Loading...

Follow Soap Making Magazine on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
Or

Valid


Each week we will be looking at colouring soap and this week we start with cold process.

One of our most frequently asked questions is what colours to use for certain products.

So here is a quick guide to using colourants by product;

There is no definitive usage rate for colours in cosmetic products. How much you add depends on a number of factors, including the type of colourant and the recipe used. The depth of colour will vary with the amount added. Start off with a few drops and build up to the required colour, remember to keep a note of how much you used ready for next time.

Colouring Cold Process Soap

The main thing to remember when choosing a suitable colour for cold process soap is that it needs to be alkali stable, sodium hydroxide can cause a reaction that changes the final colour; blues can turn pink for example. So before you make a large batch always test your planned colourants in a small batch

Mineral and Organic pigments have high tolerance to alkali (except for Manganese violet powder) and generally they give gentle earthy colours to soap. Although Oxides are synthetically produced, they are “nature identical”, meaning they have the same molecular makeup as the once mined pigment from the earth.

  • As ultramarines and oxides start as a powder, they need to be suspended in water before adding them to your soap. If you want to maintain the same colour through the batches you will need to ensure you are mixing to the same ratio each time and keep a note (ie 5g of powder in 50g of water).
  • Some types of pigments (known as insoluble pigments) are NOT water soluble so will need mixing with warm oils. Add to melted coconut/palm oil and whisk in very thoroughly to avoid any ‘spotting’.

 

  • Water Dispersible pigments are dispersions of organic insoluble pigments created by adding them to a liquid base together with an emulsifier. They disperse in water and add colour by ‘coating’ the molecules of the products they are added to. Organic water dispersible pigments are very alkali tolerant and can be used successfully in CP soaps.
  • You can add the colour at any time once all the base ingredients have been added, before or at trace. With ALL colours/pigments, the depth of colour will vary with the amount added. Ultramarine violet and pink can appear grey in cold process soap, just add more colour and mix well, and use a stick blender if needed to help disperse the colour. Keep colours subtle to avoid bleeding of colour into the lather when using the soaps.

Water Soluble Dyes have small particle size and lend their colour to products by solublising. Some dyes are less tolerant of extreme pH environments than others which mean that not all are suitable for use in alkali products such as CP soaps. Dyes are synthetic and are not considered natural or “nature identical”.

  • If bought in powdered form it will need to be diluted in water, to make a concentrate use a maximum of 5% by weight in 95% water. Dyes should always be used sparingly and never added to any dry toiletries in their powdered form.

When diluted in water, dyes often appear a different colour from that of their concentrated liquid or powdered forms.

  • You can add the colour at any time once all the base ingredients have been added, before or at trace. With ALL colours/pigments, the depth of colour will vary with the amount added.
  • Dyes can bleed into layers of the soap, sometimes this can be the look you want, but not if you want a nice crisp line of colour.
  • Some of the names can be confusing; labels such as D&C mean it’s suitable for drugs and cosmetics, FD&C means it can also be used in food.

Natural Dyes are similar to synthetic dyes in that they have small particle size and lend their colour to products by solublising, but they are derived from natural sources as is evident from many of their descriptions. Some dyes are less tolerant of extreme pH environments than others which means not all are suitable for use in alkali products such as CP soaps

  • Natural Dyes can come in powdered, granular or liquid form. When dilute or further diluted in water, dyes often appear a different colour from that of their concentrated liquid or powdered/granular form. Dyes should always be used sparingly and never added to any dry toiletries in their powdered/granular form.
  • You can add the colour at any time once all the base ingredients have been added, before or at trace. With ALL colours/pigments, the depth of colour will vary with the amount added.
  • Dyes tend to bleed into layers of the soap, sometimes this can be the look you want, but not if you want a nice crisp line of colour.
  • Advise testing before use in C.P. soaps.

Natural Colours (Spices & Botanicals)

Dried botanicals are a great way to decorate your soaps, along with adding decoration they can be used to give a natural colour to soaps. If ground to a fine powder mix into a paste with a little oil before adding to soap at trace, alternatively remove a small amount of soap base at light trace, mix in the powder and then return it to the pot and stir briskly. If using leaves, roots or larger pieces it’s usual to steep the cut or ground root in warm oils until the oils takes on the colour, then strain the particles from the oils and make your soaps with the coloured oils

  • Alkanet root. As far as herbs go this is one of the most sought after for its colouring properties. It’s usual to steep the cut or ground root in warm oils until the oils takes on the colour, then strain the particles from the oils and make your soaps with the coloured oils. The steeped oil is a rich dark red but will turn lavender purple to blue in soap.
  • Ground cinnamon can be used for its colouring and decorative purposes on soaps and cosmetics. When added to soap, cinnamon gives a warm light brown shade with speckles and gives a pleasant spicy aroma. It is mildly abrasive to the skin, has gentle antiseptic properties, and adds longevity and character to the lather. Mix into a paste with a little oil before adding to soap at trace or remove a small amount of soap base at light trace, mix in the powder and then return it to the pot and stir briskly.
  • Cocoa powder is a wonderfully fragrant product that makes an excellent addition to soaps and many toiletries, both for its warm brown colour and its curative properties. Mix into a paste with a little oil before adding to soap at trace. Please note, using too much may overpower your chosen scent and some people are allergic to cocoa.
  • Curry powder has a pleasant sweet and aromatic fragrance and can be used as a natural colourant in soaps giving a gentle peachy yellow. Mix into a paste with a little oil before adding to soap at trace or remove a small amount of soap base at light trace, mix in the powder and then return it to the pot and stir briskly.
  • Seaweed & Algae. Kelp, bladder wrack and spirulina, as well as being used for their concentration of minerals and nutrients can also add colour and texture. Kelp and bladder wrack tint a pale green-grey and spirulina is bluer. All have a distinct smell! Luckily the smell will disperse within a few weeks.

 

  • Paprika. From blusher to eye shadow, paprika has been making women look great for decades. Its deep red powder produces a salmon peach tint to soap with russet speckles. Too much can be abrasive.

 

  • Turmeric has been long used in Ayurveda and Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent, produces a golden yellow-orange colour in CP soap.

Minerals and Clays as well as imparting their own properties, can be used to colour cold process soaps, ranging from delicate pastel shades through to deeper earthy hues.

Coloured Micas are fine pigment-coated mica powders which are widely used in many cosmetic applications as they add colour with a fine glittery sheen. They are almost all very alkali tolerant making them ideal for use in CP soaps.

  • Mica colours soap by suspension of their particles. If you are making a single coloured soap, you can add mica to the oils before pouring in the lye solution.
  • You can also add to traced soap, but adding it to the oils allows you to have enough time to mix in without your soap getting too thick. Mica doesn’t clump too badly and can usually be stirred in by hand when added at a light trace. Using of a stick blender helps to disperse the mica.
  • Mica is considered natural but the type of colour used would determine if it is synthetic or natural. Dye coloured mica is synthetic, pigment coloured mica would be synthetic but “nature identical”, meaning they have the same molecular makeup as the once mined pigment from the earth.

Coated Mica Pigments differ from regular mica in that their coating allows the mica to freely suspend in water, unlike regular mica which tends to float on top and then cling to surfaces such as the bath itself or your skin.

You can read more about using glitters in our article here.

To view the colours and application chart, click here.

The post Guide to using colours (Part 1) appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Soap Making Magazine by The Soap Kitchen - 3d ago

Today’s make are some moisturising Lotion Bars to keep your skin looking it’s best this Winter. Lotion bars slowly melt onto your skin when rubbed with warm hands, adding moisture and fragrance. This simple recipe uses Lavender Oil and creates a decadent and simple make.

Ingredients: You’ll Need:
  • A Saucepan
  • Suitable Moulds (We used a silicone mould, you could use plastic but you’d need to ensure your mixture is cooler when poured.)
  • A spoon to stir with
How To Make: Step One

Gently melt your coconut oil and beeswax together over a low heat. Ensure to not overheat it!

Step Two

Once melted add the sweet almond oil and mix thoroughly, then remove from the heat and leave to cool slightly. Go make yourself a cup of tea and come back! But don’t take too long, the mixture still has to be liquid!

Step Three

Now cooled, add the lavender oil and stir through thoroughly.

Step Four

Now you are ready to pour into your moulds! Be careful if you are using plastic moulds to not pour anything too hot in or your moulds will melt!

Step Five

Leave to set at room temperature for a few hours, over night ideally. Once you feel they are firm enough pop them out and they are ready to go!

Now use your bar whenever your skin feels like it needs a little bit of loving, and make sure not to store these in a warm place or they will melt!

The post #MakeItMonday- Lotion Bars appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

With the recent ban on micro-beads, and the world turning their mind to being as environmentally friendly as possible everyone is trying to do what they can. Today we talk through some ways that you can start creating a plastic free bathroom.

Swap your Shower Gel for Soap Bars

A simple and easy swap is to swap your plastic bottled shower gels for soap bars. A lot of high street or supermarket shower gels can be full of man made chemicals, over packaged and over priced, but out of convenience people will usually just grab a bottle off of the shelf because of the smell. It’s also true that it is hard to find a good selection of natural soap bars in high street stores or supermarkets, but not only ourselves, but a great many of our customers work tirelessly to create unique, natural soap bars with a large choice of fragrances.

It’s just as easy to make your own soap, meaning you can have the exact fragrance you desire, and you can make it look exactly how you want, plus being able to tailor the recipe to suit your exact skin type and needs can’t be sniffed at (pun intended!) This is a simple way to not only cut down on the plastic bottles around your tub, but take a step towards knowing exactly what you are putting on your body.

To shop our range of soap bars click HERE. Or to see our tutorial on how to make a basic natural soap block click HERE.

Or create your own packaging free shower jellies

Shower jellies are a great packaging free alternative to shower gel for those who do not like bathing with soap bars. A simple make they lather like a shower gel. These packaging free jellies are becoming more and more poplar, with Lush now starting to stock similar products. Just like anything you make yourself at home, you can customise the recipe to make it exactly as you desire, ours smell like lime and are inspired by the seaside!

The recipe HERE is for a vegan friendly shower gel using Irish Moss powder and which smells delicious.

Swap your liquid Shampoo for Shampoo Bars

Shampoo can often come in large unwieldy plastic bottles, but did you know you can make your own shampoo bars that work just as well and require no packaging? These bars look exactly like natural soap bars, but work exactly like liquid shampoo. They are great for adding natural products to your hair care routine, and ditching the chemicals that you can find in high street products.

You can shop our Shampoo Bars HERE, both types are wrapped in fair trade handmade paper.

Swap your Pouf for a Natural Loofah

Your synthetic pouf can hang in the shower for a long time, and with every wash fibers can end up down the drain. Instead of opting for these cheap sponges you can enjoy the real, natural thing. Natural loofahs can either be purchased from our shop, or you can grow them yourself in your back garden! Naturally occurring from legumes, loofahs are a great natural exfoliant and look great in your bathroom. Plus one loofah can make many loofah pads, and can be replaced as and when you want to.

You can shop our loofahs HERE.

Use Natural Sponges

As well as loofahs, you can also get natural sponges. These are grown in warm seas and sourced for the Caribbean. They are often referred to as grass sponges and can be a natural alternative to synthetic sponges. They are a great natural exfoliant and just like loofahs, they look great as well as being functional.

You can shop our natural sponges HERE.

Swap your plastic bottles for glass bottles

Sometimes it isn’t possible to completely cut bottles out of your bathroom, but you can instead move your makes over to reusable glass bottles. From shower gel, to conditioner to mouth wash, everything if your bathroom is probably residing in a plastic bottles. An easy way to cut this out is to make your own products and use a refillable glass container instead. It is worth mentioning glass bottles are not allowed in the shower, but they are fine to host your products around the bath.

Shop our glass bottles HERE.

These are just a few easy ways to start creating your plastic free bathroom for 2018. We would love to hear your ways of cutting plastic from your life below! Also if you missed our recent blog post on how the Micro-bead ban may affect you, you can check it out HERE.

The post The Naked Truth: Starting Your Plastic-Free Bathroom. appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This week we talk you through how to make Steamy Romantic Bath Bombs for Valentines Day. A great gift for your loved one, or just a brilliant way to treat yourself. A simple make with great rewards.

Ingredients: (Makes 5/6 Bath Bombs) You Will Need: How To Make: Step One

Gather all of your supplies, pour your water into your spray bottle and set to one side.

Step Two

Add your rose petals to the bottom of your moulds, be careful not to add too many, just a light sprinkle.

Step Three

In your mixing bowl, combine all of your dry ingredients (Bicarb & Citric) and mix thoroughly with your hands making sure there are no clumps.

Step Four

Next add your fragrance oil to the mixing bowl and blend until you are happy they are completely combined.

Step Five

Now comes the good part, spray your mixture with water a few times until your mixture sticks together with a squeeze. Now you can pack your mixture into your moulds. Fill both parts of your mould, and then add a little extra in between to ensure they stick together.

Step Six

Let your bombs dry in the moulds for about half an hour, then turn them out of the moulds and leave them on the side (on grease proof paper if you can) and let them continue to dry over night.

Step Seven

Run yourself, you loved one a steamy bath and throw one of these in. After a few minutes to bomb would have filled the room with beautiful smells and the bath will be full of your rose petals, ready for a well deserved romantic soak in the tub.

The post #MakeItMonday- Romantic Bath Bombs appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

With Valentines Day coming up anticipation is in the air. By far one of the most given gifts on Valentines Day, but do you know exactly what your flowers means, exactly what your bouquets are saying? In this post we are going to go through some of our flowers, and share a bit history and information about them.

Red Roses

Here are our red rose buds. The oldest rose is thought to be about 1,000 years old, it’s presence has been recorded since A.D 815! All rose colours have a significant meaning, and this is no exception, deep burgundy roses symbolise unconscious beauty! So these are the perfect addition to add when making gifts for that special someone!

Ivory Roses

There are at least 15 different ‘white’ roses to be found around the world today! The ancient Romans were so enamored with roses that they grew them in fields like they were crops, and you can still see wild roses growing around the country. White roses are known to symbolise, beauty, grace and purity, but they also mean ‘I am worthy of you’.

Pink Roses

Pink roses are traditionally seen as a symbol of gratitude and are the floral way to say ‘thank you’! They carry grace and elegance with them, and are an elegant addition to your makes.

Small Superior Rose Petals

These are brilliant to add into your handmade soaps, or use for a natural confetti. Did you know, the most visually appealing roses have between 25 and 40 petals?  Cleopatra used to believe rose petals were a natural aphrodisiac, and demanded her bed be covered in them everyday! Napoleon believed they were a natural healer, and used to provide each of his soldiers with a bag of dried rose petals to use in case of a gunshot wound.

Calendula

Commonly known as Pot Marigold, but also known as the ‘flower of rains’, it is believed when it opens in the morning it will rain in the day. In the language of flowers it symbolises sorrow or sympathy, despite it’s glorious yellow colouring. The leaves are also edible, but very bitter to the taste.

Chamomile

The sun this morning is reminding me of these beautiful Chamomile buds! Chamomile is most popularly used in tea, because of it’s calming powers. BUT, did you know, in Egyptian times it was also used in the treatments of diseases like Malaria AND in the mummification process, due to it’s association with the Gods of the Sun!?

Jasmine

Jasmine is part of the Olive family! Like Chamomile it is largely used in tea! In China, the Jasmine flower is a symbol of happiness and deep affection, which is why it is traditionally used in the Wedding toss!

Hibiscus

Dried Hibiscus is actually considered a delicacy in Mexico! These are brilliant for adding to your more exotic creations, the Yellow Hibiscus is the nation flower of Hawaii! Hibiscus also has a lot of medicinal value, as well as flavour, plus, when crushed down it makes a natural shampoo!

Heather

Heather is famously abundant across Scotland, it actually covers about 5 million acres of the place! White Heather is associated with good luck, especially for brides on their wedding day.

Lavender

Lavender is one of the most fragrant and versatile herbs there is. The smell of lavender can deter rodents and pests, in the Elizabethan times it was used to perfume linens AND, like Chamomile, it was used in the mummification process, due to it’s fragrant smell!
Perfect for adding to your more traditional creations, lavender is a classic when it comes to toiletries!

Blue Malva

Commonly known as part of the mallow family! It’s incredibly popular in high-end hair products due to it’s ability to intensify colour, a brilliant natural toner!

Cornflower

The colouring in these flowers is so vivid that they are often used to makes dye, hence the colour Cornflower Blue. It is also the national flower of Estonia!

If you love the look of anything you see here, you can shop all of our dried botanicals HERE. If not, have a lovely Valentines Day and we will see you soon!

The post A Guide To Flowers And What They Mean. appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This month’s ‘Make Of The Month’ is a revisited recipe, this brilliant Piña Colada Body Butter! A great recipe to make me start wishing for Summer more and more each day, and in all honesty it just smells DIVINE. As usual, this is a simple make, but I think it’s brilliant and last time we posted the recipe it was so popular I couldn’t help but to revisit!

You’ll Need:
  • Heat Proof Container
  • Scales
  • Whisk (Electric hand whisk will be easier, but a manual one will do too.)
  • A container to put your Body Butter in (This recipe will make enough to neatly fill this 200ml squat jar.)
  • Pipettes
Ingredients: How To Make:

Step One

Weigh out your body butter base and heat gently. If microwaving then heat in 30 second bursts and ensure it is stirred through to keep consistent and smooth. If you are heating on the hob keep your product moving and heat thorough gently.

Step Two

Add your coconut oil and fragrances oil. Ensure it is mixed through your base. Then add a few drop of liquid colour and whisk together.

Step Three

Fill your container with your body butter. Once it has cooled fully, pop on your lid and it’s ready to use!

Now all together fingers crossed that this premature creation encourages the warmth and then sun to come out, but until then at least I smell great! If you make this, of any of our other recipes we would love to see, just share them with us on social media!

The post #MakeItMonday- Piña Colada Body Butter appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Colin Fox explains how soap moulds are designed and produced at The Soap Kitchen

It is not widely known that all of the soap moulds sold by The Soap Kitchen are designed and produced on site here in Devon. I produce two types of moulds: silicone rubber and vacuum formed-plastic. Both types of moulds produce excellent melt-and-pour soap bars, and numerous different bath bomb shapes. There is a huge range to choose from and all are listed on our website. Check them out here.

There are two processes involved in the making of the models from which to form the moulds. What’s know as 2.5 dimensional models are produced using a desktop CNC milling machine. Full 3D models are produced on a 3D printer

The first part of the process is for the design of the mould to be drawn. Given an idea I will draw from scratch, or use a logo or artwork design submitted by a client. I use either of two software packages to achieve this: Iron Cad Innovate, and Adobe In Design. Once the design is finalised, the software will convert the code to that read by either our 3D Printer, or our CNC milling machine.

The CNC will produce 2.5 dimensional models which are cut from blocks of porous modelling board. A 2.5 D model is actually 3 dimensional but because it can only be cut form the top there is no side or underside detail. The printer produces complete 3D models with detail on all sides.

Usually, models from the CNC machine will be used to produce the vacuum-formed plastic moulds. Models from the 3D printer, are used to produce full-enclosing silicone moulds.

Designs that use the CNC may have multiple files, as different cutting tool heads may have to be used to complete the image. This means that a cutting tool may have to be changed two or three times to produce one model, depending on the size of cut required.

Once complete, the model is extracted from its base, cleaned using a paint brush and lightly sanded to erase any sharp edges. When free of any dust, I then coat the model with a clear lacquer. After this has dried, the model is ready for vacuum forming. So you can see there is a lot of preliminary work carried out before the model is ready.

The plastic mould is produced using a Formech vacuum forming machine. The model is placed on the platform of the machine, and lowered away from the top level. A sheet of PET or PVC plastic is then tightly framed into place and heated. The model is then forced back up and the vacuum pump is activated. The hot plastic envelopes the model and the pump then sucks it firmly into place. The vacuum pressure is then released and once cool, the model is ejected from the newly-formed plastic mould. Any excess plastic around the mould is then trimmed.

A model which is produced on the 3D printer, when complete is positioned inside a container. Silicone is then mixed and poured around and over the model completely enclosing it, except for a small base area. Once the silicone has cured, usually overnight, the model is extracted from the silicone and the mould is ready for use. Silicone 3D moulds allow for a great deal more detail in the final soap bar.

To view our full range of moulds, please click here.

The post Soap mould design and production at The Soap Kitchen appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It’s not even one month into the year and I’ve already lost track of all of my resolutions (although I’m sure I’m not the only one!) One of my resolutions this year was to pay more attention to my skin care routine, meaning actually start a skin care routine, so to try and re-inspire myself today I wanted to share the recipe for this brilliant Tea Tree and Sea Weed Rejuvenating Facial Mask.

You’ll Need:
  • A mixing bowl.
  • Something to mix with (I used a silicone spatula.)
  • 2 X 100ml squat jars to store your product in.
Ingredients: How To Make:

Step One

Place your Sea Kelp Powder, Clay and Vitamin C into your mixing bowl. Then add your warm water a mix until combined properly.

Step Two

Add your Aloe, and stir until well mixed. Now mix in your essential oils (to disguise the smell of your Kelp.)

Step Three

When properly mixed you can add more water or clay until you reached your desired consistency.

To Use:

Apply the mask to your face and leave for up to 20 minutes, then rinse off with warm water and a soft cloth. Use this mask up to twice a month alongside your (now hopefully existent) skin routine!

Hopefully this inspires you to keep going with your resolutions (or if you are like me actually start them!) I always find when I’ve made something it inspires me to use it more, so fingers crossed with this face mask! If like me, you are proud of what you make we would love to see it, simply share your creations with us on social media. Or if there are any recipes you’d like to see simply ask us and I will see what I can do!

The post #MakeItMonday- Tea Tree & Sea Weed Rejuvenating Facial Mask. appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Soap Making Magazine by The Soap Kitchen - 1M ago

The Soap Kitchen name is well-known throughout the UK, Europe and beyond, known for its high quality ingredients but we also make our own products too. Our products are made from our own unique recipes, they are handmade, hand poured, packaged and labelled by hand in house too. Today, our chief manufacturer, Jo is going to list some equipment we use and just couldn’t live without!

So what is in our kitchen?

Apart from us being lucky enough to have a warehouse full of fab ingredients to try out, what’s our essential equipment that might be different to what is in your own kitchen?

Safety First

Whether you are making soap at home as a hobby or commercially you are still going to need safety equipment. You can’t make cold process soap without Sodium Hydroxide (Lye). Sodium hydroxide is a caustic chemical that if it comes in to direct contact can cause severe skin and eye irritation. So make sure you take care. Have arms (and legs) covered, safety goggles and gloves. The fumes can be pretty strong too, we have loads of space in our kitchen and really high ceilings, so at home make sure the room you are in is well ventilated.

Before I start soap making I make sure I get all the equipment out ready, there is nothing worse than getting half way through the recipe to find your colours have run out or you don’t have enough fragrance.

Accurate Weighing Scale

When following recipes and formulas it is important to measure accurately, especially with the caustic soda for making the lye and the base oils that mix with it. For soap making we always work in weight not volume as it is the only constant. We need to be able to accurately weigh from 1g up to 30kg and have our scales calibrated annually.

Saucepan/Soap pan

We make 5kg of soap in each batch, so we need a big pan to mix it in. A heavy bottomed one is best and stainless steel or enamel. No copper, aluminium or Teflon coated as they will corrode or react with the lye.

Heat Resistant Measuring Jug

We use heavy duty plastic or glass when mixing the caustic soda into water for the lye. You need to make sure the jug is not too thin and flexible, you are going to have hot lye in the jug so need to be able to move it safely. Extended use with lye may weaken certain plastics overtime.

Spatula

A simple piece of equipment but one I cannot do without. Not only does it help to get every last smear of soap from the pan, and so helping with the washing up, but it can also be a valuable tool when trying different techniques. Make sure you have a sturdy silicone set, wood will eventually deteriorate due to the contact with lye and you will risk getting splinters in your soap.

Stick Blender

Okay, so you purists might think that this is cheating, but when you are mixing 5 kg of soap batter by hand, sometimes several times every day, waiting for the perfect trace, this saves my sanity. We don’t have anything fancy, just good quality and solid that is easy to clean. Using the blender also helps with some of the heavier colours too, breaking up the particles and creating a far brighter colour than I can achieve by hand.

Balloon Whisk

Before the invention of stick blenders we always made soap by hand with a balloon whisk and even if I do revert to the ease of a blender sometimes I always start and finish whisking by hand. Everyone has their favourite whisk so really it depends on personal preference. I like a heavy handled stainless steel whisk, but other prefer the lighter silicone option.

A Mould

The most important piece of equipment really, something to pour that soap mix into. We have our moulds custom made from wood which we then line with silicone paper.  Having our moulds made to our own measurements ensures every bar we cut should be the correct finished size and weight, the moulds have a loose bottom to help us unmould the soap.

Bain Marie

Because we make so many large batches of soap we have our coconut and palm oils in a large bain marie. This means we can easily measure out the melted oils at the perfect temperature without having to cut up blocks of solid oil and melt them every time. Saving time and washing up an extra saucepan.

Soap Cutter

We have our soap cutters custom made to fit our blocks of soap and calibrated to the size of our bars. It is all done by hand still though; essentially it is an extra-large cheese wire!

Curing Cupboard

We usually have between 15 and 18 varieties of soap available and make 55 bars per batch. As soap needs to cure for at least 4 weeks we need quite a lot of space. Because our kitchen is within a large warehouse it can get pretty chilly in the evenings and at weekends when the staff have all gone home. Whilst the soap is curing it needs to stay at a nice ambient temperature, so we have made a curing cupboard, which houses 3 small greenhouse heaters to ensure it stays at a nice constant temperature throughout its curing. Kind-of-like a large glass fronted airing cupboard!

Wrapping

Okay, so once the soap is all cured we either hand wrap it in beautiful handmade paper or if a customer has asked for it unwrapped we enclose it in shrink wrap. A handy piece of kit, the plastic wrap fits around the soaps and we then heat seal it into a bag which then goes on to be heat-shrunk until all the air is removed. It ensures that when we pack products they are sealed in a pack and not tumbling around in the box getting damaged.

And that’s it, a basic look into the equipment we have in the kitchen and what we couldn’t live without! If you have any questions about anything we have mentioned today just comment them below and we will answer them or you can email us! You can also click HERE to do a virtual tour of our warehouse.

The post What’s In Our Kitchen? appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It may still be cold and we may be in the cold depths on Winter but I want ice cream so badly I HAD to throw it back to this make this week. These Bath Melts smell fabulous, and look just as fabulous!

You Will Need:
  • A large mixing bowl
  • Kitchen scales/or cup measures
  • Suitable moulds to shape the bath bombs or Ice cream scoop
  • We used our 2.5” bath bomb mould with the excess plastic edge cut off.
  • Gloves (Optional)
Ingredients:

300g Bicarbonate of Soda

100g Citric Acid

100g Corn starch

100g Cocoa butter

50g Shea Butter

15ml Fragrance or Essential Oil of your choice

(We used Cornish Ice Cream FragranceChocolate raspberry)

Colour (Optional)

(We used Yellow Liquid Colour for the vanilla, Ultramarine Pink Powder for the Raspberry and Natural Cocoa for the chocolate)

 The Steps:

Step 1.  The Base Mixture

First measure out the dry ingredients into the mixing bowl and break up any lumps. Thoroughly mix together until you have a consistent texture.

 

Step 2.  The Butters

Measure the butters into a small saucepan and gently heat until they are just melted. Allow to cool slightly.

 

Step 3.  Colour

We split our recipe into 3 bowls and used a few drops of Yellow Liquid Colour for the vanilla, a sprinkle of Ultramarine Pink Powder for the Raspberry and a sprinkle of Natural Cocoa for the chocolate.

Using your hands or a whisk thoroughly mix until you reach a consistent colour.

 

Step 4.  Fragrance

Measure 15ml of either fragrance or essential oil into mixture. As we split our recipe into 3 we used 5ml of each fragrance in each bowl, Cornish Ice Cream FragranceChocolate & Raspberry. Mix well with hands or a whisk until the fragrance has all been absorbed.

 

Step 5.  Binding

Carefully add the melted butters a little at a time (you may not need to use it all) and mix continuously.

Your mixture should resemble cookie dough.

 

Step 6. Moulding

Squidge the mixture together at the side of the bowl and then use a mould or ice cream scoop to “scoop” the mixture into balls.

They should have a rough ice cream type texture. Pop them on a palate or tray and leave to set for about an hour in the fridge.

These bath bombs have a high oil content so please use with caution, it can leave an oily residue at the

bottom of the bath and can get slippy.

If like me you love ice cream, these are the make for you! See you next week for our next #MakeItMonday!

The post #MakeItMonday- Ice Cream Bath Melts Throwback appeared first on Soap Making Magazine.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free year
Free Preview