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Dave Sutton is one of the driving forces behind the Lloyd family’s vision to create a sustainable estate that reflects Central Otago’s beauty and unpretentious quality of the land and lifestyle. As Te Kano’s Winemaker and General Manager, Dave not only crafts a range of premium Central Otago wines but has also been tasked to help leave a positive legacy for future generations of the Lloyd family.

Having secured a substantial amount of vineyard sites throughout the region, Te Kano Estate is only getting started. Their Nortburn site is celebrating its first harvest this year and an impressive tasting room, events space and office complex is currently being constructed in the iconic Bannockburn sub-region. I have a feeling we’ll hear a lot more Dave and his team in the future.

Let’s find out more about him in the following Q&A….

What’s your background?

I studied winemaking directly after high school and started travelling as soon as I graduated from that. I worked all around the wine world before settling down in Central Otago, where I have been for the past 8 years.

Dave Sutton | Winemaker & GM at Te Kano Estate What does a typical working day look like for you?

The truth is there is no typical working day! Te Kano is a relatively new wine company which is rapidly carving a niche for itself, so a days work might involve planting a vineyard, working with the sales and marketing team, travelling and selling wine, or tasting and blending at the winery.

Every month we hit a new milestone, and that brings a great number of challenges and opportunities into the workplace.

When and why did you fall in love with wine?

My lightbulb wine moment happened at Magill Estate – Penfolds premium winery in Adelaide. We had tasted through the range and were getting ready to leave when the winemaker came in with a 100 year old fortified they had recently ‘rediscovered’ in the dusty depths of the barrel hall.

That port blew me away – the depth and complexity of flavour, the reverence with which each minuscule amount was poured and savoured, and the fact that the legacy of the maker is still alive today.

If you were a wine, what wine would you be?

I would aspire to be a fine Red Burgundy. Muscular and powerful, while remaining elegant and aging gracefully for many years.

Dave Sutton | Winemaker & GM Te Kano Estate What’s the favourite wine you’ve made to date?

Well, I’ve made a few. Definitely Te Kano Chardonnay is the most fun to make. With only half a hectare of vines, and a small amount of wine each year, it is really easy to see the impact of trying new things – new viticulture and winemaking techniques, the effect of different barrels and approaches. It offers the chance to shine a light into the things you do as a winemaker and challenge a few assumptions.

Share a fact about yourself that only a few know

I have no middle name. As the youngest of six kids, I think my parents ran out of inspiration when I came on the scene.

Te Kano Estate’s Eliza Vineyard Things you still want to do – what’s on your bucket list?

I would love to work in Champagne. The opportunity came up in 2013 and I just couldn’t get the time away from the winery here. It’s something I have always regretted, and hope to tick off the list.

Dead or alive, who would you like to share a glass of vino with?

I never met either of my grandfathers – both of whom passed away tragically young. I would definitely love to share a glass or two with them.

Find out more about Te Kano Estate here and make sure you follow them on Instagram and Facebook as well.

The post Meet Dave Sutton, Winemaker at Te Kano Estate appeared first on Sip NZ.

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Today is International Women’s Day and we’re keen to get amongst it by sharing some of our most popular Q&A’s with women in the New Zealand wine industry with you.

We’ve asked 4 women in various areas of the wine trade what it means to them to be a “woman in wine” in New Zealand.

Rose Finn

Sales & Marketing Manager at Neudorf Vineyards

“To me being a woman in the New Zealand wine industry is awesome, I think being a man in the New Zealand Wine Industry would be too. Why? Because the industry itself is so special. Its innovative, exciting, we make a unique product and have a great time doing so. I am lucky enough to work with both men and women who are intelligent, humble, bright and fun. Who wouldn’t want to be a part of that?”

Find out more about Rosie in our Q&A here.

Mary-Therese Blair

Wine Writer / Mermaid Mary

“Women in wine for me is an acknowledgement that we are stronger together & a reminder for us as women to lift each other up and support each other. I feel sad when I hear WIW (or any feminist movement) being described as anti-men because nothing could be further from the truth. We regularly have men attend our functions, WIW is about inclusivity & joining the celebration of women’s contribution to what has traditionally been a male dominated industry.”

Find out more about Mary in our Q&A here.

Nic Olsen

Hawke’s Bay Wine Ambassador & Viticulturist at Pernod Ricard

“Being a women in wine means everything to me, both in viticulture & my role as HB Wine Ambassador. I’ve had to work hard to cultivate the future I strive for. It’s about being patient, growing together, having an understanding of one another and learning all the time. We need to be kind to ensure we create deep connections to move forward with.”

Find out more about Nic in our Q&A here.

Alice Rule

Winemaker at 3Sixty2

“Being a young woman in wine has undoubtedly been a hard journey. However the adversity that comes with being a square peg in a round hole has been my biggest driver for change, the discomfort my most efficient teacher, and the fear my most poignant informant of what I really care about. All this has made me more empathetic to the challenges of others. It’s prepared me to stand by not only women in wine, but to stick up for others who are less represented and commit to creating an inclusive industry culture.”

Find out more about Alice in our Q&A here.

The NZ Women in Wine initiative was launched in 2017. Find out more about ithere.

The post 4 Women in Wine Worth Watching appeared first on Sip NZ.

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FMCG Business Magazine asked us and other related industry experts to share the top wine trends for 2019.

Our predictions are now being featured in a special edition of the publication, the “FMCG Business Leaders Forum“.

Here are our 2019 wine trends and predictions…

Conscious Consumers

Consumers are increasingly interested in where their products are coming from and how they’re made. Wine is no different and with growing consumer interest organic, biodynamic and vegan friendly wines are “naturally” popular choices.

Bubbles Blossom

Sparkling wines, especially Prosecco and Rosecco, will continue to grow in popularity here in New Zealand, turning the drink that has been historically reserved for celebrations into an everyday sip. Launches of small format bottles such as Moët Mini fuel that trend and offer a suitable new format to enjoy bubbles at different occasions.

Rosé is here to stay

Once labelled a by-product, Rosé has come a long way with a huge selection of styles available in New Zealand to suit every taste and budget. Kiwis will continue to drink pink over the next year (especially on Rosé Day on 5 February!) and we’ll see more instgrammable wine-based cocktails and new packaging formats as Rosé unleashes its full potential as a lifestyle drink.

The rise of the wine-fluencer

Chel Loves Wine | Chelsie Petras

Peer to peer and Key-Opinion-Leader (KOL) reviews are becoming as important as wine critics’ thoughts on a product especially for younger consumers, especially in emerging wine markets. New Zealand’s wine influencer scene is in its infancy, but we predict it is going to mature over the next year(s).

New concepts pop-up

Events such as Pinot Palooza and the Urban Wine Walk are shaking up the wine event scene and are offering interesting new ways to taste wines and meet the maker. Exciting pop-up concepts will continue to emerge in 2019 and we are ready for it.

Bye bye trestle tables and laminated tasting notes. You won’t be missed!

The post 5 Wine Trends to look out for in 2019 appeared first on Sip NZ.

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We’ve teamed-up with talented foodie & caterer Chantelle Tournier aka Food by Chantelle who kindly created a couple of pink recipes for us to indulge in style this NZ Rosé Day.

Rosé Spritzer

Fill an ice cube tray with edible flowers, fresh mint and berries. Top it up with your favourite Rosé and freeze. Once frozen, fill a glass with Rosé cubes and top-up with soda water. Enjoy!

White Chocolate & Raspberry Cupcakes

INGREDIENTS
Makes 12 big or 24 mini cupcakes

Cupcakes
125g softened butter
1 tsp vanilla essence
1/2 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 1/2 cups self raising flour
1/4 cup milk
100g fresh raspberries

White chocolate ganache icing
300g cream
100g white chocolate

Dr. Bugs Candy floss and edible flowers to garnish.

Pre-heat your oven to 180C and spray grease your muffin tin (I use a vegetable spray). Cream butter and sugar, add eggs one at a time, gently combine and add the milk. Sift in flour and fold together. Lastly add the fresh raspberries. Evenly spoon the mixture into greased muffin tin.

Bake for 15 mins until the mixture bounces back when lightly touched.
Remove from oven and let cool.

While the cakes cool, bring the cream for the white chocolate ganache to the boil in a separate bowl, pour the cream over the white chocolate. Mix together until the mixture comes together – this may take a few minutes. When combined place in the fridge to cool about 15 minutes. Once the mixture has cooled whisk together until light and fluffy.

Pipe the ganache onto the cool cupcakes with a piping bag and decorate with candy floss and edible flowers.

Serve for afternoon tea with your favourite glass of chilled Rosé!

Find out more about Chantelle on her website and make sure you follow her on Instagram and Facebook.

The post Indulge this NZ Rosé Day with Food by Chantelle appeared first on Sip NZ.

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We understand, trying new wines at special occasions can be somewhat daunting, especially if your guests love their vino.

We challenge you to mix it up a bit this Christmas with these 5 Must-Sip Wines that will not only please your guests’ palate but also encourage you to explore new varietals and styles this summer.

Spencer Hill Reserve Fumé Sauvignon Blanc

Time to explore, get adventurous and see new sights. This wine offers a new take on the emblematic Sauvignon Blanc.

So venture a bit to the region of Nelson for this lightly oaked, honey laced Sauvignon Blanc that is in full bloom. Tropical with vanilla and honey and that distinct Sauv Blanc nose, this will be sure to please all Savvy lovers on your list. 

Find out more about this Fumé here:  https://buff.ly/2BdhC4j

The Hunting Lodge Albariño

A heavy hitter with round luscious flavours, aromatic perfume and a cool all around character.

Well dressed in beautiful packaging, you will want to make friends with this wine this holiday season. 

Find out more about this wine here: https://buff.ly/2RIEUpu

Petal Rosé 

The holidays are all about giving, so not only can you give a bottle of this from wine away you can also support a small local winery from the Patutahi Plateau in Gisborne who is fairly new to the game. 

Soft and delicate, from the colour to the label on the bottle, this 100% Merlot Rosé entices you to branch out, and try a little bit pinkly different. 

Find out more about this wine here: https://buff.ly/2Ea0Ohp

Te Kano Blanc de Noir

You like Pinot, it’s summer… you have a new wine to try! This wine has a lot of structure like a Pinot but is refreshing and simple to drink.

Pair it with some delectable blue cheese and crackers and your deck will soon be calling you to put up your feet.

Find out more about this festive Sip here: https://buff.ly/2Edmp8C 

Leveret IQ Rosé

Bubbles make everyone happy and this one is sure to be a crowd pleaser. A beautiful blend of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier it is full of strawberries and cream dusted with rose petals.

Round in the mouth and perfect for that holiday toast that you know you have to do… get out the cheeses, appetisers and Christmas cheer and it will feel a lot like Christmas! 

Found out more about these festive bubbles here: https://buff.ly/2ASwFQr

The post 5 Must-Sip Wines this Christmas appeared first on Sip NZ.

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Everyone has at least one of those “hard to buy for” people on their Christmas present list and if they’re a wine geek, it’s even harder as you don’t want to end up buying a bad bottle of wine or gadget that they already own. That’s why our second Sipmas Gift Guide is the Wine Geek Edit including 5 fail-proof gift ideas.

Ok, you do need deep pockets for these gift ideas, they ain’t cheap, but they’re certainly unique and won’t disappoint that fussy wine geek in your life!

Sipmas Gift Guide: The Wine Geek Edit

The Jancis Robinson Collection Wine Glass | from $85 via Atelier Nash

This elegant glass is the result of a successful collab between wine goddess Jancis Robinson and product designer Richard Brendon. It’s a delicate and well-designed glass that can be used for all wines no matter its colour, including sparkling wine, port, sherry and sweet wines. Perfect for a minimalist wine geek that appreciates good design and delicate stemware!

Mount Michael Heli-Tasting in Central Otago | $375

Why build a tasting room at the bottom of a mountain if you can simply taste wines on top of it? That’s what the crafty crew of Mount Michael Wines thought, offering exclusive heli-tastings with a view of the stunning Central Otago wine country.

A unique way of tasting and appreciating New Zealand’s wine culture and an excellent experiential gift for the adventurous wine lover.

Mills Reef Arthur Edmund Cabernet Merlot 2013 | $350

Quite possibly the most expensive New Zealand wine you can buy right now. We haven’t been lucky enough to try it yet but the price tag suggest its bound to be a delicious drop!

Te Mata Showcase Collection | $330

This exclusive collection includes some of Hawke’s Bay’s top wines, from one of New Zealand’s most iconic producers. Established in 1896, Te Mata has mastered the art of fine winemaking over the years, consistently producing ultra-premium wines. A must-own collection for any New Zealand wine enthusiast!

Tony Bish The Sassy Bunch Chardonnay Wine Club | $620

This is the ultimate Chardy lovers gift! A subscription to Tony Bish’s (aka the King of Chardonnay) wine club, The Sassy Bunch. Get a dozen Chardonnays including his premium Heartwood and iconic Golden Egg wines delivered straight to a wine lover’s door step, two times a year, and receive other member benefits including ongoing savings and exclusive offers.

Happy shopping!

Keep an eye out for our 5 Days of Sipmas next week including festive wines and giveaways on our social media channels.

The post Sipmas Gift Guide: The Wine Geek Edit appeared first on Sip NZ.

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I’ve got a love-hate relationship with Instagram and recently read the perfect quote, well on Instagram of course: “Sometimes, when I’m feeling really overwhelmed, I like to sit back, take a deep breath, make a list of everything I need to do and then spend 3-4 hours looking at photos of complete strangers on Instagram!” It still makes me laugh really…

BUT then there are times when you come across boutique producers or inspiring makers that definitely make hours of pointless scrolling worth while.

Alice from 3Sixty2 is one of those. I stumbled upon her profile and beautiful content a few weeks back, eager to find out more about this down to earth, young maker and go-getter.

I’m excited to be sharing a Q&A with her today. Let’s get straight into it…

Hi Alice, tell us a bit more about 3Sixty2. What’s the story behind the name?

A play-on-words is one thing.  A play-on-numbers, however holds meaning deeper than the roots of the vines that are harvested or the very purpose of our trade.  Numbers mark the starting point of what has grown to be one of New Zealand’s greatest success stories.

570 is the number of vine cuttings James Busby had accumulated from Europe before taking on a role as British Resident in NZ (Waitangi).  Only 362 however survived the journey and that’s how my name came about.

My career began at a winery Marsden Estate in the Far North, when I was kicked out of school my first job was at a cafe called Waikokapu on the Treaty Grounds. And when I won Esk Valley top viticulture student, I was given a book ‘Chances and Visionaries by Keith Stewart’ that taught me about the influential character James Busby.

When and why did you start this wine venture?

I don’t tolerate being held back, and I quite honestly never worked for someone who believed in me. I found myself slaving my guts out for literally peanuts (I never made more than $18 in the industry until I became self-employed; despite having a double degree and 8 years experience).  I believed I would be happier taking a risk and flying solo. Believe these early efforts hustling is better invested in my own business than someone else’s.

It also makes me angry seeing so much good talent leaving the industry because wineries and vineyards don’t pay properly, or treat staff fair. So I would like to scoop them up, and get them working for me when I get a bit bigger.

I started this venture back in 2016 but have only recently launched my first wine and created a proper brand and company in January this year 2018.

When and why did you fall in love with wine?

My Dad tells me I started my first vineyard role as a toddler in nappies rolling around in his Ford6610 breaking in the land which is now Omata Estate in Russell. I’ve grown up on dairy farms, and loved the land. I trained as a chef when I was asked to leave high school, and worked in a winery restaurant.  Didn’t care so much for the food so my boss got me into the winery and vineyard, and later shipped me off to EIT in the Hawke’s Bay.

If you were a wine, what wine would you be?

Tough question. Tannat. Strong, bold, rare species in New Zealand, hard to ripen haha, takes a bit of age haha, omg but courageous and interesting – best with food, I get so hangry.

Why did you choose to become a winemaker? 

Because I was fed up being a very skilled, over qualified technical viticulturist, and having under skilled bird scarers zooming around on a bike honking horns getting paid more than me.

I love being on the land, I grew up on farms, new all the paddocks and rivers off the back of my hand. I learnt grape growing and winemaking doesn’t come with 4am starts (like milking cows) or getting poo’d on, or working 365 days of the year.

I love wine because its indicative of the vintage it was grown, and when you spend so much time out in the vineyards, you remember those times….like when the dog poo’d in front of your mower, or the time when the tractor fell off the truck, or the time the I threw a bin of grapes at a guy because he was being lazy.

Share a fact about yourself that only a few know

I have the worst bird phobia.  Like everyone teases me because I’m supposed to be this staunch farm girl. But actually I run away from chickens and ducks (walking birds are the worst). When I found bird nests in the vines, it would kinda make me throw-up and I would tag the bay and come back with a dog or someone else to get it out.

Things you still want to do – what’s on your professional and personal bucket lists?

Professional:  Create a strong conscious consumer, award-winning brand.  Craft exceptional, unconventional brave wines every vintage – and add a Rose, Chardonnay and Syrah to the portfolio.  I want to make my distributors and consumers proud of me.

Personal:  To be the best Rescue Helicopter Ambassador I can be. I run their instagram account, and recently ran a major fundraiser alongside MoreFM at the Duke of Marlborough in November to raise money for our annual appeal.  We have two new Sikorskys getting fitted out now and I’m incredibly honoured to work alongside these local heroes.

Dead or alive, who would you like to share a glass of vino with

Dad.  He taught me everything I know.  Raised me to work seriously hard, has a heart of gold and distributes my wine all over Northland while he moves bulls, shears sheep, or sells hay or whatever he gets up to.

Don’t see a lot of him but when I do, I always bring him a tasty Hawke’s Bay Cabernet.

Find out more about Alice and her 3Sixty2 journey on her website and make sure you follow her on Instagram | Facebook & Twitter.

The post Meet Alice Rule, maker at 3Sixty2 appeared first on Sip NZ.

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Once you spot Santa at Westfield you know that the silly season and Sipmas are finally here.

This year we’re easing into it with our Sparkling Lovers Gift Guide. Bubbles lovers are pretty easy to shop for really but maybe you’ll find some new ideas below to spoil that Sparkling drinker in your life this Christmas!

Silver Fan Gatsby Champagne Flute | $12.50 each

I’m a sucker for vintage glassware and these old/new Gatsby inspired straight flutes are not only on sale today (Black Friday), chances are your bubbles loving friend or family member won’t have anything like them in their glass cabinet either.

Sparkling Wine Silicon Candy Moulds | $24.50

Candy is dandy, Sparkling wine is divine! Gift the mould or buy it for yourself and make Sparkling gummi bears for your bubbly friends.

Matahiwi Rosé Brut NV | $26

This gorgeous new Rosé Sparkling wine is not just a pretty face. She exudes elegance and entices you with her pale pink teint and perfume of red berries and floral scents. Her complex character and rich personality guarantee lengthy conversations until the last fine bead in the glass!

Quartz Reef Méthode Traditionelle NV | $33

This classic Méthode from Central Otago is beautifully balanced and a benchmark when it comes to New Zealand sparkling wines. Green apple, brioche and its creaminess will leave you not only extremely satisfied but asking for more and more and more…

Sparkling Rosé Gummies | $8

If you or sparkly friend are not so much into DIY get these Rosé gummi bears. Perfect as an add on for a bottle bubbles or on their own as a snack to make it until bubbles o’clock.

Urban Vogue Round Bar Cart | $395

Go all out with this elegant 3-tier round bar cart!

Merry Sipmas everyone!

The post Sipmas Gift Guide: The Sparkling Wine Edit appeared first on Sip NZ.

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Innovation in a very traditional category such as the wine industry is often as simple as wrapping some paper around a bottle or offering a wine in a different format size.

But some makers, such as Lee Winston, who is the founder and maker of the exciting, new Untitled range, are a bit more daring and are switching up what’s in the bottle, offering a white, pink and red blend.

Now, I’m sure the wine trade will immediately question where to put them on shelf as these new wines don’t fit the traditional wine aisle layout. One equally progressive retailer has already given this rule-breaking range of wines a prominent spot in their stores, giving Lee the opportunity to challenge the current New Zealand wine portfolio.

Untitled stands for a range of skilfully blended wines that are in no way entitled. Their unique character is a reflexion of hard work. They’re here to challenge expectations, creating their own path.

Because Lee’s website is a bit different just like his wines, we got in touch with him to find out a bit more about his winemaking journey to date and idea behind the Untitled range.

Untitled Wines | Lee Winston

Tell us a bit more about yourself and your winemaking journey to date

I was born in England, grew up in Queensland, and now live in Auckland.

My Bachelor’s degree was in Sport and Exercise Science and I worked for a number of years in cardiac investigations and then in health promotion.

Fancying a change of scene one day, I packed up my Subaru station wagon, grabbed a mate, and drove across the Nullabor to Margaret River in Western Australia where I enrolled in a graduate diploma of Oenology at Curtin University and was fortunate enough to land cellar jobs with Cape Mentelle and Howard Park.

I then did the whole 2 vintages a year thing for a few years—McLaren Vale, Abruzzo, Hunter Valley, Languedoc, Tasmania, Abruzzo again. To fill the gaps between vintages, I completed the WSET diploma by block release in London—probably the best place in the world to learn about wine.

While between vintages, I accidentally and unexpectedly fell in love with a Kiwi girl who was living in London. I flagged a job I had lined up in Tasmania and stayed in the UK. I worked briefly for the International Wine Challenge and then as Oenologist for a large contract bottling facility near Chester.

My girlfriend’s UK visa expired so we moved to New Zealand at the end of 2011. I landed an assistant winemaker job with Delegat. I was only there for just over a year but learned an incredible amount. Since the 2013 vintage, I’ve been the winemaker at Pleasant Valley Wines in Henderson. Pleasant Valley is primarily a contract bottling and winemaking facility. Not many people know it, but it is also New Zealand’s oldest family owned winery. The Yelas family have had the property since 1896 and have made wine every year since 1902.

When and where did you fall in love with wine? 

In Kingaroy—the peanut capital of Australia! I was about 14 and on a swimming trip. We had quite a young, attractive assistant coach and one night she gave me a taste of her Lambrusco. It was love at first taste—the wine wasn’t too bad either.

But really, it was probably more of a gradual thing. While I was studying sport and exercise science I came across the French paradox and the health benefits associate with regular wine consumption. I really love the idea of wine being part of a healthy lifestyle. Wine’s such a social drink and great companion to wholesome food. If you’re ever looking for a reason to drink more regularly read Roger Corder’s The Wine Diet.

As wine became more of a staple in my diet, I wanted to learn more about it so started buying some wine magazines. But, I quickly developed a dislike and distrust for wine journalists — specifically wine critics. I found they were often saying things like the winemaker over extracted, or over oaked, or they should have done this or they should have done that. And I was thinking, but maybe the winemakers intent was for a lot of extraction or a lot of oak or this or that. I figured the only way I could really know about wine was to become a winemaker!

The funny thing is, I’ve been in the industry for 12 years now and I’m still learning … and always will be. That’s one of the great things about wine.

Why did you create the Untitled range?

Like a lot of winemakers, I was keen to do something of my own. I would love to have been able to find a special bit of land and do something like Burn Cottage, Rippon, Bell Hill etc. However, this takes an enormous amount of cash. And, it’s a long time before you see any return on your investment. Untitled is more like the French negociant model. It’s less capital-intensive. I use a mixture of wines made by myself at Pleasant Valley and wines made by other people to create a blend that’s better than the sum of its parts.

I wanted to do something that could potentially appeal to a really broad range of wine drinkers—from novices to highly engaged wine geeks. So, I kept it simple with just a red, white, and pink blend and made the wines to be friendly and affable but with ample depth and complexity. I wanted the focus to be on the wine rather than the vintage, region, variety, soil type or winemaking so left all this info off the label. But, if you are a wine geek, the wine’s composition can be found by entering the wine’s lot code into the untitled.nz website.

A few people have asked why I called it a pink blend rather than rosé. Well, rosé is just the French word for pink. I always thought it a little be funny we use a French word to describe pink wine but use the English words for red and white wine. I thought it would be good to be consistent across the range and have everything anglicised! Plus, then I don’t have to worry if I’ve the accent on the ‘e’ the right way around or not.

What’s your motivation behind the range? 

To be as different as possible without doing something silly like making blue wine. There’s lots of wines out there claiming to be breaking away from the mainstream or celebrating individuality or doing something different but they’re usually just another Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc or ‘Provincial’ style rosé. The wines are essentially the same as pretty much everything else and it’s only the packaging and marketing that’s different. Untitled is trying to do both—make a wine that really is different from the mainstream and also presenting it in a way that’s different too. Of course, Untitled is not the only one doing this, Waiana Estate’s Indian Summer Rosé, is a great example, the packaging is really fresh and different and they’re actually using Cinsault and Grenache in their Provincial style rosé—no one else in New Zealand is doing that! It’s great!

At the end of the day I just love tasty wines—I don’t really care where they are from or what they are made from. I love a good assyrtiko from Santorini as much as a good chardonnay from Chablis. I just want to make wines that are as tasty as they can possibly be. I feel restricting myself to the convention of a single region, a single vintage, or a single variety or ‘traditional’ blend isn’t going to help me in that pursuit. Max Schubert didn’t let convention get in the way when he made Grange—and look how that turned out. I don’t think Untitled will ever get anywhere near that level, and it’s not trying to—Max’s aim was to make wines that would drink well after 20 years my aim is to make wines that will drink will now!

Thank you Lee!

THE WINES – Pink, White & Red Blend

Now, we don’t want to give away too much so you have the opportunity to discover these unique blends for yourself but be assured, you won’t be disappointed!

We like to think of them as a unique New Zealand mosaic of flavours. Each carefully selected parcel is a piece that on its own might be unusual or even lack a bit of character, but skilfully arranged this element becomes an integral part of a unique blended creation, an artwork.

We suggest to discover and enjoy these blends without regional, varietal or vintage specific preconceptions. Pick-up a bottle or the whole range at Glengarry, taste it and THEN enter the lot code on the Untitled website to unveil its composition and you might even bump into Jacinda, Jono, Joseph or Dan on your journey!

Last but not least, follow Lee on Instagram and Facebook and let him know what you think of his wines!

The post Untitled Q&A with Lee Winston appeared first on Sip NZ.

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Chelsie Petras, aka Chel Loves Wine is a wine blogger and influencer from New York City. She makes wine less intimidating one glass at a time which resonates with 28,000 Instagram followers and a rapidly growing YouTube channel.

We got in touch with Chel to find out more about her love of wine and journey to date….

Tell us a bit more about Chel Loves Wine
I started CLW almost 3 years ago. I was working a 9-5 job (and still am) in finance. I really needed a creative outlet so I decided that I was going to start a blog.

So, I started up my blog and my Instagram page that day and just hit the ground running. It’s been such an amazing experience being able to learn about wine and help others learn about wine along the way.

Sometimes it can be really stressful trying to work a full-time job on top of blogging, but it’s given me so much joy and allowed me to travel to amazing places and meet even more amazing people.

If you were a wine, what wine would you be?
I love this question! I would probably be a Malbec. Bold and robust, a little fruity, but with a kick of spice at the end.

What’s your go-to wine at the moment? 
I’m currently loving Beaujolais! It’s always been a top wine on my list but since we’re getting into the colder months, I’m loving these light bodied reds, like Beaujolais.

Chelsie Petras aka Chel Loves Wine

Which is your favourite New Zealand wine to date?
I actually just had a Pinot Noir from Maude wines which I thought was fantastic. I know New Zealand is known for its Sauvignon Blancs, which I love, but this Pinot Noir was awesome. Definitely eye-opening!

What advice would you give someone who is just starting their wine journey?
Don’t give up! The wine industry can be tough, especially for a woman. I would say it is key to get some sort of wine education, even the basics of wine so that you can have a base to keep learning. Wine is all about learning and the more you learn the more you understand.

Making connections with people in the wine industry is also SO important if you’re looking to start your own blog. Some of my favourite people ever I’ve met through my blog.

Share a fact about yourself that only a few know
This one is hard! I feel like I share so much on social media but I would say something only few know is that I’ve played volleyball my whole life and still continue to play on competitive adult leagues in New York City.

Chel chatting to Carl about Rosé

What’s on your bucket list?
Going to Australia and New Zealand is on the top of my bucket list! I’d also love to host my own TV show, go to an award show, I have so much on my list yet to accomplish!

Dead or alive, who would you like to share a glass of vino with?
This is a tough one because I would choose from so many people! But I’d probably pick Celine Dion. I’m going to see her in concert in March so maybe she’ll want to have a glass of wine with me!

Here’s a taste of Chel’s YouTube channel…

EPISODE 1: Behind the scenes with PureWow | Chel Loves Wine - YouTube

You can find out more about Chel on her blog here and make sure you’re also following her on Instagram & YouTube.

The post One to Watch: US Wine Blogger & Influencer Chel from Chel Loves Wine appeared first on Sip NZ.

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