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Most likely herbs are part of your kitchen cabinet. Most definitely, your ancestors used herbs as medicine, they may have used it to enhance their food, but today we use herbs to season our food.

Using Herbs as Medicine are not the same as spices. Herbs generally refer to the leafy green or flowering part of a plant – fresh or dried. Thyme, Basil, Cilantro, Bay, Fennel, Lavender, Oregano or Mint are examples of herbs you might already know well. Your ancestors were smarter than you might realise. They used herbs as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-thrombotic an anti-hypertensive. They also used is to regulate glucose and help protect your nervous system. Modern science is now finding out that herbs contain something called polyphenols. Polyphenols help fight inflammation and oxidative damage caused by stress, aging & poor lifestyles. These polyphenols are the reason for an improvement in your symptoms.
Ashwagandha, for example, is an adaptogenic herb that can help reduce your cortisol levels. Barberry can help fight infections as it acts as an antifungal and antibacterial. Basil acts as an anti-inflammatory. Bay leaves, commonly used in Indian cooking acts as an antimicrobial, antifungal and antioxidant. Cardamom can supply eighty percent of your daily requirement of manganese and also lower your blood pressure. Feverfew is used to ease the pain from a migraine attack as well as arthritis pain. Kava helps in alleviating anxiety and insomnia.
Now maybe you might look at herbs in your kitchen differently. People today have become too accustomed to instant relief. Waiting a few days to relieve a symptom is intolerable. There is a straightforward solution – if you know your ailment, include the relevant herbs in your diet. There are virtually no side effects.

A Purveyor of sustainable organic ingredients is www.mountainroseherbs.com/
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The Optimal Diet and Lifestyle for YOUR Unique Body Type with Dr. Stephen Cabral - Episode 240 - YouTube
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Kombucha is a fermented tea that has been consumed for thousands of years, and its origin is either China or Japan.
 It's rich in beneficial probiotics and  contains antioxidants, that can kill harmful bacteria and may help fight several diseases.
It's made by adding specific strains of bacteria, called a scoby (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast), to sugar and black or green tea, then allowed to ferment for 7-10 days.

During this process, bacteria and yeast form a mushroom-like film on the surface of the liquid. This is why kombucha is also known as "mushroom tea."  This blob is a living symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast, or a SCOBY, and can be used to ferment new kombucha.
The fermentation process produces acetic acid (also found in vinegar) and several other acidic compounds, trace levels of alcohol and gases that make it carbonated    A large amount of probiotic bacteria is also produced during fermentation
Probiotics provide your gut with healthy bacteria. These bacteria can improve many aspects of health, including digestion, inflammation and even weight loss.  For this reason, adding probiotics foods like kombucha to your diet might improve your health in many ways. Green tea is one of the healthiest beverages on the planet.   This is because green tea contains many bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols, which function as powerful antioxidants in the body.
Kombucha made from green tea contains many of the same plant compounds and presumably boasts some of the same benefits Studies show that drinking green tea regularly can increase the number of calories you burn, reduce belly fat, improve cholesterol levels, help with blood sugar control and more.  Studies also show that green tea drinkers have a reduced risk of prostate, breast and colon cancers.
 Kombucha is rich in antioxidants, and studies have shown that it protects rats’ liver from toxicity.
One of the main substances produced during the fermentation of kombucha is acetic acid, which is also abundant in vinegar.
Like the polyphenols in tea, acetic acid is able to kill many potentially harmful microorganisms.
Kombucha made from black or green tea appears to have strong antibacterial properties, particularly against infection-causing bacteria and Candida yeasts.
These antimicrobial effects suppress the growth of undesirable bacteria and yeasts, but they do not affect the beneficial, probiotic bacteria and yeasts involved in kombucha fermentation.
Kombucha is rich in tea polyphenols and acetic acid, which have both been shown to suppress the growth of undesirable bacteria and yeasts. Kombucha has been shown to improve “bad” LDL and “good” HDL cholesterol levels in rats. It may also protect against heart disease.
Type 2 diabetes affects over 300 million people worldwide. It is characterized by high blood sugar levels and insulin resistance.
A study in diabetic rats found that kombucha slowed down the digestion of carbs, which reduced blood sugar levels. It also improved liver and kidney function.
Kombucha made from green tea is likely to be even more beneficial, as green tea itself has been shown to reduce blood sugar levels.
In fact, a review study of almost 300,000 individuals found that green tea drinkers had an 18% lower risk of becoming diabetic (32).
Further human studies are needed to investigate the benefits of kombucha for blood sugar control. Kombucha improved several markers of diabetes in rats, including blood sugar levels.
Cancer is one of the world's leading causes of death. It is characterized by cell mutation and uncontrolled cell growth.
In test-tube studies, kombucha helped prevent the growth and spread of cancerous cells due to its high concentration of tea polyphenols and antioxidants.



Health Nuts - How to Brew Kombucha - YouTube
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The Truth about Magnesium & Copper: Food Industry Secrets- Thomas DeLauer - YouTube
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