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The Fresh Loaf by Pablo - 4h ago
Afer 10 years
Submitted by Pablo on February 24, 2018 - 7:18am.

Cell phones rock for casual photography!

 

Well, time flies.  It's interesting to read "where I was at" 10 years ago with bread and it reminds me of where I was at with life.  I was living in Canada and approaching bread baking as a hobby.  Things were very different.  Now I live in México and I regularly bake my house bread with no variations except that I occasionally bake a loaf of rye that lasts quite a while in the freezer.  Today I'm passing on my load of bread books (sans 3) to the local cooking club.  I am very comfortable with my starter, I always bake with it, I now know what "crumb" is, and I critically review every bake.  My main problem these days is shaping.  I often get loaves that are constricted in places and blown-out in other places.  My most recent bake went pretty well, shaping-wise.  We like a small, tall loaf, good for toasting.  My other difficulty is that no matter how I try it, when I slash the tops of loaves prior to baking the skin wrinkles.  It usually straightens-out when the loaves are baked and they bloom properly in the oven.  Proofing remains something of a mystery.  How does one judge when loaves have doubled or are at 90% or whatever?  Judging the dough in a container is easy as there are marks on the container, but once the loaves have gone through all their processes and are proofing in the couch... well it's a mystery to me.  In retrospect I'm so grateful that I found this website.  It's full of friendly, knowledgeable people.  Maybe some day I'll get back to breadsloration (bread exploration), but for now I'm sticking to the tried and true house bread.

 

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Tartine Porridge and other things
Submitted by Lazy Loafer on February 23, 2018 - 6:21pm.

I had a full load of 8 cast iron pots in the oven this morning. I had four of my Heart Bread loaves to bake for a customer, and I've been waiting for an opportunity to bake some of Ian's cream cheese breads, and I also added a couple of Tartine Porridge loaves to top up the load - this one made with Kamut flake porridge, walnuts and walnut oil (bought some the other day). They all turned out very pretty, and the Kamut Durum Potato Cream Cheese sourdough is soooo yummy! Good baking morning... :)

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Porridge Cream Cheese Rolls
Submitted by isand66 on February 20, 2018 - 4:47pm.

   I needed some rolls to eat with all the food we've been cooking with our Instant Pot and figured I would make a version of one of my favorites.  Cream cheese always makes for a nice soft crumb and the addition of the maple syrup in the porridge added a little extra sweetness to go along with the honey.

These came out great with a nice soft flavorful crumb.  I used some white and black poppy seeds to top some of the rolls and also used some powdered cheese and some garlic spice mix for some of the others.  I used some scissor cuts on some of the rolls just to make them pretty.

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.  You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4's of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk along with the maple syrup and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge, cream cheese, honey and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.      You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape into rolls around 125 - 135 grams each.  Place on a baking sheet with parchment paper and place a moist lint free towel on top or use plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 435 degrees.  Bake for 35 minutes until the rolls are nice and brown.

Take the rolls out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

 

 

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Multi-Color Roasted Carrot Porridge Bread
Submitted by isand66 on February 19, 2018 - 10:00am.

    I made a rye bread with shredded carrots while being a test baker for Stanley Ginsberg's Rye Baker book and that came out better than I expected.  I'm not a big carrot cake fan, but I do love roasted caramelized carrots, which are sweet like candy.  I used some special multi-colored purple, yellow, and orange carrots and roasted them in some olive oil until they were nice and soft and sweet.  I mashed them up before adding them in the dough and I was not disappointed with the final bread.  It came out moist with just a little hint of sweetness from the carrots.  This is one of those bakes you can eat just by itself with nothing on it, but it does go well with cheese and was perfect to dip in the Instant Pot sausage, peppers and beans we made last night :).

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.   You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4's of the water called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients, in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water  and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Peel and cut the carrots into medium to small size pieces and toss in some olive oil.  Place on a sheet pan and roast at 425 F until soft and slightly charred.  Let cool until ready to use and mash using a potato masher .

If using your own milled flour, mill and sift as desired.  Next, mix the flours, porridge and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, carrots and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1 hour.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

 

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Pain de campagne - Pâte fermentée
Submitted by rudirednose on February 19, 2018 - 6:09am.

the loaf

detail upper rim

 crackling crust

 crumb

 detail crumb

This bread has different 'fathers'!

The first 'father', a friend of mine, made Pâte fermentée with rye, no success, dead end! So he did not give up and made a mixed one fifty-fifty, success, that worked! He told me and so I made my PF with the amounts of wheat and rye as used in our regional peasant-breads:

  • wheat - first clear - 70 %
  • rye - medium rye - 30 %
  • water - 60 %
  • fresh yeast - 2 %
  • seasalt - 2 %

I feed once a week or so and one day before use. After feeding 1 h rest on the bench at roomtemp and then he lives all the time as compagnion with my sourdough in the fridge. He now is at least 1 y old!

The next 'father' is Richard Bertinet. In his book 'DOUGH' he has a recipe for 'pain de campagne' with a 'rye dough' as 'starter'. It is a french rye-bread with 20 % rye-flour, and this 'rye dough' is nothing but a PF!

The other 'father' is Gontran Cherrier. In his book 'GONTRAN FAIT SON PAIN' he has two recipes from the Normandy, each with a high amount of PF!

The last 'father' am I. I mixed these recipes, tested and corrected and got finaly this bread!

 

My Formula:

  • PF - 260 g - 28 % total weight - (french notation, formula see above)
  • AP - 280 g - 75.7 % - (this time I used french T55)
  • medium rye - 70 g - 18.9 %
  • VWG - 20 g - 5.4 % - (this against the biodegradation in the old PF)
  • water - 240 g - 64.9 % - (the water good warm, mine was arrond 43C/110F)

mix, cover, and let sit 1 h on the bench for an integrated autolyse at roomtemp, then add

  • fresh yeast - 5 g - 1.3 %
  • seasalt - 10 g - 2.7 %
  • 2nd water - 15 g - 4 %
  • smoked dry potato granules - 20 g - 5.4 %
  • another water - 30 g - 8 %  - (to correct the dough if needed)

knead as used.

bulk-f : 1.5 h

s&f : every 30 mn

shape : boule, the seam well dusted with rye-flour!

final-f : 1 1/4 h at roomtemp or in the fridge at 4-6C/39-43F for 5-10 h  (I had 6.5 h this time) placed with seam-side down in a linned banneton, well dusted with rice-flour to the linnen side and rye-flour to the loaf-side. For isolation in a sealed plastic-bag.

baking :

preheating the oven with pressureless steam until the oven-temp ist near 98C/210F, then load into the oven seam side up

  • 5 mn <= 98C/210F steam only
  • 10 mn <= 240C/465F steam + convection mode (increasing temp)
  • 10 mn 230C/445F convection mode + bottom heat
  • 10 mn 210C/410F convection mode
  • 20 mn 180C/355F convection mode, removing steam several times by opening the door

 

After the 'normal' baking-time I tested a tip from 'dmsnyder'. He wrote somewhere here that after baking he let his bread cool down a while in the oven with the door a little bit open. I did this for 20 mn and think, it works for me! Thx David!

This bread is very delicious. Hard, splintering crust, soft, creamy crumb, complex taste from the PF and a fine scent from the smoked potato granules. Like a vegan ham-sandwich! ;-)

 

happy baking

rudi

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Today's bake - Vanessa Kimbell beginners' SD
Submitted by not.a.crumb.left on February 18, 2018 - 8:55am.

Hi,

I have been baking the Champlain like mad and had so much starter that I thought I try a different loaf with different bread. This recipe is from Vanessa Kimbell in UK:

http://www.sourdough.co.uk/a-basic-sourdough-recipe/

I followed a recipe in her 'Food for thought' book which is essentially like the one in the link...

However, note the following differences:

1. She suggests in the book 30 min MIX  of ALL ingredients (salt and starter included) - I used a bit more water at 325g water @ 28C, 100g leaven, 400g white , 100g whole, 10g salt 

2. I used after this the Rubauld method to create gluten...rather than just S & F and not too difficult as dough was not too stiff to do this..

3. 2 X 30 min S & F

4. 1 hour rest after last S & F and then tension folds to create structure and tried to let dough proof under tension created

5. I think roughly after 45 min pre-shape - dough was bubbly but not proofy yet as this can be a problem for me...

6. 1 hour bench rest- and pre-shape was quite tight and the shape relaxed to a nice pancake shape for final shape

Straight into banneton after final shaping and then fridge, I tried this time floured towel in banneton and covered the dough with the towel in fridge.

Still not the open crumb I yearn for and a lower hydration loaf but family and I eat happily the bread and I learnt lots rather than going for much wetter doughs which are not (YET ) in my league.....

Kat

 

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Polenta Sourdough with Toasted Sunflower and Pumpkin Seeds 
Submitted by Danni3ll3 on February 18, 2018 - 7:05am.

 

I felt it was time to revisit some of the recipes that I have made in the past and Ru’s Polenta Sourdough was one that I really liked and wanted to play around with a bit. So this is my second version of her recipe.

 

Recipe:

 

330 g of Selkirk wheat berries (this is a 1950s hard red spring wheat variety)

110 g of cornmeal

300 g of boiling water 

770 g of unbleached flour

50 g ground flax

100 g raw sunflower seeds, toasted in a dry frying pan

100 g raw pumpkin seeds, toasted in a dry frying pan

575 g water

22 g pink Himalayan salt

35 g kefir

360 g levain (100% hydration)(Instructions included below)

 

  1. A couple of night before making the dough, mill the Selkirk wheat berries and sift out the bran. Mill the bran again on a finer setting. Reserve all of the bran for the levain. Remove 143 g of the sifted flour for the main dough and reserve the rest of it for the levain.
  2. The morning before making the dough, start building the levain as follows: Build #1: 16 g starter, 31 g water, 31 g bran Let rest 8-10 hours. You won’t see any activity, so don’t worry. Just leave it alone. Build #2: 62 g each of water and sifted flour. Let rest overnight.  Build #3: 94 g each of water and sifted flour. Place in a warm spot. It is ready to use once it doubles. Mine doubled in a couple of hours but I used it after about 4 hours.
  3. The night before, soak the 110 g of cornmeal in 300 g of boiling water. Let rest covered overnight.
  4. A couple of hour before the levain is ready, mix the the 143 g of sifted Selkirk flour with 770 g of unbleached flour, 50 g ground flax seeds, 100 g each of toasted sunflower and pumpkin seeds.
  5. Pour 575 g of water into the the soaking polenta and loosen the whole mess with a whisk. This will take some time. There may be a few little lumps left but keep at it until it is all loosened. If you don’t, you will find huge lumps of cornmeal in your dough. Don’t ask me how I know that!
  6. Pour the cornmeal/water mixture into the flour/seed blend and mix well until all of the flour is hydrated. Let autolyse for a couple of hours until the levain is ready.
  7. Add 22 g salt, 35 g kefir and 360 g of levain to the dough. Mix very well and then do 100 stretches and folds in the bowl/bucket. This really is more like kneading in the bowl rather than true stretches and folds but it helps develop the gluten and it distributes the levain and the salt.
  8. Place in a warm spot and give two sets of folds one hour apart. Let rise until 50-60% risen and you can see bubbles at the edge of the bucket. The dough should feel solid but full of air.
  9. Divide into 3 loaves and do a very loose pre-shape. Do not degas the dough. Let rest for 30 minutes. Do a final shape by cinching the dough. Once again, do not degas the dough. Place seam side down in rice/AP floured bannetons and cover. Let rise on counter at room temperature for 45 minutes and then put to bed for the night in the fridge.
  10. The next morning, heat the oven to 475 F with the Dutch ovens inside for at least 45 minutes. Place parchment rounds on the bottom of the pots and gently drop the boules inside seam side up. Cover and drop the temperature to 450 F, and bake for 25 minutes. Remove lids, and bake for another 20 minutes at 400 F or until the insides measure 205 F. 
  11. Cool for at least a couple of hours before cutting and enjoying!

The oven spring wasn’t what I would wish for. I am guessing that it was slightly over proofed. The photo is deceiving. The loaf doesn't look like that in real life.

 

Next time, I think I would reduce the rest time to 15 minutes and then skip the room temperature proof and put directly into the fridge. I also retarded it for longer than usual (about 13-14 hours) and the amount of prefermented flour was more than usual as well. So live and learn. I know it will taste good. Crumb shot to come later.

 

This is a more accurate photo of the oven spring.

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My bread short list to date for 2018
Submitted by Cedarmountain on February 17, 2018 - 2:58am.

Marquis Wheat Sourdough

Fresh milled high extraction Marquis wheat, young levain, 85% hydration, cold proofed overnight

  

 

 

 

 

Bacon Cheddar Caramelized Onion Sourdough

Fresh milled rye, emmer and hard red wheat, young levain, 78% hydration; caramelized onions, white cheddar, havarti, parmesan, crisped maple smoked bacon and raw sesame seed coating: cold proofed overnight

 

 

 

 

Toasted Ground Seed Porridge Sourdough 

Fresh milled emmer, rye, hard red wheat, young levain, 78% hydration with a toasted ground seed porridge (millet, sunflower, pumpkin, flax, sesame); cold proofed overnight

 

 

 

Oat Spelt Porridge Sourdough

Fresh milled spelt, rye, hard red wheat with rolled oat/flaked spelt porridge, young levain, 80% hydration, coated with oat/spelt flakes and raw sesame seeds; cold proofed overnight

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The Fresh Loaf by Leslieruf - 1w ago
Feel good bake :)
Submitted by leslieruf on February 16, 2018 - 12:43am.

After recent bakes I have been a bit disheartened. Earlier this week I got the Red Star Yeast newsletter and they featured “Unbelievable Sweet Orange rolls” - a variation on cinamon rolls.  I followed the recipe exactly (I made a slightly bigger dough and had to bake some rolls seperately) and whilst mine wasn’t as pretty as theirs, it went down a treat with friends tonight. it feels good to have a sucess and the taste was really nice - a combination of orange and cinamon.  yum!

Happy baker tonight

Leslie

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Post-holiday baking
Submitted by Gill63 on February 14, 2018 - 7:22am.

Recently we went on a ski holiday, which was great fun, but I managed to slip over on an icy pavement when walking back to the chalet in ski boots. (No falls on the piste!) Landed on my right side, and my elbow hasn’t quite settled down yet. It didn’t interfere with skiing, but now that I’m home it is a good excuse reason to get out of the hoovering!

Before the holiday I’d built my 50% hydration starter up as it was going to be sitting in the fridge for 3-4 weeks. So, on return I had plenty of starter to be going on with. As well as bread I made a batch of sourdough muffins and a double batch of parmesan and herb sourdough crackers. I usually use the Bertinet method of handling/developing my dough as I really enjoy it, but usually then do one or two extra stretch and folds, as I find that and a cold overnight proof in the fridge work well for me.

It was my first use of Shipton Mill cut malted rye grain, and I was pleased with the result.

400g starter/400 white bread flour,75g rye flour,325g wholemeal flour/650g water. 30g cut malted rye grain soaked in 50ml boiling water and 120g mixed seeds added with 3rd (final) stretch and fold.

The dough was soft, but handled well and I loved the flavour. But, although fine at the time, my elbow really ached the next day!

Time to bake again, and its not completely better, so I decided to combine my Bertinet starter and formula with a Dan Lepard type method, and to try and go with the feel of the dough to decide on how many stretch and folds to do.

250g starter/200g white bread flour, 300g Shipton Mill 3 malts and sunflower brown bread/650g water.

It took a long time to get any structure, so I did an extra round of minimal kneading and 5 sets of stretch and folds.

Still a bit sticky after pre-shaping, so I added seeds to one banneton as well as using brown rice flour/bread flour mix in both. I wanted to make sure at least one loaf released well! 3.5 hours rising at room temperature before going in fridge overnight.

No problem with release of either loaf - thanks to TFLers for the tip about using a rice flour mix. That’s the softest/wettest dough I’ve used it with. Whilst lining the banneton with oats or seeds works well it isn't always wanted.

Good oven spring, slashing could be better. Closer crumb than usual, but I’m not particularly bothered by that as it has a very nice flavour.

 

 

 

 

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