals you never know what you will encounter. Sometimes it may take weeks to get a single decent shot, while other times the animals seem to find you. Although the days of just walking around without finding anything to photograph might feel frustrating at the time, when you do find something it’s so rewarding that it makes up for those days of striking out.”

A Willow tit I managed to get to sit on my hand after many hours of trying.

A Yellow-necked mouse who sure was happy to see me.

My favourite places in Finland

“In Finland the nature is always close to you and you can find wildlife pretty much anywhere. My favourite cities for photography in Finland are of course my hometown Lappeenranta; my previous hometown Kouvola; Kotka, which is a city by the sea; and Finland’s capital Helsinki, where in this particular place called Seurasaari one can find a lot of tame squirrels and birds.”

A squirrel photographed in my parents backyard. You can photograph animals pretty much anywhere.

A squirrel that wasn’t too amused by the rain.

“I’ve visited Finnish Lapland twice now, but this was before I got seriously into photography so to go there again with my current camera gear and experience as a photographer is pretty high on my wish list.”

Probably the most beautiful fox I’ve managed to photograph.

A fox in the morning light. My favourite time to shoot is early in the morning.

Favourite animals to photograph

“My favourite animals to photograph are definitely foxes and squirrels. It definitely feels very rewarding to find foxes and to get amazing shots of them - they are such beautiful creatures. Squirrels on the other hand are very easy to find, but they have so many expressions that you´ll never get bored with them.”

A raccoon dog pup I met in Finland’s capital Helsinki.

A fox cub enjoying a sunny day.

See more of Eetu’s images at: @eetukannel

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“I wanted to share my grandmother’s recipe for her wonderful no knead rye bread. Her breads have always been dark and slightly sweet, making it the perfect open sandwich bread. I love topping it with caviar, eggs, salt and pepper- served with a cup of earl grey tea. The only tea she had in the cupboard and the reason I started liking it as a child, with sugar obviously.

In Norway, one of our biggest traditions when it comes to any holiday or weekend for that matter is our breakfast table. Long breakfasts on Saturday, Sundays or any big event. Our table would be filled with whole grain bread, crisp bread, pickled herring, smoked salmon, cheese and any kind of spreads to make an open sandwich.”

Recipe by Therese Elstad from My Nordic Kitchen


Ingredients

300 g wheat flour

200g rye flour

1/4 teaspoon dry yeast

1 teaspoon salt

0,5 decilitre walnuts

1 teaspoon ground ginger

24 - 26 cm cast iron pot

1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

4 tablespoons syrup, dark

4 decilitre water

2 tablespoons olive oil


Instructions

Combine the dry ingredients and wet ingredients in two separate bowls.

Add the wet ingredients into the dry bowl and quickly stir it together. The dough will be sticky, but firm.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let sit for 12-18 hours.

Sprinkle a good amount of flour on a baking paper and transfer the dough upside down.

Gently wrap the dough in towards the middle. You want to keep as much of the air as possible while doing so.

Sprinkle the bread with a good amount of flour.

Cover the dough with your baking bowl to avoid it rising too much outwards. Let it sit for 1 1/2 hours.

Preheat your oven to 250 degrees Celcius and place your pot there to make it good and warm while the bread is rising.

Take out your pot and cover the bottom with flour before you quickly turn your bread upside down and into the warm pot.

Quickly put the lid back on and place the pot into the oven and let bake for 30 minutes.

Remove the lid and bake for another 12 minutes to get a crispy surface.

Remove the pot from the oven and place the bread on a cooling rack.



To get more delicious recipes from Therese, go to www.mynordickitchen.no

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Everyone loves a good sunrise and sunset photograph, but this week Nordique is delighted to meet a guest who has turned it into an art form! Toni Strandback talks to us about his love of photography and has kindly shared some of his stunning photographs of the gorgeous Finnish coastline at dawn and dusk.

“My name is Toni Strandback - I’m a 33 years old construction worker and father to two energetic boys aged 6 and 4. I’m from Hanko in Finland, or should I say Hangö because I’m a Finnish-Swede. I grew up here in Hangö, - somehow I always wanted to move from here, but at the same time I’ve always loved this place.”

The water level was very low this evening, usually these rocks are under water

“I bought my first DSLR which was a Canon 600d about seven years ago. I liked photography and I usually took photographs when we were travelling or on vacation. The thing is that I was never fully satisfied with the photos I took. I didn’t think of composition and the light or exposure - I just snapped photos in full auto mode so I didn’t even have any control over where the camera would focus.”

“Then my wife won some kind of raffle on the internet last autumn and the prize was a short photography course. She asked if I wanted to go along and I did, somehow sitting there listening to the teacher opened it all up for me. Now I try to photograph every day but its not always possible... what is nice is that I learn something new every time I go out shooting pictures.”

A panorama of Hangö East harbour during a sunrise

Why Sunsets?

“Working Monday to Friday from 7am to 4pm, and being with the family after work just doesn’t leave so much time, so actually sunsets were what I had time for! It’s not always so easy to get there though after a long day, and it would be easier to lay on the couch watching Netflix. But the thing is, after a busy day being surrounded by nature and the sea is the most relaxing and serene thing that I can think of.”

I often set a low aperture to get a nice sunstar

“The other thing that I love about sunsets is just watching the light going from harsh daylight to softer warm light, then turning in to really deep moody yellow/orange/red and blue and finally watch the darkness come. Actually I probably like it best 30-45 min after the sun sets, when there is a mix of all the colours and it is getting dark.”

Märsan. On the north side

Tell us about Hangö

“Hangö is the southern-most town in mainland Finland. The Gulf of Finland surrounds us on three sides so we have a lot of beaches and shoreline.”

Love the colours after the sun has set… it just has this peaceful feel.

“Only around 8500 people live here, and in the winter it feels almost like a ghost town with no people and nothing happening. But when the summer comes it really brings this place to life. In the summer there is almost always something happening. There are a lot of tourists, and a lot of people from bigger cities who have their summer houses here.”

Its not so often i get to photograph sunrise and when i do it is likely to be overcast. This shot is just outside of beach Plagen.

“What I like the most about Hangö (besides the sunsets of course!) are the islands around. When I was younger, me and friends used to just pack some stuff and go camping for the weekends during the summer. And there are really a lot of islands to choose from!””

One of the many favourite places of mine, located just around the corner of ”chappelharbour”

Trying some smoke at sunset, i get these ideas sometimes. Photo taken on the North side of Hangö

It was almost this light for almost a week, a strange sensation to be able to look into the sun without being blinded… These sunsets was very red and there was this strange ”haze”. I heard it was because of some sandstorm in Sahara that pushed sand particles in to the atmosphere. And when the sun had set, the colours faded very quickly.

I Took this photo during a beautiful winter sunset at kråkudden.

See more of Toni’s sunsets and sunrises at: @tonistran

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