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The Fresh Loaf by Rgreenberg2000 - 11h ago
RWC SD Bagels (1st attempt)
Submitted by rgreenberg2000 on May 26, 2019 - 8:47am.

I already has bagels on the mind for this weekend when Lazy Loafer (Wendy) posted up her lovely batch yesterday.  So, I dove into the deep end, and took my first go at making sourdough bagels.  I did some searching, and decided to go with THIS RECIPE (posted by Quantum.)  I modified the levain build slightly (favoring a 1:5:5 build up), and also did the bulk proof in the fridge overnight.  I'll cut to the chase on the results......they ARE bagels, but they are a bit denser than even a typical NY bagel might be.  I think that's because I got into shaping, boiling and baking too soon after I took the dough out of the fridge.  On the next go around, I'll probably leave the dough to sit on the counter for a couple hours after they come out of the fridge.  Here are the details......

Formula

Levain Build:

31g mature starter from fridge

155g Flour (used freshly milled hard red spring)

155g Water

Let levain ferment for 10-12 hours

Dough:

753g Flour (used Gold Medal AP)

377g Water

339g Levain

19g Salt

"Dissolve" levain and salt in the water, then add to flour in a mixing bowl.  Bring everything together into a cohesive dough mass (it's a bit dry, but it will happen!), then knead for 10-15 minutes (I did this by hand, so if you have a mixer, make adjustments here.)  Once the dough has become smooth in texture, place into an oiled container, and proof at room temp for 1-2 hours.  Then put dough into fridge overnight.  Remove dough from fridge in the morning (this is where I will let it sit for a couple of hours next time), and get your boiling/simmering water ready to go.  I used hot tap water, and some dry malt extract (eyeballed it).  Now is also a good time to preheat your oven to 500 degrees (I baked these on a stone.)

Divide the dough into 12 equal portions (about 122g each), pre-shape into balls, then let rest for a few minutes.  Take each ball and roll it out into a cylinder about 8" long, wrap the cylinder around your hand (seam on the palm side), then roll the seam to seal.  Once all of the bagels are formed, simmer them in your water for about 1 minute per side (do this in batches sized according to the vessel you are using.)  Remove from the water, press into whatever toppings you might be using, and place on parchment paper that has been lightly sprayed with cooking spray.  Slide the parchment onto the stone in your oven, bake for 20 minutes.  If they aren't dark enough for your tastes, bake a bit longer.

Remove from oven, cool, then slice, toast and enjoy!

I'm looking forward to eating these, and then giving this recipe another go with some tweaks.

Rich

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The Lazy Loafer has retired!
Submitted by Lazy Loafer on May 25, 2019 - 9:34am.

Hi all. Sorry it's been so long since I was active on the site. After our big trip to Australia and New Zealand last autumn, then Christmas, we decided to sell our house. It took a while to get it ready to sell, and part of that 'getting ready' was storing all my bread-baking equipment away out of sight, and not baking for customers anymore. The house is still on the market so I'm just baking for the family now. The bagels shown here are a modified version of Peter Reinhart's bagels from "artisan bread every day", with the addition of some whole wheat flour and sunflower & sesame seeds. I find it's easier to control the ferment and proof if I refrigerate the bulk ferment, then shape them the next morning. They proof fairly quickly so make sure you've got the water simmering and the oven pre-heated in time!

Anyway, good wishes to everyone here and I do have a peek now and then to see what everyone is doing!

Wendy

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Spelt Barley SD Bread and Whole Wheat Rye Buttermilk Rolls
Submitted by isand66 on May 25, 2019 - 9:15am.

Both of these bakes were pretty simple for me and I had to restrain myself from adding some cheese or other ingredient :).  Sometimes simple is best and I have to admit the Spelt Barley loaf tastes awesome.  It has a nice chewy crust with deep nutty flavors from the spelt and barley flours.  It made an excellent pastrami sandwich for lunch the other day with some melted cheese and Thousand Island dressing.

The rolls came out nice and soft with an extra tang from the buttermilk.  These are also excellent sandwich rolls or great for breakfast with some butter, cheese or jam.

The crumb was not exceptionally open, but perfect for sandwiches.

 

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

The bread came out great. The crumb was nice and open and moist and tasted fantastic.  This one is a keeper for sure and worth trying.  The nutty flavor of the spelt was really complimented with the corn flour and made for one tasty bread.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.   You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and the water(buttermilk for the rolls) for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, (honey for the Spelt-Barley Loaf) and salt and mix on low for 4 minutes.  You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 540 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

Lower the temperature to 450 degrees (for the rolls I baked at 435 F).  Bake for 35-50 minutes (15-20 minutes for the rolls) until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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The Fresh Loaf by Jbt - 2d ago
Pizza Friday
Submitted by JBT on May 24, 2019 - 8:56pm.

Growing up Friday's meant pizza in my parents home, along with some very cheesy, terrible family TV viewing.  It is a habit - the pizza, not the cheese-ball TV - that I have come back to again and again.

Sourdough Pizza crust (based on KA recipe)

100 grams starter discard; 65 grams warm water; 155 grams unbleached AP flour; 1/2 teaspoon salt; 1/4 teaspoon dry yeast

Rise in oiled bowl till doubled, 2-4 hours. Turn out and form into disk, rest 15 minutes. Stretch to shape; let rise. Preheat oven w/ stone to 500F, cook 12-14 minutes, last minute under broiler.

I like the crispness this dough can achieve in my oven, and how well it holds up even when very thin. It is also very extensible and easy to stretch. However, I'm missing a bit of chew so I'll probably try some kneading next time. 

Toppings today where jarred sauce (meh), olive, onion, pepper, GimmeLean sausage w/ added Italian sausage spices, Daiya cheese.

 

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The Fresh Loaf by Roger Lambert - 2d ago
Light Rye & Coffee Chaff
Submitted by Roger Lambert on May 24, 2019 - 1:41pm.

15% Rye flour + 1 tbls finely chopped coffee chaff.

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The Fresh Loaf by Not.a.crumb.left - 2d ago
50% Swiss Ruchmehl loaf
Submitted by not.a.crumb.left on May 24, 2019 - 1:01pm.

 

A while ago I bought back some Swiss Ruchmehl from Germany and was curious about the

flour as Max Kugel, in Bonn bakes a lot with it in his bakery...

Last time it turned out to be an amazing bake and sadly I could not get my hands on it in UK....

But my fortune changed when I spotted Dark Swiss Flour on the Shipton Mill web site.

It did not give much information but when I baked with it, indeed it was very similar to the Ruchmehl, I thought...

The other day I saw a formula on https://brotokoll.com/recipe/?lang=en blog and after contacting Alex, he confirmed that indeed the Shipton Mill Dark Swiss Flour is a Ruchmehl...

It is difficult to find information in English on the flour but it is like a 85% extraction flour that is not quite WW but darker than a strong bread flour....The taste is rustic and deep...although I mixed it with 25% Strong Organic White Marriages and 25% Strong Canadian flour. I might try it 100% next bake...and I think it will take more water easily...

This one was 78% hydration, 20% young leaven (ph 5 when I used it), 2 % salt.. , 2 hours autolyse, 30 min before adding salt after adding levain, slap and folds to develop gluten, 3 Stretch & folds and last 1 and 1/2 dough was left alone, pre-shape, 30 min benchrest and 30 min before going into wine cooler...

It was a warm day and tried to keep dough at 23C throughout whole process.

I can highly recommend this flour should you be in the UK and use Shipton Mill. No postage if you order min of £ 30 and lots of amazing flours there at a very good price!   Kat

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The Fresh Loaf by Trailrunner - 3d ago
Swiss Farmhouse Bread
Submitted by trailrunner on May 24, 2019 - 4:09am.

Couldn’t be happier about this bread. My 7 yr old Apple YW performed like a champ. I will definitely be making this again with some modifications. The hydration of the levain is unworkable at least for me. It’s so dry it’s impossible to mix and then a second feeding hours later just clumps the flour again. I managed by increasing the hydration and subtracting from the final dough. I won’t do two feeds that far apart as my YW is so active. I will do one feeding to make 700g levain and call it good. For the raisins I misted them with water while tossing them to moisten then I sprinkled with a good amount of cinnamon/sugar and heated in the microwave for 20 sec. tossed with the toasted chopped pecans. The flavor of each bite with this explosion of spice and texture is wonderful. The dough handles beautifully you wouldn’t know it isn’t an enriched dough. I mixed everything as I always do and had to use the KA briefly due to the lumpy levain . Will follow my own procedure next time. I only needed 2 s&f at 30 min bulk . The dough was so active. Did a lamination fold to add the fruit/nuts. My usual no shape/shape and into the banneton for one hour then fridge for one hour. Amazing crumb. Light light light! Crisp thin caramel crust and the spiced fruit. This is a winner.

 

 

 

 

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new country loaf recipe
Submitted by LouisGluck on May 24, 2019 - 12:15am.

Hi all! I am a senior in high school and I just recently finished my senior final project on sourdough bread. Throughout the year I interviewed bakers and had them try different loaves of bread. I took this information to develop my own country sourdough recipe. I made a documentary about the whole process which will be linked. Enjoy the recipe and happy baking!

 

Time: 4 Days

Yield: 2 Loaves

 

Ingredients

For feeding starter

Unbleached all purpose white flour (preferably organic)

Purified water

For making bread

Whole wheat flour (preferably organic)

Unbleached white bread flour (preferably organic)

Salt (preferably non-iodized)

Water 

Extra flour for work surface

Vegetable or olive oil for bulk fermentation

 

Equipment

Kitchen scale

2 glass jars (for starter)

Rubber spatula

Medium and very large mixing bowls

Large wooden spoon

Plastic wrap

Bench scraper

Paper towels

Handheld sieve

2 bread proofing baskets

Multiple cloth towels

Parchment paper

Dinner plate

Lame (Bread scoring knife)

Dutch oven

Cooling rack

 

Directions

1) Feed Starter

Starting 2 days before bread making, remove starter from fridge and begin feeding. Each day leading up to the feeding it should be fed. To feed, in a medium mixing bowl, combine 20g starter with 100g purified water, and dissolve the starter into the water using a rubber spatula. Next, add 100g unbleached all purpose white flour and mix until there are no dry spots. Put into a glass jar with lid lightly placed on top (not screwed on), then let sit until next feeding. Two jars of starter should be made if the feeding is leading up to baking sourdough.

Note: If feeding without intention of baking, simply let starter sit for 2 to 3 hours after feeding then return to fridge. Feed once per week. 

2) Autolyse

In a very large mixing bowl (Glass or metal), combine 250g whole wheat flour, 750g unbleached white bread flour, and 750g water. Mix well with a large wooden spoon, cover with plastic wrap, and let sit for 30 minutes to 2 hours. This step develops glutens in the dough

Note: During this time the starter should be checked for readiness. To do so, fill a small bowl with water and using a spoon, put a small dollop of starter on the water. If it floats, the starter is ready for use. 

3) Make Dough

Remove the plastic wrap from the bowl that autolyse was done in. Measure 200g starter and pour into bowl of dough. Pinch starter into the dough using middle and index fingers and thumb until mostly combined. Add 20g salt and 50g water and mix until combined using hands. 

4) Slap and Fold

Remove dough from bowl. On a clean and unfloured surface, lift dough all at once, with bench scraper in one hand, and slam it onto the surface, allowing it to fold onto itself. Repeat for 5 minutes and dough is less slack. This step helps to achieve the desired texture for the bread.

5) Bulk Fermentation

Clean the bowl used for autolyse. Lightly oil it using a paper towel. Put dough into the bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Put into an oven with the light on and let sit for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, remove from oven, pick up dough using oiled hands, and gently lift it up so that it stretches and fold back onto itself. Fold 2-3 times, then recover bowl with plastic wrap and return to oven. Repeat this step 6 times for 3 hours. (3 hours of proofing and 5 rounds of folding). This step helps to rise the dough and achieve a good crumb in the loaf. 

Note: It is recommended to feed the starter during the first 30 minutes of bulk fermentation. If you are planning on making another batch the next day, then feed two jars and let it stay out until the next day. If you wish to return it to the fridge, feed into one jar and let it sit for 2-3 hours, or until bulk fermentation has finished, then return to fridge.

6) Basket Prep

Put two cloth towels into the bread proofing baskets. Pat them down so they match the concave of the basket. Put the extra flour into the sieve and heavily dust the towels in the area where they hug the baskets. Also, during this time cut two pieces of parchment paper the size of the dutch oven, you will use these tomorrow. 

Note: This step can also be done during bulk fermentation. 

7) Preshaping

After bulk fermentation, gently remove dough from bowl onto an unfloured work surface. Using a bench scraper, estimate the middle of the dough and cut into 2 equal sections. Using a lightly floured bench scraper, swoop under the edge of the dough in a circular motion, gently coaxing it into a circular shape. Give a medium dusting of flour on top of it, and put a towel over it to rest for 10 minutes. After resting, remove towels and flour the surface just behind the two pieces of dough. Using a bench scraper, gently and quickly flip the dough back onto the floured surface. Gently tug the top bottom and sides of the dough out to elongate them and flatten them slightly. Fold the bottom of the dough up towards the middle, the sides in, and the top down. Pull pieces of dough from the sides and stretch them up to the seam and stitch it together by pinching and twisting the dough simultaneously. Do this a series of times along the whole seam of the dough. After, turn the dough over to rest on the seam and attach to itself. This process allows for the gluten to stick to itself and strengthen the bread and dough. Let the dough rest on the seam for 2 minutes. After resting, quickly flip the dough into the basket using a bench scraper, making sure to leave the seam side up in basket. Flour the top of the dough and fold the excess flaps of towel over the dough to cover. Put in the fridge overnight. 

8) Baking

In the morning. Preheat oven to 500 degrees and set the dutch oven in the middle of it. Let the dutch oven sit in the oven for 1 hour to heat up. Put the round piece of parchment paper on a dinner plate and flour it. Once one hour has elapsed remove one loaf from the fridge and turn out onto the plate with the parchment paper on it. Using the lame put multiple scores in the loaf, this will create nice ridges in the crust during baking. Remove dutch oven from oven, remove lid and slide the parchment paper with dough on it into the dutch oven. Put the lid back on the dutch oven and put it back in the oven. Bake with lid on for 15 minutes, this helps to create a crispy bubbly crust. After 15 minutes, remove lid and bake another 30 minutes with lid off. Remove loaf from dutch oven after baking and put on a cooling rack for two hours. Repeat process with second loaf. After the two hours of cooling, the loaves are ready for consumption!

Note: I recommend serving right after the cooling, and with room temperature salted butter. 

 

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The Quest for Purple Bread
Submitted by Tandem Tails on May 23, 2019 - 6:33am.

There's no rational explanation for why I've been trying to make purple bread, but that's what I've been doing lately.  In this batch I mashed a purple sweet potato and added it to the flour.  The color is definitely purple, leaning slightly toward pink.

The flavor of the sweet potato is subtle but it gives the bread a hint of sweetness and that soft pillowy texture you associate with potato breads.  The crumb is a little dense but that's to be expected when you add mashed potatoes to a bread.

Ingredients:

  • 490g bread flour
  • 30g dark rye flour
  • 308g filtered water @ 90-95’F
  • 180g levain
  • 12g sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp yeast
  • 150g purple sweet potato mash (see below)

To make the sweet potato mash, I poked a few holes in the potato with a fork and baked it at 350'F for about an hour and a half until it was soft when poked.  I skinned it and mashed it with a fork.  Once it cooled to room temperature it's ready to use in the bread.

I used a stand mixer to integrate the potato, flours and water.  This started out really goopy so I had to add more flour (accounted for in the ingredients above).

I did a 30 minute autolyse, 5 hour bulk ferment at room temp (w/ 4x folds in first 90 minutes) and then an overnight proof in the refrigerator.  I baked at 450'F for 38 minutes covered and 14 minutes uncovered.

I have a full writeup with more photos and instructions here: https://alegrebread.com/2019/05/23/purple-sweet-potato-sourdough/

 

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First Sourdough Loaf
Submitted by JBT on May 22, 2019 - 6:50pm.

After contemplating sourdough for several months, a first try, and fail, at creating a starter, and finally success at nurturing my very own starter, I was ready to bake. Something simple, straightforward, and with little scope for disaster was in order.

1, 2, 3 Sourdough seemed the way to go. 

 

I used a generic unbleached AP flour and bulk fermented in cool room temp for 6 hours. Shaped into a round and placed, seam down, in a parchment lined bowl; covered and put in the refrigerator overnight. Pulled from fridge an hour before starting oven preheat. Baked in pre-heated roasting pan at 450. Uncovered after 15, then another 20.

I was very pleased with the success of this first loaf. Undoubtedly I will have failures, and hopefully I will learn a great deal as I work with my starter and the doughs she helps me create. I am glad, though, that this first outing was both delicious and confidence boosting. I am so grateful for all the amateur and professional bakers who so generously share their wisdom and experience. 

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