Loading...

Follow SPROUTED KITCHEN on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Sprouted Kitchen turns ten this week. TEN! My goodness. I had some Instagram friends tell me their favorite SK recipes and it was so neat to hear what your favorites are. The ones that were on repeat were the pumpkin muffins, lentil meatballs, salads in general, strawberry leek quesadillas, goodness wraps, fiesta kale slaw, enchiladas, lentil soup and the salmon tacos and honey fudge from SKCC, amongst others. I have never considered myself a chef - I am a home cook who chose to be doing her learning and experimenting in a public space. I am so grateful that you’ve trusted me with your dinner plans and feeding your families.

I have always felt a bit outside of the online life - sort of there, but not fully - never putting two feet in, as this business has felt so fleeting. Until Cooking Club, my work with Sprouted Kitchen has never been the one, full-time job I’ve had, it has always been in tandem with x, y, and z other gig. I liked those other jobs, I enjoyed being around real-life people versus just online, it also felt like a safety net while income here has always fluctuated. Hugh made this site as a gift for my 25th birthday and we didn’t make a cent from it for a good three years maybe? Just two people naively working on a passion project in my parents kitchen one day a week. I wrote recipes and shared my ramblings without any knowledge about SEO or ads. Lots of kitchen trial and error. A girl trying to figure out where she stood in her story with food and wellness and love and self-confidence and hospitality - a story I am still very much in, just ten years down the timeline with babies sprinkled in.

I was baffled that people trusted me, or wanted to read about how we were figuring out how to be newlyweds, or funny stories from working the sample booth at Trader Joes . The cookbook deals were both flattering and challenging. I am proud we have those - maybe the most proud of myself I’ve ever been was when I saw the first printed and bound copy. We worked hard, and sure, maybe it was premature in my experience as a home cook, but I needed to say yes to the risk and I’m so glad I did. We learned SO much from that experience and I hope I get another go at it, especially now that my cooking style feels more developed.

We happened to get started in this space before Twitter and Instagram burst into everyone’s lives. I have watched the game change in both of those places. In it, but not with both feet. So what would it look like if I DID say yes to this whole thing? What is my “why?” What is the problem I am trying to solve? Can I (happily) be a worker and a mother? Where would my work live and not feel like the other shoe may drop at any time? I don’t really know what makes someone successful. Is it money or popularity or that you can make a living doing what you enjoy? I don’t really know what we’re all chasing and whose definition we’re using as anchors.

Hugh and I started Cooking Club last September as the last endeavor to see if Sprouted Kitchen had potential to be a career - like a capital “C” Career - one that paid our mortgage and afforded health care and that heavy preschool bill, and ideally some savings. Inspired by my Weekends with Elyse, Brene Brown writings, and a handful of encouraging conversations with friends, and honestly because Hugh and I both couldn’t quite believe in the idea of starting over with a 9-to-5-office-grind kind of thing - we put both feet in.

I have an email folder dedicated to nice notes I receive from readers over these past ten years and the frequency I was filing emails to that folder was notable - this was helping people, I felt useful. I believe in family dinners. I believe in eating and feeding people in a health conscious way. I believe that even with little kids or allergies or zero time, YOU CAN MAKE DINNER! Anyway, I don’t mean to do more evangelizing for Cooking Club, but my point is that I feel like I stepped into the work this whole timeline was leading me towards. I feel confident in this work. I believe it is beautiful and useful and absolutely my voice. I feel like I am in peoples’ kitchens with them - sharing what I’ve learned and trying to give away as much knowledge as I can, so they can make a pretty and practical and wholesome dinner at home too. I don’t think it will be forever, but for this first time in this past ten years, I am not scared about what that means.

“You either walk inside your story and own it, or you stand outside your story and hustle for your worthiness.”

- Brene Brown

I’m in the arena, as Brene would call it, and it feels right in here.

Thanks to those of you who still read the blog - who have perhaps followed along for all of these past ten years. Thank you for buying our books or looking past a sponsored post when you may have not preferred that or signed up for Cooking Club or have been my friend IRL. Your support is what has allowed us to continue work in and around this space, and we are grateful. Thank you!

TACO SALAD BOWLS

I called for chili powder, dried oregano and cumin to season things, but I will also use taco seasoning if I have it. The Trader Joes one is fairly spicy for my kids, so I generally use that for adults.

The sauce can be made a day in advance. The potatoes can be made a day in advance and brought to room temperature before serving.

All these bits can also be stuffed into a tortilla.

IngredientsFor the MAGICAL AVOCADO SAUCE

2 clove garlic
1 jalapeño, partially seeded
2 green onions, trimmed
1 small bundle of cilantro
1/4 cup roasted, salted pumpkin seeds/pepitas (pistachios work too!)
2 large avocados, pitted
1 tsp. sea salt
juice of 2 large limes
2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
splash of water

For the Roasted Sweet Potato

1 large sweet potato, peeled and diced
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 tsp. chili powder
1/2 tsp. sea salt

For the SALMON

1 1/2 lbs. wild salmon filets
sea salt and pepper
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp. maple syrup
1 tsp. dried oregano
1 tsp. cumin
juice of one lime

For the bowl

1 1/2 cups cooked black beans (1 13.5 oz. can, rinsed and drained)
1 cup cooked quinoa
6 cups greens - cabbage and baby kale
minced red onion

optional salad bits

1 pint baby tomatoes, halved and quartered
corn
shaved radishes
cotija
fresh cilantro

Directions

Preheat the oven to 425’ and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Put the diced sweet potatoes on the sheet and drizzle them with the oil, chili powder and salt. Toss everything together to coat, spread them in an even layer and roast for 20-25 minutes until tender and just browned on the edges. Set aside the potatoes, but we’re going to reuse that same sheet.

Turn the heat down to 300’. Put the salmon filets on the baking sheet and season the fish with salt and pepper. Rub the olive oil, maple onto the flesh then sprinkle the top with the dried oregano and cumin. Bake on the middle rack for 15 minutes. Timing will vary based on thickness of the fish. Squeeze lime juice all over the top just out of the oven.

Ok! Let’s assemble these bowls. I start with a big pile of greens tossed in a tiny bit of olive oil, lime juice and salt. Dress or not dress, it’ll be fine. Top the bowl with a scoop of quinoa, beans, sweet potatoes, any other salad bits you want to add. Flake apart the fish and add some of that on top of the bowl and finish it with a big spoonful or two of the avocado sauce and garnish with more cilantro or anything else you fancy.

Sara Forte 2019-05-08 Taco Salad with Wild Salmon

4

A bright and healthy take on taco salad with wild salmon and a magical avocado sauce.

  • 2 clove garlic
  • 1 jalapeño, partially seeded
  • 2 green onions, trimmed
  • 1 small bundle of cilantro
  • 1/4 cup roasted, salted pumpkin seeds/pepitas (pistachios work too!)
  • 2 large avocados, pitted
  • 1 tsp. sea salt
  • juice of 2 large limes
  • 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • splash of water
  • 1 large sweet potato, peeled and diced
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 1 1/2 lbs. wild salmon filets
  • sea salt and pepper
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp. maple syrup
  • 1 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1 tsp. cumin
  • juice of one lime
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked black beans (1 13.5 oz. can, rinsed and drained)
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa
  • 6 cups greens - cabbage and baby kale
  • minced red onion
732 calories42 grams fat7 grams satFat0 grams transFat50 grams carbohydrate7 grams sugar18 grams fiber32 grams netCarbs44 grams protein

Preheat the oven to 425’ and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Put the diced sweet potatoes on the sheet and drizzle them with the oil, chili powder and salt. Toss everything together to coat, spread them in an even layer and roast for 20-25 minutes until tender and just browned on the edges. Set aside the potatoes, but we’re going to reuse that same sheet.

Turn the heat down to 300’. Put the salmon filets on the baking sheet and season the fish with salt and pepper. Rub the olive oil, maple onto the flesh then sprinkle the top with the dried oregano and cumin. Bake on the middle rack for 15 minutes. Timing will vary based on thickness of the fish. Squeeze lime juice all over the top just out of the oven.

Ok! Let’s assemble these bowls. I start with a big pile of greens tossed in a tiny bit of olive oil, lime juice and salt. Dress or not dress, it’ll be fine. Top the bowl with a scoop of quinoa, beans, sweet potatoes, any other salad bits you want to add. Flake apart the fish and add some of that on top of the bowl and finish it with a big spoonful or two of the avocado sauce and garnish with more cilantro or anything else you fancy.

PT20M

PT40M

PT1H

mexican

Entrée

salad, vegetarian, pescatarian, fish, gluten free, dairy free

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
SPROUTED KITCHEN by Sara Forte - 3w ago

Let me start off by saying that I did not go into this trip feeling easy breezy. I love my children more than anything; they lighten my heart and ask interesting questions and love me unconditionally and say the funniest things but honestly, it is easiest to take a trip without them. Ok? ok. It certainly gets better year by year, but it feels like we are still investing in future trips being better by getting them some experience now. That said, my fondest memories from childhood are trips - camping, drives down to Mexico, weekends away to Palm Springs (all this by car mind you). It was not extravagant or expensive, it was fun to get out of the routine, and I want that for my family, even if it’s hard.




My sister got married in Australia a few weeks ago and I was anxious going into it. Unfortunately, I ride the waves of my kids’ emotions (I’m working on it…), and I knew that them being tired, out of sorts, whiny would pull my overly-sensitive self down with them, so we tried to prepare.

With summer around the corner, I wanted to share a few items we had for the plane, in case you find yourself needing to fill your tool bag sometime soon. At the time of publishing, our daughter is 3 and son nearly 5. The former is a light sleeper, the later loves tv, both are hungry ALL THE TIME so I knew these truths going in. I packed them each a generously filled backpack that had a reusable water bottle, iPad, card games, snacks and two toys from the dollar store I let them pick out a few weeks prior. We also had neck pillows which I’m not sure were necessary because they are so bulky and the plane gives you their flimsy ones anyway which are fine for kids.







The amazon links are affiliated, but all purchases were made by me and I hope you trust I wouldn’t mention it if I didn’t like it.

IPAD APPS

I don’t mind however you feel about screen time, but I believe it has a time and place, and that place is certainly on a 15-hour plane flight. Since everyone has their own screen on a flight that long, the ipads actually lost out to the novelty of their “own tv” but still, having these apps came in handy when we were sitting at restaurants for wedding festivities and such.

Monkey Lunchbox

Daniel Tiger

Duolingo (I have to do this language app with my son, so probs age 5+)

Endless Reader

Starfall

Thomas the Train

GAMES + BITS

Zoob Traveler: If you have a lego loving kid, these were great for keeping my older child busy and they come in an easy-to-pack bag.

Melissa and Doug everything: The tape book, water wow deals and felt pad specifically.

Card Games: Uno, Spot it, Go Fish and Memory







SNACKS

Melatonin Chocolates: I bought these from Good Day. They make a kids version too but it’s the same 1mg dose per chocolate, and the kids eat one and adults eat four so it doesn’t really matter which you buy, just alter the dose. Melatonin is natural and harmless. This from Zarbees is the same dosage and less expensive.

Nut Butter packets: All four of us ate these. I can usually find carrot sticks and apples no matter where we go, and having some nut butter to squeeze on makes those things more exciting for my kids. We buy the ones from Justins or Wildfriends has some. Speaking of, the oatmeal and nut butter packs came in handy too and the plane does have hot water available to cook the oats. Most markets have those on the go deals now.

Cut apples and carrot sticks: These can sit for hours without refrigeration and not get weird. I packed them in reusable bags then was able to reuse these throughout the trip.

Coconut Chips: Trader Joes makes a low sugar one near the trail mix.

New Primal Turkey Sticks: they make kids and adults sizes. You obv can get turkey jerky anywhere, but it was nice to have a protein for them since I brought a lot of carbs and that is what the airline offers them too.

I packed myself a salad on the way over. It was mostly composed of the last bits in the fridge I needed to use up, but if you’re planning ahead: these soba noodles, this salad, or these wraps or oh! or the winter salad from SKCC. I made the kids a turkey and hummus sandwich that got consumed before we even took off but whatever.

Dates, pretzels…yes, my entire personal item was full of food





Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Don’t judge these at first look! I mean, these are hard to take a photo of ok? There is something about this tot recipe that equally makes me roll my eyes a bit and also feel quite proud of myself. I am not above a convenience food for the kids - they love Banza Mac n’ Cheese and all things Dr. Praegers and we do fish sticks and avocado in tortillas for a scrappy fish taco and everyone is happy with those things. BUT! I made a homemade tot! That is exciting and I know ya’ll have been asking for me to populate the feeding babies section with more options. The tricky part with veggie burger type doughs is that eggs, or cheese or breadcrumbs hold those bits together. These have none of those things, but will also need you to treat them gingerly because of it. Be patient, expect to have funny shapes and dirty hands and I think your littles will like these. Do not forget the ketchup and ranch.

SWEET POTATO + BROWN RICE TOTS

Recipe adapted from the Natural Nurturer

A friend from Cooking Club pointed me towards this recipe and my kids are obsessed. I always have leftover rice and stock sweet potatoes so these are easy to get together. They do not have eggs, breadcrumbs or dairy, which I usually include in my veggie patties so hopefully these help some people whose kids (or selves!) are sensitive to those things. If yours are not, a sprinkle of shredded cheese in here would help them stay together. These don’t have a ton going on, so feel free to add more herbs or spice based on whom you’re feeding.

ingredients

1 cup cooked and cooled brown rice (or quinoa)
1/2 cup steamed and cooled sweet potato flesh, about 1 small
2 Tbsp. flaxmeal
1/2 tsp. sea salt
2 Tbsp. brown rice flour, plus more for coating (panko or breadcrumbs work too)
dollop of pesto or chimichurri, optional
fresh parsley
avocado or coconut oil, for cooking


directions

In a mixing bowl, combine the grains, sweet potato, flaxmeal, salt, brown rice flour, dollop of sauce if using and a small handful of fresh chopped parsley. Stir to combine. Pop the bowl in the fridge for 10-15 minutes to chill and firm up.

Heat a generous few tablespoons of oil in your pan (non-stick or seasoned cast iron suggested). Put a bit more brown rice flour in a shallow bowl. Form the sweet potato mixture into tot shapes and roll them in the flour. Your hands will get messy, just rinse between. Add them to the hot oil and continue with the remaining dough. Toast the tots on all sides, shaking the pan around, and remove them to a plate to cool.

Serve the tots with ketchup or ranch. They can be frozen and reheated in the oven at 400’ as needed.

Sara Forte 2019-04-11 Sweet Potato & Brown Rice Tater Tots

16

A simple and healthy home made tater tot.

  • 1 cup cooked brown rice (or quinoa)
  • 1/2 cup steamed and cooled sweet potato flesh, about 1 small
  • 2 Tbsp. flaxmeal
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 2 Tbsp. brown rice flour, plus more for coating (panko or breadcrumbs work too)
  • dollop of pesto or chimichurri, optional
  • fresh parsley
  • avocado or coconut oil, for cooking
31 calories1 grams fat5 grams carbohydrate0 grams sugar1 grams fiber1 grams protein

In a mixing bowl, combine the grains, sweet potato, flaxmeal, salt, brown rice flour, dollop of sauce if using and a small handful of fresh chopped parsley. Stir to combine. Pop the bowl in the fridge for 10-15 minutes to chill and firm up.

Heat a generous few tablespoons of oil in your pan (non-stick or seasoned cast iron suggested). Put a bit more brown rice flour in a shallow bowl. Form the sweet potato mixture into tot shapes and roll them in the flour. Your hands will get mess, just rinse between. Add them to the hot oil and continue with the remaining dough. Toast the tots on all sides and remove them to a plate to cool.

Serve the tots with ketchup or ranch. They can be frozen and reheated in the oven at 400’ as needed.

PT10M

PT15M

PT25M

american

Snack

kid friendly, finger food, quick, easy, snack

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This egg salad recipe existed here a few years back, piled on top of avocado toast. For our Cooking Club menu a couple weeks ago we piled it on top of asparagus and served it with toast. I know it feels lunchy-brunchy, but it’s nice to have something off the mark for dinner. Videos take us awhile to make, but I know they make a recipe feel so much more approachable. Recipes can look like so many words, and then you see it on video and realize cooking is a lot simpler than it looks in recipe format. I know this is ahead for an Easter menu, but maybe log this one away for then.

Quick Roasted Asparagus w/ Eggs Gribiche - YouTube
Directions

Hard boiled eggs: Put the eggs in a pot and cover them with water. Bring the water up to a boil, put the cover on, turn off the heat, and let them sit for 10 minutes Drain off the hot water and fill the pot with ice and a splash of water. Let the eggs cool completely, then drain. This can be done a week in advance. 

Preheat the oven to 400’. Lay the trimmed asparagus on a rimmed baking sheet and drizzle with the oil and a big pinch of salt and pepper. Roast for 8-10 minutes, though timing will vary on the thickness of your asparagus. Early season bundles are on the thin side, so 10 minutes should be the max, less if you like them snappy. 

For the gribiche: I don’t like my egg salad super yolky, so I remove half of the yolks. Don’t remove all of them! The yolks do help make it rich and delicious. Chop up the hardboiled eggs. 

In a medium bowl, combine the mustard, mayonnaise, olive oil, zest and juice of the lemon, salt and pepper and stir to mix. Add the fresh herbs, chopped eggs and stir to mix. Taste for seasonings. 

Serve a heap of the eggs gribiche over the asparagus. Serve it with fresh toasted bread, or not. 

IngredientsFOR THE GRIBICHE

6 hard boiled eggs
1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 Tbsp. mayonnaise
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
Zest and juice of one lemon
2 Tbsp. capers, drained and chopped
1/4-1/2 tsp. sea salt, to taste
Fresh ground pepper
1/2 cup fresh herbs - some combination of parsley, dill and chives

FOR THE ASPARAGUS

3/4 lb. asparagus, trimmed
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
sea salt and pepper

FOR SERVING

Good quality bread, toasted, for serving

Sara Forte 2019-04-03 Quick Roasted Asparagus with Eggs Gribiche

4

A simple brunch recipe that can be served along side all the favorites.

  • 6 hard boiled eggs
  • 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1 Tbsp. mayonnaise
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • Zest and juice of one lemon
  • 2 Tbsp. capers, drained and chopped
  • 1/4-1/2 tsp. sea salt, to taste
  • Fresh ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup fresh herbs - some combination of parsley, dill and chives
  • 3/4 lb. asparagus, trimmed
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • sea salt and pepper
200 calories16 grams fat0 grams transFat5 grams carbohydrate2 grams sugar2 grams fiber10 grams protein

Hard boiled eggs: Put the eggs in a pot and cover them with water. Bring the water up to a boil, put the cover on, turn off the heat, and let them sit for 10 minutes Drain off the hot water and fill the pot with ice and a splash of water. Let the eggs cool completely, then drain. This can be done a week in advance.

Preheat the oven to 400’. Lay the trimmed asparagus on a rimmed baking sheet and drizzle with the oil and a big pinch of salt and pepper. Roast for 8-10 minutes, though timing will vary on the thickness of your asparagus. Early season bundles are on the thin side, so 10 minutes should be the max, less if you like them snappy.

For the gribiche: I don’t like my egg salad super yolky, so I remove half of the yolks. Don’t remove all of them! The yolks do help make it rich and delicious. Chop up the hardboiled eggs.

In a medium bowl, combine the mustard, mayonnaise, olive oil, zest and juice of the lemon, salt and pepper and stir to mix. Add the fresh herbs, chopped eggs and stir to mix. Taste for seasonings.

Serve a heap of the eggs gribiche over the asparagus. Serve it with fresh toasted bread, or not.

PT20M

PT10M

PT35M

vegetarian

Entrée

brunch, vegetarian, gluten free, dairy free

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I can’t do strict diets. They inspire an otherwise absent rebellious streak in me and I go headlong into a sugar spiral. I remember trying the master cleanse many years ago, fully stocked on all the maple, lemon and cayenne I could stand and I lasted until lunch on the first day. I really like eating. It is much more sustainable for me to find some healthy moderation, because if I set out to not eat ANY sugar, or swear off bread, all I can think about is chocolate and toast. Healthier habits have come from over a decade of caring about wellness, and figuring out what that means to me. I have learned some things by following Kelly Leveque/@bewellbykelly, and while I don’t follow her program (it isn’t realistic with how often I work around food and the variety it requires of me), she’s helped me rethink my meals to curb hunger. I am not afraid of fat, I’m trying harder to incorporate a portion of protein into my meals, and remain mindful of carb intake. I am notorious for giant salads, with no protein, then you would find me halfway through a pint of ice cream one hour later because I was not satisfied. Nuts, avocado, eggs, healthy oils… all of these things help a salad stick. I recently learned I am highly allergic to casein (dairy) and am at the beginning of the road with some auto immune issues, so I am just trying to keep things generally less inflammatory. I keep canned salmon and tuna in the pantry, hard boil half my carton of eggs, or make a lentil salad that has lots of crispy vegetables in it so it will keep in the fridge. I love a good entree salad so much but some garden plate with cucumbers, tomatoes and lettuce does not qualify as dinner.  I don’t have the credentials to speak as an authority on nutrition, but I love learning about it and trying new things to feel good. 

At first glance, this salad may look a little complicated, but I promise all the steps layer on each other and it is the most delicious salad I’ve made in a long time. While the cauli roasts, you make your dressing and crispy quinoa. It makes sense to double up so you can recreate this for lunch the next day. Add chicken or salmon if you are looking for an obvious protein, or don’t, and it works for all the vegan, veg, gluten and dairy free people. I do miss my favorite feta, so add that if you have some. I divided it by component below, so you can make some things in advance if that helps. For nearly every part of the salad, I used the Rich and Robust Olive Oil from the Destination Series by California Olive Ranch. You can see more in my last post here. I used it to roast the cauli, make the green harissa, crisp the quinoa, and smooth out the dressing. It has a grassy, forward flavor, that I really like in salads. California Olive Ranch has partnered with olive growers in other countries for these delicious blends, keeping with the same quality standards you can always expect from the brand. 

baby kale salad with green harissa roasted cauliflower, golden raisins, crispy quinoa, avocado + lemony tahini vinaigrette

I am linking to a green harissa recipe we have here on the site, or also giving you full permission to use the amazing zhoug sauce from Trader Joes if you need to save a step. Both are amazing here or on eggs or smashed with some avocado for a taco or sandwich. You get the idea. It, as well as the quick dressing, can be made in advance to save you time. 

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 400’, spread the cauli florets on a rimmed baking sheet, drizzle with the oil, salt and pepper and toss everything to coat. Rub the oil into the cauli with your hands to make sure everything gets a thin coat. Roast in the upper third of the oven for 25 minutes, stirring halfway through, until well browned. 

Make the green harissa if you’re making it from scratch, or have your zhoug ready. When the cauliflower is out of the oven, toss it with the red onion and about 3 Tbsp. of the green sauce. Set aside to cool. 

For the quinoa, heat the oil in a pan over medium heat. Add the dry and cooled quinoa to the pan, give it one stir, then leave it undisturbed for 3 minutes so it browns. Give it one more stir, let it brown for 5 minutes. Continue to do this every 5 minutes until the quinoa looks browned and crispy. Should take about 15 minutes. Let it cool. 

Stir the dressing ingredients together - the tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, with a pinch of salt and pepper. 

Collect you kale in a large salad bowl. Drizzle on desired amount of dressing and toss to coat. Add the raisins and half the pistachios, toss again. Serve your bowls of salad with a heaping pile of the cauli, some crispy quinoa, avocados and garnish with remaining pistachios. 

You could add a little feta or lentils or whatever protein you’d like!

ingredientsfor the green harissa cauli

1 large head cauli, about 2 lbs., cut into florets
2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp. sea salt
Fresh ground pepper
1/4 of a red onion, thinly sliced
green harissa or zhoug from Trader Joes

for the crispy quinoa

1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 cup cooked and cooled quinoa

for the lemon tahini dressing

2 Tbsp. tahini
Juice of one Meyer lemon (about 1/4 cup)
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

for the salad

5 oz. / 4 cups baby kale
1/3 cup golden raisins (I soak mine in a tiny bit of apple cider vinegar and hot water to plump up)
1/2 cup toasted pistachios, roughly chopped
2 avocados, sliced

This post is sponsored by California Olive Ranch. All recipes and writing are my own. Thank you for supporting brands I work with, so that I may continue to create recipes here!

Sara Forte 2019-03-07 baby kale salad with green harissa roasted cauliflower, golden raisins, crispy quinoa, avocado + lemony tahini vinaigrette

6

A hearty salad with layers of flavor and texture.

  • 1 large head cauli, about 2 lbs., cut into florets
  • 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • Fresh ground pepper
  • 1/4 of a red onion, thinly sliced
  • green harissa or zhoug from Trader Joes
  • crispy quinoa
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup cooked and cooled quinoa
  • lemon tahini dressing
  • 2 Tbsp. tahini
  • Juice of one Meyer lemon (about 1/4 cup)
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 oz. / 4 cups baby kale
  • 1/3 cup golden raisins (I soak mine in a tiny bit of apple cider vinegar and hot water to plump up)
  • 1/2 cup toasted pistachios, roughly chopped
  • 2 avocados, sliced
353 calories27 grams fat26 grams carbohydrate7 grams protein

Preheat the oven to 400’, spread the cauli florets on a rimmed baking sheet, drizzle with the oil, salt and pepper and toss everything to coat. Rub the oil into the cauli with your hands to make sure everything gets a thin coat. Roast in the upper third of the oven for 25 minutes, stirring halfway through, until well browned.

Make the green harissa if you’re making it from scratch, or have your zhoug ready. When the cauliflower is out of the oven, toss it with the red onion and about 3 Tbsp. of the green sauce. Set aside to cool.

For the quinoa, heat the oil in a pan over medium heat. Add the dry and cooled quinoa to the pan, give it one stir, then leave it undisturbed for 3 minutes so it browns. Give it one more stir, let it brown for 5 minutes. Continue to do this every 5 minutes until the quinoa looks browned and crispy. Should take about 15 minutes. Let it cool.

Stir the dressing ingredients together - the tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, with a pinch of salt and pepper.

Collect you kale in a large salad bowl. Drizzle on desired amount of dressing and toss to coat. Add the raisins and half the pistachios, toss again. Serve your bowls of salad with a heaping pile of the cauli, some crispy quinoa, avocados and garnish with remaining pistachios.

You could add a little feta or lentils or whatever protein you’d like!

PT15M

PT25M

PT40M

Mediterranean

Entrée

vegetarian, gluten free

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It is a lot of recipes. It sounded manageable in theory; write four recipes each week for Sprouted Kitchen Cooking Club, keep up loosely here on the blog, my private chef job, occasional freelance work, try to keep up with instagram content anddddd my little family with two spirited wee people. It’s a lot of time in the kitchen, let’s just say that. I don’t idolize busyness, I try not to use that as a response to “how are you?” because it’s overused and self imposed. Being busy is not a state that makes me respect someone any more nor a flurry in which I wish to reside. I try to honor that, as I schedule activities and social plans for our family, but with two parents who have their own businesses which seem to keep birthing more mini side businesses, “busy” feels like a word I have to try really hard not to use.

I was thinking about how there are likely a number of you who feel the same, perhaps with kids or a demanding job and the hamster wheel feels exhausting. I wanted to share a recent SKCC favorite - this vegetable tagine. It’s a bit of chopping up front, but it simmers away in a just-spicy-enough broth and you ladle it over couscous which sort of blends in and thickens the whole thing if/when you stir it around. The garnishes are important, a little creaminess and crunch. The best part is, that it gets better on day two or three, when the vegetables really soak in the flavor from the broth so leftovers are welcome. Big pots of soup and stews seem to calm me. They speak of comfort and warmth and leftovers that get you out of making yet another meal.

Maybe you’re overwhelmed or lonely or worried or sad or doing super great this week but I just find this stew to be a recipe for all people of any sort of circumstance. Food is special - it connects and heals and nourishes and slow us down in a good way (hopefully), so I hope you take good care of yourself this week! xo.

VEGETABLE TAGINE WITH APRICOT COUSCOUS

Serves 4-6

They sell harissa paste at Trader Joes, Whole Foods and larger grocers near the salsas or international foods section. While it will vary by brand, it is spicy, so if you are timid with that, start with one teaspoon and add from there. We use the TJ’s version and while 2 tsp. is definitely warm, it's not burn your face off warm.

INSTRUCTIONS

In a large dutch oven over medium heat, warm the butter or ghee. Prepare all your vegetables and preheat the oven to 300’. Add the potato, onion, garlic, cauliflower and salt and sauté about 5-7 minutes until there are some brown marks on the edges and they just begin to soften. Stir in the zucchini, cumin, coriander, harissa, honey and tomatoes and all their juices. Stir and cook another minute. Add the can of chickpeas and broth and bring it to a gentle simmer. Cover the pot and transfer it to the middle rack of the oven. Bake for 35-40 minutes until vegetables are tender. Let it cool a bit on the stove and then taste for seasonings. 

While the vegetables cook, prepare your couscous. 

Bring 1 cup of water, a pinch of salt and the butter to a simmer. Add the couscous, stir, turn off the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes to hydrate. The same can be done in a microwave, instructions are typically on the back of the box. Stir in the apricots and set aside. 

To serve, put a scoop of couscous in the bowl with a few ladles of the vegetable stew on top. Garnish generously with plain yogurt, lots of cilantro and some toasted nuts. 

IngredientsFOR THE TANGINE

2 Tbsp. unsalted butter or ghee
1 large sweet potato, 2” dice
1 yellow onion, halved and sliced thin
4 garlic cloves, sliced thin
1 small head of cauliflower, broken into small florets
1 tsp. sea salt
2 zucchini, sliced in 1” half moons
1 tsp. cumin
1 tsp. coriander 
2 tsp. Harissa paste*
2 Tbsp. honey
1 14.5 oz. can diced, fire-roasted tomatoes
1 14.5 oz. can chickpeas, drained
1 qt. vegetable stock or broth

FOR THE COUSCOUS

1 cup couscous
1 Tbsp. butter or ghee
Handful of dried apricots, chopped small

FOR SERVING

1 bundle of cilantro, roughly chopped
plain yogurt
toasted pine nuts or almonds

Sara Forte 2019-01-29 vegetable tagine with apricot couscous

4

A hearty, spiced vegetarian stew.

  • 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter or ghee

  • 1 large sweet potato, 2” dice

  • 1 yellow onion, halved and sliced thin

  • 4 garlic cloves, sliced thin

  • 1 small head of cauliflower, broken into small florets

  • 1 tsp. sea salt

  • 2 zucchini, sliced in 1” half moons

  • 1 tsp. cumin

  • 1 tsp. coriander 

  • 2 tsp. Harissa paste*

  • 2 Tbsp. honey

  • 1 14.5 oz. can diced, fire-roasted tomatoes

  • 1 14.5 oz. can chickpeas, drained

  • 1 qt. vegetable stock or broth
  • 1 cup couscous

  • 1 Tbsp. butter or ghee

  • Handful of dried apricots, chopped small
  • 1 bundle of cilantro, roughly chopped

  • plain yogurt

  • toasted pine nuts or almonds
521 calories13 grams fat88 grams carbohydrate18 grams protein

In a large dutch oven over medium heat, warm the butter or ghee. Prepare all your vegetables and preheat the oven to 300’. Add the potato, onion, garlic, cauliflower and salt and sauté about 5-7 minutes until there are some brown marks on the edges and they just begin to soften. Stir in the zucchini, cumin, coriander, harissa, honey and tomatoes and all their juices. Stir and cook another minute. Add the can of chickpeas and broth and bring it to a gentle simmer. Cover the pot and transfer it to the middle rack of the oven. Bake for 35-40 minutes until vegetables are tender. Let it cool a bit on the stove and then taste for seasonings.

While the vegetables cook, prepare your couscous.

Bring 1 cup of water, a pinch of salt and the butter to a simmer. Add the couscous, stir, turn off the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes to hydrate. The same can be done in a microwave, instructions are typically on the back of the box. Stir in the apricots and set aside.

To serve, put a scoop of couscous in the bowl with a few ladles of the vegetable stew on top. Garnish generously with plain yogurt, lots of cilantro and some toasted nuts.

PT20M

PT40M

PT1H

Mediterranean

Entrée

Vegetarian, healthy, stew, entré, bowl food

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
SPROUTED KITCHEN by Sara Forte - 4M ago

I am forever and always a proponent of having sauces, dressings and condiments in the fridge to make something out of pantry staples or the end of the vegetable bin. I got into garlic confit after I had a surplus of garlic sometime last year and now I plan for it. It makes a delicious oil that can be used a number of ways. It’s delicious smashed into toast or some of the fragrant oil stirred into soup or a bowl of grains. I have a list going below of the ways I’ve made good use of it - it just makes quick, simple things taste like you spent more time than you really did. Garlic and olive oil are both great for immunity, so cooking aside, it’s legit health food during cold and flu season.

You start with a few heads of garlic and send them for a warm bath in some good olive oil in a low oven. I use the Rich and Robust olive oil from the new Destination Series from California Olive Ranch. You can read more about the Destination Series in that link above. We were able to taste the new blends and learn more about these forward thinking partnerships on our trip with them last month. The olive oil has an assertive and noticeable flavor which works great here. Seeing as I use this confit to flavor otherwise super basic dishes, the great tasting oil is noticeable here. The confit is mostly hands off time, just enjoy that incredible smell wafting through your house. You let the garlicky oil cool down then transfer it to jars so it’s easy to use. It will firm up in the fridge, as olive oil does, but just leave it at room temperature for 10 minutes for it to return to it’s liquid state. It will save for a few months and also gifts beautifully along side a jar of soup.

This post is made in partnership with California Olive Ranch. Thank you for supporting our partners so we can continue to create recipes here. All opinions are my own.




What do I do with it?

- Spread on crostini (before or after toasting)

- Smashed and stirred into a bowl of beans or grains

- Pasta or zucchini noodles

- Sautéed greens

- Flatbread topping

- Smashed into potatoes

- Cauliflower mash


ingredients

3-4 heads of garlic, peeled
Sprig of fresh thyme and/or rosemary
1 bay leaf
Sprinkle of red pepper flakes
1.5 cups California Olive Ranch Rich & Robust extra virgin olive oil

instructions

Preheat the oven to 325’.

Open and peel the garlic cloves and place them in a small, oven proof baking dish. Add the thyme, bay leaf, sprinkle of pepper flakes and then cover everything with the oil. Pop the dish in the oven for 45 minutes. It can be used immediately after this, or cool completely before transferring it into jars and storing it in the fridge.

Note: this is not salted, so when you add it to dishes or crostini, you will want to season it with salt to your taste.

Sara Forte 2019-01-15 How to make garlic confit

12

A delicious, garlic infused oil that can be used to dress everything from bread to salads to soups.

  • 3-4 heads of garlic
  • Sprig of fresh thyme and/or rosemary
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Sprinkle of red pepper flakes
  • 1.5 cups olive oil
261 calories27 grams fat5 grams carbohydrate1 grams protein

Preheat the oven to 325’.

Open and peel the garlic cloves and place them in a small, oven proof baking dish. Add the thyme, bay leaf, sprinkle of pepper flakes and then cover everything with the oil. Pop the dish in the oven for 45 minutes. It can be used immediately after this, or cool completely before transferring it into jars and storing it in the fridge.

PT5M

PT45M

PT50M

italian

Side

condiment, sauce, side, herbs, dipping

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We went out last night to pick up a tree. The kids were bundled and the packing blanket was in the back to protect the roof. This is the first year both of the kids are super jazzed about the holidays. Curran (4.5) is excited for new toys and allllll the colorful, tacky decor. I am told every day that the white lights we have on the house are NOT festive AT ALL. Cleo is excited about whatever Curran is excited about lately, so anytime we see lights (trees, wreaths, fake reindeer, whatever) squealing ensues. It was cute at first, and now it’s just… loud. But truly, I love it. The first few years of parenting are so much work, with few of those personal connections where you actually get to see your children as a people. The more I get to know them, the more I like them. Even the complicated, emotional parts. Anyway, their excitement is infectious, and their Scrouge McWhite-Christmas-Light-Preferring mother is even considering putting rainbow lights up somewhere… like inside their room ;)

Anyway, the tree. I had this romantic idea about the tradition of picking out a tree and how we would pick up dinner after and decorate it, fireside, with classic Christmas tunes. As it turns out, it was not the romantic vision I anticipated in my head. There was a time this would have wildly disappointed me, but kids have lowered my expectations for the better. We ended up at Costco which I love for many reasons, but rustic tree buying experiences is not one of them. I mean you can’t even see the trees, they are all wrapped in twine in bins and you just take a wild guess. Curran seems to be recovering from a minor concussion so complains and whines frequently, and I get that he doesn’t feel well, but, again, with the Cleo doing everything he does. Our dinner was underwhelming and by the time we got home, people needed to go straight to bed. They both screamed at the reality of needing to take a warm shower (how dare me!), and tucked away they went. There was no decorating, no songs, no fire.

I am not disappointed, this is life. When I think back about getting a tree and decorating it with my family, it was not some Norman Rockwell scene every time. Traditions and memories in their imperfect state are just as nostalgic for me as the ones where everything went ‘right.’ Fighting over whose year it was to put the angel on top, holding the twine down through the windows of the mini van to make sure the tree didn’t fly off, how all the limbs starting breaking off the clay wisemen in the manger scene and no one bothered to glue them back on, or the year a votive candle lit a garland on fire. I would maybe argue that the messy parts, the imperfect parts, are actually more interesting. I don’t think I even remember the moments that went as planned, if there were any. So Mr. Frankie, the bare, unlit, lopsided tree, is sitting in the living room, reminding me that all I want for this month is just to soak in the holidays and stay flexible. Mayyyyybe we’ll even put rainbow lights on him this weekend.

CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINT SHORTBREAD

Makes 18

Recipe adapted from Real Simple

I made these a touch sweeter than the written recipe because well, it’s a holiday cookie. You could sprinkle crushed peppermint candies on top while the chocolate drizzle is still soft and that should act as glue for the candies. If you have tried Dorie Greenspan’s World Peace Cookies , they are basically shortbread with a bit of baking soda to help them rise a bit. I’ve tried it here, but don’t think it changes them wildly, so it depends how dense or light you prefer your cookie. Add 1/2 tsp. if you want to try. These are snappy day one, and start to become more tender as they sit. Taste great either way, texture changes, just a fyi.

Ingredients

1/2 cup/1 stick unsalted butter, room temperature
1/3 cup light brown sugar
2 Tbsp. natural cane sugar
1/2 tsp. sea salt
1/4 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 tsp. peppermint extract
1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 cup all-purpose flour

3.5 oz. bar of dark chocolate
1/4 tsp. peppermint extract

flaky salt, for garnish, optional

Instructions

In a stand mixer with paddle attachment or with an electric mixer, beat the butter and both sugars until fluffy. Add the salt, vanilla, peppermint and beat those in to combine. Add the cocoa, flour and beat until just combined, do not over mix. Roll the dough into a log about 2” across (this is kind of hard, just do your best), wrap it in plastic wrap and chill for at least an hour, or overnight. Alternatively, you can roll it out and use cookie cutters to make shapes.

Preheat the oven to 325’ and line a baking sheet with parchment (maybe two, or work in batches). Slice the cookie log into 1/2” coins and arrange them on your baking sheet. They won’t spread much, but give them an inch between for safety. Bake for 10-12 minutes until just dry on the edges. They will look raw in the center but that’s ok! Pull them, and let them cool.

While they cool, melt the chocolate either in the microwave or in a glass bowl over a pot of simmering water. Drizzle it on top of the cookies, sprinkle flaky salt or peppermint candies, if using, and let the chocolate set.
Enjoy! Cookies will keep at room temperature for up to 3 days.

Sara Forte 2018-12-04 CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINT SHORTBREAD

18

A pepperminty, chocolate shortbread cookie with a chocolate drizzle because it's the holidays.

  • 1/2 cup/1 stick unsalted butter, room temperature1/3 cup light brown sugar2 Tbsp. natural cane sugar1/2 tsp. sea salt1/4 tsp. vanilla extract1/2 tsp. peppermint extract1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3.5 oz. bar of dark chocolate1/4 tsp. peppermint extract
  • flaky salt, for garnish, optional
49 calories5 grams fat1 grams carbohydrate0 grams protein

In a stand mixer with paddle attachment or with an electric mixer, beat the butter and both sugars until fluffy. Add the salt, vanilla, peppermint and beat those in to combine. Add the cocoa, flour and beat until just combined, do not over mix. Roll the dough into a log about 2” across (this is kind of hard, just do your best), wrap it in plastic wrap and chill for at least an hour, or overnight. Alternatively, you can roll it out and use cookie cutters to make shapes.

Preheat the oven to 325’ and line a baking sheet with parchment (maybe two, or work in batches). Slice the cookie log into 1/2” coins and arrange them on your baking sheet. They won’t spread much, but give them an inch between for safety. Bake for 10-12 minutes until just dry on the edges. They will look raw in the center but that’s ok! Pull them, and let them cool.

While they cool, melt the chocolate either in the microwave or in a glass bowl over a pot of simmering water. Drizzle it on top of the cookies, sprinkle flaky salt or peppermint candies, if using, and let the chocolate set. Enjoy! Cookies will keep at room temperature for up to 3 days.

PT1H10M

PT12M

PT1H22M

american

Dessert

cookie, holiday, chocolate, treat, dessert

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Easily one of my top five pantry staples, extra virgin olive oil is what I use to cook with most often. To dress a salad or finish my favorite roasted potatoes or add moisture to the best lemon loaf ever. We were invited up to the groves and mill of California Olive Ranch to take a closer look at their process and while I had an idea of the olive oil process from past work experience, it was fascinating to see it on a larger scale.

First of all, the transparency was enough to make me love their brand even more, as they are truly taking every precaution to ensure their oil is the highest quality. I couldn’t believe how many rounds of quality control the olives go through before they are actually pressed. You are probably familiar with their green, squared bottle. They sell it at most grocery stores and even sell at Costco. While the ‘Everyday’ oil is great for, well, everyday, I really enjoyed getting to taste the difference between their Reserve Collection bottles - some mild, or a more spicy, peppery variety for getting great flavor as a salad dressing where you’ll really taste it.

This November, California Olive Ranch is introducing a new suite of products called Destination Series. As they’ve prepared for the weather systems to fluctuate, the brand has been establishing relationships with other olive growers outside of the U.S., who grow their crop with the same attention to detail. After years of perfecting the craft, they are releasing a line of affordable blends, reflective of these partnerships abroad. We had the chance to taste them and again, each so unique and fresh tasting. Can’t wait to pick up a few bottles.

We had the opportunity to ride the harvester that collected the olives, and then see how they get from there, to the mill and the dozens of steps that happen before the oil is bottled and on store shelves. We included some photos here, but there is more information on their site for Olive Oil 101.

I grew up often using rancid oil, and only through learning more about cooking, can identify that terrible smell. Kind of like...plastic? It is a smell you know immediately if you compare it to a truly fresh bottle. How long have you had the bottle you’ve been using? Do you keep it in the pantry, not right next to the hot stove? Olive oil is best stored in cool, dark places. Did you know that people take shots of it to help with inflammation and that it’s been known to bring cholesterol levels down, lower blood pressure, and improve bone calcification and mineralization? I just think it is such a fascinating product that we use without thinking on a daily basis.


I am partnering with California Olive Ranch to share a few olive oil recipes here over the next few months, so stay tuned.

The best part of all this, is that California Olive Ranch is giving away a YEAR (!!) supply of their new Destination Series extra virgin olive oil to a Sprouted Kitchen follower. Head over to our instagram page asap to enter!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
SPROUTED KITCHEN by Sara Forte - 6M ago

Per request! Many moons ago, we made a summer cheese here. It was simple, had a few handmade components but was super quick to throw together. Since then, and especially lately with the holidays coming up, there have been requests for a fall version. It’s not so much that cheese has a season, but the accoutrements do. Slightly heavier cheeses, fall fruits, darker foresty vibes with the herbs and colors.

I included four cheeses: Emmi Le Gruyère, a young blue cheese, a soft goats’ cheese and a firmer, saltier one, such as pecorino, (or a dry manchego is great too). Emmi Le Gruyère is a great specialty cheese to upgrade a recipe or prepare a cheeseboard. I used it in the mini sandwiches because it melts well and has lots of flavor. I made a candied walnut to go along with the blue cheese, drizzling honey and herbs on the goat and leaving the dry cheese cut up. I like to have other bits for snacking that will satisfy the non-cheese lovers. I added fresh pears, grapes, dates, olives — this adds variety, visual interest, and covers a variety of diets, so at least everyone has a snack. I’ll be sure one of my crackers is gluten free, cause it seems someone always is. One of our favorite nights this past year was hosting a game night for friends and I asked everyone to bring an app to share. Funnily enough, every single couple brought some form of a cheese plate, so next time I’ll be more specific :) Anyway, if you find yourself needing cheese plate inspiration this season. Hope the below may help!

mini apple + gruyère grilled cheese

You could use pear in place of the apple, or even included a thin slice of ham if that’s your deal.

1 baguette
2 crisp apples, cored and sliced thin
4 ounces of Emmi Le Gruyère, grated
Dijon mustard
Butter or olive oil, for cooking
Slice the baguette into thin slices.

Heat a slick of butter or olive oil in a pan over medium-low heat. On a slice of bread, give it a swipe of Dijon, a generous sprinkle of Gruyère, a few apple slices, another sprinkle of Gruyère and then top with another piece of bread. Griddle the mini sandwiches for about 2 minutes on each side until the crust is golden and then cheese is melted. Repeat in batches with remaining ingredients.

These can be made in advance and warmed in a 250’ oven for 5 minutes before serving to refresh them. 

mapled walnuts

If you stock pecans, those will work great here too. Make extras, these are so yummy in green salads.

1 Tbsp. butter or coconut oil
1 Tbsp. maple syrup
2 tsp. light brown sugar
3/4 cup walnut halves, roughly chopped

Preheat the oven to 350’ and line a small baking tray with parchment paper. In a small saucepan, warm the butter, maple and brown sugar together till combined. Add the walnuts and stir to coat. Spread them on the baking sheet and roast for 5-6 minutes until dried and just toasted. Remove to cool completely to crisp up. These can be made up to a week in advance and kept covered until ready to use. (Also great in salads!)

To Assemble:

Mini sandwiches with Gruyère and apples

A wedge of blue cheese with the crumbled candied nuts on top

Soft goats’ cheese (chevrè) drizzled with honey and a handful of fresh thyme leaves and ground pepper

A dry, salty cheese: such as pecorino, parmesan, aged manchego

A dish of assorted olives

Dates - pitted if you wish

Fresh Pears

Salami, if that’s your deal

Crackers: a few different sizes, shapes

Herb bundles on there for color

This post is sponsored by Emmi. They make the delicious Gruyère featured here, amongst other award winning cheeses. See their site and locator to find where you may be able to find their brand near you. All opinions expressed herein are my own. Thank you for supporting our partners, so that I may continue to create recipes here.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview