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The Galaxy in Comics is a deep dive into the events and themes of one recent Star Wars comic. In this installment, StarWars.com checks out Darth Vader #17, the final part of a crossover with the Star Wars ongoing series.

Spoiler warning: This story contains details and plot points from Darth Vader #17.

It was never going to go well for Mon Cala.

This may not have been a traditional comic book crossover, but the ties between the stories in Marvel’s Darth Vader and Star Wars have been strong nonetheless. In Darth Vader’s “Burning Seas,” we’ve seen what happens when the Mon Calamari fight back against the Empire, even as the Rebel Alliance tries to coax the planet into becoming a new ally in their war in Star Wars’ “Mutiny at Mon Cala.” After seeing Tarkin’s merciless bombardment of the planet over 15 years ago, it’s little wonder that Admiral Urtya was unwilling to risk his home world becoming the next Alderaan. In a way, Alderaan was the next Mon Cala — a symbol to the rest of the galaxy of what happens when a planet moves against the galaxy (and against Tarkin).

Compared to the rest of the “Burning Seas” arc and the rest of this comic series in general, Darth Vader #17 doesn’t put the Dark Lord in the spotlight. He’s there, of course, but this issue isn’t about him. If anything, it’s about Barr and King Lee-Char as they are the ones who have their character arcs conclude. And that’s okay because everything doesn’t always have to be about Vader…even when his name is on the front cover. Vader’s work here was already done. He is the instrument of the Emperor’s will and it is the Emperor’s will that Mon Cala be subjugated. Mission accomplished, especially once Ferren Barr, the king’s Jedi advisor, falls to his red blade.

If anything, “Burning Seas” is about Barr and Lee-Char, as they are the ones who have their character arcs conclude within the issue. Perhaps influenced by his interactions with the Jedi Order during the Clone War, Mon Cala’s king listened too closely to Barr’s counsel, allowing the Jedi to nudge him away from the Empire. By the end of the issue, Lee-Char has no choice but to surrender. Barr’s willingness to sacrifice billions of Mon Calamari lives has shattered the king’s trust and even though he tells Vader that Mon Cala will rise again, he seems crushed as the stormtroopers lead him away. Rebellions are built on hope and Lee-Char has none left.

It is through Ferren Barr’s actions on Mon Cala that Darth Vader #17 makes us ask what being a Jedi even means in this post-Republic world. On the surface, Obi-Wan’s message in the Jedi beacon, left during Revenge of the Sith, may have sounded encouraging — “But we must persevere and, in time, I believe a new hope will emerge.” — but what help or solace did it really offer? Stay away from the Jedi Temple, trust in the Force. Is it any wonder that we’re increasingly introduced to characters who found a path for themselves that differs so strongly from that of Obi-Wan or Yoda or even Jocasta Nu? Young Caleb Dume went into hiding, trying to pretend he was never a Padawan. Prosset Dibs, Bil Valen, and Masana Tide fell to the dark side and became Inquisitors. And Ferren Barr? His actions do not feel worthy of the title of Jedi Knight or even of the Jedi Padawan that he was before Order 66. How can using the Force to convince others to follow you be the Jedi way? How can sacrificing billions for the lives of trillions be the Jedi way? By the time Vader slays him, Barr doesn’t even care because he thinks he’s won. For him, beating the Sith was worth falling off the Jedi path and that just might be the true tragedy of this issue.

In the final pages of Darth Vader #16, Ferren Barr named all three Inquisitors as former Jedi before forcing the clones to execute Order 66, making them targets so that he and his one remaining disciple can escape. Yet Barr himself isn’t their first target despite holding a lightsaber and dressing more akin to how the Jedi of three years before once had. This is a batch of clones who were likely brought onto active duty after the Empire’s rise but are old enough that they were likely once taught to view the Jedi as the superior officers and such. One would think these clones would understand that the Inquisitors are not Jedi and yet…the Kaminoan programming is strong. Would the clones think Vader is a Jedi too if the order were to be given in his presence? After all, we’ve already seen such assumptions being made given his lightsaber. He may want to watch his back.

Artist Giuseppe Camuncoli has been stellar on this book since day one. Credited with layouts for this issue while usual inker Daniele Orlandini is credited with finishes, the pair continues to be an excellent choice for this book. The two-page spread midway through that shows the destruction a mere three Star Destroyers can rain down upon a planet, killing thousands if not millions as King Lee-Char watches, is a powerful image. Camuncoli and Orlandini (in conjunction with colorist David Curiel) have particularly excelled with the Mon Calamari characters. Overtly alien characters can be a challenge for Star Wars some artists especially when it comes showing expressions but it is one this trio rises to.

With this issue, Charles Soule not only concludes what has been a strong story line but also plants the seeds for Tarkin and Vader to cross paths again. He’s also shown that a good Darth Vader story doesn’t need to keep Vader at its very center 100 percent of the time to be engaging. It’s hard not to be excited for what comes next.

Bria LaVorgna is a writer who doesn’t remember a time when she didn’t love Star Wars. She also really loves Alderaan, Doctor Aphra, and Inferno Squad. You can follow her on Twitter @chaosbria.

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Disney’s Hollywood Studios recently hosted the third Star Wars: Galactic Nights event at Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida, which included an exclusive discussion with some of the minds currently bringing Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, the upcoming Star Wars-themed land, to life. The panel, moderated by David Collins, featured Scott Trowbridge (portfolio creative executive), Eric Baker (creative director), Jon Georges (executive producer), and Margaret Kerrison (managing story editor), who offered insights and a few big reveals. Here are some of the things we learned at the presentation.

1. Hello, AT-ATs.

Trowbridge revealed that the Millennium Falcon is not the only huge Star Wars vehicle being built for Galaxy’s Edge: The team is building two towering AT-ATs, making our Imperial dreams come true. The walkers will be part of the second attraction in Galaxy’s Edge (the first being the Millennium Falcon), with guests facing off against the AT-ATs. Trowbridge showed photos of the armored behemoths being built in Japan, eliciting roars from the crowd. The feet alone were massive, but the detail put into them, as well as the rest of the transport, promises to be most impressive.

2. Hello, Resistance Transport, too.

To help create that real-world feel for the vehicles in the universe, some Imagineers traveled to the sets of recent Star Wars films at Pinewood Studios. The plan is to replicate authenticity from the big screen and brings it to life on Batuu. As evidence of this, we were treated to some images of an all-new vehicle: the Resistance Transport.

The Transport will feature prominently as you take on the First Order firsthand. As Georges explained, “This is an actual, physical, full-size ship that you’ll actually step on board and set off on an adventure of your own.” It even features battle damage, indicating things have been challenging up to this point for the Resistance crew. Again, the attention to detail is staggering.

3. Loth-cats are coming to our galaxy.

Production designer Doug Chiang is working with artists to create physical representations of some Star Wars creatures, many of which have only been present in animated form up to this point. In fact, a creature pen is being built to allow for the illusion of a lifelike encounter with Star Wars wildlife.

Perhaps most exciting of all, however, is that the team is creating lifelike Loth-cats — a fan favorite from Star Wars Rebels — with which guests will get to interact. The image shown of the in-the-works creature elicited a cacophony of “Aww”s throughout the Epic Theater at Disney’s Hollywood Studios. (It’s a fair assumption we will all want to take these adorable little critters home after meeting them on Batuu.)

4. Set your coordinates for Black Spire Outpost.

Finally, we learned that the town on Batuu that Disney Parks guests will be exploring is called Black Spire Outpost. That name may be familiar to Star Wars fans, who first heard L3-37 tell Lando Calrissian in Solo: A Star Wars Story that he could not find Black Spire without her. The panel showed the exciting above images of Black Spire Outpost, and you can find out more right here.

5. Welcome back, Nien Nunb and Hondo Ohnaka.

While there are many new Star Wars encounters in Galaxy’s Edge, there will also be some familiar faces. Nien Nunb, the co-pilot that helped destroy the second Death Star and returned to take on the First Order, is back. Actor Kipsang Rotich will once again voice Nien for Galaxy’s Edge, adding some true connectivity to the Star Wars films. Disney went all the way to Kenya to find the actor, who was a graduate student at the time of Return of the Jedi, and showed a video where he shared his excitement about returning to this character.

Also returning is Hondo Ohnaka, the Weequay pirate from Star Wars: The Clone Wars, Star Wars Rebels, and Forces of Destiny. The last set of Galaxy’s Edge trading cards (which guests received once they left the park for the evening) included an image of Hondo and Chewbacca at the entry ramp of the Millennium Falcon. At this point, it is hard to say what brought these two together, but it certainly seems to be a recipe for plenty of unexpected and exciting moments.

In just over a year, we will be immersed in the largest land ever created for the Disney Parks — coming to Disneyland Resort in summer 2019 and to Walt Disney World Resort in fall 2019. Get ready.

Dan Zehr is a high school English teacher with an MS in Teaching and Learning, and is the host and co-creator of Coffee With Kenobi, a podcast that examines Star Wars’ mythology from a place of intelligence and humor.

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In your hands, you hold a top-secret dossier of sensitive information vital to the Rebel Alliance. Rescued from the ruins of an abandoned base, the information inside has new vitality in the age of the Resistance. Classified documents, secret communications, and other intelligence — annotated by some of the most prominent war heroes — once helped to bring an end to the Empire, and may still hold clues to fighting the First Order today. Or at least, that’s how it feels when you’re gazing at The Rebels Files, enshrined in a portable vault and seemingly ready to spill all of the secrets on the birth of Mon Mothma’s Rebellion.

In-universe, the collection was curated by one of the senator’s most trusted aides, but the real-life scribe is Daniel Wallace. Wallace previously helped lay down the law for the lawless with The Bounty Hunter Code, channeled the most ancient wisdom of the early masters in The Jedi Path: A Manual for Students of the Force, and turned to the dark side to pen the Book of Sith, among others. He recently sat down with StarWars.com to exchange emails about his latest journey deep into the lore of The Rebel Files. The fully illustrated Deluxe Edition hit shelves last year, complete with the carrying case and stolen plans for the Death Star, with a later release of book alone in July.

StarWars.com: This certainly isn’t your first time stepping into the Star Wars universe, having previously penned quite a few essential guides and roleplaying sourcebooks. How would you describe your creative approach to a project like this? After seeing the finished book, it seems like it must have been a daunting task.

Daniel Wallace: There’s something fun about planning these kinds of “in-universe nonfiction” books, because you’re not quite storytelling but you’re not writing an encyclopedia either. My editor, Delia Greve, came up with the idea of making The Rebel Files a scrapbook made up of artifacts like news headlines, diary entries, ship blueprints, top-secret memos, and text conversations.

You’re right that it was a daunting task. Both in coming up with unique styles for each individual scrap, and in making the scrapbook feel like a holistic story and not just an assemblage of parts.

StarWars.com:  Still, this had to have been a tremendously demanding project in terms of the depth and breadth of information, covering so many eras and established films, TV shows, and published material. But the immersive, in-universe Star Wars books are some of my favorites because they plunge us deeper into the minds of the inhabitants, the political climate of the galaxy, and make the universe feel that much more alive. What was the most challenging part of working on this project and what are you most proud of now that it’s complete?

Daniel Wallace: The Rebel Files presents an in-universe history of the Rebel Alliance from roughly the time of Star Wars Rebels up until the Battle of Endor, plus an additional running commentary laid down decades later by Resistance members like Poe Dameron and Admiral Holdo. That’s a lot of ground to cover, and a lot of scraps to paste into a scrapbook!

I struggled with how to make everything feel cohesive, at least until I zeroed in on Mon Mothma as the central character. Mon Mothma is the most important figure in the Rebel Alliance, but she hasn’t really been featured as much as you’d think in the expanded canon. I felt like we had never really discovered what she’s all about. That’s why I enjoyed getting into her head, and thinking about how she might react to tragedies like the destruction of Alderaan. The Rebel Files contains private exchanges between Mon Mothma and her aide, Hendri Underholt, and those were my favorite parts to write.

StarWars.com: There are so many layers here: news clippings, wanted posters, field manuals on combat tactics and flight, meeting minutes, scouting logs and classified missives. Official documents in our own universe can be a bit dry and dull. Certainly, the subject matter and the handwritten annotations from the likes of Admiral Ackbar, General Leia Organa, Poe Dameron and Vice Admiral Holdo give it a more lived-in feel here. How did you work under the parameters of the premise but still manage to keep the text lively and interesting? And how do you maintain so many distinct and well-known voices among the many characters represented in first person?

Daniel Wallace: Nothing in the Star Wars universe should be dry or dull unless it’s for comedic effect. I’ve always believed that the Star Wars world is bigger, faster, and more intense than our world. If you watched paint dry it’d be some kind of self-spreading chromatic space paint, and it would be utterly fascinating.

That’s why memos in The Rebel Files tend to get right to the point, and why the book’s references are thick with characters you’ve met before and starships you’ve seen on the big screen. I’ve always had this theory that if you could spend a week in the Star Wars universe, everything would just work. You’d instinctively know what you needed to do and who you needed to talk to. You’d know which hydrospanner to grab in order to fix the hyperdrive. That aesthetic of “simpler and more satisfying” worked its way into how we wrote and designed memos and news clippings.

To your second point, it turns out that maintaining distinct voices for characters like Ackbar, Poe, and Leia is easy when you’ve seen the movies a billion times. In the case of Leia and Ackbar, they actually showed up twice—once during the classic trilogy and again during the sequel trilogy—so I wanted their voices to change across the decades.

StarWars.com:  But at its core, this is really Mon Mothma’s story, almost like a very official and confidential memory box of all the documents she thought would need to be preserved for the future. We get to see her dealing with the big picture as well as smaller incidents of rebels going rogue. But we also have a front-row seat to the strategic genius of the rebels as a whole and the minutiae of the operation. How did your own feelings about or understanding of the rebels change as you worked on the project?

Daniel Wallace: You nailed it, and I like your characterization of the book as a memory box. This is a repository of documents that Mon Mothma wants to preserve due to their future historical significance—or so she hopes. I kept thinking about the American Revolutionary War and the kinds of things that would be fascinating to see from that period. An attack plan for the Battle of Yorktown? Entries from Washington’s journal? Early sketches by Betsy Ross for the U.S. flag?

Something that changed for me in my understanding of the Rebel Alliance was the depth of their desperation. The Battle of Hoth does a good job of establishing that the Rebels are in dire straits, but the expanded canon goes even further. The Alliance suffers additional defeats as it tries to take control of the Mid Rim in Alexander Freed’s novel Twilight Company. By the time of the Battle of Endor, the Rebels have their backs to the wall. If this doesn’t work, it’s over.

StarWars.com:  I enjoyed how the dossier hits on some essential pieces of in-universe history like the Battles of Yavin and Endor, and an overview map from Echo Base and more subtle references, like a memo on the evacuation of Crait, a page on Evaan Verlaine from the Marvel Princess Leia series, and a memo about the ill-fated Bothans agreeing to take part in an intelligence op. What are your favorite Easter eggs that you were able to include in the book?

Daniel Wallace: The Rebel Files is stuffed with Easter eggs, but I didn’t really think of them that way. There are plenty of references in the book to things established under the old Legends continuity, but my view is that the modern continuity is essentially a brand-new stage play using the previous play’s backdrops, costumes, and props. This opens up a massive toolbox stuffed with planets, aliens, weapons, droids, and starships for use. I’m convinced it makes the universe feel more fleshed out and lived-in when you can reference both Evaan Verlaine from the modern comics and Tac-Com Base from 1993’s Rebel Assault CD-ROM.

StarWars.com:  So much of Star Wars publishing is about beautifully bridging the spaces between what we’ve already seen on screen, giving the galaxy even more depth. And the many creators who get to play with and step into the universe leave their own mark. What personal touches did you incorporate into The Rebel Files to make it your own?

Daniel Wallace: Honestly, my aim with The Rebel Files was to make it feel like it wasn’t written by a real person at all. That it was literally a collection of documents that fell onto our planet through a wormhole from the galaxy far, far away. I hope my author voice is minimal, if not invisible. My name isn’t even on the cover!

StarWars.com:  This makes me wonder what an Imperial cache of confidential documents would reveal. Any chance you can tell us what you’re working on now or hoping to write in the near future?

Daniel Wallace: Well, we did publish The Imperial Handbook several years back, but that was an Imperial primer distributed to newly-minted officers. I like your angle, though! I think there’s a lot of good material to be mined from the rigid Imperial bureaucracy, in which everyone watches their backs and is terrified of failure.

What else lies in store for this book series? Some things I can’t reveal, but I’m convinced there are some really fun corners of the Star Wars universe we have yet to explore.

Kristin Baver is a writer and all-around sci-fi nerd who always has just one more question in an inexhaustible list of curiosities. Sometimes she blurts out “It’s a trap!” even when it’s not. Do you know a fan who’s most impressive? Hop on Twitter and tell @KristinBaver all about them!

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At San Diego Comic-Con, Hasbro is bringing a bounty of long-awaited Star Wars figures. And we want them all. Here’s what’s been revealed…so far.

Finally, we’re getting our first Doctor Aphra figure. Created by Kieron Gillen in Marvel’s Darth Vader series and now starring in her own ongoing title, the kinda good, kinda bad archaeologist quickly became a fan favorite. (She outsmarted Darth Vader and often gets in over her head. What’s not to love?) Accompanying Aphra are 0-0-0 (Triple Zero) and BT-1 (Bee Tee), the murderous droids from Marvel’s comics who’ve also struck a cord with readers.

Part of the relaunched 3.75-inch Vintage Collection, the three figures come in charmingly retro packaging that hearkens back to the days of ’70s and ’80s Star Wars toys, complete with Kenner logo and “Special Action Figure Set” banner. The three-pack will be available for $49.99, a score of which Aphra herself would be jealous.

Also coming to SDCC is Han Solo in his Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back outfit, joining the highly-articulated 6-inch Black Series with a mynock (!) in tow. The packaging for this set appropriately features the Millennium Falcon. (Just keep the mynock away from it.) It’s also worth noting that Han’s head sculpt looks incredible, as it was created using Hasbro’s new Photo Real painting tech. Look for it at SDCC for $34.99.

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Much to Learn You Still Have is a rundown of trivia and fun facts, both in-universe and behind-the-scenes, about the aliens of the Star Wars galaxy. Whether you’ve never set foot in a cantina or you’re a well-traveled Jedi Master, you’ll find the intel you need.

Trandoshans are, quite frankly, giant lizard people, and though they first came on the scene in The Empire Strikes Back with the appearance of the bounty hunter Bossk, there is still a lot that most Star Wars fans don’t know about these scaly, sentient beings. For starters, they didn’t have a name until 1989 with the release of the roleplaying game book Galaxy Guide 3: The Empire Strikes Back. Intrigued to learn more? I’ve gone ahead and done the legwork for you. Here are seven things you may not know about Trandoshans.

Bossk mail-away, 1980. Image courtesy theswca.com.

1. You may have seen Bossk before The Empire Strikes Back.

Not to immediately take back what I just told you, but the character of Bossk was actually revealed prior to his first look in the film. In 1979, Kenner announced a “secret action figure” that could be obtained by sending four proofs-of-purchase to the toy company. The figure, complete with laser pistol and moveable limbs, came with a flyer describing Bossk’s character in the film before his official debut. Having an awesome lizard-man bounty hunter toy was probably worth the mild spoiler for any child in the early ’80s.

2. Bossk’s costume was recycled.

The bounty hunter lineup in The Empire Strikes Back has become iconic, but when Bossk and the rest of the boys came onto the scene, they weren’t the most original looking crew in the galaxy. That is, if you’ve seen “The Tenth Planet” episode of Doctor Who’s fourth season. The yellow getup now much more famous for covering the Trandoshan is actually a High-Altitude Windak Pressure Suit used by Britain’s Royal Air Force in the 1960s. The suit wasn’t only utilized in the second film of the saga. The outfit actually predates Bossk and can be seen on the character BoShek in A New Hope’s cantina sequence.

Fun fact #1: According to director Irvin Kershner, Admiral Piett’s disgusted reaction to Bossk’s sharp toes hanging above him on the Executor was actor Ken Colley’s natural reaction and was not in the script. The disgust was based on the immorality of the creature, not so much his look.

This is a Saurin, not a Trandoshan.

3. They weren’t really in the cantina.

While we’re on the subject of recycling, I have to point out a common misconception. You may think you’ve seen a Trandoshan lounging at the bar at Mos Eisley, but despite the similar look of the Saurin species, we technically can’t call that a Trandoshan. However, if we really want to push our nerd glasses up, the same mask was used in The Empire Strikes Back for Bossk but with some minor adjustments. A new paint job, new eyes, and different arms, hands, and legs were added to the alien to make him a distinctively different species. Though Trandoshans and Saurins are not exactly the same, the two are most likely distant relatives. Take a look at their hands for an easy distinguisher. Saurins have humanoid hands and Trandoshans have claw-like appendages with three or four digits. The Saurins didn’t always have their name, however. While filming in the cantina, everyone referred to the reptiles as “crocs,” “crockers,” or “Gila-men.”

Trandoshan Hunting Lodge interior concept art by W.Lo.

4. They have bad relations with the Wookiees.

The only thing more terrifying than an angry Wookiee or Trandoshan on their own is pitting the two against each other. The walking carpets are not exactly fond of the lanky reptilians, mainly because they share a system and the Trandoshans make it a sport to kill Wookiees for the fun of it. Take a look at the Trandoshan hunting lodge in the Star Wars: The Clone Wars episode “Padawan Lost.” The building is adorned with numerous Wookiee pelts showing off just how many of Chewbacca’s people have died at the hand of the scaly snipers. Though the Trandoshans are equal-opportunity assassins: You can also see the heads of rancors, stuffed narglatches, Ithorians, and even Gungans. If you’re not familiar with all of these names, let’s just say slaying some of these behemoths would be a mighty impressive feat.

Fun fact #2: In the Star Wars: The Force Unleashed video game, killing 200 Wookiees will get you the “Bossk” achievement in the prologue level on Kashyyyk.

5. They have a moon just for hunting.

Trandoshans aren’t only known for destroying Wookiees. The species will pretty much track down and kill anything and everything, and they have a specific location dedicated solely to the art of the hunt. A moon that orbits the planet Trandosha located in the Kashyyyk system goes by the name of Wasskah, and it is the ultimate Trandoshan playpen. Helpless, sentient beings are kidnapped from all around the galaxy and dropped onto the moon so the scaly menaces can perfect their stalking skills. The Padawan Ahsoka Tano herself was kidnapped on Felucia and brought to the jungles of Wasskah to join several other young captives.

Fun fact #3: The Trandoshan hunting pods are inspired by the classic Cobra Trubble Bubble flight pod from the G.I. JOE toyline.

The smuggler Gha Nachkt from The Clone Wars.

6. They’re not all tall and thin.

Trandoshans get a pretty prominent feature in The Clone Wars, and executive producer Dave Filoni put a lot of thought into how he could diversify the species. We’re all familiar with Bossk’s tall, spindly build, but Filoni wanted the Trandoshans to vary just like humans. With the droid and arms dealer and smuggler Gha Nachkt, we saw a smelly, untidy, slightly overweight Trandoshan who, as Filoni explains, isn’t at the prime of his life. In Star Wars Rebels, the Mining Guild worker and crawler captain Seevor also has a non-traditional look. He’s on the smaller side of the Trandoshan scale, and has brown-hued skin with orange markings. Seevor’s family has been in the Mining Guild for years, adding another less-violent profession to the list of Trandoshan trades.

7. One Trandoshan was inspired by a cult classic.

Among the gang of Trandoshans introduced in The Clone Wars, one of the most unique goes by the name of Sochek. At first glance you may not recognize the resemblance, but his look was based on a fan favorite character from a well-known late ’90s comedy. With snazzy amber-tinted goggles and cargo shorts, Sochek was actually based on John Goodman’s character Walter Sobchak from The Big Lebowski. In true Trandoshan fashion, Sochek ends up killing the captive Terrelian Jango Jumper Lika, but ultimately couldn’t escape the blaster of a Wookiee.

Anything else you can share about these beasts? Let me know what I missed in the comments below!

Sources: The Making of Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, J.W. Rinzler, Del Rey, 2010., Star Wars: The Ultimate Action Figure Collection, Stephen J. Sansweet, Chronicle Books, 2012. 

Dana Jennings is Lucasfilm’s associate producer for StarWars.com. You may remember her from such polls and quizzes as, “Who Wore it Best?” and “Which Star Wars Character Should You Invite for the Holidays?” When not acting as chairman of the Nien Nunb Appreciation Society, she can be found working hard to make sure The Star Wars Show stays fully operational or dressing up as Kevin the Ewok. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter for all these things and more!

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“I might be the only person who knows what you really are.”

From her very first line of dialogue in the Solo: A Star War Story teaser trailer, it was clear that there was far more than met the eye when it came to Qi’ra…even if that red cape was nothing short of fabulous! After watching Solo, seeing her on Forces of Destiny, and reading Most Wanted, it’s clear that Qi’ra’s name deserves to be listed along with the many other awesome women in the Star Wars galaxy. She’s capable and definitely not someone in need of a rescue. She’s also incredibly complex. It’s not hard to see why both Han and so many fans already love her.

Here are five reasons why we love Qi’ra. (Spoiler warning: This story contains details and plot points from Solo: A Star Wars Story, Forces of Destiny, and Most Wanted.)

1. She knows how to fight.

In keeping with Star Wars tradition, Qi’ra knows how to defend herself. Who needs a blaster when you’ve learned the art of Teräs Käsi? Despite being unarmed, she took out Quay Tolsite of the Pyke Syndicate so fast and efficiently that she even made L3-37 say “Whoa!” She’s also not half bad when it comes to hurling grenades or even using a sword. How many other people can say they have used a sword to trap an opponent’s blade and then used that blade to take the opponent down?

2. She knows what she wants.

Whether it’s getting off of Corellia or seizing control of a vast criminal organization, Qi’ra is a woman who knows what she wants in life. She’s also able to prioritize what she wants even when that means not reigniting a relationship with a lost love. Above all though, she wants a better life for herself than the one she’s had thus far, and given how horrible both the Silo and the White Worms were, it’s hard to blame her.

3. She can seize the moment and think on the fly.

Qi’ra is also a woman who thoroughly understands the concept of carpe diem. While it may have been done partially out of a sense of self-preservation, she saw her chance for upwards mobility within Crimson Dawn and took advantage when the right moment presented itself. Throughout Solo, we saw her quickly adapt as circumstances changed. Sure, Han was the one to come up with the initial coaxium plan, but Qi’ra helped fill in the key blanks and sold Dryden on the idea. In the Forces of Destiny episode “Triplecross,” Qi’ra saw an opening when IG-88 and Hondo started arguing and turned it to her advantage by capturing them both.

4. She’s incredibly brave.

It takes an exceedingly brave sort of person who can straight up lie to a really bad bad guy’s face (you know who I’m talking about if you’ve seen Solo), especially since she’ll have to keep up the lie. Qi’ra doesn’t even blink when negotiations suddenly turn aggressive on Kessel. Instead, she takes it in stride and even runs back off the Falcon to throw grenades at the Pykes while trying to make their escape. It also takes a very courageous teenager to walk into an Imperial facility on Corellia and act as if she belongs there (despite being from the slums) in order to break out a prisoner like she did in Most Wanted.

5. She has a great sense of style.

“You look phenomenal.” Lando Calrissian doesn’t say that to just anyone; they have to earn it. Qi’ra has mastered the art of looking elegant and chic and yet still capable of action at a moment’s notice. Sure she may have ended up borrowing that gorgeous red cape from Lando’s vast collection but she knew how to style it and pull off an all together magnificent look. It’s far from the only fabulous look she serves over the course of the film. If you ever have to unexpectedly run into an old fling, you can’t beat the black dress she wears on Dryden Vos’s yacht and Han’s fur coat look had nothing on hers.

Why do you love Qi’ra? Let us know in the comments below!

Solo: A Star Wars Story is in theaters now.

Bria LaVorgna is a writer who doesn’t remember a time when she didn’t love Star Wars. She also really loves Alderaan, Doctor Aphra, and Inferno Squad. You can follow her on Twitter @chaosbria.

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Star Wars has always been about parents and children, different generations trying to do better than the last. Star Wars kept me on a path where I wanted to be a better father for my kids. And my love of the saga is such that I want to share it with my kids, along with all of the lessons I’ve learned from my failures over the years. I mean, that’s what The Last Jedi is all about right? Maybe that’s why it resonated so strongly with me.

But sharing your passion with your kids is tricky, right? At what point are you forcing your love of a thing onto them? My eldest has definitely had Star Wars thrust on him in some way, whether he likes it or not. His name is Anakin. It says so on his driver’s license, too. Handing his ID over always ends in, “Really? That’s your name? That’s so cool.”

It’s been a careful balancing act to not try to force my obsessions on him further than in name only. Though I took him to see his first Star Wars film in the theater at three (Revenge of the Sith, which, according to him, is still his favorite, with Solo: A Star Wars Story now a solid second place), it was his friends that got him into the saga.

I tried to find other things to bond with him over — board games, other movies, and a hundred other things, because I wanted him to find his own relationship with Star Wars.

He loves Star Wars (though not to the degree I do), and I think letting him come to that relationship on his own was part of the reason. I tried the same with my middle daughter who is now 14 and she likes Star Wars only to the extent that Jar Jar or Ahsoka are involved.

The thing that makes me happiest as a dad, though, is getting to share moments in Star Wars that resonate with me emotionally with my kids.

It’s also been a learning tool for me. Star Wars makes me want to be a better father. I can look at things and say, “I can’t do that, I need to be less like Vader,” or “I should do more of that, I need to be more like Qui-Gon.” It’s also been a valuable tool as a parent. When Anakin was much younger, it was easy to talk to him about his actions when he threw a tantrum and explain, “That’s too much of the dark side. Do you want to be on the dark side?” It helped establish a language of metaphor with my children and enhanced our rapport. The universal cultural myth of Star Wars was something we both understood and it became a meeting place for us to see better eye to eye.

But I’ve found it’s also one of my favorite vehicles for sharing joy with my kids, and sharing joy is something that I think is important for parents.

Solo: A Star Wars Story was my youngest daughter’s first Star Wars film on the big screen. She just turned three and her only exposure to Star Wars prior to last month was The Phantom Menace. I was hoping to hold off on showing her the rest of the films until she could really digest what they were and what they were about. And since Episode I is the most kid-friendly of the films, that’s what she was able to watch when she asked for Star Wars. That’s not quite true, though. She asked for Jar Jar more than Star Wars.

Her primary interaction with Star Wars is through the toys, though. Her favorites became Chewbacca and the Millennium Falcon, in addition to Jar Jar. Why the Falcon? Well, her name is Valkyrie Amelia Falcon, her middle names loosely coming from Han’s freighter. Once she put together that the ship was representative of her, she fell in love. So making the Solo movie her first in the theater made a lot of sense.

As a parent, getting to share an experience like that with your child is electric.

We took Valkyrie to a matinee on Monday, May 28, still technically the opening weekend. She was so excited to be seeing the movie that she woke up that morning and yelled, “We’re seeing the Falcon today!”

We arrived at the theater. We brought snacks and brought her favorite milk-like beverages in case the movie wasn’t enough to hold her attention, but we were wrong to worry.

For Valkyrie, the movie kicked into high gear when Han was thrown into the pit of the beast. “Chewbacca!” she shouted with glee, probably too loudly in a crowded theater.

And I found myself misty eyed.

The water works began for me when a number of factors coalesced. As Han and crew are walking through the junkyard and Lando introduces the Falcon and John Powell’s music swells, Valkyrie with wide, bright eyes and an even wider smile says, “Hey! That’s my name! And my ship!”

To my mind, sharing moments like this, regardless of the movie or moment, is what being a dad is all about. It’s our job to instill hope and wonder and awe into our children so they can make the world in their time a better place. Star Wars is a great way to get there.

Bryan Young is an author, a filmmakerjournalist, and the editor in chief of BigShinyRobot.com! He’s also the co-host of the Star Wars podcast, Full of Sith. You can also follow him on Twitter.

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Family plays a huge part in Star Wars. Without the guidance of influential parents and parental figures, our favorite characters would not become the beloved heroes we’ve come to know. In honor of Father’s Day, we’ve gathered a list of father figures who made a huge impact on some of the biggest heroes in the galaxy.

Owen Lars

Yes, he did push off Luke’s desire to become a pilot, but Uncle Owen did have his reasons. Luke needed a father figure to help him grow into a good man and Owen’s life as a moisture farmer showed him the importance of rolling up his sleeves and getting the job done. If Uncle Owen had not taken Luke in, who knows what Luke would be up to in a galaxy far, far away.

Cut Lawquane

A clone trooper gone rogue, Cut left his life of war to start a family and live as a farmer. He took down an entire group of Commando Droids just to keep his family safe and he was willing to put his life at risk asking for Rex’s help.

Qui-Gon Jinn

Qui-Gon mentored Obi-Wan and was willing to teach him all he knew – including the hard lessons of the Jedi. Introducing a tough reality to your child or pupil is no easy task, but Qui-Gon unflinchingly revealed the good and the bad about the Jedi Council to Obi-Wan in the hopes that he could pass on what he had learned. Luckily, it worked!

Cham Syndulla

An advocate for freedom, Cham fought against the Separatists and the Empire to liberate Ryloth. He raised our beloved Hera Syndulla, who became an outstanding pilot for the Rebellion, and advocated for freedom against tyranny. While their relationship was a little shaky, Hera showed Cham the benefits of fighting the Empire beyond Ryloth. He was willing to learn a strong lesson from his daughter and he became better for it.

Han Solo

Even with his shortcomings with Ben, Han was the father figure Rey needed in her transition from Jakku scavenger to Jedi in training. For a brief moment, Han made Rey feel like she was valued for who she was. Rey was a second chance for Han to be the father he wanted to be, and he taught her the most important lesson that any of us can learn: you matter.

Ephraim Bridger

Ezra’s father and mother, Mira, spoke out against the Empire and started their own rebellion on Lothal. Ephraim’s revolutionary messages inspired Ezra to send one of his own, which in turn inspired his parents to start a prison revolt. Ezra was motivated by his father to liberate Lothal and make a stand against the Empire.

Kanan Jarrus

Ezra also had Kanan to thank. Although his focus was just to train Ezra as a Jedi, their relationship grew as they got closer to each other. Kanan taught Ezra valuable life lessons and prepared him to lead on his own and had a major influence on Ezra’s life.

Obi-Wan Kenobi

This man does not know what a vacation is. He helped raise Anakin Skywalker to be a powerful Jedi before having to fight against him when he turned into Darth Vader. Even after that heartbreak, Obi-Wan got back to work, protecting Luke and helping to train him as a Jedi, continuing his valuable teachings even after he became one with the Force.

Galen Erso

Galen was willing to do anything for his family, including designing a weakness in the Death Star knowing that his Stardust would be able to find it. That connection to his pride and love for Jyn ultimately helped the Rebellion have a fighting chance against the Empire.

Bail Organa

We owe a lot to Bail. General Leia was able to learn the ropes of politics with the help of her adoptive father and he trusted her with obtaining vital information that could give the Rebellion a leg up against the Empire. Bail raised Leia to be a strong leader and the galaxy has benefited from that tremendously. Leia’s tactics in combating the Empire and First Order would make Bail proud.

Who are some influential fathers or father figures in Star Wars that you admire?

Kristen Bates is flying by the seat of her pants and doing the best she can. Slow walker. Spends too much time on the internet. Season ticket holder for the Boonta Eve Classic. Aspiring smuggler. Find her on the interwebs @kristenkbates.

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Father’s Day can be complicated. One day you think your dad is a navigator on a spice freighter only to find out — well, like I said, it’s complicated.

To celebrate your own father, bake up a batch of TIE Advanced X1 starfighter cookie accessories. Made to look like a dapper necktie and inspired by Darth Vader’s iconic experimental TIE fighter, these treats will prove worthy in both blasting rebel starfighters and hunger.

These stylish cookies are the tastiest ships in the Imperial Starfighter Corps and are sure to make you want to rule the galaxy with your dad this Father’s Day.

Darth Vader Bow TIE Cookies

What You’ll Need:

  • 1 bow tie cookie cutter
  • White icing
  • Black icing
  • Red confetti sprinkles

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • Black food gel dye

Step 1: In a medium bowl whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.

Step 2: In the bowl of an electric mixer cream the butter and sugar until combined.

Step 3: Add the egg, vanilla, and a small amount of black food gel dye.

Step 4: Slowly add in the dry ingredients just until the dough comes together, and turns gray in color.

Step 5: Split the dough into two and wrap in plastic wrap. Chill until you are ready to use.

Step 6: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Prep baking sheets with silpats or parchment paper.

Step 7: Roll out the dough to about 1/4 inch thick. Use the bow tie cutter to cut out the shapes and transfer onto the prepped baking sheets.

Step 8: Bake for 10 minutes, let cool on a wire rack.

Step 9: With a #3 tip and white icing, pipe a circle in the center of the tie, adding a small line across the top. Then pipe the side wings, and details to form a TIE fighter shape.

Step 10: Use the black icing and a #2 tip to create the center window and details.

Step 11: Add two red sprinkles at the base of the window, adhering with more icing.

Step 12: When the icing is dry, the cookies are ready to serve.

You may dispense with the pleasantries — enjoy these cookies and Happy Father’s Day!

Jenn Fujikawa is a lifestyle and food writer. Follow her on Twitter at @justjenn and check her Instagram @justjennrecipes and blog www.justjennrecipes.com for even more Star Wars food photos.

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This week, The Star Wars Show returns BeHan the Scenes for a trip to Han Solo’s home world.

We’ve already traveled the mean streets of Corellia at the beginning of Solo: A Star Wars Story. Now Lucasfilm Story Group’s Pablo Hidalgo gives us an in-depth look at the coordinated stunts and special effects that brought the sequence to life.

Speeder chases, gangs of goons, and superstar space pups! What’s not to love?

Seeing the scene come together is pretty impressive, but our favorite part has to be Saxon, who plays a Corellian hound. But you’d never recognize the cute canine on-screen; Saxon is specially trained to wear a custom Lycra bodysuit and muscled costume to transform into the fearsome creature bred for hunting and attack.

Check out the full segment in the video below, plus news on Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order and other gaming news from EA Play and E3, and an interview with Star Wars author Claudia Gray about expanding Leia’s story and seeing her words come to the world of manga.

Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order Announced, Exploring the World of Corellia, and Author Claudia Gray! - YouTube

 Solo: A Star Wars Story is in theaters now.

StarWars.com All Star Wars, all the time.

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