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When was the last time you wondered how to let someone know exactly what you were thinking without using a gif or emoji?

“The increase in technology within recent years, although bringing about many positives to society, has had a detrimental effect on communication,” said Neil Shah, founder and director of The Stress Management Society who’s working with RESCUE on sharing ways to help people reduce stress.

All that screen time also has resulted in “people becoming less effective and comfortable communicating face to face,” said Shah. More than that, “face-to-face communication is becoming increasingly uncomfortable and stressful for many, and a lot of people tend to overthink it. The less we engage in personal communication the harder it becomes.”

We can all agree that socializing in person is important, but increasingly difficult and confusing after all that screen time.

In a previous professional incarnation, I used to produce a lot of glittery events including schmancy celebrity studded parties around Fashion Week and the Academy Awards, and international networking events. I’ve always been fairly gregarious, but even I would get nervous at times.

Here are some things I learned about how to socialize successfully:

1. Plan in advance

If you head to a conference and panic when faced with a room full of hundreds of strangers, you may end up just heading back to your hotel room and skipping everything — and then kicking yourself for wasting an opportunity. Try researching any relevant hashtags in advance and pay attention to conversations happening online and then join in. You’ll find familiar faces and potential kindred spirits in advance, so you won’t feel like you’re walking into a room alone. It’s also a nice way of blending your social media self with the 3D version of yourself!

2. Have a wingman … or three

One of my schticks when hosting an event was to position myself near the door and greet each and every guest. I understood that not everyone loves to socialize, and that on some level they were there because I invited them (or because of the swag). But even the most socially gifted among us can sometimes blank out on a face or name. For that reason, I’d always have one or more of my interns positioned near the door and I’d ask them to escort in each guest and introduce them by name. It wasn’t just a nice touch, it made the guests feel welcome — it also reminded me who I needed to be extra nice to. If you’re at a networking event, you can ask a trusted friend to keep an eye out for anyone you really want to talk to, and take it from there.

3. The rule of one

Professional networking can be excruciating. For that reason, I always remind myself that I don’t have to connect on a deeper level with everyone in the room. In fact, I tell myself that if I only get one great result from the event, it will have been worth it. One new contact, one interesting industry related conversation, one new resource — If I manage that, my time was successfully spent.

4. Choose wisely

As I get ready to launch a brand new professional networking group this spring, I am ever mindful of my past mistakes. Life is too short to spend listening to long schpiels about widgets. Don’t feel bad about turning down invitations to events that sound boring or feature nothing beneficial to you for the long term. Conversely, if you’re the one doing the planning, carefully curate your guest list and then cull as needed. You’ll build a loyal and interesting group instead of a huge one filled with people everyone will avoid.

5. It isn’t always fun

If you realize that cocktail parties involve both cocktails and the word party but are, in essence, about building your professional standing or network, you’ll have a better mindset. Know that enjoying yourself is the bonus, but networking and work lunches still have the same bottom line — business first.

Shah also offered some tips to help stress less when face-to-face:

  • Try progressive muscle relaxation; tensing, holding, then releasing muscles, has also been proven to lower both physical and mental stress.
  • Mirror the other person’s movements and expressions: mirroring someone creates a social bond
    in the other person’s brain and lead to rapport, lowering any potential conflict.
  • If you make a fool of yourself, stay positive. Often when we mess up, no one really notices, or even cares.

To read the full article, click here! 

The post Ladders: How to re-embrace face-to-face instead of virtual everything appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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With recent survey findings revealing that 66% of those working in the UK health-care sector are suffering from significant levels of work-related stress, it is important for health professionals to start prioritising their wellbeing. To mark Stress Awareness Month, Neil Shah suggests five stress-busting strategies for nurses to adopt when they are feeling overwhelmed with pressures in the workplace

Work-related stress, depression and anxiety accounted for half of all working days lost in 2016–2017, equating to around 12.5 million days (Health and Safety Executive, 2017). This is the highest figure reported in almost a decade, a trend which has steadily increased over the past 9 years.

Back in 1960, Menzies revealed four common causes of stress for nurses: patient care, decision-making, taking responsibility and change (Menzies, 1960). Although these factors were identified over 50 years ago, workplace stress within the health-care sector has not improved much since then.

With the most recent causes of stress for nurses cited as emotional and physical demands, management issues, lack of resources, and difficulty balancing home and work responsibilities (American Holistic Nurses Association, 2018), it is often hard for individuals to manage their levels of stress. However, managing workplace stress is likely to have a positive impact on productivity, absenteeism, presenteeism, meeting targets, and health and safety, as well as budget (ERS Research and Consultancy, 2016).

Stress-busting strategies
Learn to say no

Nurses can do anything, but not everything! Saying yes all of the time can leave people feeling tired, stressed and overstretched, which often results in individuals becoming run down and more susceptible to illness. Stress negatively impacts how well people can fight off bacteria, germs and viruses. Saying no does not mean you are being selfish; when you say no to a new task, you are honouring your existing commitments and ensuring that you can devote quality time to them. Focus on existing tasks to avoid feeling overwhelmed.

Eat well and exercise

The food one consumes can increase their energy levels and calm their mood. Being in stressful environments can act as a trigger to eat greater amounts of comfort foods. Although this is quick and easy, eating these types of foods can make people feel lethargic and less able to deal with stress. It is best to aim to eat low-fat, high-fibre and carbohydrate-rich meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner, with plenty of fruits and vegetables. Health foods slowly release energy throughout the day and supply the body with the nutrients it needs to boost the immune system.

Get a good night’s sleep

It is impossible to be in good health and not have enough quality sleep. Lack of sleep has been said to impact health as much as, if not equally to, not eating, drinking nor breathing (Mental Health Foundation, 2011). The physical effects of stress on the human body are well documented; sleeping both allows the body to repair, and enables the brain to consolidate and process information.

When the mind is not functioning optimally, or is plagued by negative thoughts and emotions, eventually the body will suffer the consequences. Common problems that arise due to poor sleep include weakened immune systems and increased mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression (NHS Choices, 2015).

Meditation and breathing

Meditating or learning to breathe properly will allow people to identify your stressors and reflect. Try this technique—it can be done anywhere and at virtually any time:

  • Sit or stand in a comfortable, relaxed position with the spine erect

  • Inhale slowly through the nose to the count of five. Imagine a ball or balloon in the stomach inflating

  • Hold the breath in the ball or balloon in the stomach for 5–10 seconds.

  • Count slowly to eight while exhaling

  • Repeat this technique several times.

Positive thinking

It can sometimes be incredibly hard to stay positive in difficult situations, and often a bad hour can turn into a bad day, which can easily turn in to a bad week. Try to get out in nature as often as possible—exposure to natural environments has been found to reduce blood pressure, enhance feelings of connection and relieve stress (Li et al, 2011). Try going for walks on days off or step outside during breaks at work.

To read the full article, click here!  

The post Journal of Aesthetic Nursing: What are the most helpful strategies for managing work-related stress? appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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Take time to unplug.

Most of us are never far from our smartphones. We text with friends and check social media obsessively, often making it the first thing we do when we wake up and the last thing we do before falling asleep. That might be contributing to our stress levels, though, so experts say that taking time away from the internet and technology is a great way to manage stress.

Some studies have found that social media use can decrease people’s ability to cope with feelings of being overwhelmed. Other studies have found that being on social media can increase chances of depression.

In addition to those issues, the blue light emitted by tablets, smartphones, and other technology can disrupt our natural sleep patterns. Since sleep is important to coping and feeling less stressed, unplugging before bed is essential.

“Getting a good night’s sleep is critical to the well-being of your mind and body. For a better night’s sleep, consider taking a tech break,” says Neil Shah, founder and director of the Stress Management Society, a U.K. nonprofit that focuses on stress management issues. “Ditch the tech at least an hour before bed.”

To read the full article, click here! 

The post Healthyway: Everyday Stress Management Techniques That Emphasize Self-Care, Mental Health, And Physical Well-Being appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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I have a good friend who can sleep anywhere. Cars, planes, trains. And the moment her head hits the pillow she’s out like a light.

Now I’m the least jealous person on the planet although I must confess I am slightly envious of her ability to instantly nod off because I STRUGGLE enormously.

Last week, on one particular school night, I hit the hay at 10pm. It took a good few hours to eventually drift off into what felt like a state of sporadic dozing. Then bam. At 3am I was wide awake. I tossed and turned. Went to the bathroom. Had a glass of water. Each act proved fruitless. At 4.30am I was still wide awake so switched on the light.

The previous week I’d moved house – one of the most stressful things you can do – and had a LOT on my mind so I made a list of all the things that were troubling me and jotted down possible solutions. I even composed an email. After 20 minutes or so I turned off the lamp. Guess what? I fell asleep instantly. Why I didn’t think of writing everything down before is beyond me as I always keep a notebook by the side of my bed!

Below Neil Shah, founder of The Stress Management Society, a not for profit organisation which offers practical help and advice on managing stress, shares his quick tips on achieving a better night’s kip.

KEEP A JOURNAL
Write down everything that’s on your mind. Thoughts, worries, problems, to-do lists. This can reduce night-time anxiety and could help you fall asleep faster.

HIDE YOUR CLOCK
Listening to a ticking clock or constantly checking your phone to see how many hours you have left before you need to wake up causes unnecessary anxiety.

VISUALISE BLOWING BUBBLES
Think of a situation that took your energy and left you feeling drained and tired or made you feel upset and uneasy. Visualise blowing a bubble and imagine putting that situation in the centre and letting it go. Keep doing this until you get your energy back, feel better or lighter. It’s a great way of clearing your mind.

USE YOUR BEDROOM FOR SLEEPING ONLY
Ban TV, phones and tablets from the bedroom. It has been proven that exposure to bright white and blue lights at night prevent our brains from releasing melatonin – the key hormone that tells our bodies that it’s time to sleep.

MEDITATE OR COUNT
Meditation allows us to centre ourselves and relax the body – studies have shown it decreases stress and lowers our heart rate. For beginners who are struggling to fall asleep try counting backwards from 100. If you lose track, restart and focus on the present.

AVOID  DAYTIME NAPS
Although many say that having a 20-minute snooze in the afternoon improves alertness, performance and mood in general, napping for longer has been proven to disrupt sleep. If your energy is flagging meditate instead.

ESTABLISH A WIND-DOWN ROUTINE
According to experts at Harvard Medical School a calming bedtime routine is essential for getting a good night’s sleep. It keeps your internal clock in check, which helps you fall asleep and wake up effortlessly.  Every parent understands the importance of preparing a child for bed so treat yourself with the same respect.

OPEN A WINDOW
Our body temperature drops as we fall asleep so having a cooler room to start with may help decrease the amount of time it takes to nod off.

Do you struggle to sleep or have you found a method that works for you? I’ve love to hear from you in the comments below.

Click here to see the full article! 

The post Relax Ya Self To Health: STRUGGLING TO SLEEP? 8 tips that may help! appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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Saying No:

Neil Shah, founder of non-profit organisation The Stress Management Society and author of The 10-Step Stress Solution, says: “Our ‘always on’ culture means that people are under more pressure than ever.
“You only have 24 hours in a day, so use them wisely.

“Sometimes saying yes is not the healthiest answer as it can leave you under too much stress.

“Saying no doesn’t mean you are being selfish, it simply means you are honouring your existing commitments.”

Read the full article here!  

The post The Sun: Experts reveal how to beat the January blues on ‘most depressing day of the year’ appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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Waiting around for your other half causes 30 arguments annually, a survey has found.

Millions admitted to regularly falling out with their partner because a lack of organisation and leaving things to the last minute means they are often left hanging around for their other half.

Millions admitted to regularly falling out with their partner because a lack of organisation and leaving things to the last minute means they are often left hanging around for their other half.

“However, while women seem to face a last-minute rush for everyday events, for holidays they are far more organised, leaving them worry-free and ready to start their holiday as soon as possible.”

The poll of 2,000 adults found 65 per cent of women claim to be super-organised and always ready for things ahead of time, compared to just 55 per cent of men.

But the results show women are more likely to be late for important everyday events with one in four admitted they have been tardy when meeting friends, compared to just 16 per cent of men.

And more than one in five women admit to often turning up late to work while just 13 per cent of men say the same.

Women are also more likely to be behind schedule when it comes to arriving at birthday parties, getting a train, a doctors or dentist appointment and weddings.

However, the poll carried out by OnePoll.com, found that when it comes to holidays, the average woman starts packing four days before they leave, with more than one in ten allowing a full week to get organised.

Men don’t start packing until three days before they go, with more than half admitting they often leave it until a day or so before, or even on the day, they depart.

And when it comes to getting to the airport, eight in 10 women worry about making sure they leave enough time to get there, while less than two thirds of men say the same.

But 47 per cent of women start to worry if they are running slightly late before a flight – something which bothers just 35 per cent of men.

Neil Shah from The Stress Management Society added: “When it comes to holiday preparation, one of the most important things is to be organised.

Start by checking in online to save yourself time at the airport. You can even send your boarding passes to your smart device!

If you need to take a moment to remove yourself and take a few deep breaths or write a list of things you still have to do, it will help realign your focus and enable you to think more carefully.”

If it all gets a little too much to handle why not take a moment out with RESCUE REMEDY.

RESCUE REMEDY is specially blended from five Bach™ Original Flower Essences, the flower essences are Star of Bethlehem, Clematis, Impatiens, Rock Rose and Cherry Plum. Get the most from your busy day, or from packing with RESCUE REMEDY by your side. It can be used anytime, anywhere and is suitable for all the family.

Click here to see article!

The post The Sun: Waiting for a row – Missed appointments and poor organisation cause millions of arguments a year appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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A poll of 2,000 adults revealed the age-old stereotype of men leaving things to the last minute is true, with guys admitting to starting their holiday preparation as late as possible.

It’s official – men have a last-minute rush before a holiday while women are more organised, a survey has found.

A poll of 2,000 adults revealed the age-old stereotype of men leaving things to the last minute is true, with guys admitting to starting their holiday preparation as late as possible.

The average woman starts their packing for a break four days before they leave, with more than one in ten allowing a full week to get organised.

But men don’t start packing until three days before they go, with more than half admitting they often leave it until a day or so before, or even on the day, they depart.

The poll by Rescue Remedy also revealed women allow more time to travel to the airport and check in earlier than men.

Despite this, it also emerged being organised doesn’t necessarily result in a more relaxed build-up to a holiday with women most likely to feel concerned before a trip away.

A spokesman for Rescue Remedy, said: “It’s a common belief that men leave things until the last minute but it seems that really is the case.

“Being organised is often key when it comes to holidays – making sure you have packed everything you need and getting to the airport in plenty of time to make your flight.

“But the results show that despite being more organised, women are generally the ones who feel most worried about their holiday – so perhaps men have it right after all.”

The poll found 65 per cent of women claim to be super-organised and always ready for things ahead of time, compared to just 55 per cent of men.

Instead, three in ten guys admit they don’t really prepare for things too far in advance and just tend to leave it until the last minute.

But the last-minute rush when packing for a holiday has led to three quarters of men forgetting something important.

And more than half of men find the packing process stressful compared to just 31 per cent of women.

When it comes to getting to the airport, eight in ten women worry about making sure they leave enough time to get there, while less than two thirds of men say the same.

And 47 per cent of women start to worry if they are running slightly late before a flight – something which bothers just 35 per cent of men.

But even if they get there with plenty of time to spare, three quarters of women still feel worried and disorganised about everything going to plan compared to just 35 per cent of blokes.

It’s not just holidays where women are more organised though, with the average man getting ready for a night out just 44 minutes before they are due to leave, while women allow more than an hour.

And while women start their Christmas shopping 38 days before the 25th December, men wait until just 29 days before the big day, with one in ten admitting they don’t start until a week or less beforehand.

Neil Shah from The Stress Management Society added: “When it comes to holiday preparation, one of the most important things is to be organised.

“Start by checking in online to save yourself time at the airport. You can even send your boarding passes to your smart device!

“If you need to take a moment to remove yourself and take a few deep breaths or write a list of things you still have to do, it will help realign your focus and enable you to think more carefully.”

If it all gets a little too much to handle why not take a moment out with RESCUE REMEDY. RESCUE REMEDY is specially blended from five Bach™ Original Flower Essences, the flower essences are Star of Bethlehem, Clematis, Impatiens, Rock Rose and Cherry Plum.

Get the most from your busy day, or from packing with RESCUE REMEDY by your side. It can be used anytime, anywhere and is suitable for all the family.

Click here to see the article!

The post Mirror: It’s official! Men really do leave everything until the last minute while women are organised appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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Women2day this week looks at how stress is different for males and females.

You might not have realised it, but April is Stress Awareness Month.

Every April since 1992, health care professionals join forces to try and increase public awareness about the causes and cures of stress.

I don’t think I know anyone who hasn’t been affected by stress at some point in their life. There are so many reasons why we can feel stressed -whether it be with our jobs, our relationships or our friendships. It happens to all of us, and while sometimes it can serve as a motivating factor – the usual ramifications of stress are negative and destructive, in some cases even leading to depression and anxiety.

But is there a difference between how men deal with stress compared to how women do?

The answer to that is yes. Studies have shown that women differ from men in how they emotionally respond to stress – women are much more likely to report a rise in their stress levels than men are.

And The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) says women are actually twice as likely than men to suffer from depression and anxiety disorders.

I came across an interesting article in Misc magazine when I began looking into this topic. It said that one of the reasons for this is because in their lifetimes, women are more likely to experience traumatic events, such as abuse or harassment, for no other reason than their gender.

Furthermore, women are said to be more likely to make less money than men, be sexually harassed at work, live in poverty, perform child rearing responsibilities while holding down a full-time job, and simultaneously manage the care of both their children and elderly parents.

These pressures undeniably contribute to stress and depression in women, particularly for those who live in cultures with an extreme gender divide. This is not to say that men do not experience traumatic events that trigger high levels of stress and depression as well, the article was careful to point out, but socio-cultural pressures on women apparently tend impact more on their psyches.

A psychological study in 2000 found that women were more likely to deal with stress by nurturing their loved ones and developing social networks of people to help them through their difficult periods, whereas researchers found that men leaned towards the ‘fight or flight’ response when it comes to stress – either bottling it up and escaping, or fighting back.

Neil Shah, director of the Stress Management Society said: “Absolutely men and women deal with stress differently. They have very different mental, physical and emotional perspectives.”

“The truth is men and women’s brains were designed slightly differently. If you go back 200,000 years when men were hunter gathers they had to focus on survival whereas women, according to research, were better at multitasking, looking after children in the caves and watching for dangers.”

And according to Neil, this is how men deal with stress nowadays. “Even though men and women are very different to 200,000 years ago, under the bonnet there’s the same engine that’s running,” he explains.

“A man is more likely to deal with stress head on, to do something about it or, alternatively, ignore it. If a man had a stressful day he can talk about footy with his mates and turn off completely.”

“Women would still be thinking about an issue and the stress would continue to impact on them. They are more likely to want to explore the issue and talk about it with a friend.”

Click here to see the article!

The post The Chester Chronicle: Stress and the gender divide appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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On Wednesday 1st February, The Stress Management Society and RESCUE celebrate their second annual Wellbeing Wednesday to encourage everyone to bring a moment of calm into their increasingly challenging lives.

International Wellbeing Wednesday on 1st February 2017 - YouTube

On Wednesday 1st February, The Stress Management Society and RESCUE celebrate their second annual Wellbeing Wednesday to encourage everyone to bring a moment of calm into their increasingly challenging lives.

Wellbeing is expressed as the state of being comfortable, healthy and happy and this year the focus is on the Ultimate Wellbeing Environment – how taking control of our surroundings can positively affect our mood, health and productivity.

Neil Shah, Founder of The Stress Management Society and Author of The 10-­Step Stress Solution, has put together some helpful tips to help you enhance your environment:

1. Incorporate physical activity into your day

It’s not rocket science to know why physical activity is important to your wellbeing. It helps boost your energy, health and positivity, so find a way to add a little exercise here and there, whether that is to walk your dog, join a yoga class or get off the bus a stop earlier.

International Wellbeing Wednesday Tip 1 | Get Moving - YouTube

2. Fresh air

We all need a bit of fresh air now and then, but very often this gets forgotten. Take a moment outside, or on your doorstep and breath. It will feel very refreshing, and leave you feeling energised and focused – an instant mood booster.

3. Use background music to up your mood

We have all experienced the way in which a good song can raise our spirits, and studies have found that the improved mood and overall wellbeing created by listening to music results in increased productivity – so we feel happier and get more done!

4. Healthy eating and drinking

Take a step forward to making smarter food decisions. In order to start feeling good, you need to start from within. Cut out the caffeine and refined sugars and opt for the healthier alternatives – complex carbs, fruit and vegetables.

International Wellbeing Wednesday Tip Two | Making Mindful Choices - YouTube

5. Find a furry friend – “pets are good for us”

Pets have been found to reduce heart rate and lower blood pressure by creating a less hostile and more relaxed environment. In addition, pets can act as a social catalyst – encouraging you to get social. If you don’t want the responsibility of owning a pet yourself the addition of a birdfeeder on your windowsill can encourage feathered friends to lighten your day.

6. Let in the light

The wrong kind of lighting can leave you feeling out of sorts, whereas light from a natural source is the best for your overall feeling of wellbeing.  Increasing the light in your space encourages both mental and physical benefits, cueing the appropriate reactive responses in our moods, productivity and body patterns. You might find SAD lamps an effective alternative too, especially as the seasons change.

7. Find some quiet space

Meditation is known to increase both mental and physical health. We can use mindfulness to tap into an inner stability and resilience during stressful moments; it encourages better personal and business relationships, and allows people to be more creative, focused and productive. Physically moving to a quieter space can help you to achieve this state, stepping into a stairwell, car park, garden or even just a different room can help.

International Wellbeing Wednesday Tip Three | Find a Quiet Space - YouTube

8. Bring the outside in

Not only can indoor plants brighten up your space and be pleasant to the eye, they are also beneficial to our health. A study found that plants can:

Reduce tension/anxiety by 37%

Reduce depression/dejection by 58%

Reduce anger/hostility by 44%

Reduce fatigue by 38%

9. Keep your surroundings tidy and fuss free

Lots of items around you, paper on your desk, clutter and a full inbox are all things that compete for your attention. A tidy environment means a tidy mind.

International Wellbeing Wednesday Tip Four | Declutter - YouTube

10. Feng Shui your health

A few simple adjustments to the layout of your room or office can maximise positive energy and improve how you feel about the space – good quality air, sufficient natural light and a clutter-free space all help.

International Wellbeing Wednesday Tip Five | Get a Goodnight's Sleep - YouTube

For more tips about how to implement these principles in your daily lives, follow us on Twitter #wellbeingwednesday, check out our Facebook page or find more information on our website: Stress.org.uk

You can find out more information below: Click here to read more about Our Ultimate Wellbeing Environment “The Lighthouse” Click here to read more about how to “Bring The Outside In” Click here to read more about starting a “Healthy LifestyleClick here to read about the relationship between Music and Wellbeing Click here to see how to Declutter towards a Positive Wellbeing Check out our “Change your environment, Change your state” Infographic

Click here

The post [Press Release] International Wellbeing Wednesday appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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There is a lot you can do to reduce the pressure of your job, finds Aimme Stanton.

In 2014/2015, 440,000 people in the UK reported work-related stress at a level they believed was making them ill.

French workers have officially been given the ‘right to disconnect’. As of midnight on 01 January 2017 a new employment law was passed in France to give workers the right to ignore their emails outside of working hours.

Not logging off after work is effectively unpaid overtime and a factor that’s actually causing burnout and unneeded stress to millions of lives. But it’s not just the French that suffer, Brits do too. Over the years 2014/2015, 440,000 people in the UK reported work-related stress at a level they believed was making them ill according to the Health and Safety Executive. The number equates to 40 per cent of all work related illnesses. Employers are accountable for the health, safety and welfare of staff under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

“It may seem like a huge problem if you or people you work with are stressed however in reality there is a lot you can do to help reduce the problem,” says Neil Shah, Chief De-stressing Officer at The Stress Management Society. Here Neil gives his top five tips for minimising stress at work.

MAKE A LIST

Make a list of the things you need to do each day and prioritise them in order of urgency
and importance.

Do Now – these are both urgent and important
Plan To Do – these are important but not urgent
Reject Diplomatically – these might be urgent but are not important
Resist and Cease – these are both non-urgent and non-important

LEARN TO SAY ‘NO’

“You only have 24 hours in a day, so use them wisely. This is simple but effective. Turn down things that you don’t have the time for or can’t justify doing.”

GO STEP BY STEP

Break large projects into small stages and take it one simple step at a time. This is a great way to start those huge projects that you keep putting off.

COMMUNICATE

If you start to feel stressed on an existing job, tackle it early in a very matter of fact way. Say to the relevant person, “Given the work that’s needed, I need another week” rather than rush in with a frantic “I can’t cope!”

CREATE A GOOD WORK/LIFE BALANCE

All work and no play is a
recipe for stress. So make sure you have a mixture of work and home activities in every week. Start those huge projects that you keep putting off.

The post Edinburgh Evening News: Five ways to beat stress at work appeared first on The Stress Management Society.

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