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In its broadest sense, the definition of the single word ‘seduction’ is to be charmed or tempted by something or someone with attractive and alluring qualities. It is fair to say that we all want some form of seduction – either to seduce or to be seduced – in our lives. After all, since time immemorial, seduction has been the conduit to countless stories of human endeavours and emotional dramas. One could suggest that it all started with the serpent seducing Eve who went on to entice Adam. The lure of temptation is exciting – that is what makes us human.

Whether we need that excitement now or for the longer term, we all need to seduce someone with something – at work, at home, with family, with colleagues, with friends and, of course, with potential romantic partners. However, the association and misconception that seduction is about sex is incorrect – yes, it has its place but takes up only a fraction of space. True seduction is about desire, not the gratification of desire, but the thrill of it.

So what does the phrase ‘The Art of Seduction’ actually mean?

If the word ‘Art’ can be simply interpreted as the imagination and skill to create something, then surely the ‘Art of Seduction’ describes the process by which desire can be arranged or offered – and therein lies the truth about ‘seduction’. It does not concern itself with the final outcome or finished article; it only concerns itself with the build-up of an appetite; an eagerness; a want. In fact, the art of seduction could be redefined as ‘the development of desire’, or perhaps more acutely, ‘the progress of anticipation’.

Anticipation is a feeling that we sub-consciously enjoy almost on a daily basis. If you think about it, we are seduced by anticipated events or behaviour on numerous levels, even by the smallest things: looking forward to your favourite meal; your favourite book; your favourite film; your favourite friend. One could say that planning the perfect party is arguably more pleasurable than the party itself.
All of these examples have one thing in common: incremental steps that increase the tension; every mouthful; every chapter; every scene; every conversation – and so it is with the art of seduction; a series of seductive moments to be savoured – slowly.

Speed is the antithesis of seduction. To seduce or to be seduced requires the slow build-up of delightful prospects ahead – the slower, the better. The art is in encouraging expectation, not forcing it; introducing intrigue, not dismissing it; expanding moment after moment, not to hasten them – with the thrilling purpose of eventually reaching an unknowable climax.

Indeed, you cannot seduce, nor can you be seduced, if your desire for something or someone has not been kindled, established and implemented. It takes time – step by step. Desire has to be cultivated – then grown along a pathway of delicious anticipation. That is the true art of seduction.

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The term ‘Emotional Intelligence’ was first used in 1990 and can be defined as the ability to perceive, identify and manage your emotions accurately and effectively, both for yourself and those around you. The importance of measuring EQ (Emotional Quotient), as opposed to IQ (Intelligence Quotient), is the emotional capacity to guide your own actions and reactions which, in turn, is able to influence the emotional responses of others.

The emergence of Emotional Intelligence over the past 30 years has led to a standardised framework which applies intelligence to particular emotional beliefs and conceptions, previously undocumented. Consequently, awareness of EQ has demonstrably aided people across the World who pursue a more fulfilled and contented life within their personal and professional arenas alike.

Just as someone born with a high IQ, there are people who naturally inherit a high EQ. However, by learning and practising certain behaviours and skills, Emotional Intelligence is a skill that can be developed. We all have a brain which possesses the faculty of adapting to new emotional thinking and habits which eventually make positive responses instinctive as well as removing unwanted emotional traits.
The fundamental skills of a high EQ are as follows:

• To identify your feelings.
• To interpret and comprehend your emotions.
• To understand the impact of your emotions on others.
• To manage your own emotions.
• To manage other people’s emotions.

It is generally regarded that Emotional Intelligence has 5 pertinent categories which should be developed and applied in raising the level of one’s emotional characteristics:

1. Self-Awareness
Self-awareness means to accurately recognise your emotions, strengths, limitations, actions and understand how these have an effect on others around you.

2. Self-Regulation
Self-regulation enables you to prudently manage your emotions and instincts – to either demonstrate or hold back certain emotions depending on what is necessary in the moment and beneficial – to all parties – relative to the circumstances at hand.

3. Self-Motivation
Being self-motivated consists of full commitment to what you truly enjoy doing; and setting then working towards achieving your goals. It does not involve being motivated by money or status.

4. Empathy
To show empathy is to identify and understand someone else’s emotions by imagining yourself ‘in their shoes’ and the full understanding of how an individual feels and why they behave in a certain way. As a result, your compassion and value in helping another to tackle a problem increases as you react in a genuine manner to their concerns.

5. Social Skills
Being able to effectively communicate is vital in improving social skills. Managing relationships in a way that benefits another person’s way of life has a knock-on effect of building rapport, trust and respect with and for you. Developing your communication skills can highlight the manner in which others would like to be treated and create a synergetic social bond between you as, similarly, they will want to mirror your conduct towards them.

It is important to note that emotions have a mind of their own which, when left unchecked, can have very opposite views to your rational and logical psyche. However, emotional intelligence is not contrary to the commonly accepted intellect of humans – or to put it another way: the heart overruling the head.

Indeed, it is the unique joining of these forces as one whole that enables reasoning, judgement and insight to flourish.

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It is universally accepted that to succeed in both personal and professional relationships, the skill of communicating well should be exercised. However, the most powerful indicators of good communication are arguably not spoken or written words at all but the non-verbal communication which has most impact; that is to say “body language”. The non-verbal prompts such as facial expressions, gestures, posture, tone of voice, and level of eye contact that are in constant use are tools that express true meaning to your feelings and make connection with others for building trust and rewarding friendships. In contrast, non-verbal signals can also cause confusion or sabotage what is being said.

Physical behaviour, expressions, and mannerisms to communicate non-verbally are often done instinctively or sub-consciously. Interaction with others is a continuous stream of transmitting and receiving wordless signs and messages. Some non-verbal behaviours including posture and body orientation, space and distance(or proximity), touch and personal appearance are not as recognised as the commonly regarded forms of body language such as eye contact or hand movement. Even when silence reigns, non-verbal communication dominates.

There are many instances when what is said and what is communicated through body language may carry two varying pieces of information, completely at odds with one another. In these cases, the listener or audience are faced with ‘mixed-messages’, creating a sense of disbelief in the verbal content. It is important to note that since body language is a natural, unconscious language that conveys true feelings and intentions, in all likelihood, it is the non-verbal message that will be relied upon to get at the truth. Non-verbal communication signals which match up with the spoken word exhibit confidence, clarity, credibility and rapport – rather than tension, confusion and mistrust when they do not.

The importance and implementation of non-verbal communication cannot be underestimated. It can repeat and strengthen the message being made verbally; it can contradict the message being conveyed – thus demonstrating insincerity; it can substitute for a verbal message – facial expressions illustrate far more vivid messages than words ever can; it can add to or complement verbal messages – a pat on the back whilst smiling increases the impact of saying ‘well done’; it can emphasise or underline a verbal message – gesturing with hands, for example, can emphasise the importance of your message.

Although no word is used in non-verbal communication, it can effectively communicate many human emotions more accurately than verbal methods of communication. This is where emotional awareness and intelligence can be developed to recognise the true feelings of others by reading their unspoken cues. Understanding non-verbal communication and the way it exerts influence over people is vitally important in making valid judgements in social and professional settings.

For example: Do they really care? Can they be trusted? These two questions are frequently answered by the detection of non-verbal behaviours. By developing emotional awareness and the capacity of reflecting inner feelings with non-verbal communication as well as observing the physical behaviours of others can offer far more control over the process of thinking and the taking of subsequent action in a rational and logical manner.

One could say that making right decisions – when other people are concerned – is simply a case of hearing and accurately interpreting what is NOT said.

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Rejection is a natural human condition but it is simply a feeling. It has no physical presence and only lives in our minds, yet success in love or in life is not achieved without first handling rejection. We have all experienced it; those times when we feel alone and unwanted. However, once we understand that rejection is an emotional reaction, we can turn this negative sensation into acceptance of the situation.

In fact, the hurt and pain we struggle with is not based on the actual rejection itself but on how we perceive the experience; the way we put ourselves down because of it; the way we allow ourselves to become a victim of it; the way we think that the future holds no hope. Consequently, it is how we react to rejection and learning to cope with it which is considerably more important than someone (of no importance) telling us we are not required.

There are many ways to learn to deal with rejection. These include self-development tools and techniques that involve reflecting on our past, enhancing our self-awareness, and strengthening our sense of self in order to feel more self-assured and confident in facing a future post-rejection.

The most common form of rejection takes place in the dating process followed closely by the job hunting exercise. Both processes will invariably involve, at some point in our lives, not getting a reply to a message we have sent or not securing a second date or interview, although it is worth bearing in mind that rejection can happen at any stage of the procedures. Whatever stage it occurs, it is very much about your thinking process which determines how well you can move on.

First of all, do not take it personally. It is never you as a person that is being rejected. Whoever is rejecting you is quite probably reacting to something in their own lives or demands outside of your control or knowledge. They do not even know you that well! You cannot allow your self-esteem to be influenced and affected by people who are not qualified to make judgements on you. Dealing with rejection – and overcoming it – is about maintaining a positive mental attitude. Staying positive helps place a better perspective and view of the situation. In other words and to paraphrase a well-known idiom: the door that opens after another has been shut only opens if you can see it opening.

People with a strong and positive mental attitude acknowledge their emotions. They have what is called emotional intelligence or self-awareness. They accept embarrassment or disappointment head-on. Rather than trying to minimise the hurt or convincing themselves that it was not a painful experience, they welcome the opportunity of learning from it. It is a time for self-growth; a chance to grow stronger and more confident. There is a realisation that the experience of being rejected is, in fact, not as fearful as what was imagined. It teaches you about other areas in your life that may need improvement and, most certainly, being able to handle rejection is one of the first principles for attaining more wisdom.

To conclude, rejection is okay. Self-rejection is not. Rejection does not define you; self-compassion does. Being kind to yourself and killing off your harsh inner critic with positive words and affirmations builds the foundation for handling rejection. If you are not prepared to be rejected, then perhaps you are not ready for change.

Indeed, one could say, the true, but often hidden, pathway to rewarding and loving relationships is only discovered after travelling down the route of rejection – a few times!

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Habit formation and behavioural change are indelibly linked to one another. The process by which new or changed behaviours become automatic is the definition of forming a new habit. The difficulty with habit formation is that our behaviour, normally, has to change dramatically. Good habits are hard to bring to life and old habits, as the saying goes, ‘die hard’. The reason for this is that patterns of behaviour are fixed and entrenched into our neural pathways, thus constantly repeating the same actions and responses without thinking. Ironically, it is through repetition that we can mould and maintain new and positive behavioural patterns which will eventually disrupt and override other ingrained but negative forces of habit.

It is fair to say that our day-to-day lives are made up of habitual behaviour. From the time we wake up to the time we turn the light off, our days are really just an amalgamation of repeated actions; most of them conducted with no conscious awareness. It is only when someone or something has prompted us to change our behaviour that old habits manifest themselves into seemingly unbreakable objects and new habits appear to be dauntingly unattainable. Therefore, it is interesting to consider that habit formation is a cycle of constructive behaviour. Building habits comes down to four simple steps. We need to be encouraged; we need to yearn; we need to act; and finally, we need the prize as reward for our actions. When those four stages – in that order – are implemented, habits form. If we can understand this pattern or framework, then changing behaviour to create new habits can be expedited.

In simplest terms: the prompt; the desire; the action; the benefit.

• Prompt: the initial stage, such as seeing an advert for losing weight. This is a trigger to our brains that we should behave differently with our approach to food in order to benefit from a better figure; in turn, creating an inner desire or yearning for losing weight.

• Desire: Without the motivation to want something bad enough, there is no reason to act.

• Action: By activating our thoughts and taking action – commencing change – the seeds of a new habit begin to grow.

• Benefit: Habits only stick when their end goal is met; this is the benefit or pay-off; the single reason for any habit to exist. The pay-off serves one purpose: to satisfy whatever it is we crave.

The prompt is about being aware of the pay-off. The desire is about craving the pay-off and the action is about receiving the pay-off. If we are satisfied by the pay-off, we repeat the process, again and again, until it is embedded into our neural pathways. We do not desire the habit itself, but the way the pay-off makes us feel. For instance, cigarettes are not addictive per se, but the relief they provide is. Brushing your teeth habitually every morning is not a particular passion, but the feeling of a clean mouth and fresh breath is.

Naturally, we as individuals are unique. Consequently, our prompts, desires, actions and benefits differ considerably between us. Transitioning through the four levels of habit formation from the prompt to the benefit is hugely dependant on the thoughts, ideas, and emotional drive of each individual

To sum up, habits are formed through the behavioural changes during each of the four stages mentioned above. If behaviour falls short of expectations at any stage of this process, it will not become habitual. Remove the prompt and the habit will never see the light of day. Diminish the desire and the motivation to act or change is extracted from the equation. Lastly, if the pay-off does not satisfy the desire, reasons for forming the habit in the first place vanish. Habits require these four steps to exist. Without the first three, behavioural change will not happen and without the fourth, the behaviour will never be repeated – the habit can never be formed.

Conversely, tick the four boxes and habits – the good and the bad – are generated.

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A pre-performance routine can be explained as a consistent procedure or set of sequential actions which are conducted prior to a specific assignment or performance in order to prepare physically and mentally for the immediate task at hand. These routines can take various forms depending on the mission that is to be accomplished; its environment; and, of course, the individual who is carrying out the actual process.

Pre-performance routines not only incorporate physical movement but allow for psychological preparation as well such as visualisation, positive self-affirmations, or deep breathing exercises. Physical routines ready the body for action, whilst psychological drills clarify and calm the mind to eject any negative thoughts, avoid distraction and permit quick and accurate decision making involved with the task or job.

Routines are frequently used by the sporting fraternity and stage performers, however anybody who has to achieve something under pressure in the imminent future can benefit from these behaviours. Very often, trainers, coaches and mentors encourage and devise pre-performance patterns or drills for their charges to operate successfully by creating optimal circumstances just prior to the event. It is important to note that people handle situations differently, and although all individuals need to adapt and adjust their mind-set to the task environment or skill, the routines they employ are unique to them.

To illustrate this point, the individual (or coach) should consider whether visual, auditory or kinesthetic practices will optimise the execution of the task – or a combination. For instance, some people like to visualise the implementation and subsequent success of their intended actions. Others like to hear or to repeat to themselves key words or phrases – or listen to particular music – before setting out. Finally, there are those who prefer to “shadow-box”, so to say, or strike physical poses moments before ‘taking the stage’. Diaphragmatic breathing (or taking regular deep breaths) is another simple technique which can be used to reduce bodily tension or nervous energy yet is also extremely effective in enabling the mind to remain completely focussed.

Every situational task, once underway, evolves rapidly in real-time which can dramatically affect the desired outcome. But what should not change is the pre-performance routine. The methods that are planned and practised take time to establish themselves as habits, but the more they are practised and utilised, the more the behaviours become developed and natural. Consequently, regardless of situation and eventual outcome, the individual gains an inner-confidence that manifests itself externally; applies learnt technique and skills precisely; and, importantly, creates a positively enhanced mental attitude towards achieving the target.

Practice and consistency are the two keys that provide for rewarding pre-performance routines. Forming behaviours which boost success in specific areas of life is not something that can be done overnight. As previously suggested, conducting and practising the actions over and again, in exactly the same style, are the two major principles underpinning pre-performance routines.

Successfully attaining an optimal mind-set for achieving a desired outcome or result comes from developing habitual tools which unreservedly work for the individual concerned. If they do not, then change the behaviours but not the routine of conducting them. “Getting in the zone”, when it matters, is the sole purpose of pre-performance routines. They are arguably the most vital element in performing live.

They are not rehearsals.

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Empathy is a powerful self-development tool for demonstrating that we understand someone else’s view of the world. It enables us to totally identify with another person’s feelings within their particular situations. Empathy allows us to experience someone’s circumstances on an emotional level by attaining a profound awareness and knowledge of why they feel the way they do.

Basically, we demonstrate empathy by being able to “walk in another’s shoes” and when we are able to echo back an individual’s inner feelings, they recognise that we are connected with them on an emotional level. In a way, we are employing a vital element of our ‘Emotional Intelligence’ (or EQ) – as opposed to IQ – which is essential for developing dynamic and rewarding relationships. Empathy goes beyond reason and rational judgement because it involves our senses and heart-felt instincts, not just our logical minds.

The two main factors that seem to facilitate empathy towards others (or not) are the age-old debates between nature and nurture.  Our genetic make-up contributes to our overall personality including how we treat other human beings, but our beliefs and values are often shaped as we mature by our social communities and lifestyle in general. Some people feel instant compassion and sympathy for those in pain or trauma, whilst others lack the capacity for an empathetic connection, although what makes one person cry and another laugh is extremely individualised and cannot be generalised; empathy is not a universal response to sufferance.

For example, “The Good Samaritan” is empathetic. Doing something in order to help someone in need – unconditionally – shows behavioural kindness and compassion. Indeed, the actions of heroes and heroines fall into the circle of empathetic behaviour as do the altruistic deeds conducted by people every day. However, as we all know, human beings are also very adept at being selfish, unkind and cruel; frequently without knowing it as they perceive their actions as the ‘right way to behave’.

All human beings are born with the emotional capability of empathising. We can consciously communicate empathy on a physical level: we can mirror other people’s facial expressions such as a smile; we can focus on someone’s eyes for a second longer; we can stand or sit in a more open manner; we can moderate or soften our tone and volume of voice; we can ask questions that show true interest in someone. All of these qualities resonate with people; they literally demonstrate empathy which, as a result, will invariably lead to the formation of a social bond or union.

Empathy does not mean to sacrifice oneself. In fact, to show empathy is as much an act of self-contentment as it is in helping another find peace and hope. To wholly connect with another human being, to fully understand and be fully understood in return,  are moments of unbridled unity – and yes, even a sense of love, in its purest definition.

In summation, to demonstrate empathy is to join two great forces of nature: our minds with our hearts – combined to the extent that the feelings of self-accomplishment and personal happiness which have arisen in us simply overwhelms and eradicates perceptions of loneliness, self-doubt and despair – in ourselves as well as others.

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Reflective listening is a way of hearing and comprehending another person in such a way that they are completely assured that their words have been understood. However, reflective listening is not just about hearing and understanding the spoken words of others. In fact, one could say that reflective listening is part of a communication strategy which interprets ‘the emotion’ of a person’s dialogue; the capacity to reflect the ideas and feelings of others.

It concerns building a rapport through the mirroring of body language, tone of voice and posture amongst other non-verbal cues – not just by standard responses to the spoken content. In other words, listening acutely and then reflecting back what has been heard in various forms of verbal AND non-verbal communicative skills allows the reflective listener to participate and engage in exactly the same emotional environment that the speaker has created through their dialogue. Reflective listening facilitates empathy and is one of the main conduits that enable us to demonstrate an empathetic connection with another person which, subsequently, establishes the first foundations of trust in both social and professional interactions.

The three areas of reflecting that listeners should pay attention to are the speaker’s content; the speaker’s feelings; and the speaker’s meanings. The content consists of the information, actions, reactions, events and experiences that are relayed by the speaker. Reflecting content puts the situation in focus but it is also essential to reflect the feelings and emotions the speaker is exhibiting through their words in order to fully understand the message. Reflecting needs to combine content and feeling to truly comprehend the meaning of what the speaker has said.

It is important to note that we are also able to utilise reflective listening skills in a multitude of different ways because the speaker actually ‘feels heard’. We can help people clarify their own thoughts and achieve outcomes by being able to discuss matters at a deeper level.  Reflection of emotional understanding can find solutions to problems; aid decision making; handle confrontational issues; deflect anger or resistance.

When employed in social settings, reflective listening can create a climate of warmth between two people by sincerely viewing the speaker’s perspective of a subject in a non-judgemental and empathetic manner. The reflective listener literally echoes the mood of the speaker and is able to harness the emotional atmosphere of the conversation. Consequently, the speaker is encouraged to open up and their true thoughts are free to flow.

Reflective listening has another fascinating purpose, especially in informal situations. Used in the right way and the right time listening reflectively can highlight not only intelligence but humour too. By inviting more depth and emotion to the conversation, a skilled listener who has fully grasped the content, feeling and meaning behind the speaker’s words, can turn the conversation around into a light-hearted, tongue-in-cheek – even a little mischievous – interaction. Instead of interpreting, as previously mentioned, the listener deliberately misinterprets the speaker’s words in a manner that generates an emotional response.

When the speaker’s thoughts, ideas and feelings are bounced back in an unexpectedly exaggerated, ironic or contrastive fashion, humour is elicited. For instance, if someone is conveying adventure in a conversation, we can contrast it with boredom; if someone is conveying intelligence, we can contrast it with ignorance; if someone is conveying success, we can contrast it with failure. The reflective technique of contrasting something or someone in an obviously overstated way is not to give an opposing or argumentative view, but simply to induce a smile – an emotional connection.

To summarise briefly, reflective listening is a supremely powerful tool. It mirrors moods. It echoes understanding. It communicates empathy. It makes friends. It confirms colleagues. And it hears love.

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In its broadest sense, the definition of the single word ‘seduction’ is to be charmed or tempted by something or someone with attractive and alluring qualities. It is fair to say that we all want some form of seduction – either to seduce or to be seduced – in our lives. After all, since time immemorial, seduction has been the conduit to countless stories of human endeavours and emotional dramas. One could suggest that it all started with the serpent seducing Eve who went on to entice Adam. The lure of temptation is exciting – that is what makes us human.

Whether we need that excitement now or for the longer term, we all need to seduce someone with something – at work, at home, with family, with colleagues, with friends and, of course, with potential romantic partners. However, the association and misconception that seduction is about sex is incorrect – yes, it has its place but takes up only a fraction of space. True seduction is about desire, not the gratification of desire, but the thrill of it.

So what does the phrase ‘The Art of Seduction’ actually mean?

If the word ‘Art’ can be simply interpreted as the imagination and skill to create something, then surely the ‘Art of Seduction’ describes the process by which desire can be arranged or offered – and therein lies the truth about ‘seduction’. It does not concern itself with the final outcome or finished article; it only concerns itself with the build-up of an appetite; an eagerness; a want. In fact, the art of seduction could be redefined as ‘the development of desire’, or perhaps more acutely, ‘the progress of anticipation’.

Anticipation is a feeling that we sub-consciously enjoy almost on a daily basis. If you think about it, we are seduced by anticipated events or behaviour on numerous levels, even by the smallest things: looking forward to your favourite meal; your favourite book; your favourite film; your favourite friend. One could say that planning the perfect party is arguably more pleasurable than the party itself.
All of these examples have one thing in common: incremental steps that increase the tension; every mouthful; every chapter; every scene; every conversation – and so it is with the art of seduction; a series of seductive moments to be savoured – slowly.

Speed is the antithesis of seduction. To seduce or to be seduced requires the slow build-up of delightful prospects ahead – the slower, the better. The art is in encouraging expectation, not forcing it; introducing intrigue, not dismissing it; expanding moment after moment, not to hasten them – with the thrilling purpose of eventually reaching an unknowable climax.

Indeed, you cannot seduce, nor can you be seduced, if your desire for something or someone has not been kindled, established and implemented. It takes time – step by step. Desire has to be cultivated – then grown along a pathway of delicious anticipation. That is the true art of seduction.

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The term ‘Emotional Intelligence’ was first used in 1990 and can be defined as the ability to perceive, identify and manage your emotions accurately and effectively, both for yourself and those around you. The importance of measuring EQ (Emotional Quotient), as opposed to IQ (Intelligence Quotient), is the emotional capacity to guide your own actions and reactions which, in turn, is able to influence the emotional responses of others.

The emergence of Emotional Intelligence over the past 30 years has led to a standardised framework which applies intelligence to particular emotional beliefs and conceptions, previously undocumented. Consequently, awareness of EQ has demonstrably aided people across the World who pursue a more fulfilled and contented life within their personal and professional arenas alike.

Just as someone born with a high IQ, there are people who naturally inherit a high EQ. However, by learning and practising certain behaviours and skills, Emotional Intelligence is a skill that can be developed. We all have a brain which possesses the faculty of adapting to new emotional thinking and habits which eventually make positive responses instinctive as well as removing unwanted emotional traits.
The fundamental skills of a high EQ are as follows:

• To identify your feelings.
• To interpret and comprehend your emotions.
• To understand the impact of your emotions on others.
• To manage your own emotions.
• To manage other people’s emotions.

It is generally regarded that Emotional Intelligence has 5 pertinent categories which should be developed and applied in raising the level of one’s emotional characteristics:

1. Self-Awareness
Self-awareness means to accurately recognise your emotions, strengths, limitations, actions and understand how these have an effect on others around you.

2. Self-Regulation
Self-regulation enables you to prudently manage your emotions and instincts – to either demonstrate or hold back certain emotions depending on what is necessary in the moment and beneficial – to all parties – relative to the circumstances at hand.

3. Self-Motivation
Being self-motivated consists of full commitment to what you truly enjoy doing; and setting then working towards achieving your goals. It does not involve being motivated by money or status.

4. Empathy
To show empathy is to identify and understand someone else’s emotions by imagining yourself ‘in their shoes’ and the full understanding of how an individual feels and why they behave in a certain way. As a result, your compassion and value in helping another to tackle a problem increases as you react in a genuine manner to their concerns.

5. Social Skills
Being able to effectively communicate is vital in improving social skills. Managing relationships in a way that benefits another person’s way of life has a knock-on effect of building rapport, trust and respect with and for you. Developing your communication skills can highlight the manner in which others would like to be treated and create a synergetic social bond between you as, similarly, they will want to mirror your conduct towards them.

It is important to note that emotions have a mind of their own which, when left unchecked, can have very opposite views to your rational and logical psyche. However, emotional intelligence is not contrary to the commonly accepted intellect of humans – or to put it another way: the heart overruling the head.

Indeed, it is the unique joining of these forces as one whole that enables reasoning, judgement and insight to flourish.

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