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When I think about corn I think about my grandfather, Daddy Don. Daddy Don was a farmer who grew up in Celina, Texas (where I was born and raised, also).  I had an incredibly close relationship with him until he passed away when I was in the 4th grade. One of my most fond memories of him was when he would take us in the summer time to pick corn from his fields. We’d hack off ears of corn for dinner at my grandparents house, and take home a huge basket for ourselves for the week. 

I love the sweet taste of summer corn and there really isn’t anything better than simply grilling it and topping it with butter, salt and pepper in my opinion. However, I love making salads, dips, and even soups with summer corn, too!

Here is a simple Summer Corn Chowder. I’ve cleaned it up by keeping it dairy-free (since typical chowders are filled with heavy cream). I also love the smokey flavor given by the smoked paprika in this dish. It gives it such a rounded, unique taste that makes you want more.. and more!!

So if you are like my family and find yourself with more corn than you can imagine in the summertime, try making this delicious and cleaned up chowder. 

Simple Summer Corn Chowder

  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 3/4 cup yellow onion, finely diced (about 1/2 medium onion)
  • 1/2 cup celery, diced small (about 2 stalks)
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 lb yukon gold potatoes, cut into 1/4 inch cubes
  • 4 cups fresh corn, cut off the cob (about 4 corn cobs)
  • 2 tbsp arrowroot starch
  • 4 cups chicken stock or vegetable stock
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp smoked paprika
  • 2/3 cup unsweetened, full fat coconut milk ((you can sub heavy cream))
  1. In a large pot or dutch oven, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add the onions, celery and garlic. Cook, stirring, until vegetables are tender, about 4 minutes. Season with kosher salt and pepper.

  2. Add the corn and arrowroot starch. Stir until well combined.

  3. While stirring, slowly pour in the broth until it is well incorporated.

  4. Add the potatoes, thyme, cayenne (if using) and smoked paprika. Stir to combine and bring to a boil. Once it reaches a boil, reduce heat to a low, simmer and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes.

  5. When the potatoes are tender, ladle 3 cups of the soup to a food processor or blender and blend until smooth. Transfer back to the soup and stir to combine.

  6. Stir in the coconut milk and continue to let the soup simmer, uncovered, for 8 to 10 more minutes, allowing the soup to thicken a bit more.

  7. Taste the soup and adjust seasonings, if desired.

  8. Serve and enjoy! I garnish mine with a drizzle of olive oil, some fresh cut summer cherry tomatoes, and a little microgreens for garnish.

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I really love split pea soup and grew up eating it. My Mom always made it when we had leftover ham after the holidays and I always looked forward to a warm, comforting bowl of it. 

I do have a funny story about split pea soup though– after I gave birth to Winnie, I got home and my sweet Mother-In-Law asked me what I wanted to eat because she wanted to cook for me. Split pea soup was exactly what I wanted. She made us the BIGGEST pot of it and I was so happy. It was so good that I ate it for multiple days in a row. Meanwhile, sweet newborn baby Winnie tummy was hurting and she was so gassy and having a hard time pooping so I took her into the pediatrician and after many questions and looking at her– we decided it was because I was eating *way too much* split pea soup. So note to all you breastfeeding moms— don’t eat too much of anything. It upsets your baby’s tummy!

I’ve taken the split pea soup I grew up eating and added my own little touches to it. It’s one of my all time favorite comforting bowls of soup and I just know you’ll love it! 

Split Pea Soup with Ham

  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup yellow onion, diced ((or 1/2 medium onion))
  • 3/4 cup carrot, diced ((or 1 large carrot))
  • 3/4 cup celery, diced ((or 2 large stalks))
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1 lb split green peas, dried and rinsed, until the water runs clear
  • 2 cups ham, diced (*see notes)
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 4 cups water
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 5 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 tsp cajun seasoning
  • 1 lb yellow potatoes, peeled and diced into 1/4 inch cubes
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp fresh dill, parsley or thyme for garnish
  1. Heat a large pot over medium heat with the olive oil. Add the onion, carrot, celery and garlic. Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, until tender, about 4 minutes.

  2. Add the split peas and ham. Stir to combine. Pour the chicken broth, water, bay leaves, thyme and cajun seasoning. Bring soup to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover, for 30 minutes.

  3. Add the potatoes. Simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. 

  4. Remove the bay leaves and thyme stems. Taste and adjust salt and pepper, as desired. Finish with fresh lemon juice and dill, for garnish. Serve and enjoy!

*If you are using leftover ham and have a ham bone, throw that in the soup while it’s cooking for best results. I just remove it right before serving.

Reheating directions: I like to reheat mine on the stovetop in a saucepan and add a little extra broth to thin it out (as it tends to thicken even more after refrigerating).

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Pozole is one of my favorite dishes of all time. Pozole, literally meaning “hominy” is a traditional soup from Mexico. As a Texan, I’ve experienced many bowls of pozole. Some great, some not so great. There are many different types of pozole but I’ve grown up eating either Pozole Verde or Pozole Rojo (aka red or green pozole). 

Pozole is traditionally filled with hominy (made from dried corn kernals and treated through a special process involving lye), lots of meat (typically using pork), and can be seasoned and garnished using radishes, shredded lettuce, chiles, onion, lime, and avocado. 

Pozole is one of those dishes that I grew up eating, but never knew how to really make it nor never tried. I was recently raving about one of my favorite bowls of Pozole served in town at the local restaurant Jose to our Nanny, Martha. Martha said while Jose’s pozole is very good, her Mom’s recipe is better and she wanted to teach me how to really make pozole. Heck yes! Martha is an incredible cook, and I love learning from her in the kitchen. 

So, I sat down in the kitchen and watched her work away. A rare and quite enjoyable moment for me since I am usually the mad scientist in the kitchen myself. And a mad scientist she was, indeed. At one point, there was a giant pot on the stovetop boiling away, a small saucepan boiling away, a skillet sauteeing away, and she was chopping away at the counter. I thought, woah. This is quite a production to make pozole! 

The pozole that Martha made for me was the best I’ve ever had. The depth of flavor was unreal and I we ate it all week long. It made enough to feed a small army, haha, but hey! I am not complaining. I would be happy to eat that pozole for breakfast, lunch, and dinner everyday. yum. 

After Martha showed me the ropes in making Pozole, I knew I needed to attempt it for myself. I’ve taken Martha’s Pozole and I have done a few things so that I can share it with you. First off, I’ve made the recipe much smaller; however, it still makes a ton and can feed a lot of mouths. Like I said, Martha’s fed a small army! haha. There are also a lot of steps in making a good pozole, so I’ve made some minor changes to make it a tiny bit easier/less messy of a cooking experience for the home cook. That way, any level of cook can get a delicious bowl of pozole on the table. And lastly, I opted to use chicken instead of pork in this soup. Pork is preferable but many folks don’t eat pork these days. Plus it makes the cook time increase by a lot. I do love it with the pork though, personally, and will show you guys how to make it with pork sometime soon! It’s so good. 

One more tid bit that I never knew about eating pozole. Martha told me that you never eat pozole without a tostada. We had a good laugh in my kitchen because she served up my pozole with a crispy tostada (just the packaged ones you buy in a store, nothing fancy) and I said… do I dip this? Martha said nope. Okay, do I scoop the soup contents over it? Martha said nope, you just eat it alongside the soup. I thought.. hum. Seems unnecessary but the corn flavor from the tostada alongside the pozole is quite a match made in heaven. It’s like saltine crackers with chicken noodle soup. They just go together.

Regardless, a big thank you goes to Martha for teaching me new, amazing techniques in my kitchen. I love learning from you. Thank you for sharing with me and allowing me to share it on my blog! 

Pozole Verde

  • 4 large poblanos, seeds and cores removed & cut into 2 inch chunks (or 5 cups)
  • 1.5 lbs tomatillo, husks removed and rinsed
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 cups chicken broth, low sodium
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 medium white onion, cut into 1/8ths
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 3 tsp kosher salt (or more to taste)
  • 4 cups (packed) green leaf lettuce, loosely chopped
  • 2 cups (packed) cilantro
  • 2 lbs boneless, skinless chicken breast
  • 2 25 oz Mexican style hominy, drained and rinsed
  • 6 radishes, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 head iceberg, shredded
  • 2 limes, cut into wedges
  • 1/2 avocado, sliced
  • 2 tbsp cilantro, for serving
  1. Preheat oven to 375 and line a baking sheet with parchment. 

  2. Add the poblanos and tomatillos. Drizzle with olive oil and toss to coat. Roast until the poblanos are tender and the tomatillos have softened, 15 minutes.

  3. Meanwhile, heat a large pot over medium high heat. Add the chicken broth and water and bring to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the chicken breast and let simmer until cooked through, or no longer pink, 15 to 20 minutes.

  4. Meanwhile, in a high-speed blender, add the white onion, garlic, kosher salt and 1-2 ladles of the broth mixture (or approx. 1 cup). Blend until smooth then add into the soup pot. (don’t put up the blender– you’ll need it a few times).

  5. In the blender, add the green leaf lettuce, cilantro and 2-3 ladles of the broth mixture (about 2 cups). Blend to combine then add to the soup pot.

  6. Once the cook time on the poblanos and tomatillos is complete, add to the blender with 1-2 ladles of the broth (you may need to do this in 2 batches depending on the size of your blender). Blend until smooth and add to the soup pot. 

  7. At this point in the cooking process there may be some foam forming at the top of the soup. Using a spoon, skim the foam off the top of the soup and discard. 

  8. Once the chicken is cooked through, using tongs remove the chicken from the pot and onto a cutting board. Using two forks, shred the chicken. Add the shredded chicken back into the soup.

  9. Add hominy and stir to combine. Simmer until the hominy is just tender, 15 to 20 minutes.

  10. When ready to serve, ladle soup into bowls and garnish with sliced radishes, iceberg, lime, avocado and cilantro. Serve and enjoy!

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Lately, I’ve been trying to incorporate a meatless meal at least once a week. I’ve found myself craving more veggies lately and just feel like I get plenty of protein (through meat) throughout the week and since legumes don’t seem to have an effect on my body/inflammation– chickpeas have been heavy on my mind. Don’t ask me why? haha. Just a phase, I guess. 

I absolutely love Tuscan style bean soups and this soup came about the other day when I scoured my fridge and pantry and put together this Tuscan-inspired chickpea and kale soup with things I had in my fridge and pantry. Y’all. It’s absolutely delicious, super easy to make, and very budget friendly! Not to mention… healthy! 

The key to a good bean soup, in my opinion, is to partially blend the soup. this gives the base that nice, creamy texture you want in a bean soup. You can either use an immersion blender to accomplish this, or transfer a portion of the soup to a blender and add it back to the soup. You just still want to leave plenty of the whole beans and veggies for texture.

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Easy Chickpea and Kale Tuscan-Style Soup

  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup carrot, diced (or 1 large carrot)
  • 1 cup celery, diced (or 2 stalks)
  • 1 cup onion, finely diced (or 1 medium onion)
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt (or more to taste)
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper (or more to taste)
  • 1/2 tsp crushed red pepper flakes ((optional))
  • 4 cups low sodium chicken broth
  • 1 bayleaf
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary (or 1/2 tsp dried)
  • 4 sprigs thyme (or 1 tsp dried)
  • 1 [14.5 ounce] can diced tomatoes (undrained)
  • 2 [15 ounce] cans garbanzo beans (or chick peas) (drained and rinsed)
  • 1 bunch Lacinato Kale (ribs removed and loosely chopped)
  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice (or 1 lemon)
  1. Heat oil in a pot or dutch oven over medium heat. When hot, add the onions, carrots, celery, garlic, salt, pepper, and crushed red pepper. Cook, stirring often, until tender, about 7 minutes.  

  2. Add in the broth, rosemary, thyme, bayleaf, tomatoes, and chickpeas. Stir to combine and increase heat to bring to a boil. Once boiling, reduce heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 15 minutes. 

  3. After 15 minutes of cooking, add the kale and stir to combine. Cover and continue cooking until the beans are very tender and the kale has wilted, 10 to 15 more minutes.

  4. Remove the bayleaf, and the thyme and rosemary stems (if using fresh). Using an immersion blender, partially blend the soup leaving plenty of beans and veggies for texture. (Alternatively, transfer about 1.5 cups of the soup to a food processor or blender and blend until smooth. Return to the soup and stir to combine).

  5. Stir in the lemon. Taste the soup and add salt and pepper, if needed. Serve and enjoy!

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Vietnamese food is at the top of my list of favorite types of cuisine. I love how how traditional vietnamese cooking combines umami (fish sauce, shrimp paste, and more) with copious amounts of fresh herbs. Traditional Vietnamese cooking is greatly admired for its fresh ingredients, minimal use of dairy and oil, complementary textures, and reliance on herbs and vegetables. With the balance between fresh herbs and meats and a selective use of spices to reach a fine taste, Vietnamese food is considered one of the healthiest cuisines worldwide. [source: wikipedia]

One of the most commonly admired Vietnamese dishes worldwide is Pho [pronounce FAH, not FOH]. There is no question as to why this dish is admired in so many countries– it’s hot, aromatic broth combined with noodles, fresh herbs, and a little bit of protein is just a combination sent straight from heaven itself. In my opinion, Pho is one of the best foods on the planet. 

Traditionally, making a pho broth is an adventure that takes at least a day’s worth of work. The broth is a work of art filled with a beautiful combination of aromatics and simmered for hours upon hours. Perhaps, a few days if you’re really getting some good Pho. So let’s cut straight to the point. My ‘pho’ here is far from authentic. It’s a short cut, or faux pho if you will. It’s one that you can get on the dinner table in about an hour and the flavors are there, the depth of flavor is not near as deep as an authentic pho, but they are there. It’s still really good. But I just want to be candid and say that, admittedly, it’s not the real deal. 

We all sometimes just want a big bowl of Pho though, and here I’ve made an easy-to-make version for the home cook that’s also Whole30/Paleo approved. Instead of using rice noodles, I opted for spiralized diakon radish (you can also use spiralized zucchini) to mimic the noodles. The pork meatballs are absolutely delicious and packed with umami and perfect for an easy protein choice in this faux pho. I think you’ll just love it. 

Vietnamese Meatball Pho
Serves 4
A delicious, whole30 compliant Vietnamese inspired meatball pho.
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Total Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr
For the Broth
  1. 1/2 tsp coriander seeds
  2. 1 star anise pod
  3. 1/2 tsp whole cloves
  4. 1 cinnamon stick
  5. 8 cups beef broth (I prefer bone broth)
  6. 1 inch knob of ginger, peeled and sliced into thin sheets
  7. 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  8. 1/4 cup cilantro stems, loosely chopped
  9. 1 stalk lemongrass, bruised
  10. kosher salt, to taste
For the Meatballs
  1. 2 pounds ground pork (you can sub ground chicken or turkey thigh)
  2. 1/4 cup finely diced shallot (or 1 large shallot)
  3. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 2 birds eye chiles, very thinly sliced (optional)
  5. 1 tablespoon fish sauce (I use Redboat brand)
  6. 2 tablespoons coconut aminos
  7. 1/2 inch piece of ginger, peeled and finely grated
  8. 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  9. 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
For Serving
  1. 4 cups uncooked spiralized Diakon Radish, or 2 daikon radishes (you can also sub zucchini noodles)
  2. 1 cup bean sprouts
  3. 2 limes, cut into wedges
  4. 1 watermelon radish, thinly sliced (you can sub 4 regular radishes, thinly sliced)
  5. 1 cup fresh mint leaves
  6. 1 cup fresh thai basil leaves
  7. 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves
  8. 1 serrano pepper, thinly sliced
For the Broth
  1. Heat a large pot or dutch oven over medium heat. When warm, add the coriander seeds, star anise, cloves, and cinnamon stick and toast, stirring and being careful not to burn, until very fragrant, about 4 minutes.
  2. Add the Broth, ginger, fish sauce, cilantro stems, and lemongrass and increase the heat to bring to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to simmering and cook, covered and stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes. (when the cook time is complete, taste the broth and add kosher salt, to taste. you also will need to strain the broth to remove the spices, etc from the broth, so only the broth is remaining).
  3. Meanwhile, make your meatballs.
For the Meatballs
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F and line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the pork, shallot, garlic, chiles, fish sauce, coconut aminos, ginger, salt and pepper. Using hands, mix until well combined then roll into 1.5 inch sized balls. Place rolled meatballs on the prepared baking sheet. Place in the preheated oven and bake until the meatballs are cooked through, or no longer pink when you cut into the center, about 15 minutes.
For Serving
  1. Divide the spiralized daikon radish amongst 4 bowls and ladle the broth over the 'noodles'. Add desired amount of meatballs to the soup and garnish as desired with the bean sprouts, radishes, fresh herbs, serrano peppers and serve with a wedge of lime.
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I absolutely love a rich, creamy, and elegant soup– and a good bisque is just that!

Typically, a bisque is made with shellfish, especially lobster, but today i’ve stuck with a cheaper alternative, shrimp, to make this a much more approachable weeknight meal. Of course, you can add cooked lobster meat to this rich and creamy broth if you so choose. By all means! 

Bisque’s are typically made with heavy cream but today, i’ve creamed up this soup and left it dairy free by using a few diced potatoes in the base of the soup and a little bit of coconut milk. It’s absolutely delicious. It’s also a very easy take on Shrimp Bisque. In most authentic shrimp bisque recipes, sautéing and simmering shrimp shells to make a quick stock gives this soup a deeper, richer flavor. To keep this weeknight ready I’ve omit that step and just used seafood stock. But if you’ve got the time, making your own stock with the shrimp shells is always a great idea.

Either way, this soup is creamy, dreamy, and decadent and only uses clean, real ingredients! I hope you enjoy it!

Whole30 Shrimp Bisque

  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1.5 cups leeks (halved lenthwise, rinsed well, and sliced thinly (ends and dark green tops discarded) )
  • 1/2 cup celery, diced small (or 1 stalk )
  • 1/4 cup carrot, diced small (or 1 small carrot)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp ghee
  • 1.5 tbsp tomato paste
  • 4 cups seafood stock
  • 1 cup russet potato, peeled and diced small (about 1 small potato)
  • 1 bayleaf
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened, full fat coconut milk (I like Thai Kitchens)
  • 1/2 tsp fish sauce (I like Red Boat brand)
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice (or 1/2 lemon)
  • 1.5 teaspoons Louisiana style hot sauce (such as Crystal's or Tabasco)
  • 1 pound jumbo shrimp (peeled, deveined and tail off), cut into small pieces
  1. Heat olive oil in a dutch oven or soup pot over medium heat. When shimmering, add the leeks, celery, carrots, garlic, salt, pepper, and thyme. Cook, stirring, until the vegetables are tender, 5 to 7 minutes.

  2. Add the ghee and melt then, add the tomato paste. Cook, stirring, until well combined, about 2 minutes.

  3. Stir in the seafood stock and increase heat to bring the pot to a boil. Add the diced potatoes and bayleaf and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook, covered and simmering, until the potatoes are fork tender, 12 to 15 minutes.

  4. Discard the bayleaf. Using an immersion blender, blend until the soup is smooth. Or, alternatively, transfer soup in batches to a food processor or blender and blend until smooth. 

  5. Bring the soup back to a simmer and stir in the coconut milk, fish sauce, lemon and hot sauce. Add the shrimp pieces and stir to combine. Cook, stirring, until the shrimp is just cooked through, about 3 minutes.

  6. Taste and add more salt and/or hot sauce to your soup, if desired.

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Growing up, my friends and I frequented Chili’s. One of my go-to orders was their Enchilada soup. Holy YUMMO. Gosh that soup is freaking good. 

Well, I had a craving for it and thought I’d do a little Paleo/Whole30 spin and make a creamy, cheeseless, gluten and grain-free version of that soup in my own kitchen for a wholesome weeknight meal that the whole family will just gobble up. This soup not only tastes like heaven, but it comes together quickly and with very few steps. 

If you are a love hearty, bold flavors in your soups– you’ll absolutely just love this soup! Enjoy!

WHOLE30 CHICKEN ENCHILADA SOUP - YouTube

CHICKEN ENCHILADA SOUP

For the Spice Mixture:
  • 1 tbsp + 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin
  • 1/2 tsp. sweet paprika
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp. onion powder
  • 1/4 tsp dried oregano
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
For the Soup:
  • 1 cup yellow onion (finely diced)
  • 1/2 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup diced green bell pepper
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tbsp ghee
  • 2 tbsp arrowroot flour
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 4 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 14.50z can fire roasted diced tomatoes (undrained)
  • 1 4oz can diced mild green chiles ( undrained)
  • 3 cups cooked shredded chicken ( (I use Rotisserie))
For Serving:
  • 4 radishes (thinly sliced and cut into matchsticks)
  • 1 cup iceberg lettuce (thinly sliced)
  • 2 tbsp fresh cilantro (chopped)
  • 1 lime (cut into wedge)
  1. In a small bowl, combine all of the spice mixture and set aside.
  2. Heat a dutch oven or large pot over medium heat with olive oil. Add the yellow onion, red bell pepper and green bell pepper. Saute, stirring until the vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes. While sautéing, season the vegetables with salt and pepper.
  3. Once the veggies are tender, melt the ghee. Sprinkle in the arrowroot flour and stir until well combined.
  4. Add the spice mixture and the tomato paste and stir to combine. It’s going to look like a sticky mess, but just bare with me.
  5. While stirring, slowly pour in chicken broth, using a spoon to scrape up the brown bits on the bottom of the pot.
  6. Add the diced tomatoes and green chiles. Stir to combine and increase heat to bring to a boil.
  7. Once boiling, reduce heat and stir in the shredded chicken. Cook, simmering and uncovered, for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  8. Remove from heat, taste and add more salt, if desired.
  9. Ladle soup into bowls and top with the radishes, iceberg lettuce, cilantro, and serve with lime wedges.
  10. Serve and enjoy!

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You know how much I love soup, right? It’s a major thing over here in the Snodgrass household except 1 major problem: Clayton is NOT cool with the amount of soup I make. It’s not that he doesn’t like each of the soups I make it’s the fact that eating soup regularly is not his idea of a complete meal/dinner. HA! Last week, I made soup 3 days in a row (oops) and when he got home he said “SOUP AGAIN?” and I was like yo, watch it you ungrateful little scum bag. haha, just kidding. He had some validity because sometimes, you just get souped out. But this girl? I just can’t ever have enough soup. 

Anyway, there are some soups in my soup recipe file that Clayton absolutely loves and this chowder is totally one of them and I can tell you why: It’s super filling and it’s got perfect flavor. None of that dainty sh*t going on over here with this chowder. 

Typically, Chowder is made with a roux base (aka flour and butter) and finished off with heavy cream; but I’ve worked my magic on a fantastic, creamy base that is Gluten, Grain, and Dairy-Free so that we all can enjoy a thick and hearty chowder guilt-free on any night of the week. 

I also love that this soup is packed full of so many veggies and my kiddos love it too! I hope you and your family love it as much as mine!

And I am going to close out this blog post by saying one last thing… Soup for life!

Creamy Chicken and Potato Chowder
Serves 4
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 1.5 cups carrot, medium dice (or 1 large carrot)
  2. 1 cup celery, medium dice (or 3 stalks)
  3. 1 cup yellow onion, finely diced (or 1/2 medium onion)
  4. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  5. 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  6. 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  7. 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  8. 1.5 cups sliced baby bella mushrooms (about 4 mushrooms)
  9. 2 tablespoons arrowroot flour
  10. 4 cups low sodium chicken broth
  11. 1 russet potato, scrubbed and cut into 1/4 inch cubes
  12. 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  13. 1 bay leaf
  14. 2.5 cups diced cooked chicken (I use a rotisserie chicken)
  15. 1 bunch Swiss chard (or 4 cups baby spinach)
  16. 1 cup coconut milk, full fat and unsweetened (I use Thai Kitchen brand)
For serving
  1. 4 slices of bacon, cut into 1/4 inch pieces and fried until crispy
  2. 2 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley
  3. 2 tablespoons freshly chopped chives
Instructions
  1. Heat a large pot or dutch oven over medium high heat with olive oil. When the oil is shimmering, add the carrot, celery, onion, garlic, salt and pepper. Saute, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes. Then, add the mushrooms and stir. Saute for an additional 2 minutes.
  2. Reduce heat to medium and add arrowroot flour. Stir until arrowroot has dissolved into the vegetables and the clumps have dissolved.
  3. While stirring, slowly pour in the chicken broth, scraping up any brown bits in the bottom of the skillet.
  4. Add the potatoes, dried thyme and a bayleaf increase the heat and bring to a boil. Once the soup comes to a boil, reduce heat so that the soup is lightly simmering.
  5. Add the chicken and stir to combine. Cover and cook, simmering, until the potatoes are fork tender, about 10 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, if you are using Swiss chard, fold the leaves in half and cut off the stem. Then, tighly roll the leaves into a cigar and thinly slice into ribbons.
  7. Once the cook time is up, stir in the greens and let wilt, about 1 minute.
  8. Stir in the coconut milk and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes.
  9. Taste broth and adjust seasoning, if desired.
  10. Garnish with crispy bacon, parsley and chives.
  11. Serve and enjoy!
The Defined Dish http://www.thedefineddish.com/
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