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You’ve probably noticed that a good night’s sleep makes you feel good, while a poor night’s sleep can make you feel anxious, foggy, irritable, or even downright sick. And, in fact, it’s true that sleep is linked to a number of health factors.People who get enough sleep typically maintain and lose weight more easily, have better memory, cognition, and productivity, and reduce their risk of depression, heart disease, stroke and diabetes as compared to those who do not get enough sleep. Sleep is so important that the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognizes insufficient sleep as a ‘public health problem’.

If you’re not getting enough sleep, you’re not alone. According to the CDC, more than a third of American adults are not getting enough sleep on a regular basis. Here in Dallas, we’re tracking pretty closely to the national average. The 2017 American Fitness Index report showed that only 67% of Dallas area residents were getting seven or more hours of sleep per day — a factor contributing to Dallas ranking 38th of 50 on the index, which measures health and community fitness at the metropolitan level in the United States.

The good news is that most people can meet their sleep needs by practicing good sleep hygiene. Often, a few behavioral and environmental changes are all that’s needed to turn a poor sleeper into a sound sleeper. And that’s what this challenge is all about. Over the next 30 days, we’ll guide you through a series of guidelines and challenges designed to help you create a more sleep-friendly environment, tweak your diet and exercise program to support your sleep needs, and introduce a consistent, healthy bedtime routine that promotes quality sleep.

(Printable PDF version available at bottom of post.)

How Much Sleep Do You Need?

The average American adult needs a minimum of seven hours of sleep every 24-hour period. As you might expect, individual needs vary from person-to-person, and change with age.

National Sleep Foundation: Recommended Sleep

If on average your sleep duration falls within the “normal” range, this simple alarm clock test can help you assess whether you’re getting enough sleep to meet your own personal needs.

  • If you typically wake without the aid of an alarm clock, or naturally wake up ahead of your alarm, you’re probably getting enough sleep. Congratulations!
  • If you rely on your alarm clock to wake you and then struggle to wake up, you may not be getting enough sleep, or may need to adjust your sleep schedule to better fit your personal rhythm.
What Sleep Does For Your Body

Sleep can be thought of as the ultimate maintenance opportunity for your body. Your heart rate, respiration, and blood flow all begin to slow as you sink more deeply into slumber. As you fall further into deep REM sleep, your “muscle tone” (contraction of your muscles) reaches almost zero – none of your muscles are engaged in activity.

This period of rest gives your body the time it needs to repair damage to tissue and muscles, and rebuild stamina in your body. Human growth hormone, which is secreted in its highest quantities during sleep, plays a key part in the optimization of muscle and tissue recovery and growth.

Further physiological impacts include low respiration, blood flow, and heart rate, which allows your cardiovascular system time to rest. These hours of prolonged, lowered heart rate are extremely valuable to maintaining a healthy heart.

What Sleep Does For Your Brain

Sleep is also hugely beneficial to your brain. Most predominant scientific theories involve “consolidation” – the idea that the brain uses the restful times of sleep to categorize, organize, and store thoughts and memories in the mind.

Current research indicates that sleep may be a way in which memories and other important information can be moved from “short-term” storage in the brain into stronger, long-term memory banks. This allows the mind to empty itself of what it has processed during the course of the day and store important information for long-term retrieval.

Essentially, what happens in the brain during sleep can be thought of as similar to what happens in the body – a long period of rest allows the brain to restore itself and prepare for another day.

Improving Your Sleep

So how can you optimize your own sleep to achieve the physical and mental benefits enjoyed by those who regularly get enough sleep? During this challenge, we’ll focus on evaluating and adjusting a series of environmental and behavioral factors that have a significant impact on sleep. Each week, we’ll assign a mini-challenge to help you address the issues that most find hardest to change or overcome. Starting on January 13, and for each week of the challenge, you can expect to receive several emails per week from us including tips related to our primary areas of focus during the challenge.

Weekly Mini-Challenge Schedule

Week 1: Creating Your Ideal Sleep Environment & Routine

Week 2: Mindfulness & Exercise for Quality Sleep

Week 3: Strategic Consumption of Caffeine & Alcohol

Week 4: Tech-Free Bedtime

To track your personal sleep changes throughout the challenge, you’ll need a notebook in which to track the following information each day:

We encourage you to track this information daily throughout the challenge; however, some changes to your sleep behaviors will take some time to impact your sleep duration and quality, so don’t give up if you don’t experience a change overnight.

While we won’t be focusing as a group on every factor that influences sleep quality, we’ve collected the most current overarching guidelines here for your review before we officially kick off the challenge. So, read on to learn more about the four “big kahunas” in the sleep ecosystem:

  • Sleep Environment
  • Bedtime Routine
  • Diet
  • Exercise

Important note before you continue reading: The goal of the Sleep Challenge is to strive for progress, not perfection. As with a workout or diet change, it’s small changes and consistency that make a big difference.

Sleep Environment

As silly as it may sound, your bedroom should be treated as your sleep sanctuary – a haven of peace and relaxation. Creating the ideal sleep environment involves creating a space for both physical and mental rest.

  • Keep it cool – The average optimal sleep temperature is a cool 65 degrees, and a range between 60 – 67 degrees works for most. If you regularly wake up sweaty or shivering, try adjusting the temperature in the room, adding or removing blankets, or changing your pajamas. Cotton sheets and pajamas are breathable and can help prevent you from overheating.
  • Limit lighting – Light and dark have an effect on sleep. Light stimulates alertness, and light exposure affects your body’s sleep rhythms. All artificial light — including light emitted by your digital devices such as your alarm clock, your phone, or other device dials, sensors and displays — can make it hard to fall and stay asleep.
  • Choose a bed that’s just right – Your mattress should be supportive and comfortable, and your pillow should be as well. Your own body is your best guide to whether a firm or soft mattress and pillow is right for you. Your head, neck and back should feel supported, and your bed should be free of lumps and sags. If you experience acid reflux, elevating your upper body while you sleep may help to reduce symptoms. A wedge inserted under the top portion of your mattress may help, or consider an adjustable bed. If your mattress is more than 10 years old or your pillow is older than 2 years, it may be time for a new one. If a new mattress or pillow is not currently in the budget, that’s okay. Work on adjusting other environmental elements to optimize your sleep.
  • Reduce noise – Turn off your TV, radio or other streaming device and, for new parents, lower the sound on the baby monitor. While you likely have the ability to control sound within your home, outside noises can be harder to manage. Some find it useful to have white noise machines, fans, or other sources of static background noise to cover up noises like neighbors, dogs barking, and other distractions.
  • Make your bedroom about sleep – Work and entertainment are important, but ideally, your office, computer, and television all stay out of the bedroom.
Bedtime Routine

Over time, it can be easy to develop a nightly routine that inhibits your natural ability to unwind from the hustle and bustle of daily life. Having a glass of wine just before bed, staying up late watching television, or powering through those last few emails on your phone are just a few of the habits that can severely impede your brain’s ability to slow down and prepare for slumber. Creating a consistent, sleep-promoting evening or bedtime routine is important to helping you achieve better sleep. After all, small children have a very routine bedtime ritual, and they (generally) sleep very well. Why would adults be any different?

Sleep schedule

First and foremost, going to bed and rising at a consistent time each day helps your body know what to expect, and can help you fall asleep more easily and wake up without aid. You should ideally maintain the same schedule, plus or minus 20 minutes, every day of the week, including weekends.

If your job, school or personal commitments are flexible, you may be able to design a schedule that works seamlessly with your personal sleep rhythms. However, not everyone will be so lucky. Much like children respond well to a consistent bedtime, assigning yourself a specific bedtime hour creates a signal to your body that it’s time to wind down, and ultimately helps you fall asleep more quickly and sleep more soundly. Even if your daytime commitments move you away from your ideal sleep rhythm, it’s possible to create a consistent sleep schedule that will support quality sleep.

If you regularly have trouble sleeping, it is advisable to avoid napping (though some exceptions apply, as in the case of some shift work schedules). As we’ve discussed, each person needs only a certain amount of sleep each day. If you nap during the day but are having trouble sleeping at night, this could be the result of your body having achieved as much sleep as it needs throughout the day. Eliminating naps could help you sleep longer in one stretch.

Shift workers who need to manage between different day and night schedules will have the hardest time identifying and maintaining a sleep-supportive schedule. The UCLA Health article Coping with Shift Work includes detailed guidance for workers following a variety of different shift schedules.

Pre-sleep routine

Get yourself in the mood for rest by creating a calming and relaxing pre-bedtime routine. This may include taking a warm bath or shower, sipping a cup of herbal tea (though not too much, or it could cause you to wake to empty your bladder), read a book, listen to a podcast, meditate, or stretch. Adjust your lighting to dim, and set your thermostat to your preferred sleep temperature.

You may have noticed that neither watching TV nor catching up on Facebook are included in this set of recommended pre-sleep activities. That’s purposeful. Avoid TV, tablets and phones before bed to protect yourself from the stimulating blue light they emit. Many advise avoiding screens for at least a full hour before bedtime.

Don’t force it

If you’ve lain in bed for 20 minutes and can’t fall asleep, try getting up and engaging in a restful activity such as reading, listening to music or listening to a podcast. Keep the lighting dim, and return to bed when you feel more drowsy.

Diet

You may be familiar with the age-old debate: does a balanced diet allow you to sleep better, or is it sufficient sleep that motivates you to eat a healthy, balanced diet? Ok, so it’s not really an age-old debate, but it should be because the two are very much related and dependent on each other. The answer to both questions above is a resounding “YES!” The fact of the matter is that a reciprocal relationship exists between sleep and diet.

Let us explain:

Sleep is vital for our body–its biological and metabolic processes–as well as our mind to function efficiently and effectively. When we are sleep deprived, we suffer memory problems, immune system issues, and we experience fatigue and inflammation in the body. Furthermore, our levels of the important mood and energy regulating hormones norephinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin, which are secreted during sleep, are significantly impacted. In an attempt to compensate for the lack of energy and hormones, our brain triggers cravings for specific foods, and generally, those foods are high in fat and sugar. Additionally, sleep deprivation increases hunger signals to our brain and reduces our ability to feel satiated.

In complementary fashion, what you eat greatly impacts your ability to fall and stay asleep. Our diet provides us with nutrients necessary for the production of sleep-inducing hormones. Melatonin, a powerful hormone that controls our sleep-wake cycles, is a derivative of tryptophan, an amino acid found in eggs, bananas, dairy, nuts, and certain meats. Tryptophan breaks down into serotonin and, eventually, into melatonin.

So the bottom line is this:

By eating a healthy, balanced diet, you’re providing your body with the nutrients it needs to sleep well, and by sleeping well, you avoid the energy crash-and-burn that leads to eating unhealthy foods. There are many diets on the market that can provide you with more detailed guidelines for foods to eat and to avoid and when to eat them, and we encourage you to select and follow one – or meet with a dietician or nutritionist – if you feel you would benefit from more structured and specific nutritional guidance.

All things being equal, if you only make two dietary changes during the 30-Day Sleep Challenge, these two will have the most significant near-term impact on your sleep quality:

1. Avoid alcohol prior to bed

There is a catch-22 relationship between sleep and alcohol. While, on the one hand, it may aid in relaxation and allow you to fall asleep quicker and easier, studies have shown that alcohol causes you to sleep less deeply and wake more frequently. You may also experience night sweats, headaches, or nightmares when consuming alcohol too close to bedtime.

2. Avoid caffeine and nicotine

Both caffeine and nicotine are stimulants, which means it is their job to stimulate or inhibit sleep. Consuming either substance too close to bedtime may make it difficult to fall and stay asleep. Also, be careful about hidden caffeine sources, such as in chocolate, protein bars, decaf coffee, and even some medications.

Exercise

Yes, just as exercise can help positively impact your health overall, it can also positively impact your sleep. Adding just one 10-minute walk per day could be enough to improve your sleep. As with diet, there are a myriad of guided exercise programs and sporting opportunities available in most communities to get involved in if you feel it will help you stick to a regular exercise routine. You should select a program that fits your schedule, your ability, your current health level and your age.

Yoga

With its focus on breath and attention to the body, yoga – particularly restorative yoga poses – can be a good way to prepare for sleep.

Relaxation techniques

While perhaps falling outside of the regular definition of exercise, incorporating relaxation techniques in your routine are recommended to reduce anxiety and stress, two common emotions that can greatly inhibit your ability to fall asleep. The goal of relaxation techniques is to calm the mind and eliminate preoccupations by focusing solely on sensations within your body and your breath. Training your mind through meditation to get rid of noise, literally and figuratively, will have a profound effect on your sleep habits.

Still Experiencing Sleep Issues?

If, after completing the 30-Day Sleep Challenge and following the guidance provided throughout, you’re still unable to achieve quality sleep – or wake feeling lethargic or fatigued – a disorder such as narcolepsy, sleep apnea, or restless leg syndrome may be to blame. Sleep disorders are surprisingly common, yet often go undiagnosed. Happily, sleep disorders are also treatable, usually through a combination of behavioral changes like those we explore in the sleep challenge, along with medical intervention. A sleep specialist can diagnose sleep disorders utilizing a sleep study, which measures various biological, neurological, and physiological processes that occur during sleep. The study determines if there is an abnormality that could indicate the presence of a sleep disorder. In the case of sleep apnea, for example, the study will measure how many times the patient stops breathing for seconds or longer per hour, which indicates not only the presence of the disorder, but also its severity.

There are two types of sleep studies used to diagnose sleep disorders: polysomnogram (PSG) and home sleep apnea testing (HSAT). Both types of studies are non-invasive and virtually painless. A polysomnogram (PSG) is an in-lab sleep study that requires an overnight stay in a testing facility. PSGs are performed by registered polysomnographic technologists (RPSGT). The technologist utilizes a series of strategically placed monitors and electrodes to track the brain, eyes, heart, breathing patterns, carbon dioxide and oxygen levels, and other biological functions.

Home sleep apnea testing (HSAT) is a portable monitor that allows the patient to test in the comfort of his/her home. The healthcare professional overseeing the patient will give a demonstration on proper usage of the device, then the patient will complete the study at home and send or physically transport the device back to the office for analysis. After your sleep study is completed, the data will be reviewed to identify any prevalent sleep issues that need to be addressed. If a sleep disorder or problem is uncovered, your doctor will discuss treatment options with you.

If you believe you may have a sleep disorder, consult with a sleep specialist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Download this information as a PDF: Sleep Challenge Basics

The post Dallas 30-Day Sleep Challenge Basics appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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Make Sleep a Priority in 2018 Join the 30-Day Sleep Challenge

Dates: January 13-February 11, 2018

Challenge is FREE & open to all Dallas-area adults

Register Here

2018 is upon us and many of us are thinking about ways to improve our health and well-being in the coming year. Health goals typically revolve around diet and exercise, which are indeed important, but even more foundational to our health is SLEEP. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 1 in 3 American adults don’t get the recommended 7 or more hours per night of sleep.

Why Sleep Is Important

Sleep is essential for preserving and restoring our mental and physical health. During sleep, our body goes to work repairing the wear and tear we put it through every day. It boosts the immune system, helps muscles recover, and gives our heart and other metabolic systems an opportunity to rest. Sleep also promotes healthy and optimal brain functioning and maximizes productivity. In order to maintain a healthy brain, you need sufficient sleep to allow pathways to be formed and information to be processed.

Quality sleep provides for:

  • Improved memory, concentration & productivity
  • Decreased inflammation
  • Healthy weight maintenance and/or weight loss support
  • Stress reduction
  • Mood support
  • Lower risk of depression, heart disease, stroke & diabetes
  • Immune function support
Sleep Deprivation

In the short term, a lack of sleep increases your risk of getting sick, harms heart health, promotes gain weight, and leads to problems with alertness, memory and motivation. Long-term sleep deprivation carries even more serious risks, including a higher risk for cancer, diabetes, heart attacks and strokes, and elevated blood pressure levels. Furthermore, sleep deprivation has been linked to an increased risk of injury or death as a result of workplace and roadway accidents. According to the National Sleep Foundation, driving while drowsy is equivalent to drunk driving, making sleep deprivation a public health risk.

Join the 30-Day Sleep Challenge

With the support of nationally renowned sleep expert Dr. Kent Smith, you can join a community of others in the Dallas area for the FREE 30-day focus on improving sleep habits. Some of the benefits include: an expert sleep plan, weekly mini-challenges, and personalized support from Dr. Kent Smith. Learn more about the FREE challenge and register here.

The post Join the 30-Day Sleep Challenge for the New Year appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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Sleep apnea is a condition that afflicts an estimated 22 million Americans and is generally believed to be vastly under-diagnosed in the general population. The difficulty in diagnosis originates in the fact that many of the condition’s symptoms can be attributed to a number of ailments, and the medical community is still working to understand and recognize symptoms as possible indications of sleep apnea.

For women, the situation is compounded by the fact that their symptoms tend to deviate from the “classic” symptoms found in men. Chronic snoring, the most common tell-tale sign of sleep, is frequently replaced by other sleep disruptions in women.

A new study published this month in Menopause showed that hot flashes and night sweats, which are experienced by up to 80 percent of middle-aged women, may indicate an increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea.

The study leveraged self-reported data of 1,691 midlife women who were seen at Mayo Clinic and found that 24.9% were at intermediate to high risk for OSA. The data also showed that those who endure severe hot flashes were at a significantly higher risk for sleep apnea than those who reported experiencing mild to no hot flashes.

And while those results are certainly interesting, what is even more telling is that two years after their clinical consultation, 65 percent of those women determined to be intermediate to high risk remained undiagnosed with the sleep disorder.

It’s important to note that this study wasn’t sufficient to prove a cause-and-effect relationship between hot flashes and sleep apnea, but rather an association. It does, however, further solidify the fact that sleep apnea symptoms experienced by women often differ from those experienced by men. Due to that fact and other factors, sleep apnea in women frequently goes undiagnosed or misdiagnosed–at an even greater rate than in men–leaving them at risk for serious health issues such as high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

A few of the reasons women are often under or misdiagnosed:

  • Women are less likely to suffer from loud, chronic snoring, which is a tell-tale sign of sleep apnea
  • Women’s apneic events tend to be fewer and/or shorter than men’s
  • Women’s sleep disturbances tend to be more subtle and less likely to be noticed by a bed partner
  • Most sleep apnea symptoms can also be attributed to other ailments, which leads to misdiagnosis
  • Women often reveal their symptoms to their general practitioners who may attribute the symptoms to another ailment and not be inclined to refer the woman to a sleep specialist who can screen for sleep apnea

In addition to the classic symptoms, these are common symptoms of sleep apnea in women:

  • Mood disturbances
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Morning headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Restless leg syndrome
  • Disrupted sleep

Here are a few of the conditions that, according to the National Sleep Foundation, are often diagnosed in lieu of sleep apnea:  

  • Anemia
  • Cardiac or pulmonary illnesses
  • Depression
  • Diabetes
  • Fatigue from overwork
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Hypertension
  • Hypochondria
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Insomnia
  • Menopausal changes
  • Obesity

As doctors and physicians continue to better understand the signs, associations, and correlations between sleep apnea and other ailments–as well as how those factors vary between genders–sleep apnea diagnosis is sure to rise. Fortunately, effective treatment of the condition significantly reduces the risk of its associated and alleviates many of its debilitating symptoms.

For women who suspect that sleep apnea may be an underlying cause of their symptoms, a sleep study, performed by a qualified sleep medicine specialist, will provide the data necessary for diagnosis. Once evaluated and diagnosed, treatment options range from a traditional CPAP machine to custom-fit and calibrated oral appliance therapy or surgery.

The post Severe Hot Flashes Linked to Increased Risk of Sleep Apnea in Women appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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The year is winding down and Thanksgiving is right around the corner. For most of us, that means festive celebrations, grandma’s out-of-this-world pumpkin pie, and embracing the joys (and trials) of family bonding time.

Excitement is sure to build as the menu planning and guest confirmations progress, but there are also the more sinister behind-the-scenes discussions underway. You know, the high-stakes negotiations that’ll determine who gets to sleep in the room next to the uncle Ted, the notorious relative known for making the walls shake while he sleeps. The one who refuses to wear his CPAP because “he doesn’t want to scare the little ones.”  

Ok, dramatic hyperbolic illustrations aside, every family has that one relative who snores so loud that–for those unlucky enough to find themselves within earshot–it’s nearly impossible to get a good night’s sleep. For snoring that extreme, there is almost certainly an underlying medical condition that needs to be addressed. And a family get-together is the perfect opportunity to empathize and suggest it may be wise to that they visit a sleep specialist to get their sleep evaluated.

For more mild snorers, there are a couple strategies that’ll help stave off a particularly rowdy bout of snoring. Before the tryptophan takes effect and causes an overwhelming urge to lay down on the couch for a nap, suggest or employ–if you’re the offending party–this simple game plan:

Limit alcohol consumption.

While it’s certainly true that alcohol aids in relaxation–and that very property makes it appealing, particularly when Cousin Brutus appears and insists on giving you your annual noogie just like he has since you were seven years old–alcohol also inhibits one’s ability to slip into and stay in a deep, restorative sleep. Partake wisely in the provided spirits, or better yet, stick with the sparkling cider.

Don’t go from the kitchen table to the couch.

Normally, we’d advise you to be mindful of your food intake–both the type and quantity–and that certainly is a key to getting quality sleep on a consistent basis.

But we’d never deprive you of the opportunity to experience the obligatory Thanksgiving food coma. Go ahead, indulge in the smorgasbord of delicious food your loved ones have so expertly prepared. But once dinner is over, don’t just head to the couch to sleep off your overindulgence.

Take it outside instead–play catch with your nieces and nephews, or catch up with your aunt over a stroll around the neighborhood. A little physical activity will help your body’s digestive processes, which in turn will allow you to sleep more soundly.

With the year-ending holiday season approaching, it’s the perfect time to consider what’s ahead for the new year. If you or a loved one has been struggling with persistent snoring or fatigue, or any of these tell-tale sleep apnea symptoms, having sleep evaluated by a sleep specialist, such as Dr. Kent Smith of Sleep Dallas, will help uncover the underlying cause of the sleep issues and is the first step to finding an effective treatment option.  

The post Thanksgiving Survival Tips for Snorers appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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Sebastien’s story is very similar to many people’s who suffer from undiagnosed sleep apnea. He spent years dealing with persistent fatigue coupled with morning headaches and constant lethargy. His wife endured his nightly loud snoring, though she eventually had to resort to using earplugs to get a good night’s sleep.

Eventually, Sebastien realized that his lack of energy and need to go to bed earlier and earlier was affecting his ability to enjoy time with his wife and kids. Seeking answers and solutions, he finally (after 10 years of suffering!) made a visit to Sleep Dallas where he found just what he was looking for.

It’s estimated that nearly 80 percent of moderate and severe sleep apnea cases in America are undiagnosed. In addition to decreased energy and vitality, untreated sleep apnea has also been shown to increase the risk of developing other serious health conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Check out Sebastien’s story below to see how an oral device helped him beat his fatigue and regain the energy he needed to take care of and enjoy his family.

Patient Stories - Sebastien | Sleep Dallas - YouTube

Sebastien:  The person that told me that I had a snoring problem was my wife. [It was] to the point where she had to start sleep with earplugs. It’s been about 10 years that I’m always waking up extremely tired with headaches; I’m not sleeping e

ight hours straight. [It’s] almost as if I was finishing a workout, and it just became the norm. You just get used to being tired all the time.

My family was realizing that I was going to be earlier and earlier and earlier, which is less time for them. They were the ones that were suffering the most.

In the past, I never did a sleep study because I was in denial, up until it really became a health problem. Working with Dr. Smith has been phenomenal–he’s very good at explaining, in words that you can understand, exactly what you need to do. [Dr. Smith is] very professional, very knowledgeable and so approachable.

My opinion of the device is that it’s extremely simple, very easy to clean, to assemble. It’s very easy to get used to it.

My wife saw the difference in terms of snoring right away. In terms of sleep, it took about a week or two that I really felt the difference about the level of energy and waking up rested. And the kids, they’re probably too young to really realize it. But the fact that when I go to the playground, I don’t just sit and let them play, that I play with them. I can get involved and have the energy to do things with them.

One thing I can say for sure is that the device, the advice, and the treatment that I got from Sleep Dallas really changed my life. [I have] way more energy to do my day-to-day activity, which is work, working out, and taking care of the family. It really got me to a point where I’m just not tired anymore.

If you, like Sebastien, need help determining a solution to your snoring and persistent fatigue, contact Sleep Dallas in Irving and Frisco to schedule a no-obligation consultation with Dr. Kent Smith.

The post Patient Story: Sebastien’s Fatigue Was Affecting His Family appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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Meet Ellwyn. He’s one of a number of people who suffered from the effects of sleep apnea for years without discovering a solution. He was always groggy, found it impossible to sleep restfully, and even caught himself falling asleep at the wheel. Ellwyn knew that his condition was negatively impacting his health, but he was frustrated by the ineffective treatments he had tried. Desperate, he came to Sleep Dallas to endeavor, one last time, to find an answer. 

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder in which the sufferer stops breathing for short amounts of time, multiple times during the night. The condition originates when the tissue in the back of the throat loosens or collapses as it relaxes during sleep. When this happens, the airway is obstructed, which limits oxygen intake and causes a microarousal from sleep. Constantly being woken up from deep, restorative sleep can cause a host of health concerns: chronic fatigue, depression, and even serious cardiovascular and cognitive impairment.

Sleep apnea is a serious medical condition, but it can be treated. The most well-known form of treatment is a CPAP machine, but many people with sleep apnea are intolerant to the device: they claim it’s claustrophobic, uncomfortable, and too bulky for practical use. Oral appliance therapy provides another option that has been clinically proven to be effective. They are comfortable, custom-built appliances that fit similar to a retainer or mouth guard. They prop the jaw into a “forward” position that keeps the airways open during sleep. Oral devices are comfortable, easy to transport, quiet, and non-invasive. Many patients experience dramatic improvements in sleep quality with these appliances, and feel a near-immediate positive difference in their energy levels and restfulness.

Check out Ellwyn’s story below to see how oral appliance therapy has restored his energy, fun personality, and quality of life.

Patient Stories - Ellwyn | Sleep Dallas - YouTube

Transcript:

Ellwyn: “Before I found treatment for sleep apnea, I found that I was dragging and fatigued most of the time. Especially when I felt sleepy in the car, I got a little bit alarmed, and I realized it was time to do something about it.”

Dr. Smith: “Ellwyn had tried quite a few different treatments. He had surgery, he had CPAP, and he couldn’t use it, so he was desperate and looking for something that would work. And that’s why he came to see us for an oral device.

Ellwyn: “The moment that I met Dr. Smith, there was no doubt in my mind that he was the right person to help me with my issue. The fact that he was so personable to begin with, so approachable, he made me feel comfortable all the time.”

Dr. Smith: “And after about three years [of successful treatment], he was ready to get another appliance. It’s made a big difference in his life, he’s not as sleepy as he used to be, and, certainly, his wife likes it a lot better.”

Ellwyn: “There’s a certain amount of fear involved because the word ‘apnea’ means cessation of breathing, and it’s scary to think that you’re doing that while you’re sleeping. And [Dr. Smith] has taken that fear out of it, and since I’ve used the device, which has been over three years now, I’m sleeping well and waking up well-rested.”

Dr. Smith: “He has all kinds of energy, he’s vivacious. And so, now, we see Ellwyn as somebody that’s fun, that we enjoy seeing in the office — and we can’t wait for him to come back!”

Have you, like Ellwyn, tried just about everything to get a good night’s sleep? Request a free consultation with Dr. Smith at Sleep Dallas today to start getting the rest you deserve.

The post Patient Story: Drowsy Driving Compelled Ellwyn to Seek Sleep Apnea Treatment appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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If left untreated, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been known to cause cumulative health risks. Stroke, type 2 diabetes, and even Alzheimer’s and dementia have been associated with the condition when it’s left alone. A recent study, however, has found that even a few nights without a treatment device increases the metabolic stress that a person with sleep apnea endures.

Put more simply, these studies found increased blood sugar, fat levels, stress hormones, and blood pressure, which correlates with what we know about the comorbidities of sleep apnea. Previously, most studies on sleep apnea were gathered during the day when participants were awake, so only the aftermath of the condition’s effects on the body were obtained.

Researchers drew blood samples every 20 minutes to measure changes in the bodies of the 31 participants, who all had moderate to severe sleep apnea and a history of regular CPAP use. After just a few nights without a device to control sleep apnea, the participants experienced an increase in plasma free fatty acids, glucose, cortisol, and blood pressure.

So, what does an increase in these metabolic functions really mean for sleep apnea sufferers?

High levels of free fatty acids and glucose: Can contribute to diabetes.

High levels of cortisol: Can also contribute to diabetes, as well as weight gain, mood swings and depression, and a weakened ability to fight infection.

High blood pressure: Can contribute to cardiovascular disease, as well as strokes and mild cognitive impairment.

The immediate increase in free fatty acids, glucose, cortisol and blood pressure (all of which worsened based on the severity of the condition) proves the necessity to treat sleep apnea effectively and with special consideration for consistent adherence to the method of treatment. For patients intolerant to CPAP therapy, the condition became even more important to treat with other methods. To learn more about the common symptoms of sleep apnea, check out one of our other blogs.

Oral Appliance Therapy as a CPAP Alternative to Treat Sleep Apnea

Oral appliance therapy is the preferred treatment method for many patients that cannot or will not use a CPAP machine to treat their sleep apnea. In fact, an estimated 20-80 percent of apnea patients fail to adhere to their CPAP treatment over the long-term.

A few benefits of oral appliances include:

  • Comfortable
  • Non-electric (does not have to be hooked up to the wall)
  • Travels well
  • Non-intrusive
  • Custom-built for each patient

If you’ve looked into the symptoms and think you or a loved one has sleep apnea, the most important thing to do is to visit a sleep physician and get a sleep study. A sleep study is typically performed in a lab or, depending on your situation, may be able to be completed in the comfort of your own home.

Dr. Kent Smith of Sleep Dallas has more than 20 years experience treating patients with sleep apnea, sleep disordered breathing, and persistent snoring. He can help you understand which treatment option will best treat your condition and eliminate or significantly reduce its associated health risks. Schedule a free consultation today.

The post Untreated Sleep Apnea: A Metabolic & Cardiovascular Stressor appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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Lebron James has reported to ESPN that he sleeps an average of 12 hours each night. Usain Bolt, Venus Williams, and Maria Sharapova average ten. By comparison, the average American sleeps seven hours. Reflecting on that simple fact stresses the importance of sleep for the body’s overall performance — the body recovers during sleep, and professional athletes strain their bodies to the limit every day.

Athletes and the Importance of Sleep Education

Clearly, sleep is necessary, not optional, for sports players to perform in the mind-boggling manner we see on TV. While coaches have recognized for some time that sleep is important for players’ performances, there has recently been an increased focus on sleep education that is changing the way professional sports view the issue. The NCAA Board of Governors named adequate sleep, nutrition and performance as a top priority for college athletes this year.

In May, the new Interassociation Task Force on Sleep and Wellness, which is made up of coaches and student athletes, as well as leaders in sleep research, sports medicine, sports psychology, academic advising and mental health, convened for the first time at the NCAA’s headquarters in Indianapolis. The Association’s mission is to change the current culture around sleep, so college athletes and coaches no longer leave quality sleep out of nutrition and wellness routines. Among other goals, the task force aims to create sleep guidelines that can be distributed to college athletic departments nationwide.

Why Professional Athletes Need Sleep

And the issue has recently gained awareness in professional sports, too. Dr. Charles Czeisler, a recognized expert for professional sports teams and the director of the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard, has attempted to bring to light the importance of sleep for athletes in recent years. He has addressed that players who don’t get a full night’s sleep after practice will never be able to form long-term memories.

Sleep is what turns new memories into long-term ones as the brain rebuilds itself after a long day. Without that process each night following a day’s practice, athletes will never properly file away the facts from that day or integrate lessons into existing knowledge.

Furthermore, prolonged sleep deprivation has been shown to have devastating effects on the body and overall health. While everyone is susceptible to the consequences of sleep deprivation, athletes are particularly at risk due to the amount of stress they put on their bodies during their careers.

How NFL Players Are Fighting Sleep Apnea

For the Pro Player Health Alliance (PPHA), tackling sleep apnea in pro athletes is their mission. Founded in 2012, the alliance is made up of David Gergen, CDT and President of the PPHC and a practicing dental lab expert for over 25 years, as well as former NFL players, including Roy Green, Derek Kennard, and Mike Haynes. Each player in the alliance has been diagnosed with sleep apnea, and have been successfully treated using oral appliance therapy. Most notably, former NFL wide receiver Roy Green insists that his sleep apnea condition contributed in large part to the multiple life-threatening episodes he suffered prior to his diagnosis.

In one interview with Gergen, Green said, “I’ve had two strokes and two heart attacks previously. There’s no question in my mind that… the fact that I wasn’t getting enough oxygen, I wasn’t sleeping, that I was tired all the time, that definitely played a part in it.”

The PPHA is dedicated to increasing awareness of sleep apnea in professional football players so they can get treatment and have a better quality of life. The PPHC has visited schools and held meet-the-players and other events for fans, all to promote the alarming prevalence of sleep apnea in football players. One study found that 60 percent of NFL linemen and 46 percent of players in other positions suffer from the disorder.

The American Sleep and Breathing Academy

David Gergen is also CEO of the American Sleep and Breathing Academy (ASBA), which was founded to improve patient care through “education for sleep professionals, sleep centers, patients and the community at large.” The nonprofit’s goal is to strengthen the sleep profession via a multidisciplinary approach, focusing largely on the awareness of oral devices as treatment.

In an interview with the American Sleep and Breathing Academy, Mike Haynes said, “I think that if players knew the importance of sleep, they would want to improve it. I think that they just don’t know. They think five or six hours of sleep is fine, and if they are on time, they are ok.”

He goes on to say that he thinks oral appliance therapy is the best way to treat sleep apnea in players, as they’re used to mouthguards.

Gergen, along with Sleep Dallas’ Dr. Kent Smith, who is President of ASBA, and members of the PPHA have recently visited Washington, D.C. to present to a Caucus Committee of the U.S Senate about the effectiveness of oral appliance therapy as a treatment option for sleep apnea. The organization continues to lobby in D.C. for the issue.

Gergen says, “The goal is to make oral appliances the true benchmark for mild to moderate sleep apnea,” according to a press release by the American Sleep and Breathing Academy.

What This Means For the Rest of Us

The recent shift in awareness about sleep deprivation and how it affects athletes’ performances is a positive one for sleep education across the board. Whether you’re training for the playoffs or sitting at a desk, poor sleep wreaks havoc on the body. It impedes your brain’s reaction time, drains focus and memory, and affects decision making skills. Quality sleep is absolutely critical for overall health and wellness, and will help ensure your life is as full and productive as possible.

If you have any questions about how to improve your night’s rest, Dr. Kent Smith at Sleep Dallas is committed to ensuring you get the rest you deserve. If you believe you have a sleep disorder, like sleep apnea, or have other concerns about your sleep health, call us or request an appointment online for a free assessment.

The post College & Pro Sports Are Taking Sleep Seriously appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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When we think of sleep apnea, the sufferers that often come to mind are mature adults. And that certainly is the case, as it is now estimated that 26 percent of adults between the ages of 30 and 70 have sleep apnea, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. But there are two other age groups that can be affected by disordered breathing during sleep: young children and adolescents. While the cases are less frequent, untreated sleep apnea during childhood can have serious, far-reaching consequences that follow into adulthood. 

Childhood Sleep Apnea and the High Risk for ADHD

More common than is generally recognized, sleep apnea affects between one to four percent of children, usually from the ages of two to six.

We’ve discussed new research that links sleep disordered breathing to certain brain diseases, such as dementia and Alzheimer’s. Turns out, similar neurological damage is evident in children with sleep apnea. Research has found that kids with sleep disordered breathing are at minimum 40 percent more likely to develop behavioral problems – the most common issues being associated with ADHD.

In one study of 263 children ages six to eleven, children with incident sleep apnea as well as persistent sleep apnea were compared to children with no breathing issues during sleep. When analyzed next to children without sleep apnea, kids with incident sleep apnea were found to be at a four to five times higher risk of developing behavioral issues. Those with persistent sleep apnea were at a six times higher risk.

As recorded by their parents, children with sleep disordered breathing were more inclined to display the following behavioral problems:

  • Attention issues
  • Disruptive behaviors
  • Hyperactivity
  • Problems with social competency
  • Difficulty maintaining self-care
  • Issues with communication

Results showed that those with persistent sleep apnea were found to be seven times more likely to have parent-documented behavioral problems. They were also three times more likely to earn grades of C or under in school.

Adolescents

Tremendous hormone shifts and rapid brain development means that teenagers require a lot of sleep. Nine hours is considered the minimum – but most adolescents don’t get nearly that much sleep due to the stresses of school, social calendars, and natural changes to the body’s circadian rhythm (or internal clock) at that age.

Sleep deprivation can also be caused by adolescent sleep apnea. Even if your teenager has been “sleeping all night,” the reality is that sleep apnea may be resulting four full hours of sleep or less. Repeatedly waking up throughout the night wrecks rapidly changing hormones, and your teen may become more prone to a series of negative side effects, including obesity, worsened mood swings, and depression. Chronic sleep deprivation has even been known to trigger serious depression in young adults that are already predisposed to it.

Research supports that many of the behaviors we often dismiss as “teen angst” – moodiness, irritability, and reckless behavior – may actually be due to a chronic lack of sleep. Between 60 and 70 percent of teenagers live within a borderline of severe sleep debt. This deprivation can affect every part of an adolescent’s brain when it comes to decision making, from the inability to control impulses to substance abuse and other risky behaviors.

Treatment Options

The best treatment for children and adolescents with sleep apnea will largely depend on the individual case. Deciding factors are often the child’s age and the severity of the apnea. In simple cases, enlarged tonsils and adenoids are a frequent cause, and removal of the tonsils will help return breathing to normal.

This procedure is not right or necessary for every child, however. In certain situations, like when the tonsils are too small to remove or more than a simple fix is needed, other methods may prove to be the best option. A sleep physician may recommend a CPAP machine for childhood sleep apnea, especially if the child is very young or their mouth and jaw are still developing. Oral appliances are also an effective treatment option, especially in patients whose facial bone growth is largely complete. Again, treatment options vary with each case. The Apnea Treatment Center says that oral devices have been used successfully in children as young as six.

Oral appliance therapies can be a great solution for teens who do not need tonsil removal and have a fully developed facial bone structure. Many teenagers feel embarrassed by a bulky CPAP machine. Smaller oral appliances can provide a solution that your teenager will actually wear, so they can enjoy all the benefits of uninterrupted sleep.

As always, it’s important to talk to a doctor about proper treatment options.  If you believe your child or teenager has sleep apnea, Dr. Kent Smith at Sleep Dallas can help you find the right solution. He has dedicated more than 20 years of his career to researching, analyzing and developing proven techniques that work. Contact us today to schedule a free consultation with absolutely no obligations.  

The post Childhood Sleep Apnea & Its Consequences for Brain Development appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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We’ve regularly discussed how getting enough sleep is a vital part of self-care and maintaining overall health, especially as we age. Deep sleep is a critical component to keeping our minds and bodies functioning efficiently — it reduces stress and helps protect against serious health problems like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and high blood pressure. But new research suggests that a lack of proper sleep may cause permanent damage to the brain. 

In a recent study performed on lab mice, scientists found that mice who were kept awake for a prolonged length of time experienced the kind of brain activity that is found in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. We know that the brain clears out toxins linked to Alzheimer’s during sleep, and repeatedly waking up during the night can cause a buildup of these toxins. Another study performed by the University of California at San Francisco on a large sample of veterans found that veterans with sleep disorders like sleep apnea or insomnia were 30 percent more likely to suffer dementia than those without such problems.

Alzheimer’s isn’t the only disease linked to sleep issues — the Canadian Association for Neuroscience recently found that a lack of sleep is connected to Parkinson’s. Researchers discovered that 80 percent of people who suffer from REM sleep disorder eventually develop neurological disorders like Parkinson’s and dementia.

Although these studies are not enough to establish a direct, causative relationship between disordered sleep patterns and neurological damage, the findings are enough reason to reevaluate our sleep habits, especially as we age. And even if such serious diseases never develop, research shows that the lack of proper sleep is related to other neurological problems that can greatly affect a person’s quality of life.

HOW SLEEP DEPRIVATION IMPACTS MOOD

Sleep and mood are closely related – we’re all familiar with the irritability that can follow a restless night. But chronically not getting enough rest can have a dramatic impact on our brain’s ability to stabilize emotions. Sleep problems are found in 90 percent of people with depression, and are often one of the first symptoms to appear. In one study of 10,000 adults, people with insomnia were five times more likely to develop depression. And the risk for developing anxiety is even greater: in the same study, people with insomnia were 20 times more likely to develop a panic disorder.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Quality sleep is essential throughout the entirety of our lives. As we age, sleeping is often more difficult, but it doesn’t mean it’s less important.  If you’re struggling to get a full night’s sleep, consider modifying your habits. Small changes to your routine to address common sleep issues can dramatically change sleep quality.

If you continue to struggle despite your best efforts, it may be time to speak with your doctor to uncover the underlying problem and get treated. An estimated 50-70 millions Americans suffer from a recognized sleep disorder, according to the American Sleep Association. Of that number, nearly 22 million have sleep apnea, with a large percentage of cases remaining undiagnosed.

If you’ve been diagnosed with sleep apnea, or suspect you may have the condition, effective treatment will help you regain your health. Contact Dr. Kent Smith at Sleep Dallas to learn more about sleep apnea treatment options.

The post Sleep & Aging: Lasting Cognitive Effects of Sleep Deprivation appeared first on Sleep Dallas Blog.

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