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Let’s finish this series by going through all the types of desires we’ve discussed, making certain that they don’t get confusing.

I want to present them in the logical sequence you might reveal them in your stories, giving you suggestions for how to employ them and where they overlap.

I’m using writer/director Edgar Wright’s screenplay for BABY DRIVER, one of my very favorite films from last year, as my example in this final article in the series. BABY DRIVER wasn’t as widely seen as my previous examples in this series, but I’m hoping this article will encourage you to watch it. It’s fun, exciting, suspenseful, romantic, and has some of the best integration of music and action I’ve ever seen. My comments about how it illustrates the various forms of desire will be in boxes like this throughout.

THE ULTIMATE OUTCOME

What is your hero’s BIG WANT? What is the overarching goal that she wants someday, that will determine the individual goals that are steppingstones to that final state of success and happiness? What are the Ultimate Outcomes your hero is striving for (or plans to strive for) when we first meet her?

Eventually, your hero will begin pursuing a specific, visible Outer Motivation that will determine the climax of your story. But that visible desire is one the hero hopes will move her closer to that ultimate outcome.

I mention the Ultimate Outcome first because your hero usually carries this big desire into the story from the beginning. It’s probably existed since before your story begins.

Baby (Ansel Elgort) is a getaway driver and part of a gang of thieves working for their boss Doc (Kevin Spacey). He’s paying off a debt to Doc, but he dreams of someday being able to live free of that obligation, no longer a criminal, and able to provide a better life for Joseph (C.J. Jones), a paraplegic who is something of a father figure to Baby. This is his ultimate outcome.

Often, storytellers I work with mistakenly identify this desire as their hero’s defining outer motivation. But it can’t be, because it’s too broad, too vague, or too far into the future.

Your audiences can understand a character wanting to reach a life goal. But it’s hard to formulate sharp, vivid images of wealth, power, happy families, legacies, or a better world for all mankind.

These larger goals can motivate your hero toward their actions in your story. But it’s possible your hero is simply paying lip service to them rather than taking any real action to achieve them. If so they also fall into the category of…

LONGINGS AND NEEDS

In the setup of your story, when you first introduce your hero, give us a sense of what’s missing from his life – what needs to change for him to lead a fulfilled life.

If your hero longs for something, give him dialogue that announces that, or have another character say something that alludes to it. Then show us how the hero is avoiding pursuing this desire, or how his plan for obtaining it is a conscious or subconscious, misguided attempt.

Perhaps he is wishing or hoping for it, or insisting he’ll dive in and get busy just as soon as something else in his life is fully resolved.

Or perhaps he claims – or actually believes – that his life is just fine, or at least as good as he’ll ever be able to make it. Instead of declaring a longing, he hides an unacknowledged need. “Things are fine,” or, “This is about as much as I can hope for,” are statements indicating that your hero’s need has been completely ignored or suppressed.

Baby tries to convince Joseph that things are fine, that he will soon step away from his criminal activities, and that there is no threat from Doc, Doc’s gang, or the law. But these empty promises are simply longings. He can’t really promise any of these things, because until he stands up to Doc and takes responsibility for his past actions, he’ll never have the life he says he wants.

SAMENESS

Revealing your hero’s longing or need allows you to explore her inner journey – her transformation from living in fear to living courageously. These missing pieces in her life are the first sign that what she deeply wants or needs is overpowered by her desire for sameness.

Because of some wound in the past – some traumatic event, some painful situation, or some belief instilled by parents or groups or society in general – your hero has created a protective identity to avoid the pain she is certain will befall her if she risks letting her guard down. This emotional armor is her comfort zone – the boundary she can’t allow herself to cross.

Sadly, a life of real fulfillment, connection and individuation lies on the other side of that wall – out of reach as long as your hero is controlled by her fear. Her desire to keep things the same as they are – even if they’ve been intolerable – keeps her safe, but stuck.

No matter how much Baby claims he wants his life to change, a part of him is afraid to leave his identity as a thief and getaway driver behind. He sounds sincere enough, and he tells himself escape is his desire, what he won’t or can’t admit is that he feels secure staying on Doc’s good side, he gets off on the danger and excitement of racing away from the cops, and he’s afraid of the consequences of admitting his illegal actions. The headset he wears to drown out his tinnitus also allows him (at least subconsciously) to escape from the real world reality of what he’s doing.

A character like this will never be truly happy – at least not until she starts pursuing her outer motivation. When she does that, she’ll begin a journey that will force her to let go of her protective identity and find her courage.

THE PRELIMINARY GOAL

Once you’ve introduced your hero and established his longing or need, introduce some opportunity or crisis into his life. He will have to respond, giving him a Preliminary Goal – a desire to figure out, “What should I do about this?” and then act on that desire.

Your hero must decide what this event means, what problem it creates, what solutions are open to him, what will the consequences of any new action might be, and who might help him out of this new situation.

Two events occur after the setup of our hero: Baby meets Debora (Lily James), a waitress in a diner, and Doc announces his plans for the gang to rob an armored car. This creates two preliminary goals for Baby – to plan for the robbery – and figure out what to do when it goes sideways – and to get to know Debra better. This is his period of entering and exploring these new “worlds” his entered, and deciding how to react to these new situations.

The pursuit of this preliminary goal may take your hero down some wrong paths, and will likely lead him to an ally who will help him define the right goal, formulate his plan, and eventually guide him to victory. (In creating a case study/success story for business, this guide should be you, your service or your product.)

This preliminary goal will result in your hero defining and declaring his…

OUTER MOTIVATION

This is the clearly defined outcome your hero wants to achieve, the desire that your readers and viewers are rooting for your hero to accomplish. And your hero wants to achieve this goal because he believes it will satisfy his…

While we’ve already seen Baby involved in two different robberies, his outer motivations are established when he is forced by Doc to do one last big job – provide getaway for another bank robbery – and when he starts to date Debora. His specific, visible goals are now to get away with the bank robbery, and to win the love of (be in a permanent, committed relationship with) Debora. [It is not uncommon for a love story to contain two outer motivations for the hero: the visible goal (usually work related) that defines the hook of the story, and the visible goal of winning the love of the romance character. When this happens, these two goals must always be in conflict with each other. For Baby, this dilemma occurs when Doc and other members of the gang threaten to kill Debora if Baby doesn’t cooperate.]

INNER MOTIVATION

This is the invisible desire for self worth that your hero thinks will be his if he can achieve that visible goal he’s striving for.

If he believes winning this battle or stopping this threat or marrying the woman of his dreams will lead to a sense of acceptance or belonging or love or retribution or success or power, then one of those constitutes his inner motivation.

Baby’s inner motivation for completing the bank robbery (his path to self worth) is that he believes it will bring him the freedom and escape from his life of crime he dreams of. His inner motivation for pursuing Debora is simply love – also a path to self worth.

When your hero takes his first step toward achieving his outer motivation, his preliminary goal is in the past, and now he is on the singular path to achieving what he wants. Now you must force your hero to face and overcome the obstacles in his way – both external conflicts that come from enemies and forces of nature, and the inner conflict that grows out of his dueling desires for achievement and sameness.

And when he wins – when all of these desires have been resolved — his journey, and that of your readers and viewers and listeners, is over.

[Click below to read the previous articles in this series.]

WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #1: The Outer Motivation
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #2: Inner Motivations
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT #3: Longings & Needs
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #4: Preliminary Goals and Ultimate Objectives
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #5: Sameness

The post WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #6: Revealing Your Hero’s Desires appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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In this series of articles exploring the various goals your hero will pursue, all the desires have had one thing in common: they all serve to move your hero closer to her ultimate objective. Your hero imagines her life changing for the better when she finally gets what she wants.

But the desire I want to discuss now has the opposite effect: it prevents your hero from moving forward or achieving what they want and need.

This is the hero’s desire for things to stay the same.

No matter how bad our circumstances might be, one thing we know for sure: we can survive them. We’ve managed to get by for this long, so wherever we are, we feel emotionally safe. We may be unfulfilled, we may even feel some kind of pain, but we’re able to tolerate it. We’re in our comfort zones.

But our desire for sameness – for feeling safe and protected – can also keep us stuck. We end up tolerating situations that aren’t bringing us the happiness or fulfillment we need and deserve.

Change would mean taking a terrifying risk. We’d have to leave what’s familiar and step into the unknown. We’d have to go against everything we believe about who we are and who we are supposed to be.

Change would mean stripping away the emotional armor we’ve created and exposing our hidden fears and desires and vulnerability. And that can be more than we’ll even consider.

That’s why, given a choice between happy and safe, we’ll almost always pick safe.

It’s the same with the hero of your story. She might be getting along just fine, content and satisfied with the way things are. Or she might be in an awful situation – a boring or painful job, or relationship, or environment. But she’s doing nothing to improve her situation, or escape from it, because the thought of change is too terrifying.

For your hero, this desire to maintain the familiar status quo is at the heart of her inner conflict. And this tug-of-war between who she’s always been and who she might become – between her fear and her courage – can elicit a powerful emotional response from your readers and audiences.

In La La Land, both heroes begin the movie trapped in their desire for sameness. Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) longs for his own jazz club, but is uncompromising about the location, fanatical about the purity of jazz, and selling out on a nightly basis by playing music he disdains.

And though Mia (Emma Stone) seems more active and determined, her efforts are really just an ever-repeating cycle of failure and rejection. She keeps grinding away at hopeless auditions while waiting tables tables at a studio diner that is seemingly inches from the stardom and success she dreams of.

Neither of them would admit, even to themselves (especially to themselves), that a part of them is content not taking the real risks achieving their dreams would entail. But we can see how stuck they really are.

It’s only when they meet each other, and Sebastian gets fired, and Mia starts writing her one woman show, that they step out of their protective identities and really go after what they want.

And of course, that’s when they fall in love.

We all struggle with our own fears and longings. So when you reveal your hero’s own inner conflict, we will identify with that character at the deepest possible level.

And when you tell a story about a hero who is able to overcome this fear, and when you reveal how they were able to find that courage, that’s when you will truly inspire your audiences, and move them to action.

In the final article of this series, I’ll show you how to present all these desires in your story.

[Click below to read the previous articles in this series.]

WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #1: The Outer Motivation
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #2: Inner Motivations
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT #3: Longings & Needs
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #4: Preliminary Goals and Ultimate Objectives

The post WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #5: Sameness appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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Defining your hero’s Outer Motivation can sometimes seem confusing because it can easily be mistaken for two of your hero’s other desires: his Preliminary Goal and his Ultimate Objective.

The key to understanding these distinctions is to ask two defining questions:

1) “When in my story will these desires be resolved?”

2) “Do any of these desires establish a specific, visible finish line?”

The Preliminary Goal always occurs early in the story, before your hero begins taking action toward his outer motivation. After you’ve introduced your hero in the Setup of your story, you will present him with a specific opportunity or crisis – an unexpected event that will force him to respond.

Depending on the kind of story you’re telling, this might be the loss of a job or a loved one, learning about some competition with a big prize, the discovery of a dead body or an alien space ship, or meeting the person of his dreams.

Immediately your hero wants to do something about this event. And this preliminary goal will always involve your hero asking himself, “Now what will I do? What is this new situation I’ve entered? What are the rules? What is expected of me? What do I want? And who will help me?”

In A Star Is Born, Jack’s opportunity appears when he first hears Ally (Lady Gaga) sing. But he doesn’t immediately walk up to her and say, “I want to make you a star and win your love.” His preliminary goal is to figure out, “Who is this woman? What is she like? Why is she singing in this club? What are her dreams? And should I pursue her – either professionally or romantically?”

For the hero of your story, figuring out how to react to the opportunity and solve his problem has no clear endpoint. We can’t envision what it will look like because we don’t know what the answers to his questions will be. But in discovering the answers, your hero will determine his specific goal – his Outer Motivation. And as soon as he begins taking action to achieve that desire, the preliminary goal is resolved.

The Ultimate Objective is trickier. It’s the final destination your hero wants to reach. But it is usually broad and generalized: he wants to be wealthy; he wants to rise to the top of his profession; he wants to make the world safe; he wants to find true love.

In Game Night, Max (Jason Bateman) wants to outshine his much more successful brother. But that eventual goal doesn’t have the clear finish line that his outer motivation (to rescue his brother from the people who want to kill him) does.

And in the original Star Wars*, Luke’s ultimate objective is to become a Jedi knight and help defeat the Empire. But his outer motivation is to learn the force and ultimately destroy the death star.

In a business or marketing story, a preliminary goal might be for your hero to find someone to help him keep his company from going bankrupt.

His ultimate objective could be to someday make enough money to buy a vacation home.

Those two desires would lead to his outer motivation/visible goal for your story: to increase his total revenue to $50,000 in three months.

Whether you’re writing a movie, novel, speech or blog, your hero’s long-term desire might be identical to the longing he revealed in the setup of your story.

But once your hero starts pursuing his outer motivation, that desire is no longer just a hope or a dream, because now he’s taking action to achieve it. And his Outer Motivation will be a step toward achieving that long term, Ultimate Objective.

In the next installment of this series I’ll examine one additional goal: the Desire for Sameness.

[Click below to read the previous articles in this series.]

WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #1: The Outer Motivation
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #2: Inner Motivations
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT #3: Longings & Needs

* I know, it’s properly referred to as Star Wars Part IV: A New Hope. But I was lucky enough to see it before it opened, and it’ll always just be Star Wars to me.

The post WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #4: Preliminary Goals and Ultimate Objectives appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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What does the hero of your story want?

Lots of things. And that’s the problem. Sifting through all those desires to pinpoint the ones that drive your story can be confusing and overwhelming. So in this series of articles I’m breaking down a hero’s primary goals to help you identify the ones that are essential, and how to manage them all while keeping your story simple and powerful.

#3: Longings & Needs

The Outer Motivation answers the question, “What is my hero’s visible goal?”

To discover your hero’s Inner Motivation ask, “Why does my hero want this?”

But when we first meet your hero in the opening setup of your story, before she begins pursing her outer or inner motivations, she may be expressing another desire: her Longing.

How many times do we say we’d give anything just to be rich or successful, or to follow our calling to be a writer or speaker or artist, or to find true love and happiness? But we don’t do everything we’d have to in order to achieve that dream, because we lack the one thing we need most: courage.

Your hero may have longed for some desire for a long time. Or rather she’s said that’s what she wants. The problem is, she’s just not doing anything to achieve it – or at least not anything that will ever lead her to what she longs for. Because risking what it would take to pursue this desire fully is just too scary.

So she’s relegated what she longs for to the realm of wishes, hopes and dreams.

Longings are the desires we’ll declare (at least to ourselves) whenever we throw coins in a fountain, tug on a wishbone or blow out candles. Whenever we say things like, “Here’s hoping!” or, “I just hope someday I can meet the right person,” we’re expressing a longing.

But if you think about the word hope, you realize there’s a sense of helplessness to it. All the power lies with some unseen force that might bless us or grant us our wishes if we’re just deserving enough or lucky enough. We make half-hearted efforts to achieve these desires, because we regard them as fantasies. Deep down we regard these desires as kind of silly – simply “more than we can hope for.”

Dreams are different than mere hopes (or we tell ourselves they are). We don’t just leave our dreams to chance and good fortune. We are definitely going after these desires…

… SOMEDAY.

We just have to wait until we have enough time or money or experience to dive in and really do it. As soon as the credit cards are paid off or the kids are grown or we’ve experienced enough books and seminars and webinars that we can be certain we won’t fail, then watch out – here we come!

It might be the same with your hero. He’ll settle for somedays that never come. But he’ll keep dreaming about what he longs for just the same.

Longing is my term for any of these wishes, hopes and dreams that characters only pay lip service to, because they’re too afraid to go after them. Their fears of failure or success, or of leaving their comfort zones, or of abandoning their protective identities, keep them stuck in a place of inertia, feeling safe but unfulfilled.

But what about the multitude of stories where the heroes don’t seem to want anything when we first meet them? They’re satisfied with their lives, thank you very much, and are just fine with the way things are.

They long for nothing.

If you look closely at these heroes, you can usually see that they’re stuck in some way, tolerating situations that keep them from realizing their potential. Something is missing from their lives, and even though they’re skating by, they’re holding themselves back from a fulfilled existence.

I describe these characters as having a need. They long for nothing, because they are too afraid to even admit they’re mired in their comfort zones.

If your hero has a need, she may be completely oblivious to how limiting her existence is – her ability to suppress her fear of change is that powerful.

Consider the two heroes of the latest incarnation of A Star Is Born. 

In the screenplay by Eric Roth and Bradley Cooper & Will Fetters, Ally (Lady Gaga) longs to be a successful singer and songwriter. She’s dreamed of this since she was a little girl. But she exhibits her astonishing talent only when she performs in a small, hidden away drag queen bar. And she won’t sing her own songs anywhere. So her deep desire to be a star is relegated to the category of longing.

Jack (Bradley Cooper), on the other hand, longs for nothing. He acts as if his deepest desires for artistry are all behind him. But when we see the pained, addicted man this brilliant singer and songwriter has become, we recognize his desperate need for love, connection and forgiveness.

Revealing and exploring your heroes’ longings and suppressed needs will strengthen your stories’ impact on your readers and audiences. Because we can all relate to characters that want their lives to be better, but who delay going after what they really want because they’re afraid.

And when you take these heroes on journeys where they find the courage to fulfill their needs and longings, your followers will get a taste of their own hidden courage as well.

In the next chapter of this series I’ll discuss two desires your hero wants that he won’t avoid: his Preliminary Goal and his Ultimate Objective.

[Click below to read the previous articles in this series.]

WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #1: The Outer Motivation
WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #2: Inner Motivations

The post WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #3: Longings & Needs appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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What does the hero of your story want?
Lots of things. And that’s the problem. Sifting through all those desires to pinpoint the ones that drive your story can be confusing and overwhelming. So in this series of articles I’m breaking down a hero’s primary goals to help you identify the ones that are essential, and how to manage them all while keeping your story simple and powerful.

#2: Inner Motivations

As I discussed last time, the Outer Motivation is a character’s specific, visible goal. When we read or hear what it is, we can picture what achieving it would look like. And our image of that moment of victory will be pretty close to anyone else’s.

This is the finish line the hero wants to accomplish by the end of the story. It defines the story in terms of plot, and it’s what your readers or audiences are invested in emotionally.

Once you’ve identified your hero’s outer motivation, then you want to ask why? Why is this external desire so important? What deeper desire does your hero believe achieving this visible goal will fulfill? Acceptance? Belonging? Success? Love? Revenge? Fulfillment?

In other words, what is your hero’s Inner Motivation?

I use the term inner motivation because these desires are invisible – they are states of mind characters want to experience. While visible goals are vivid and specific, inner motivations are more general and universal.

In A Quiet Place, Lee Abbott (John Krasinski)’s outer motivation is to stop the aliens from killing his family. But beyond his own survival instinct, his inner motivation is to be a good husband and father. He believes his path to self worth is to do whatever he can to protect and provide for those he loves so deeply.

So why does this matter to you as the storyteller?

Because you want audiences and readers to identify with your hero’s desire; you want them to connect with your hero by recognizing a deeper longing that they have also experienced. We may not have battled aliens, but the desire of a parent to give everything for their children resonates deeply across all cultures.

Such a powerful inner motivation will give more depth and meaning to your hero’s arc. Only if we know what drives your hero can we understand and be touched by their courage, determination and growth.

Your hero’s inner motivation isn’t always the right path to fulfillment. It’s possible that your hero will discover that his inner desires have taken him in the wrong direction.

Perhaps what your hero needs to learn – and the deeper message of your story – is that revenge, status, sex, riches or power over others aren’t the best ways to achieve real happiness and fulfillment.

If you’re looking for an emotionally impactful autobiographical story to deliver on the stage or the page, consider relating a misguided inner motivation from your own past. Perhaps you were consumed by your desire for money and success above everything else. Then, when you found yourself lonely, ill from stress, regretful or unfulfilled, you saw the price you had paid for these empty pursuits. This realization, and your resulting transformation, can move your followers toward a better inner motivation than yours had been.

Even righteous heroes striving for wealth or justice, or who want to change the world, might discover that wanting those things is fine, but the unexpected outcomes of the courage they find are connection, love and fulfillment.

In Part 3 of this series I’ll explore the desires that frighten your hero: Longings and Needs. 

[Click here to read the first article in this series WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT #1: The Outer Motivation]

The post WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #2: Inner Motivations appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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What does the hero of your story want?
Lots of things. And that’s the problem. Sifting through all those desires to pinpoint the ones that drive your story can be confusing and overwhelming. So in six sequential articles, I’m going to break down a hero’s primary goals to help you identify the ones that are essential, and how to manage them all while keeping your story simple and powerful.

#1: The Outer Motivation

I’m beginning with the Outer Motivation, not because it appears first, but because it is essential.

This is the hero’s goal that will define your story, determine its structure, and keep your audiences (or readers, viewers and prospects) engaged and invested in your hero’s success.

I use the term Outer Motivation because this desire is outwardly visible. But don’t worry about the jargon. Just think of it as the finish line your hero is desperate to cross.

The outer motivation is not a feeling (happiness), or an abstract concept (success), or some ongoing condition (health). It’s a specific goal that your audiences can envision as soon as they read or hear what it is. And that image is pretty much the same for everyone you’re addressing.

Common visible goals in stories are winning a competition (The Karate Kid), winning the love of another character (Titanic), stopping some threat (Black Panther), escaping from a bad situation (Get Out), rescuing a person or a group in danger (Taken), and retrieving something of value (Raiders of the Lost Ark).

If you’re a consultant, entrepreneur or public speaker, your story might be about how you won a major client using your marketing process; how your financial advice helped a client stop the foreclosure of her house; what life lesson you learned when you escaped from an avalanche; or how you got back (retrieved) a major client you had lost.

In my 35+ years of consulting with professional storytellers and business leaders, the two biggest problems I encounter are 1) their stories are way too complicated; and 2) there is no clear outer motivation for the heroes of their stories.

Almost any other weakness in your own stories can be traced back to one of those two issues. But once you have clearly defined your hero’s outer motivation and clarified that visible goal, everything else in your story can fall into place.

Part 2 of this series will reveal a second form of desire: your hero’s Inner Motivation.

FUTURE ARTICLES
#2: Inner Motivations
#3: Longings & Needs
#4: Preliminary Goals and Ultimate Objectives
#5: The Desire for Sameness
#6: Revealing Your Hero’s Desires

The post WHAT DOES YOUR HERO WANT? #1: The Outer Motivation appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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When your goal is to deliver a written or spoken story that elicits emotion (as it ALWAYS must be), your story has to include 3 essential elements: character, desire and conflict. You must introduce us to an empathetic character who desperately wants some compelling goal, and who must overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles to achieve it.

But to touch your readers and audiences deeply, a fourth element is just as crucial: transformation.

Something must change in the course of your story. Life must be different in some way as a result of your hero taking this journey and achieving (or failing to achieve) his or her goal.

This transformation will occur on four different levels. The first three are:

  1. Your hero’s external circumstances will change. She (or he) might be wealthier, more powerful, more successful, more admired; she’s is in a new relationship; she is no longer threatened by the villain or demon or disease she overcame; or (if she was unsuccessful) she might be alone, or disgraced, or deceased.
  2. Your hero has changed internally. The arc of her inner journey might have made her more courageous, more loving, more moral, or (whether she succeeded or failed) wiser.
  3. The world around your hero has changed. Her courage and sacrifice has made those around her safer, happier, wiser, more loving or more courageous themselves.

In last year’s Oscar® winning film The Shape of Water, the hero Elisa desperately wants to rescue – and ultimately be with – the amphibious creature with whom she is falling in love, in spite of the government agent who tortures and torments him, the military General who wants to experiment on him or kill him, the impossibility of getting him away from the facility where he’s imprisoned, and the fact that he is slowly dying.

(If you haven’t seen the film, stop reading now and watch it – it’s terrific.)

By the end of The Shape of Water:

  1. Her circumstances have changed: she is united with the creature.
  2. She has changed: she is no longer meek and withdrawn, but courageous and connected.
  3. The world has changed: the creature is safe and resurrected; the evil threat to the two lovers is vanquished; and her friend Giles has found a level of courage – and perhaps a faith in love and magic – that he lacked at the beginning of the story.

The fourth transformation may be harder to recognize and achieve, but will be just as powerful: you, the storyteller, will change.

If you have the courage to tell stories that grow out of your own fears and failures and successes – out of your own flawed humanity – then you will experience a greater sense of your own inner strength and courage and connection. And these are the stories that will touch your followers most deeply.

The post The 4 Levels of Transformation appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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In response to our survey asking about how our followers are using stories, and what challenges you’re encountering, screenwriter Taha Ali asked what it means when “the stakes are high” for a hero. I replied by first asking him for a list of some of his favorite films to use as examples. Using one of the films from his list, here is my explanation of why this is an essential element of any story you’re telling, whether it’s for film, fiction or business, and how to maximize its emotional power.

The simplest way to understand the idea of STAKES for the hero (or for any character in a story) is to ask, “What will this character lose if he fails to achieve his goal?”

Every hero in every story must want something. The pursuit of that goal defines the story and moves the plot forward. If the hero is risking nothing, and has nothing to lose if he fails, readers and audiences aren’t likely to be emotionally involved, because the conflict doesn’t seem to matter very much.

In action films (Eagle Eye, San Andreas), horror films (It, Scream) or thrillers (Pulp Fiction, Untraceable), the heroes’ (and others’) lives are on the line. If these heroes fail they will die (or people they care about will).

But let’s consider a movie like The Social Network. In Aaron Sorkin’s screenplay, hero Mark Zuckerberg wants to create Facebook and achieve a million followers. And in the bookending story, he wants to successfully defend a lawsuit claiming he stole the idea for Facebook.

But Zuckerberg won’t literally die if he fails to achieve those goals. It just feels like that to him, because Facebook is the most important thing in his life. It represents great wealth and success. But more that than it means status, significance and the kind of connection to others he can’t admit he longs for. So that’s what’s at stake for him.

Whatever kind of story you’re telling, your audience must empathize with your hero. That way, what’s most important to your hero is what’s most important to them.

In a love story, we must believe that the romance character is the hero’s destiny. In many dramas (The King’s Speech, The Post, Ocean’s 8, The Greatest Showman, Wonder, I, Tonya), the heroes’ desires represent their calling, their duty, the ideals they live by, or the only hope they have of achieving any kind of significance or sense of belonging. Failure for these heroes will render their lives unfulfilled, meaningless or hopeless.

In other words, ALL of these heroes believe their lives are at stake in some way. And these are the stories that elicit our deepest emotional involvement.

The post What’s at Stake? appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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The film THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI includes an early scene where the hero, Mildred Hayes (Frances McDormand) is confronted by Chief of Police Bill Willoughby (Woody Harrelson) about her billboards proclaiming that he’s done nothing to catch her daughter’s killer:

EXT. MILDRED’S GARDEN – DAY

He sits on the swing beside her, the billboards stretching out down the hill in front of them.
WILLOUGHBY
I’m doing everything I can to track him down, Mrs. Hayes. I don’t think those billboards is very fair.
MILDRED
The time it’s took you to come out here whining like a bitch, Willoughby, some other poor girl’s probably being butchered right now, but it’s good you’ve got your priorities straight, I’ll say that for ya.
WILLOUGHBY
There’s something else, Mildred.
(pause)
I got cancer. I’m dying.
MILDRED
I know it.
WILLOUGHBY
Huh?
MILDRED
I know it. Most everybody in town knows it.
WILLOUGHBY
You know it, and you still put those billboards up?
MILDRED
Well, they wouldn’t be as effective after you croak, right?

WILLOUGHBY looks at her in disbelief, gets in his car, drives off.

One of the reasons the scene is so effective is because of the way Writer/Director Martin McDonagh SETS UP THE SURPRISE.

Because we already empathize with Mildred as the hero, we anticipate that the Sheriff she’s accusing will be an angry, powerful, racist, redneck cop – a stereotype we’ve all seen in countless films. So we’re taken aback to see that he’s actually a reasonable husband and father of two who tries to see the good in a person, and seems to have done everything he could to catch the killer.

An even bigger surprise is to learn he has cancer. And bigger still is when Mildred gives him no sympathy in response.

The script has created no anticipation of these revelations; they seem to appear out of the blue.

But imagine if this scene were the opening of the film, and we knew nothing about the characters or the situation other than what is revealed here. Willoughby’s confession that he has cancer might still be unexpected, but it would carry almost no emotional impact. This is because there would have been no BUILDUP to the moment, and no CONTEXT for the revelation.

It is only because we’ve already been introduced to these characters, and their desires and conflicts, that the surprise element gets us to feel something.

This scene carries an even greater impact because the screenwriter had not only established the context for the scene, he created ANTICIPATION of what would happen in this confrontation, and then surprised us by reversing it. He created an expectation of one outcome, then surprised us by having the characters do just the opposite.

Frequently I encounter stories – whether in scripts, novels, marketing emails or speeches – which include unexpected elements that seem to have no relationship to what’s happened so far. Readers and viewers are surprised, certainly, but their surprise more often leads to confusion than connection.

Without laying the groundwork to help us understand why this unexpected event or revelation creates conflict for the characters, we’ll simply listen and observe while feeling nothing.

It’s essential that you include surprises in your script, or your novel, or your speech as well. Just make certain to first create context, so that your readers will understand, and FEEL, the impact these unexpected events will have on your characters.

The post Increasing the Impact of Surprise appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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Last week I once again was part of a wonderful, almost indescribable experience. I had the privilege of joining World Champions of Public Speaking Darren LaCroix and Mark Brown at GET COACHED TO SPEAK, one of the monthly boot camps for Darren’s Stage Time University.

This was my third time participating in this workshop, and I’ve never able to fully explain – or describe – the magic that happens at this event. It’s both exciting and humbling to get to work with Darren and Mark, not just for their absolute mastery of all elements of speaking, but also for their humor and passion, and the compassion and love they show each of the speakers.

The connections created among everyone in the room, and the transformative results for the participants and their speeches are wonderful to experience.

Think of the scene in Amadeus where Salieri is furiously writing down the notes being dictated to him by Mozart. Salieri is in awe of the music coming seemingly from nothing, and instantly transforming into something glorious.

But who is creating it? Is it Salieri, because he’s the one putting it to paper? Mozart, who is relaying the notes so quickly he cannot possibly be thinking about them? Or is it something greater?

This is when Salieri realizes the sin and futility of blaming God for giving Mozart all the talent. Salieri knows now that both he and Mozart are both simply instruments of God – they are both “mediocrities” (in his words at the end of the film), but blessed to be a part of something so much greater.

It was the same with us last week, I think. It’s the coming together – the connection we had to each other and the speakers and the stories – that brought about the transformation and allowed all of us to experience our essence.

As a storyteller, these moments will occur for you as well. When you let go of concerns about whether what you’re writing is “good,” and about how it compares, and about how others will react, you can experience the deep connection you have with your characters, your readers and yourself.

In those moments, you will be the instrument for bringing to life the power and the emotion of your story, and the transformation that comes from within you – from your own essence.

The post Writing from Your Essence appeared first on Michael Hauge's Story Mastery.

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