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Missouri residents know that technology is changing each day. Most American households have integrated the internet, and all it has to offer, into daily life. Whether it be for communication, paying bills, or even games and entertainment, people now rely on technology in an unprecedented way. Now, there is a growing concern that the law needs to catch up. In cases of high asset divorce, litigants may have trouble getting a fair shake. 

The calculation of assets just got a bit more tricky. Cryptocurrency is a new type of money, digital in nature. While many feel that using cryptocurrencies instead of traditional money is safer, because it has a level of digital security and is nearly impossible to forge or replicate, many court systems are not yet up to speed on the matter. 

This is a major concern for people considering a high asset divorce. These days, it is not unusual for one or both spouses to have assets in the form of cryptocurrency. By nature, these funds can be difficult to trace. Legally speaking, monies in the form of cryptocurrency are just as valid as traditional forms of monies, and must now be taken into account during divorce. 

In cases of high asset divorce, there is the potential that a spouse could easily hide the existence of such assets. In a situation where cryptocurrency needs to be taken into account, a divorcing party may want to ask an experienced attorney for help. An attorney can help a Missouri client feel confident that all assets are taken into consideration before a divorce is finalized, and ensure that the other spouse cannot hide money behind the veil of the internet. 

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Missouri parents who are estranged from their spouses understand how challenging life can get regarding their children. Especially if there is no existing court-approved plan in place for child custody, things can get rather complicated quickly, particularly if parents disagree about what's best for their kids. Actor Channing Tatum has been learning what it's like to be a single father and says he believes a set schedule for custody would be better for his 5-year-old daughter.

Tatum and his wife have been apart for some time. He is petitioning the court to have custody of his child two days a week, with her mother taking custody for two alternate days and both parents rotating a weekend custody schedule. Tatum has also requested that each parent be granted two weeks of time with their daughter during summer vacations from school. In addition to these requests, the singer/actor also has a specific custody plan in mind for holidays and other special occasions, such as his daughter's birthday.

Some people might find Tatum's proposed plan to be a bit extreme, as it clarifies issues, such as exactly what hours of the day are to be spent trick-or-treating with his daughter when Halloween rolls around each year. Others might think it is wise to pay such close attention to details when writing out terms of a shared custody arrangement. It definitely leaves less room for confusion or disputes.

Missouri parents can tailor their child custody agreements to align with their own needs and what both parents agree is best for the children involved. As with all child-related issues in domestic proceedings, the judge overseeing the case has the final voice of authority, whether to approve a plan parents themselves have devised or to step in and make decisions when parents can't come to an agreement on their own. Any concerned parent currently facing custody problems may seek guidance and support from an experienced family law attorney.

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Many Missouri parents encounter challenges regarding situations related to their children. In circumstances where parents are divorced or sharing child custody as parents who were never married, such problems can really get out of hand if one of the parents involved refuses to play by the rules. If the court has issued orders regarding custody, visitation or support, both parents must adhere to the terms unless and until the judge overseeing the case modifies the order.

Serious problems can arise if a parent refuses to adhere to an existing court order. Evidence of this can be found in an ongoing situation in another state. A woman says the father of her son has been making trouble, such as following her around town, even though she has an active protection order against him.

The situation came to a hilt recently when the woman picked up her children from a baby-sitter's house and was heading back to her residence. She later told police that, while traveling home, she spotted her son's father nearby on the road, and he allegedly intentionally swerved his car to wreck into hers. The two vehicles collided, but the woman was able to continue traveling until she was able to get to where her father was in order to secure help.

Police were called, and the man was given field sobriety tests. He was later taken into custody, and bail was set at more than $30,000. The woman said there is a court order in place regarding child custody, but her ex has refused to cooperate. Any Missouri parent who is currently facing similar problems can turn to an experienced family law attorney for help in determining how best to legally handle the situation.

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Many Missouri parents may still be confused about some aspects of raising children between two separate households. Especially in cases where parents have recently separated, finding the "new normal" may be tricky. In addition to working on custody agreements and co-parenting, many families must begin the process of filing for child support

While child support agreements are certainly not unusual, each family is different. The courts will consider a myriad of aspects when calculating the amount a parent needs to pay to cover his or her share of the financial support a child needs. In Missouri, the average child support payment is about $500 a month. 

A parent that needs to file for child support may find the initial process confusing. When filing, many parents do not have all the necessary information, especially when it pertains to the other parent. Rather than give up and struggle to support a child alone, parents should be aware that help is available. 

When a parent needs to establish, modify or enforce a child support order, he or she has the option to bring an experienced attorney on board. An attorney is familiar with the legal process and often knows just what needs to be done to get the ball rolling. Once a child support order is issued by the court, it is enforceable by law. If the parent responsible for making payments does not do so, he or she can face hefty fines or even jail time. When an order is put into place, a custodial parent can breathe a bit easier, knowing that his or her child will have the financial resources he or she deserves in order to grow up happy and healthy. 

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For many Missouri parents, raising children can often come with confusion and stress. Matters that may appear simple on paper, such as making or receiving child support payments, may actually be unclear and complicated. Recently, one father felt he had been wronged by the system and decided to fight back. 

The man's troubles began when his wages were garnished for child support he was unaware he was responsible for paying. The man claims he has lived in another state for nearly two decades and had not been properly informed that legal action had been taken against him prior to the garnishment. He also alleges that proper steps were not taken to establish paternity before his wages were garnished.

He felt that he should not have to pay filing fees, which he was unable to afford, to fight the perceived injustice. A judge agreed. The man must now prepare his argument as he brings a case against the parties responsible for the legal action against him. 

In cases where a Missouri parent feels he or she has been taken advantage of or treated unjustly by authorities, seeking legal justice may seem a daunting task. Many people choose to bring an experienced attorney on board. An attorney can help a client explain how he or she has been wronged, and work toward a fair outcome in a court of law. In this case, the man is not trying to evade paying child support; he is merely asking the court to ensure that the proper steps are taken prior to the issuance of an order, to avoid making payments for which he may not be legally responsible.

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Missouri parents would probably attest that they want the very best for their children. In situations where a court has put a custody order in place, it is no longer up to a parent to decide where a child primarily lives. Even if there is reason for a parent to think that a child would be better off living with himself or herself, instead of another party specified by the order, any changes must be made through a legal modification of child custody

Recently, a Missouri case resulted in a mother and her live-in boyfriend being arrested. The trouble began last autumn, when the mother took her young son to her home for a visit. The mother and father of the child had shared custody of the boy, but the child was ordered to live primarily at the home of the father. 

The child was never returned after this visit. State authorities were concerned the child may be missing or in danger and issued an advisory. When the boy was discovered to be hiding in his mother's home, the mother was arrested and the boy was returned to his father. 

It can be difficult for a parent to explain to a child that he or she must return to another parent's home after a fun visit. Even if the child does not want to go, or a parent suspects a problem in the home, a parent can not decide to keep a child against a court order. A parent would need to file for a modification of child custody through a court, and in many cases, bringing an experienced attorney on board can help a parent with the legal process necessary to change child custody and remain within the confines of the law. 

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Missouri parents who work hard to support their children may have celebrated the recent news that the state voted to increase minimum wage for workers. Many households, especially single-parent homes, are struggling financially. A parent may find it difficult to cover all the expenses necessary to provide a stable home for his or her children. In many situations, it is imperative to make sure child support payments are collected in a timely fashion. 

New laws recently went into effect to raise the minimum wage from $7.85 to $8.60. While certainly this sounds like terrific news, families are not likely to have "extra" money. Inflation on the cost of goods like food, clothing and housing costs continues to increase. Even though a parent may be paid more, living costs more. 

A reputable study indicates that, in order to merely survive, two parents with one child to care for need to make over $12.00 per hour each. This means that a single parent with one child working a minimum wage job is usually unable to provide food, clothing and shelter. In cases where more than one child lives in the home, the outlook can seem daunting. 

Missouri parents should keep in mind that, in order to best care for their children, they have the right to file, modify and enforce a child support order. The financial burden of raising a child is legally shared between both biological parents and backed by a court order. A parent interested in ensuring that his or her child's financial needs are covered can contact an experienced attorney. An attorney can walk a client through the court process and help make sure that any child involved is provided for in accordance with the law.

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For many Missouri grandparents, the thought of raising young children again may seem overwhelming. Unfortunately, the nation is in the grips of a drug epidemic that continues to affect hundreds of children each day. Many parents struggling with addiction are unable to care for their children, promoting grandparents to pursue a change in child custody

It was estimated that in a single year, in one state alone, about 1,000 babies were born addicted to the drugs they were exposed to in the womb. Called Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, newborn infants often suffer withdrawal symptoms from the drugs a biological mother uses during the course of her pregnancy. These children are often born with special medical needs, and must go through a type of detox as soon as they are born. 

When a parent is addicted to drugs, a grandparent may feel the immediate need to take action. In one case, a grandmother explains how she made her way through the court system to legally adopt her infant grandson. Though she was successful, and the child is safe in her loving care, she expressed a wish that her daughter, the infant's natural mother, will be able to overcome her drug addiction, and perhaps one day be a part of the child's life. 

When a Missouri parent is unable to care for his or her own child, grandparents may be able to step up to the plate. A compassionate attorney can help a client become educated on the legal process necessary to change child custody. It is important for children to have the opportunity to live in an home where they are safe and well cared for, and taking action in a family court can help grandparents ensure that their young family members are no longer at risk for abuse and neglect, and will not suffer as a result of a parent's continued drug use. 

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When a Missouri resident chooses to end a marriage, it may not be a topic he or she cares to discuss. Divorce can be a sore subject for many, and when it comes to a high asset divorce, things just got a bit more complicated. A new tax law is shaking up the way many divorcees proceed financially. 

Traditionally, Missouri courts assume that any assets gained during the course of a marriage belong to both spouses, regardless of whose name is on a particular asset. When a marriage is dissolved, the value of any assets is usually split evenly. This can be tricky, because if an asset is a physical item, such as a house or a car, the asset can obviously not be physically split. Many people opt to pay alimony, which is a monthly payment made to the other spouse honoring their share of any calculated assets. 

However, new tax laws are going into effect next year, and the current year is drawing quickly to a close. Current laws allow a person paying alimony to count the payment as a tax deduction. The new law eradicates this option, and alimony payments will no longer be deducted. This can be a difference of thousands of dollars. 

If a Missouri resident is considering a high asset divorce, he or she may want to bring an experienced attorney on board. An attorney can advise a client of other ways to meet court-mandated distribution of assets. An attorney can help a client understand the new laws, and stand by their side as they finalize a divorce and begin a new chapter without his or her former spouse. 

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Missouri parents need only to peruse a daily newspaper or swipe through the day's headlines online to realize that, in America, dads are winning. In decades past, it was considered the norm for a mother to be awarded physical custody of a child, often through no particular merit of her own. These days, fathers across the nation are fighting for their rights, and their children, and winning child custody cases. 

One Missouri father was awarded custody of his young son after it was discovered that the child had illegal drugs in his system while living with the mother. The court agreed that the father could provide a safe, stable environment for the boy. The mother was granted visitation rights, allowing the boy to maintain contact with her. 

After one particular visit, the mother failed to return the child. Weeks have passed and authorities are growing evermore concerned because the boy has not attended any school in the area, and no tips and sightings have panned out. The father pleads with the community, asking anyone who can help to please contact local police. This matter is being pursued as a kidnapping. 

When a father is ready to establish, modify or enforce a child custody order, he may want to make sure to be prepared for court. An experienced attorney can help a father organize his concerns into a solid argument. Good fathers do their best to make sure children can grow up happy and healthy, and when it comes time to fight for rights in a court of law, it is nice to have a helping hand.

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