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The Stillness of the Wind is now available for $12.99 on PC and Nintendo Switch, and $4.99 on iOS!

The Stillness of the Wind - Available Now - YouTube

To those who have already purchased the game, THANK YOU! We’re very grateful to everyone’s support so far And to our new goat farmers, welcome to the end of days. Have some cheese.

Talma is an elderly goat farmer approaching the end of her days—perhaps the end of everything. In this melancholic game following Talma’s story over the course of several days, you are invited to milk your goats, make cheese, collect eggs, grow vegetables, and protect your herd—all while considering an existential question: when there is no longer hope, how will you pass your final days?

You can find the game NOW on Steam, Itch.io, Nintendo Switch, and iOS!

You can also find the Original Soundtrack for $9.99 on Itch.io OR get the full game + OST for 25% off in the Deluxe Edition. These will be coming to Steam very soon as well!


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Surprise Attack Games by Suzanne Wallace - 4M ago

The Stillness of the Wind is launching on February 7th!

The follow up to the critically acclaimed Where The Goats Are, The Stillness of the Wind, now has a release date!

This beautifully designed narrative game invites players to take control of Talma, an elderly goat farmer, as she tends her crops. She maintains a simple, solitary way of life, surviving, subsisting, and tending to her homestead and her goats. Develop your own personal routine and barter with the travelling merchant who brings increasingly disturbing letters from your family in the city.

Now that the goats are ready, you will soon be able to play this sweet, sad game about life and loss on PC (available on Steam and Itch.io), iOS, and Nintendo Switch!

The Stillness of the Wind Launch Trailer - YouTube

We’re so stoked to finally announce this release date that we’ll be hosting a bit of a victory dance on our weekly livestream (on Twitch and Mixer) on Wednesday January 30 at 3pm Pacific Time. We’ll be joined by Coyan Cardenas, the solo developer behind Memory of God.

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ICYMI, last weekend was the first-ever Kinda Funny Press Showcase, and we were thrilled to reveal a new trailer for The Church in the Darkness as part of the event!

Have you watched the new trailer yet? Here it is:
The Church in the Darkness - Story Trailer - YouTube

If you’re a big fan of voice acting in video games, you might recognize some of the voices in this trailer. You probably already knew that the cult leaders are voiced by Ellen McLain (GLaDOS from Portal) and John Patrick Lowrie (Sniper from Team Fortress 2), but developer Richard Rouse III has been eagerly waiting to reveal some of the other voice actors for the game.

Hop on over to the DevBlog for The Church in the Darkness to find out who the voices are behind the residents of Freedom Town!

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With release around the corner, we wanted to delve into the mind of the game’s creator, Coyan Cardenas to share his inspirations, character design and his own description of what The Stillness Of The Wind is Check out the Q&A below.

 

What is The Stillness Of The Wind?

The Stillness Of The Wind is a somber, idle game about life and loss. Players play as Talma, an elderly goat farmer; who farms her crops and keeps her isolated ranch whilst messages and letters are becoming scarce from the city.

Were there any particular influences that inspired the look of the game

The biggest influence by far was Where The Goats Are, a free game I made which The Stillness of The Wind is based off. With The Stillness of The Wind, time was on my side to develop the visual style which draws from those simplistic forms and a handful of colours – with the addition of select details to add character into the world. The look of the game is derived more from the constraints of the project than specific influences. Constraints can be a god send to designers sometimes.

The colour palette is quite warm and cheerful-looking, but the themes of the game seem quite serious. What’s the reasoning behind this juxtaposition?

Nostalgia, a sense of loss and home are the main themes running throughout the narrative of the game. The player takes control of Talma’s isolated farm, so it was important for me to make The Stillness Of The Wind feel warm and welcoming in order to create a place that people wanted to be at, working on, and for the player to instantly settle in to. Things get tough, which results in a meta-nostalgia for how things were – a kind of literal manifestation of ‘golden memories’.

The design and characters are quite simple and highly stylised. How and why do you make them seem real and relatable to players?

I don’t think simple and stylised are counter to creating real and relatable characters, our ability to suspend disbelief stretches incredibly far in this respect. I think what’s more important is creating consistency in the world, so that the player can imagine the characters existing in this world without friction. A simple art style has the added bonus of reducing the clutter to include only what is essential which can help deliver a more poignant experience for the player.

What is it about the ‘life sim’ genre that is so appealing?

For me, peeking through a window to catch a glimpse of a quiet day in the life of someone, especially if they live in a different world, and coming to understand a bit about them: their motives, dreams and fears is just inherently appealing and something I think videogames as a medium is perfect for exploring. Asking the player to enact their daily routine, live inside their skin a while, seems to me to be the ideal way to build empathy for a character.

 

 

 

 

If you’re interested in The Stillness Of The Wind, join our Discord channel and be part of the conversation or follow Stillness Of The Wind’s official Twitter!

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We’re getting really excited about our most-recently signed game, The Church in the Darkness. This thrilling infiltration game is being developed by Paranoid Productions, so we sat down with director Richard Rouse III to chat about his inspiration behind the game and the current state of the alpha. 

Why did you choose a cult for the game’s setting?

As a game designer and writer I’m always thinking about fascinating settings. I like games set in real-world locations, and I wanted somewhere that felt different, somewhere that hasn’t been done a lot already. For all those reasons, a cult down in the jungles of South America in the 1970s just felt irresistible.

I like games that are their own little self-contained worlds, where players can do what they want to, go wherever they can get to, talk to whoever they find, and play the game a variety of ways. I wanted to create somewhere with a real sense of place. Years back I wrote The Suffering horror games, where it really felt like you were in a prison environment: everything from the art to the characters to how the player was constantly trying to get through more locked bars to escape. In The Suffering, everything was unpleasant and terrifying, even before we added supernatural horror and disturbing creatures to the mix.

The Church in the Darkness isn’t a horror game, but it’s still a disturbing environment. In the game, preachers Isaac and Rebecca Walker wanted to leave the U.S. and build their own little socialist utopia in the jungle. So they built Freedom Town. The location in Church is just like the prison island in The Suffering; it’s a self-contained little society—but this time without the supernatural horror, so everything feels like the darker corners of the real world. It’s fiction, of course, but nothing is impossible.

Cults are something that really happen, and whose actions are surprising and sometimes upsetting. I wanted to bring players into this world, let them explore it, and figure out what’s happening below the surface.

What kind of research did you do? Were you inspired by real-world examples or fictional ones?

Almost all the research was done on real-world groups rather than fictitious ones. Alternative religions and what we call “cults” are fascinating, and provide plenty of source material.

The 70s was a unique time for alternative religions—people were terrified of nuclear annihilation and disillusioned by the government, whether it was because of the Vietnam War or Watergate or lots of other terrible things that had happened in the preceding decades. Lots of people in the U.S. wanted to try something different than conventional society. There were plenty of cases of people attempting communal living—from hippie communes like like The Farm or Big Bear Ranch, to more radical alternative religions like the Rajneeshpuram community in Oregon, or Jim Jones and The People’s Temple.

Players might notice that the physical appearance of Freedom Town is most inspired by Jonestown. But the actual cult and its leaders will be quite different, since they were inspired by multiple groups.

You won’t know if the Freedom Town and the Collective Justice Mission are actually a dangerous cult, or if they’re truly progressives and idealists who just want to build their own little society. It’s possible they won’t hurt anyone else, that they just want to be left alone. It changes every time you play; the game has a rogue-like aspect, so it’s meant to be replayed, and each time the story will be different.

As you wander the cult, you’ll hear the leaders preaching over the PA system, meet and talk to other commune members, and read found letters and notes. So it’s a bit of a detective story each time, with a changing story underneath it. Then as a player, you need to decide what to do with that information.

Why did you want to do an alpha?

The project has been in the works for a while, so we wanted to open up an alpha for people who had been following the game. The best part is that we get the chance to hear early feedback on how it’s playing right now, from the people we’re making the game for. With a game like this there’s really no substitute for having people play the game at home, and I am very thankful for all the feedback we have gotten.

 Like what? What kind of feedback have you gotten so far?

Specifically we’ve heard a lot about how the keyboard/mouse controls work right now, and we’ve made some adjustments in the Alpha 2 build that we just released. We’ve also put in an alternate control scheme for people to try out, if they want to see how it feels. I’m hoping to hear how people react to that, to see if we should keep pursuing it or stick with our default controls.

What I’m happiest about is that people really seem to enjoy the way we’re telling the story of Freedom Town.

What else is new in the latest update?

We’ve also played a bunch with the difficulty. We have four difficulty levels you can pick from: Interloper, Infiltrator, Spy, and Mole. For people who don’t want all the difficulty of the infiltration gameplay, we’ve made our “Interloper” difficult setting more forgiving. We want players who don’t play a lot of games like this, but are fascinated with the setting, to still be able to get into the game and access all of the possible endings.

At the same time, players who enjoy challenging gameplay should be able to experience that as well. That’s why we turned up the difficulty on the highest levels. We’ve already seen people streaming the game and doing really well—now they’re going to have a more challenging time of it!

I’m very thankful to the people who have shared their experiences so far, and I’m super curious to get feedback on these new changes.

When and how can interested players try out that new build?

Go here! The True Believer special edition is now available on itch.io and includes immediate Alpha access, along with four songs from the game soundtrack. That purchase will also unlock the Steam key upon the game’s release, as well as MP3s of the 28-song soundtrack and a behind-the-scenes video that delves into the ideas and voices behind the game.

If you’re interested in The Church in the Darkness, join our Discord channel to chat with the developers and share your feedback or follow them on Twitter!

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Frantic co-operative ‘parenting simulator’ Think of the Children launches today on Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4, and tomorrow on Xbox One.

Developed by Australian indies, Jammed Up Studios, Think of the Children puts the co-op chaos into looking after kids.

Little Bobby’s dead, the BBQ’s on fire, Jen’s eating poisonous berries and the birthday cake still needs icing. It’s all part of just another wonderful day out with the kids. So: READY!… SET!… PARENT!

Featuring 1-4 player couch co-op, Twitch and Mixer integration that allows streamers to name the children after random viewers, a wide range of levels, the ability to customise and save characters as families, level rankings (for those who love a challenge) and a myriad of customisation unlocks, Think of the Children is multiplayer mayhem with a colourful, comedic twist.

Priced at USD $12.99, head to your local PlayStation, Nintendo Switch or Xbox One store to pick up a copy.

Think of the Children - Out Now - YouTube
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I still remember the day that I heard about Blind. Our founder Chris had just returned from our first GDC as a publishing label, and he was bouncing off the walls with excitement. “I signed this amazing VR game called Blind” he excitedly exclaimed, yet none of us could see it, because we had no VR gear in the office at the time. I was dubious at best – a VR game where everything is black?

My faith was restored in the concept when I loaded up that GDC demo on an early Oculus dev kit. This was really something else. While all VR games at the time were striving to provide hyper-realistic shooting galleries, you felt isolated and alone in this space, literally fumbling around in the dark. The game has come a long way in the four years of development, and as we hit the submit button for the final time I sat down with Matteo Lana, the studio head of Tiny Bull Studios, to reflect on the journey.

“I still remember meeting Chris at Game Connection in 2014,” Matteo recalls. A small team from Italy were in San Francisco to show off their demo. The prototype for Blind was actually created as “Come To See My House” for the Global Game Jam in 2014. The theme for the year was “we don’t see things as they are, we see them as we are”. Matteo laughs “someone joked that we should make a game about a blind person so we could skip making graphics. The more we thought about it, the more we became excited by that, and we ended up fleshing that jam prototype out into a bigger, more emotional concept”.

Funnily enough, we actually published another game that was born during that very same Global Game Jam. Screencheat took that same concept and went a hard left, creating a party shooter with insane customisation that plays on nostalgia by making everyone literally invisible, so you are forced to Screencheat. The two games could not be any more different from each other, but it’s fun to think that a small student team from Melbourne, Australia could also go on to make a multi-platform release at the same time that Tiny Bull Studios were in Turin, Italy, making their biggest release to date.

What a release it is too. A game that explores so many avenues of fear: the loss of sight, navigating a world that is foreign and unknown, fear of disconnection from family and friends, and fear for one’s life. Matteo doesn’t think that Blind is as dire as all that, however he is proud of what the game does explore. “The story of Jean is one I think people can relate to on many levels. As you slowly unravel the mystery surrounding her family, and the house, and the warden, you learn that Jean is not only lost because she is blind, but because she isn’t sure what is real in her world, and as the player you come on her journey to face the truth and take back control.”

The photos that Matteo shares of Turin literally scream European city to me; magnificent buildings and great bronze statues, complete with cobblestone roads leading from the modern city district out to the countryside. “We love our city, so we decided to found our studio here so we could contribute to the growth of Italy’s gaming industry”. Turin sits comfortably as a developer hub next to Milan and Rome, with a few dozen studios and a few hundred amatuer developers in the city. “We meet every few months, and host some of the biggest game jam events in the country” Matteo proudly beams, and as I peruse the photos I begin to think about a relocation plan.

As we talk about the release, Matteo still maintains the same amount of passion he had the first time I spoke to him four years ago. “We’re incredibly excited to finally release our game! Sometimes it feels like we have been working on this game for twenty years, so on one hand we are so happy to see it end. It has been such a huge part of our lives though, so we’re also afraid it will leave us an emptiness of some sort.” There’s a dramatic pause, as Matteo so often does during out calls. “I guess we’ll do our best to fill that void with an exciting new project!”.

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Narrative-driven VR psychological thriller, Blind, launches today on PSVR, Rift, Steam / HTC Vive and OSVR.

After four years of development, we’re excited to announce that tension-laden virtual reality thriller, Blind, releases today, available from PlayStation, Steam, Oculus Rift and Humble.

In the game you play as a young woman who wakes up in a strange room and makes the shocking discovery she has lost her sense of sight. Goaded by the sinister and twisted Warden, she must explore a perverse and frightening mansion using sound alone. By sending out soundwaves with a cane, the outlines of objects are briefly revealed, enabling the player to navigate the mansion, solve puzzles and uncover the mystery of what is happening to her.

As she gets closer and closer to the truth, however, she will be forced to confront her worst enemy–that which she does not, or will not see.

Developed by Tiny Bull Studios, based in Turin Italy, the dev team are obsessed with telling interesting stories in VR that are designed to engage you in a new way. They have been working on Blind for several years; the idea for Blind being born during the 2014 Global Game Jam.

A physical edition of the game on PlayStation VR will be released in the coming months!

If you pick up Blind, be sure to let us know what you think of it by tweeting @blind_game @TinyBullStudios @FellowTravellr.

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Step inside a narrative-driven psychological thriller when virtual reality game, Blind, launches on PSVR, Rift and Vive next week, September 18.

You play as a young woman who wakes up in a strange room and makes the shocking discovery she has lost her sense of sight. Goaded by the sinister and twisted Warden, she must explore a perverse and frightening mansion using sound alone. By sending out soundwaves with a cane, the outlines of objects are briefly revealed, enabling the player to navigate the mansion, solve puzzles and uncover the mystery of what is happening to her.

As she gets closer and closer to the truth, however, she will be forced to confront her worst enemy–that which she does not, or will not see.

Developed by Tiny Bull Studios, based in Turin Italy, the dev team are obsessed with telling interesting stories in VR that are designed to engage you in a new way. They have been working on Blind for several years; the idea for Blind being born during the 2014 Global Game Jam.

Blind will be available to play next week on PSVR, Rift and Vive – and we have partnered with Perpetual to bring you a physical edition of the game shortly after the digital launch!

We’re excited to release Blind to the world and we can’t wait to see what you think! Be sure to let us know by tweeting @blind_game @TinyBullStudios @FellowTravellr.

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