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Today was our February professional development day at school, and David Mochel (@ApplyAttention) was our presenter on”Mindful Self-Regulation – The Practice of Wellbeing & Lifelong Learning.” David’s TEDx talk from 2016, “What Are You Practicing Right Now?” is excellent and overlapped quite a bit with messages he shared with our faculty and staff this morning and afternoon.

What Are You Practicing Right Now? | Dave Mochel | TEDxPasadenaWomen - YouTube

As I’m now generally accustomed to do, I shared tweets on my main main professional Twitter channel (@wfryer) during the presentation today as David shared recommended books or made compelling points. This evening I created my first “Twitter Moment” with those tweets, which is very similar to a Storify archive. (Sadly, Storify has gone offline and is going to delete all old archives in May 2018.)

Check out some of my takeaways from today’s PD workshop with David in the Twitter moment I’ve embedded below. These themes of wellness, self-regulation and well being are SO important, and I found the messages both valuable and helpful today.

#CasadyLearns about #wellness (19 Feb 2018)

Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and "eBook singles?" 1 of them is available free! Check them out!

Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes' free magazine "iReading" on Flipboard! If you're trying to listen to a podcast episode and it's not working, check this status page. (Wes is migrating his podcasts to Amazon S3 for hosting.) Remember to follow Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also "like" Wesley's Facebook pages for "Speed of Creativity Learning" and his eBook, "Playing with Media." Don't miss Wesley's latest technology integration project, "Mapping Media to the Curriculum."
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This podcast features three different recordings from the 2018 Ohio Educational Technology Conference, which was held in Columbus, Ohio, February 12-14, 2018. The first is an interview with high school students who have learned how to create interactive games using Scratch software. They also have created DIY game controllers using the MakeyMakey and supplies like tin foil, cardboard, alligator clips, play dough, and bananas. The second interview is with high school senior Arthur Bodenschatz, who is part of the broadcast journalism team in North Canton City Schools, Ohio. Arthur and his classmates use an amazing “mobile storyteller” converted RV to conduct professional quality interviews at events like the Ohio educational technology conference. The third interview is Arthur’s interview of me at OETC, in which he asked me about my reasons for becoming a teacher and technology director, the pace of technological change in our society, and a few other topics. Two of these three recordings are also available as videos on YouTube and Vimeo, which are linked in the podcast shownotes. In addition to these three recordings, a few reflections on some additional highlights of OETC 2018 are included. These focus on Eric Curts’ (@ericcurts) 3 hour workshop “Write Right with Google Tools: Improving Writing in all Subjects,” Todd Beard’s (@teacherbeard) session on Minecraft for Education, and Apple Education’s workshop on updates to iOS 11. Please refer to the podcast shownotes for links to referenced resources, as well as a raft of Wes’ tweets from OETC 2018 sharing additional tips and links from sessions. (Since Storify is going offline and doesn’t support the creation of new Twitter archives, this blog post will hopefully serve that function to archive these learning takeaways.

Shownotes:

  1. Subscribe to Moving at the Speed of Creativity Podcasts
  2. Follow Wes Fryer on Twitter: @wfryer
  3. The EdTech Situation Room Podcast (@edtechSR)
  4. Eric Curts on Twitter: @ericcurts
  5. Generate random student writing prompts with emojis!” (using a Google Sheet and script) by @ericcurts
  6. Google Drawings for Graphic Organizers by @ericcurts
  7. Rhyme Finder Google Add-On via @ericcurts
  8. Read & Write for Google Chrome (extension and free/paid service)
  9. Language Tool Add-on for Google Chrome via @ericcurts
  10. Highlight The Music – Google Docs add-on via @ericcurts
  11. Writeful (Thesaurus Google Extension) via @ericcurts
  12. Addressing student cheating in Google Apps by @ericcurts
  13. Hour webinar by @ericcurts“Fantastic Feedback Tools for Google Docs”
  14. Sample comment banks for writing feedback by @timbowers33 via @ericcurts
  15. Recommended touch-screen enabled Chrome laptop: Acer Chromebook Spin 11 via @ericcurts
  16. Playback a Google Doc’s revision history with the free extension “Draftback” via @ericcurts
  17. Create basic/simple student writing / project rubrics with WriQ Google Add-On via @ericcurts
  18. Create more customized writing project rubrics “Orange Slice Teacher Rubric Add-on for Docs” via @ericcurts
  19. Todd Beard on Twitter: @teacherbeard
  20. Video: OETC 2018: The Casady School- Dr Wesley Fryer
  21. Video: The Mobile Storyteller of North Canton City Schools, Ohio

The Mobile Storyteller of North Canton City Schools, Ohio - YouTube

OETC 2018: The Casady School- Dr Wesley Fryer - Vimeo

So excited to be attending @ericcurts#OETC18 workshop this morning “Write Right with Google Tools: Improving Writing in all Subjects” in person/F2F! https://t.co/n0iBEiHO53 #googleEDU pic.twitter.com/rZoHdMVQQ1

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

"Generate random student writing prompts with emojis!" (using a Google Sheet and script) by @ericcurts #OETC18 https://t.co/25i1shinKx

(randomly grabs adjectives and nouns, puts them together & shows 20 at a time)

cc @sfryer @_MFreeland @emerson_glen #googleEDU #CasadyLearns

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

What a great tool to use when creating "5 photo stories" with students & teachers! How many emoji's do you want: 2, 3, 4 or 5? (Google Sheet script) https://t.co/25i1shinKx

h/t @ericcurts #OETC18 #DigitalStorytelling #create2learn #googleEDU cc @cogdog

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

What a great use of Google Drawings for a collaborative compare and contrast planning documents with students! h/t @ericcurts #OETC18https://t.co/9yRqyzgmh9

cc @sfryer @_MFreeland #create2learn #OklaEd #nwp #CasadyLearns pic.twitter.com/KvHdwW30r9

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

"You can share a Google Drive document / file with up to 200 named people, and synchronously collaborate with up to 50 people"

via @ericcurts #OETC18 #googleEDU

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

Google has changed "revision history" to "version history" in Drive documents now

via @ericcurts #OETC18 #googleEDU

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

Litmus test of "tech-savvy" = "willingness to click"

by @alicekeeler via @ericcurts #OETC18 #edtech #clever

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

The "research" tool in Google Docs is now the "explore" tool h/t @ericcurts #OETC18

Good post by @DitchThatTxtbk highlighting features: https://t.co/SsyX37FArO#googleEDU #edtech

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

great resource by @ericcurts: "Google Drawings for Graphic Organizers" https://t.co/9yRqyzgmh9 #OETC18 #googleEDU #edtech pic.twitter.com/yx3M6iHuez

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

.@sfryer For an upcoming poetry unit your students will do: Rhyme Finder Google Add-On https://t.co/RnMN7e6BDE (Highlight a word, and it suggests rhyming words. How cool is this?!) #OETC18 #googleEDU #writing #CasadyLearns #OklaEd

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

Self-Editing papers: Consider using text to speech tools like "Read&Write for Google Chrome" by @texthelp https://t.co/fxzTnsSZXx to help students with proofreading. It makes a big difference to hear "someone else" ready back your own words! via @ericcurts #OETC18 #googleEDU

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

super-helpful Google tool #googleEDU clarification from @ericcurts: "Google Add-Ons get installed INSIDE a specific Google Drive file/document. Google Extensions are installed and available within your Chrome browser for all docs / files" #OETC18

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

Really powerful for proofreading: "LanguageTool add-on for Docs" https://t.co/020LzGOKvX

via @ericcurts #OETC18 #googleEDU

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

Visually analyze your essay / paper to see patterns and outliers in your sentence length. POWERFUL! Highlight The Music – Google Docs add-on https://t.co/FS0GEmI7tB via @ericcurts #OETC18 #googleEDU #writing #CasadyLearns

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

Recommended Thesaurus add-on for Google Chrome: @Writefullapp https://t.co/BqWj7iqGXs via @ericcurts #OETC18 #googleEDU

cc @sfryer @_MFreeland @emerson_glen #CasadyLearns #OklaEd

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

Writefull Thesaurus: A Google Docs add-on that uses AI to give you synonyms! ? https://t.co/aIWfpDBpUu pic.twitter.com/1DO4EurREP

— Product Hunt (@ProductHunt) April 20, 2017

Excellent blog post by @ericcurts: "Addressing student cheating in Google Apps" https://t.co/UjyQkHDzSj #OETC18 #googleEDU

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

Would be a super after-school #CasadyLearns video-powered workshop for MD: "Fantastic Feedback Tools for Google Docs" (1 hour) by @ericcurts https://t.co/P3Ibh0AW1a #googleEDU #OETC18

cc @BiggestMeow @joshbottomly @emerson_glen

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

#WOW (all writing teachers please take note…)

Sample comment banks for writing feedback by @timbowers33 via @ericcurts #OETC18 #googleEDU https://t.co/lUdWyQahVH

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

Fantastic demo by @ericcurts today at #OETC18 on how teachers can integrate Google Keep lists (of writing comments / feedback or stickers) and readily use / copy/paste those into student Google Docs! (with a s/o to @i3algebra) https://t.co/crwpPhaxzx #googleEDU

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

I like this language by @ericcurts, responding to a question about when we let students use powerful tools to assist in their writing… Similar to teaching problem solving AFTER learning multiplication, using a calculator:

"Now we're using the technology to step higher" #OETC18

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

#oetc18 Recommended touch-screen enabled Chrome laptop: Acer Chromebook Spin 11 https://t.co/wOsoMjNo0t via @ericcurts #CasadyLearns cc @emerson_glen @BlackDogOKC @techsavvyteach #edtechSR

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 13, 2018

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Arthur Elementary School (@Arthurokcps) in Oklahoma City Public Schools (@okcps) is one of just 114 schools nationwide participating in Apple’s ConnectED program. Every teacher and student at Arthur Elementary has an iPad tablet computer. This is the third year of the project, and yesterday teachers, students and administrators hosted an open house at Arthur to showcase how iPads are becoming part of “normal classroom routines” to help students learn, grow, and become contributing members of our Oklahoma City community. Dr. Rhonda Schroeder (@rhondaschroeder) is the principal at Arthur Elementary, and her leadership as well as vision for learning is a key ingredient in the successful story of twenty-first century education which continues to unfold at Arthur.

#OklaEd If your schedule permits, RSVP to attend the @OKCPS Arthur Elementary ConnectED Grant Showcase this Thursday, Feb 15th from 12:30 – 3 pm! @rhondaschroeder and teachers at Arthur are in year 3 of their iPad 1:1 project & will share lessons learned! https://t.co/KhaCmNYpUO

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 12, 2018

After a brief welcome from Dr. Schroeder, all the visitors yesterday to Arthur Elementary were invited to explore the building and see student learning in action in different classrooms! Here are some of the highlights from my visit and observations.

Different Digital Ways to Show What Students Know

When I visited Mrs. Powell’s third grade classroom, students were presenting video projects they recently finished about the life cycle of plants. I watched three student presentations, and while each student had used the iMovie for iOS app to create their project, each student made their project in a different way to “show what they know.” I love this! Encouraging and supporting students to “show what they know with media” is a key ingredient of effective and ENGAGING digital learning. Using iMovie for iOS, each third grader explained the plant life cycle in a different way:

  1. By creating a narrated slideshow
  2. By recording “selfie-video” clips explaining the steps in the cycle, and following up each clip with a photo of that plant growth stage
  3. By creating “an iMovie Trailer” of the key stages of the cycle

After each student presented their project to the class, wirelessly mirroring their iPad screen to a classroom projector using an AppleTV, fellow students used Google Classroom to quickly access a teacher-created, online feedback form. They used that Google Form to provide feedback to each classmate via several multiple choice questions as well as an open answer feedback question. This is a technique I used back in 2011 teaching the “Technology for Teachers” course for undergraduates at the University of Central Oklahoma, and it was wonderful to see third graders in OKCPS using the same feedback strategy yesterday!

Hands-on Learning Was Everywhere

High quality learning experiences are not defined by access to technology, but rather by the high level of engagement shown by students. In line with this philosophy, I saw multiple classrooms of students and teachers at Arthur Elementary yesterday engaged in hands-on learning! First grade students were conducting experiments using colored water, plastic syringes and tubes, learning about air pressure and volume. Other students were making floam (foam and slime) in a classroom center, while other students at other centers were using the iPad app Toontastic to create and read their own animated cartoons.

.@mralberto_jh I loved ?? visiting your wonderful @arthurOKCPS @okcps classroom today and learning about @StoryBots from your kindergarten students! Thanks for letting us peek into your learning today! #oklaed pic.twitter.com/D4x1Y6sFqq

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 15, 2018

Seesaw Learning Journals and QR Codes Making Student Digital Work Accessible

The engagement of students at Arthur Elementary in their learning with digital tools was not only visible in their classrooms, it was also visible everywhere in the hallways of the school! I loved seeing photos and QR code links to student projects using Seesaw. Seesaw is a platform for student learning journals, which we have been using at our school the past three years. I believe Seesaw is one of the most powerful digital tools available today for engaging parents, students and teachers in deeper conversations about learning both inside and outside the classroom. It was great to see Seesaw, as well as Google Classroom, in use by students and teachers at Arthur. It was also great to see QR code links to student project videos using Google Drive. I used the i-Nigma app on my iPad to scan some of these QR Codes. One of the student projects I watched was an iMovie trailer video about the history of the Comanche Tribe. Again, it warmed my heart to not only see how students are using images, video and text to create media-rich representations of their learning at Arthur Elementary, but also to see how these digital creations are being shared directly with parents (via Seesaw) as well as the school community walking the hallways of the school.

Flipgrid Videos Used for Visitor Feedback

One of the very progressive uses of technology I saw and experienced at Arthur Elementary yesterday involved the use of Flipgrid. Arthur Elementary teachers and administrators created some Flipgrids in advance of the open house, and posted QR codes outside classrooms and in provided handouts to visitors. Visitors were invited to not only introduce themselves, but also provide specific feedback to the students and teachers whose classrooms they observed. This was great! This is a feedback strategy for educators in other schools to keep in mind and possibly copy for similar open house events.

More Oklahomans Need to Know About Learning Innovation at Arthur Elementary!

I was very inspired to spend time with the students and teachers at Arthur Elementary, and walked away wanting even more Oklahomans (as well as others outside our state) to know about the innovative as well as courageous learning happening within the walls of Arthur! Change is difficult, but it is clear from a brief visit to Arthur Elementary that the educators as well as students there are embracing the positive opportunities which digital tools can provide.

Thank you, Arthur teachers and students, for opening your classrooms to our wider community yesterday! You inspired and challenged us all to think about the ways we can stretch and grow to make classroom learning in 2018 even more engaging and meaningful for everyone!

What a wonderful peek into iPad powered learning at @arthurOKCPS today! Fantastic job @rhondaschroeder, teachers & students! #iArthur is a gem ? in @okcps #oklaed & the nation! Woo hoo @apple & #ConnectEd grant facilitators – and @Seesaw learning journals! pic.twitter.com/sTh25BNsOV

— Wesley Fryer ??? (@wfryer) February 15, 2018

Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and "eBook singles?" 1 of them is available free! Check them out!

Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes' free magazine "iReading" on Flipboard! If you're trying to listen to a podcast episode and it's not working, check this status page. (Wes is migrating his podcasts to Amazon S3 for hosting.) Remember to follow Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also "like" Wesley's Facebook pages for "Speed of Creativity Learning" and his eBook, "Playing with Media." Don't miss Wesley's latest technology integration project, "Mapping Media to the Curriculum."
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Today at the 2018 Ohio Educational Technology Conference, I was interviewed following my breakout session by a the amazing student broadcast journalism team from North Canton City Schools, Ohio. After their interview of me, I turned the camera and microphone around (using my iPad) and documented a short tour of the AMAZING “Mobile Storyteller” production studio they have been using the past two years. Many thanks to Arthur B, who interviewed me and graciously allowed me to video him for this tour and interview.

According to their Mobile Storyteller website (www.nctvstorytellers.org):

The Mobile Storyteller student service learning project is a product of North Canton City Schools video – journalism programs and the NCtv educational television station. This project redirects students back into their community to find ways that effectively connect people through digital storytelling and archiving.

Check out the video! It’s 2 minutes and 11 seconds long. As a Storychaser since 2007, I found this student team and their resources for sharing digital stories remarkable!

The Mobile Storyteller of North Canton City Schools, Ohio - YouTube

Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and "eBook singles?" 1 of them is available free! Check them out!

Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes' free magazine "iReading" on Flipboard! If you're trying to listen to a podcast episode and it's not working, check this status page. (Wes is migrating his podcasts to Amazon S3 for hosting.) Remember to follow Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also "like" Wesley's Facebook pages for "Speed of Creativity Learning" and his eBook, "Playing with Media." Don't miss Wesley's latest technology integration project, "Mapping Media to the Curriculum."
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Today in Columbus, Ohio, I shared a breakout session at the Ohio Educational Technology Conference (OETC) titled, “Security, Privacy, and Digital Citizenship.” The description was:

As video surveillance, social media sharing of personal information, identity theft and publicized hacks of businesses have become daily norms, how can we best protect ourselves, our families and our organizations? Why is privacy an important right we need to defend instead of give up? What roles should teachers play in educating students, parents, and our communities about these issues?

I used my iPad and the free app “Voice Record Pro” to record an audio-only version of the presentation, which ran 61 minutes. It’s available on YouTube and embedded below.

Security, Privacy and Digital Citizenship (Feb 2018) - YouTube

That recording does NOT include synchronized slides, but you can use the Google Slide deck embedded below to both view the slides and click links to referenced videos, articles, and other resources. Both my opening keynote at the conference yesterday (“Sparking Conversations About Digital Citizenship”) and this session’s slides are linked on my OETC 2018 handouts page.

Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and "eBook singles?" 1 of them is available free! Check them out!

Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes' free magazine "iReading" on Flipboard! If you're trying to listen to a podcast episode and it's not working, check this status page. (Wes is migrating his podcasts to Amazon S3 for hosting.) Remember to follow Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also "like" Wesley's Facebook pages for "Speed of Creativity Learning" and his eBook, "Playing with Media." Don't miss Wesley's latest technology integration project, "Mapping Media to the Curriculum."
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I’m presenting and attending at the 2018 Ohio Educational Technology Conference in Columbus today and tomorrow, and this afternoon I stopped by the poster sessions outside the vendor hall. I met several different Ohio high school students who have been learning to create interactive games using the free Scratch programming language and MakeyMakey controllers. This is very interesting to me for several reasons, including the fact that my wife (@sfryer) and I are co-leading an after-school Scratch coding club for older elementary students at our school in Oklahoma City this semester.

Today I recorded an eight minute audio interview with the students at OETC 2018 from Upper Sandusky High School (@upperschools), in which they explained some of the games they have created and the coding they have learned in this introductory high school programming class. I posted the audio interview as a video on YouTube. I recorded and created this video on my iPad using the free app Voice Record Pro. I uploaded it over the conference wifi using the iOS YouTube app, and also published several photos from their poster session to a Flickr album with the iOS Flickr app. I obtained permission from the students to conduct the audio interview, take their photos, and share this media online. I’m excited to amplify this conversation!

Inspired by Ohio student interactive Scratch games - YouTube

Here are the links to the student Scratch channels described in this audio interview. The students are working on verifying their Scratch accounts via email so the projects can be publicly shared, so if you don’t see them now check back later as I suspect they’ll be active soon!

  1. scratch.mit.edu/users/abraszek_i/
  2. scratch.mit.edu/users/lambert_a/

I was also able to visit (but not audio interview) Douglas who created a basic flying cat game in Scratch, and was also presenting at the OETC 2018 poster session.

This simple game controller, using a MakeyMakey, cardboard, and foil, is one of the things I’m most excited about and am going to take back our elementary Scratch Club students.

Having a simple, DIY way to create an interactive game controller like this is fantastic. What student, interested in video games, would not be engaged by this?

I also love how the interactive game coding these high school students are doing appeals to both girls and boys. This is SO important. Dr. Mitch Resnick (@mres), head of the Scratch Team (@scratch) at MIT, likes to say “Scratch is a programming environment with a low bar and a high ceiling.”

Among other things, for me this means students can experience “quick victories” with coding where they are able to see and share the results of their efforts pretty fast. Certainly it’s important for students to eventually be introduced to more complex coding languages and projects, but what a great way to start with interactive Scratch games!

I can’t wait to share some of these interactive games and MakeyMakey powered controllers with our Scratch Club students back in Oklahoma City!

Follow along with our Scratch Coding experiences this year and link to other Scratch resources I’ve shared in the past:

  1. Our Spring 2018 Scratch Club resource page
  2. Resources for Oklahoma City area Scratch Camps and Scratch Day events sponsored by The Div (@thedivorg) in Edmond
  3. My elementary STEM Curriculum resource page for Scratch
Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and "eBook singles?" 1 of them is available free! Check them out!

Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes' free magazine "iReading" on Flipboard! If you're trying to listen to a podcast episode and it's not working, check this status page. (Wes is migrating his podcasts to Amazon S3 for hosting.) Remember to follow Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also "like" Wesley's Facebook pages for "Speed of Creativity Learning" and his eBook, "Playing with Media." Don't miss Wesley's latest technology integration project, "Mapping Media to the Curriculum."
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I’ve learned and am still learning some important lessons about HDMI cables as a school technology director. Unlike older VGA cables used with many classroom projectors in the past, HDMI cables can carry both video AND audio signals. VGA cables required the use of a separate (usally 1/8th inch) audio cable when playing videos or other multimedia with sound from a laptop computer or other computing device. The transition to HDMI-based classroom projection options is an ongoing journey for us at our school in our classrooms and meeting spaces. Here are a few of the lessons I’ve learned in the past year about HDMI connections.

Not all HDMI cables are created equal. We’ve had a couple HDMI cables in the past year just not work with newer classroom projectors we have ordered. (My preferred classroom projectors at this point, btw, are Casio “lamp free” LED models, which we’ve been able to purchase on Amazon for around $750 but also for as little as $530 each. If teachers want a TV instead of a projector, I’m a fan of Best Buy’s 55″ Insignia models since we can get them for about $320 each, but I suspect since prices are continuing to fall we’ll look for 65″ models down the road.) HDMI cables comply with different standards, ranging from 1.0 to 2.1, which was just finalized last month in November 2017. This comparison chart on the English WikiPedia page for HDMI cables is helpful to highlight the performance differences and capabilities. I have not attended to the HDMI cable specification ratings in the past as closely as I should have when ordering.

According to the December 2, 2017 LifeWire article, “High Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) Facts,” there are seven different HDMI product categories today:

  1. HDMI Standard
  2. HDMI Standard with Ethernet
  3. HDMI Standard Automotive
  4. HDMI High Speed
  5. HDMI High Speed with Ethernet
  6. Premium HDMI High Speed with Ethernet
  7. Ultra Premium HDMI High Speed (Forthcoming for 8K applications)

Sadly as I’ve been ordering HDMI cables in the past, I have not been aware of or attended to (as I should have) these HDMI cable category differences. HDMI.org has a helpful page, “Finding the Right Cable,” which elaborates on these HDMI product category characteristics and differences.

HDMI cables have distance limits which vary by their specification. HDMI extenders are available which can boost signal strength, but they can also degrade signal quality. Generally the recommendations I’ve read say you should limit HDMI connections to about 15 feet unless you boost the signal somehow. We haven’t done this in all cases at school, but we probably should according to “HDMI experts.”

A few weeks ago we connected two 65″ TVs on stands in our cafeteria with a DV camcorder connected to a HDMI splitter which duplicated the image on both TVs. We used the camcorder to provide a “live feed” of an elementary student choir performance for a packed audience of grandparents who didn’t all have a clear view of the stage from the back of the room. In getting this setup connected, I was both surprised and frustrated that a HDMI connection to a different camcorder did not work. I suspect (but was not able to confirm) that the video format, size, or HDMI specification being output by the camcorder did not match what our HDMI splitter could accept and use. Thankfully, we had a different HD camcorder which worked after being outfitted with a HDMI output adapter from Best Buy.

This evening for our winter orchestra concert, I connected one of our 65″ TVs on a rolling stand to that same HD camcorder which we put up in the sound booth, to provide a lobby-area overflow TV viewing option for people who could not fit into our auditorium. I tried using the same HDMI cable to connect the camcorder to the TV that I had used several weeks ago for our elementary choir performance “live feed,” but for some reason it wouldn’t work. I suspect it was because it was a 100′ HDMI cable, and that run was too long for the power of the HDMI signal from the camcorder. When I connected the same HDMI splitter box that I had used successfully with the same HD camcorder and TV, however, it still didn’t work. I ended up having to substitute a 25′ HDMI cable, and that worked directly between the camcorder and TV.

I’ve been relieved to get the HDMI camera feed to work for both of these events, but it’s NOT been an easy process to troubleshoot these connections. I need to learn more about HDMI cable differences and capabilities, and pay more attention (I’m guessing) to the required power and video format requirements of different devices before I order and/or connect HDMI cables.

I’ve learned all HDMI cables are NOT “created equal.” I’ve also learned it’s important to NOT assume a long run HDMI cable will “just work” the way you’d expect an ethernet cable run of 300 feet or less to always work reliably as long as the ends are crimped correctly. (Thankfully I don’t have to do ethernet cable crimping anymore. I used to dabble a bit in that, but no longer.)

What have you learned working with different kinds of HDMI cables in different situations? Do you have any insights or nuggets of wisdom to offer me? I very much want and need to learn more about this, even though I’ve had a steep learning curve the past few months with HDMI. If you have a comment or thought to share, please add it as a comment below on this post (the best option since others will also get to read/see our dialog) or reach out to me on Twitter @wfryer.

Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and "eBook singles?" 1 of them is available free! Check them out!

Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes' free magazine "iReading" on Flipboard! If you're trying to listen to a podcast episode and it's not working, check this status page. (Wes is migrating his podcasts to Amazon S3 for hosting.) Remember to follow Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also "like" Wesley's Facebook pages for "Speed of Creativity Learning" and his eBook, "Playing with Media." Don't miss Wesley's latest technology integration project, "Mapping Media to the Curriculum."
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Last Wednesday about 8 members of our school faculty and staff spent the morning at the Innovation Hub at the University of Oklahoma (@ouinnovationhub). Last Saturday morning I reflected on five things I learned from that “mini-retreat.”  In this post, I’m going to share slides from a short presentation I gave at the retreat, as well as a narrated slideshow recording I created as a “practice run” the evening before. My presentation summarized 10 things I learned visiting Egypt in November for the 2017 EduForum Conference. Those ideas are included in this Google Slideshow. Some of these lessons learned and tips were the same as those I shared in this November 20th post right after I returned from Egypt, but a few of them were modified / different. In order, they are (with related and included resource links):

  1. Limit Personal Digital Data While Traveling (Digital Privacy at the U.S. Border: Protecting the Data On Your Devices and In the Cloud  by @EFF)
  2. A $146 Android Phone is pretty capable (Motorola E4 Plus smartphone)
  3. 2 Factor Authentication Options (Authy)
  4. Chromebook = Outstanding Travel Laptop (11″ Dell Chromebook with 4 GB RAM)
  5. ProHDR = Great photo app for iOS & Android
  6. What Personal Information Do You Want Private? (for me: Contacts, Past personal emails, Past personal calendar, financial / family data)
  7. Android Phone Video Editing Apps: Quik (from GoPro) and Adobe Premier Clip
  8. What’s App is Amazing
  9. Passion for student voice is transnational and can be communicate despite language and cultural barriers (#Room108 Students Respond: “I Have a Dream…” – short version)
  10. Democracy is young, fragile, and depends upon institutions (including political parties) to succeed

Here’s the narrated slideshow / video version, which is 13.5 minutes long.

10 Things I Learned Visiting Egypt - YouTube

Finally, here are the slides, which include the same links as above but with some related images. I opened this Google Slide Presentation in the iPad App Explain Everything (Classic) to create the previous narrated slideshow video.

If you have any questions, comments or feedback on these lessons learned and resources, I’d love to hear from you. Please reach out on Twitter to me @wfryer, or leave a comment below.

Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and "eBook singles?" 1 of them is available free! Check them out!

Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes' free magazine "iReading" on Flipboard! If you're trying to listen to a podcast episode and it's not working, check this status page. (Wes is migrating his podcasts to Amazon S3 for hosting.) Remember to follow Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also "like" Wesley's Facebook pages for "Speed of Creativity Learning" and his eBook, "Playing with Media." Don't miss Wesley's latest technology integration project, "Mapping Media to the Curriculum."
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This past Wednesday, December 6, 2017, I had an opportunity to participate in a “mini-retreat” with colleagues from Casady School (@casadyschoolokc) at the Innovation Hub at the University of Oklahoma (@ouinnovationhub).This is a group of both faculty and staff, involved in supporting and teaching coding and computer science at different levels at our school. This morning on Saturday, I recorded an almost 10 minute narrated slideshow, reflecting on five things this mini-retreat encouraged me to consider and think about as we strive to find ways to support innovation, creativity, multi-disciplinary learning, and STEM/STEAM learning including coding / computer science at our school in Oklahoma City. I created this narrated slideshow on my iPad using the app Explain Everything (@explainevrythng).

The five primary things I reflected on in this video were:

  1. The value and importance of exercise and wellness
  2. “Daily Create” challenges and celebrating a creative culture
  3. Multi-screen interactive classrooms of the future
  4. The importance of a centrally located coffee shop for learning
  5. The power of innovative learning spaces and “team time”

Reflections from the OU Innovation Hub - YouTube

I shared a number of photos and observations during our mini-retreat tours on Wednesday, which included redesigned portions of the library at the University of Oklahoma (@ou_libraries) as well as the OU Innovation Hub. Those are collected in a Storify archive, which is also embedded below. If you have feedback or comments on any of these ideas please reach out to me on Twitter @wfryer or leave a comment below!

Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and "eBook singles?" 1 of them is available free! Check them out!

Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes' free magazine "iReading" on Flipboard! If you're trying to listen to a podcast episode and it's not working, check this status page. (Wes is migrating his podcasts to Amazon S3 for hosting.) Remember to follow Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also "like" Wesley's Facebook pages for "Speed of Creativity Learning" and his eBook, "Playing with Media." Don't miss Wesley's latest technology integration project, "Mapping Media to the Curriculum."
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