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Children are so flexible.  An infant may just as likely pick something up with his toes as his fingers.  Elementary school children who reach for their own toes can often reach far past them, bending like human pretzels.  But as we age our bodies become more rigid.  Flexibility has to be maintained, or we soon get stiff after sitting too long, sore after repetitive motion, and even if we could get into pretzel-shape, getting back out of it might be really tricky.

But do our minds work similarly, flexible and placid in youth, and stiff and immovable as we age?  If so, does it follow that it is easier to get sober when you’re young, or even that there may be a cut-off point, after which sobriety becomes virtually impossible?

Well, yes, and no.  Here’s what you should know.

An Old Dog and New Tricks

“You naturally lose neurons as you age,” a report from Harvard Medical School states. That natural shedding of brain cells is in addition to the damage to neurons that can occur through the abuse of alcohol or drugs.  The combined impact may add up to brain cells that just don’t fire the way they used to: impaired memory, reasoning and judgment skills.

All of the sounds like a pretty fatalistic check mark in the box that says, “get sober when you’re young,” but it’s not as final as it may sound.  Certain behaviors and changes can improve memory and brain function, counteracting or even reversing the impact of age and substance abuse.  Brain-function improving activities include:

  • Aerobic exercise – Sustained, heavy breathing, such as jogging, dancing or swimming may actually help grow area of the brain and improve the health of brain cells and neurons.
  • Cross-body activity – Engaging both sides of the brain can flex your “brain muscle” in ways that no other activity can.  Learning to play the piano, using the opposite arm and leg in exercise, or activities which use the entire body (yoga, dancing or martial arts, to name a few), may help improve brain health and function.
  • Learning something new – While it can seem more difficult (and in some ways it is) to learn a new language, new sport or new skill as one ages, doing so has many benefits–including brain benefits.  
  • Stress relief – Hanging onto stress and grievances can wear and tear on mind and body.  Those who find healthy ways to relieve stress (not escape it through drugs or alcohol, but instead work through stress), may maintain healthier brain activity.
  • A positive attitude – When you feel young at heart, you may, in fact, live longer, or so research suggests. Learning to be optimistic, and to treat life with positivity, can improve the function of both body and mind.

So while it may indeed be hard to teach an old dog new tricks,  it doesn’t mean that it’s impossible to get sober when you get older. Making small, positive changes along the lines of the items listed above can be part of the process of regaining health, mental function and sobriety.

Youth is Wasted on the Young

In some ways, age may pose an advantage for getting sober: by then, one may come to see the need for a change.  It is unfortunately common for many young people to feel invincible, as though decisions such as binge drinking, experimenting with drugs, or regular substance abuse have no lasting consequences.  As people age, they tend to come to realize that family life, a job, or other such “societal norms” can be an important part of lasting happiness — and substance abuse gets in the way.

So while it can be difficult to change when one is older, in some ways that motivation can be deeper and more powerful.  Many an addict has looked into the eyes of their own child and discovered how important it is that they get clean.  Many a young person has wasted the health and energy of youth on substance abuse.

All the Passion of Youth

So you are set in your ways in your old age, and yet may have greater motivation for change.  Still, it could be much easier to get sober when you’re young.  How can both be true?  Because youth has many distinct advantages, including:

  • Mental flexibility
  • Easier physical recovery, since the body is more adaptable
  • Persistence, passion and the optimism of youth
  • The promise of more life after rehab and the possibility of building a substance-free future
  • Often, an easier time of making new friends and new changes

Many young people have a remarkable ability to throw themselves at something entirely, with the persistence and commitment and energy of one who has not fallen down on his face quite so many times.  There’s the possibility, in drug addiction recovery, of building a whole new life after drug rehab.  The sense of that future can motivate young people through recovery; even if they are unaware of it themselves, that glimmer of hope and optimism is powerful and right around the corner.

Rebuilding the Future

Young people in or after rehab often feel older than their years, a sort of wisdom that comes with experience.  But also, getting sober when you’re young has many advantages:

  • The chance to experience your life, without opportunity having already passed by
  • The ability to help others avoid the pitfalls you’ve encountered
  • The freedom to build a different life, with a career, a family, or whatever you have always wanted
  • The hope and promise of building a better future–for yourself and others.

Whatever your age, you can make a change.  But particularly if you are young and feel like there’s “still time” and you’ll make a change “later” remember this age-old wisdom: tomorrow never comes, there’s always another “tomorrow.”  Yesterday is the past, and every day you make new “yesterdays.” But today is a gift, that’s why it’s called “the present.”

Make today the day that you take our confidential assessment.  We can help you stop the cycle of addiction, while you still have the promise of the present.

The post Is It Easier to Get Sober When You’re Young? appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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While art may not be detox, talk therapy, or group, you may be surprised how art therapy can greatly aid each of those components of traditional therapy.  

A growing number of treatment facilities around the world are beginning to recognize the effectiveness of holistic addiction recovery and different types of therapy.  Time outside in nature, exercise and life skills courses have joined forces with traditional 12-step or talk-therapy approaches in a more balanced, full address of an individual in recovery.  After all, human beings are not a checklist of steps, but rather an entire and complex individual with different needs, personality traits and desires.

Art therapy may sound a little frou-frou to some, the icing on a cake, perhaps.  In fact, when used effectively and appropriately, art therapy can directly impact all aspects of treatment and recovery.

Here’s how, and three different types of art therapy that make the grade.

Everyone’s an Artist

The first words out of the mouth of nearly every individual intimidated by the idea of art therapy are, “I’m not an artist.”  

Fortunately, you do not need to be an artist to effectively participate in art therapy.  Art, in its most basic sense, is just self-expression and communication.  Just as everyone can talk or communicate in some way (even if through sign language), everyone can produce art of some kind.  You definitely do not have to be the next Picasso or paint museum-ready art to communicate through art.  In fact, learning to silence that inner, judgmental voice of self-criticism is one of the values of art therapy: in an art therapy session there is no judgment.  Silencing self-criticism is a skill nearly everyone can use.

Just as everyone can learn to play baseball, but you might not be the next Babe Ruth, everyone can learn to do the basics of art in a way that will allow for therapy to take place.

Art as Communication

One of the biggest benefits of art therapy is the value of communication through art, including:

  • Expressing or voicing complex emotions, for which one may feel like there “are no words.”
  • Facing past experiences or decisions, which may be difficult to confront–or not, since art allows for total freedom of communication, one can choose to express other thoughts or emotions, unrelated to addiction and recovery.
  • Interacting with the real and imaginary worlds at the same time–art produces an object or illustration, but in many cases it is drawn completely from the mind or imagination, making art live in the crossroads of both worlds.
  • Providing an avenue for self-expression that one can choose to share with others or not, whereas verbal communication inherently requires an audience.

Given these and other benefits to art as a form of communication, it’s easy to see how art therapy can ease the distress of detox, quiet the chaos of recovery, and calm the contention of communication in therapy.

Two-Dimensional Art Therapy

The most common types of art therapy are two-dimensional (2D) art forms, such as drawing, painting or collage. These types of therapy have generally very easy set-up and clean-up, and do not require any particular skill.  Common mediums include:

  • Drawing with pencil or charcoal, which is very easy to set-up and use.
  • Painting, which can include use of color, allowing new levels of self-expression.
  • Collage, which is a favorite medium of many instructors. Simple materials like papers, inks and glue can be used for collage, and one does not need any artistic skill–instead of drawing one’s own picture, you can use the photos or illustrations of others to piece together a collage.  Abstract collage techniques also allow for vivid use of color and line, without the burden of trying to make it “look like something.”

Sculptural Therapy

Sculpture (3D) can require additional resources over 2D art forms, but has additional therapeutic value for some addicts in recovery.  There are two main types of sculpture: additive and subtractive.  

  • Additive sculpture means “adding to something.”   You bend wire, work with clay, or piece together found objects, and you are building a sculpture.  Many people find building and forming something therapeutic.
  • Subtractive sculpture means “taking away.”  You can carve wood, chip away at plaster of Paris, or pull off bits of a block of clay to make a form.  The act of carving and chipping and pounding at something can also feel very therapeutic to many people in recovery.

Since sculpture can be any size, any material, and any shape, the experience itself can be fun, freeing and rewarding for use in art therapy.

Writing Therapy

When you think of “art therapy” you may not immediately think of writing therapy, but writing is another art form, another form of communication, that can be very valuable in addiction recovery.  Like other forms of art, writing can come in many different styles, which allows for individual expression. Some common forms of writing therapy include:

  • Journaling, and just recording one’s thoughts and recovery process, which can have lots of therapeutic and self-reflective value.
  • Poetry, which allows for as much or as little structure as the writer wishes to use, and often has symbolic meaning as a form of expression.
  • Free writing, where one writes whatever you think about, as the thoughts come, without any concern about grammar, sentence structure, or anything like that.
  • Memoir, which can turn into a longer format and inspire others–hundreds, if not thousands, of memoirs have been written and even published about addiction and recovery.

Like other forms of art therapy, writing therapy is a wonderful way to escape self-criticism and just communicate freely, without judgment.  Whether or not one shares what one has written is entirely up to the writer, which itself can be powerful.

Get Holistic Help

Do you want holistic care for yourself or a loved one, in an environment where it’s safe to communicate in any form?  At Serenity Rehab we understand individual needs, and help each person find the road to recovery.  

Stop the cycle of addiction now.  We can help.

The post 3 Types of Art Therapy Used in Addiction Recovery appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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Alcohol abuse affects everyone.  Alcohol misuse costs the economy an estimated $249 billion.  An estimated 88,000 deaths each year occur as a result of alcohol-related causes, making it the third leading cause of preventable death.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), who reports on causes of death, also estimates that alcohol costs 2.5 million years of potential life lost, “shortening the lives of those who died by an average of 30 years.”

Yet those numbers say nothing of the quality of life when an alcohol addict lives in your household, the direct impact on so many lives.  It’s a double-edged sword often neglected: the alcohol addiction problems themselves, and the turmoil and conflict which may sit beneath the alcohol abuse.

Alcohol Abuse Defined

Alcoholism and alcohol abuse are two different things.  Alcohol abuse is the excessive or illicit use of alcohol.  A person below the legal drinking age is abusing alcohol, but may not see it that way if he or she does not engage in binge drinking.  Above the legal drinking age, alcohol abuse and binge drinking are one in the same.  Binge drinking is defined as drinking 5 or more drinks in a single occasion for men, 4 or more drinks for most women.

26.9% of adults age 18 and older, when surveyed, reported binge drinking within the past month. 

Heavy drinking, while not necessarily in one sitting, is defined based on how many drinks one consumes in a week.  For male heavy drinkers that number is 15 or more drinks per week, and for women is 8 or more drinks per week (an average of more than one per day for women and an average of more than two per day for men).  Binge drinking and heavy drinking are risk factors in developing a drinking addiction.

Alcoholism, also known as alcohol use disorder (AUD) involves disturbance in life quality, activities, or ability to perform one’s responsibilities to work and/or family as a result of alcohol use.

Impact of Heavy Alcohol Use

Binge drinking or heavy alcohol use carry many negative consequences to physical health and the well-being of self and others.  Alcohol use has been linked to increased criminal activity and incidents of domestic violence or domestic partner abuse. The World Health Organization published data regarding the impact of alcohol as it relates to intimate partner violence, for use in health guidance and policy around the globe.  It included these observations:

  • “Alcohol use directly affects cognitive and physical function, reducing self-control and leaving individuals less capable of negotiating a non-violent resolution to conflicts within relationships.
  • “Excessive drinking by one partner can exacerbate financial difficulties, childcare problems, infidelity or other family stressors.  This can create marital tension and conflict, increasing the risk of violence occurring between partners.
  • “Individual and societal beliefs that alcohol causes aggression can encourage violent [behavior] after drinking and the use of alcohol as an excuse for violent [behavior].
  • “Experiencing violence within a relationship can lead to alcohol consumption as a method of coping or self-medicating.
  • “Children who [witness] violence or threats of violence between parents are more likely to display harmful drinking patterns later in life.”

The younger someone is when he or she starts drinking, the more likely to develop dependence upon alcohol, which is an additional risk factor from early exposure to alcohol use and alcohol abuse.

In addition to such psychological and familial impacts, unhealthy drinking habits have health consequences.  Short-term effects of alcohol include:

  • Increased risk of injury such as car accidents and falls
  • Alcohol poisoning, which can lead to coma or even be fatal at certain levels
  • Risky sexual behavior, which can lead to unplanned, unprotected, or undesired sexual activity, pregnancy, and/or sexually transmitted disease
  • Nausea, vomiting, hangover and/or loss of work from excessive alcohol consumption

Long-term effects of excessive alcohol intake include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Liver disease
  • Digestive problems
  • Certain forms of cancer (breast, mouth, throat, esophagus, liver and colon cancer risks all increase with alcohol abuse)
  • Memory problems and/or dementia
  • Learning problems
  • Poor performance at school or work
  • Social problems
  • Mental health or mood disorders such as depression
  • Alcohol dependence and alcoholism

The longer someone abuses alcohol, the increased risk of these consequences.  When someone stops abusing alcohol, these risk factors do start to reduce and may even return to the levels of those who have never abused alcohol.

Double Trouble

Alcohol dependency can also come as a result of a dual diagnosis (also known as a co-occurring disorder).  A dual diagnosis is when someone has both an addiction and a mental health condition, such as depression, anxiety or an eating disorder.  They can be difficult to identify, since alcohol abuse may lead to depression, but depression may also lead one to abusing alcohol. 

Identifying that both an addiction to alcohol and a mental health condition are occurring can help treatment address both, improving long-term recovery rates.  An individual with a dual diagnosis will need to develop healthy coping skills for future triggers for both (or multiple), to maintain wellness.

Similarly, as pointed out by the World Health Organization, family conflict plays a complicated, double role in alcohol abuse: those who experience conflict in the home may be more likely to abuse alcohol, and those who abuse alcohol may cause more conflict in the home.

Signs of Alcohol Dependency

Like so many other behaviors, alcohol dependency can be difficult to spot in oneself, or even in those close to us.  Identifying alcohol dependency involves examining both one’s choices and the impact of those choices on others, including:

  • Drinking more or for longer than planned/feeling unable to maintain control of how much you will consume
  • Continuing to drink, even though it causes problems with relationships or work
  • Trying to quit drinking, sometimes on more than one occasion, and feeling unable to “stick with it”
  • Experiencing withdrawal when not drinking. NOTE: Alcohol withdrawal can be dangerous, and severe withdrawal symptoms require professional assistance.
  • Lying about or covering up drinking or the consequences of drinking (such as missing appointments when hungover and then lying and saying one was sick)
More Reasons to Quit

As stressful as alcohol addiction in a household can be, family can also provide an important part in recovery.  The stressors of family and relationship difficulties can provide motivation to quit.  When there is a great deal of contention and conflict in the home, however, which leads to self-medicating behaviors, such as the consumption of alcohol or drugs, it can make family part of the problem instead of part of the solution.

Similarly, loneliness can play such a role in addiction–becoming lonely and isolated because of drinking, or seeking solace in a bottle for loneliness.

The solutions to conflict and loneliness, then, are to treat such emotional connections to alcohol use as part of the recovery process.  Only by addressing both the behavior, and the underlying reasons/motivations for use, can one really uproot and change a condition.

At Serenity we understand the layers, complexities and conflict of alcohol abuse–the internal conflict, the conflict with family, the conflict that leads to abuse.

Let us help you resolve that strife and break the cycle of addiction.

The post The Role Family Conflict Plays in Alcohol Abuse appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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Teenagers today are under lots of pressure from a variety of sources.  Many of them cope with the challenges and enjoy a drug or alcohol-free adolescence.  However, far too many of these kids are turning to addictive substances to help them escape from the daily demands and expectations.  Researchers continue to explore the dynamics that contribute to underage drinking risks, and their studies have produced some alarming statistics.

Factors that Contribute to Underage Drinking Risks

As if teens didn’t already have enough to deal with such as school, family issues, social pressures, and part-time work, many of them also face daily trauma such as neglect, sexual abuse, verbal abuse, and parents who have substance abuse problems.  For these kids, the chance of becoming dependent on alcohol or drugs is significantly increased.  To provide some perspective on this subject, we offer the following facts on what is considered childhood trauma:

  • Physical Abuse: Includes injuries or bruising from being punched, kicked, stabbed, shaken or hit with an object.  These injuries could come from a parent, family member or caregiver.  Studies show that male children are more likely to suffer physical abuse than females.
  • Sexual Abuse: More than 16 percent of males and 24.7 percent of females experience childhood sexual abuse.  This form of abuse can include incest, rape, fondling, and indecent exposure by a parent, relative, or caregiver.
  • Emotional Abuse: Surprisingly, girls are more likely to experience psychological abuse than boys are.  This kind of damage includes humiliation, threats of abandonment or punishment, berating, disparaging remarks, and confinement or isolation for extended periods.
  • Neglect: More than 686,000 kids are abused or neglected each year in the US. Neglect includes lack of supervision, abandonment, malnutrition, and failure to provide basic daily needs.  According to a survey by ACE researchers, as many as 25.9 percent of girls and 23.1 percent of boys experience child neglect.

The Adverse Childhood Experiences studies conducted by the CDC show that childhood trauma has lasting effects that continue into adulthood, affecting a person’s relationships and interfering with their ability to function appropriately in social situations or a work environment.  They are also at risk for physical or mental health problems such as eating disorders, obesity, depression, sexual dysfunction, promiscuity, smoking, alcoholism, drug abuse, and suicide.

Physical Dangers of Underage Drinking

Traumatic experiences during a child’s developing years contribute to a 20 to 70 percent increase in the chance that they will begin using alcohol between the ages of 15 and 17.  Some teens started experimenting with drinking as early as 14 years old.  By the time these teens reach adulthood the health consequences of drinking at a young age can include:

  • Pulmonary disease
  • Ischemic heart disease
  • Liver disease or failure
  • STDs
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Poor memory
  • Decreased cognitive ability

Other underage drinking risks are poor academic performance,  unwanted pregnancy, reduced quality of life, financial problems, injuries or death from drinking and driving, and suicidal thoughts or behaviors.

No child deserves to spend their young years in a drug or alcohol induced fog because of things that are beyond their control.  Nor do they deserve to spend their adult years struggling with the lingering effects of childhood trauma.  An adult can feel the effects of their childhood trauma in a variety of ways such as having trouble forming meaningful relationships, low self-esteem, unexpected fits of anger, nightmares, flashbacks, feelings of not-fitting-in, panic attacks, and feelings of inadequacy.  These individuals are also more likely to indulge in binge drinking when something occurs such as the death of a loved one or a problem at work or any other upsetting situation that they wish to avoid.

We Can Help

Childhood trauma and underage drinking risks can be just the beginning of a lifetime of struggles.  If you are concerned about your teen drinking alcohol, call our toll-free number today to learn how we can help.

The post Is Childhood Trauma Leading to Dangerous Underage Drinking Risks? appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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For many years, researchers have known that there is a correlation between sleep disorders and addiction, but the general thinking was that abuse of alcohol or drugs caused the sleep trouble or insomnia. However, as the research has advanced the complexity of the issue has grown and it is now seen as a “chicken and egg” scenario. Which comes first? Does alcohol and drug abuse cause sleep disorders, or are the sleep patterns of children and adolescents indicative of future addiction?

Most likely, both are true.

Here’s how, and what to do about it.

Sleep and Health

Poor sleep can lead to decreased attention spans, irritability, unhealthy eating (that energy has to come from somewhere!), and many other immediate reactions, within just a day or two of insufficient sleep. The real consequences of inadequate sleep, however, are the long-term health consequences, which occur as a result of poor sleep patterns or prolonged periods of insufficient sleep. According to research from Harvard Medical School, poor sleep can lead to:
Obesity — While part of the increase in weight, for the underslept, may be accounted for in dietary changes, it doesn’t completely answer the question. Yet, a link has been found between weight and sleep–with those who get 8 hours of sleep per night being the healthiest in weight, as a whole.
Diabetes — Regularly getting insufficient sleep can lead to Type II diabetes. For those already diagnosed with the condition, sufficient sleep can help stabilize blood sugar and improve disease management.
Heart problems — Those who get insufficient sleep have increased incident of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, stroke, heart attack, coronary heart disease and irregular heartbeat. The onset of heart-related issues can occur younger.
Immune function — Those who get insufficient sleep are more likely to get sick, from the common cold as well as any number of other illnesses, due to the compromised immune system that occurs with insufficient rest.

Those with sleep disorders are more likely to experience mood disorders, such as depression, increased physical pain, and disease–all factors which may lead someone to seek medication, either from a doctor or self-medicating with alcohol or drugs.

Sleep, then, is the bedrock of health, and without it the rest of the body cannot properly function.

Sleep and a Developing Body

As important as sleep is to the health of any individual, the importance to young people is even greater.

We now know that the brain continues to develop until age 25. From infancy until complete development, changes in sleep can affect full, healthy development. Children need sleep to grow, for hormones to function correctly, and to perform the important functions of learning during the school-age years. Yet, many people mistakenly believe that bedtimes should not be enforced and that teens or college-aged students do not need much sleep. Unfortunately, the opposite is true. Teens need approximately 9 hours of sleep per night to feel rested, and research shows that inadequate sleep has the same effect on performance at school as taking drugs.

Being short-slept can also create other problems for young people, including:
Problems with relationships
Falling grades
Accident or injury, such as fatigue-related auto accidents
Poor judgment
Mood swings, including depression
Attention problems or hyperactivity
Anxiety or irritability
Increased effect from any alcohol, drugs or medications consumed (even prescription medications taken under a doctor’s orders)
Depleted immune function and increased absenteeism from work and/or school

Now research shows that even in young children, disrupted sleep patterns in children may lead to later use of alcohol and drug use. Good sleep has to start in infancy and carry on throughout life.

Drugs Teens are Using

Development from age 13-25 has a lasting impact on long-term health. Yet, teens especially may not realize the effect their decisions have on their sleep, which in turn have other lasting health consequences. Some of the substances which young people use which impact sleep and health are entirely legal, including:
Energy drinks
Other caffeinated beverages like coffee
High-sugar drinks like soda, even when not in energy drink or coffee form
Smoking (legal after age 18)
Cough syrup (which many young people also use to get high)
Prescription medications

Since such substances can be legally obtained, young people may not realize the dangers involved in using them.

Other popular drugs with teens include:
Marijuana
Opioids
Cocaine
Ecstasy
“Bath salts”
Methamphetamines
Prescription drugs obtained from others

Not only can these drugs affect sleep, but so can birth control pills, diet pills, steroids, antidepressants, and many other medications which teens may use or obtain from members of their household.

These drugs commonly used by teenagers can have many long-term health consequences. So, also, can certain other choices. For example, consuming alcohol, staying up late with friends, late night screen time, and the stress and demands of a busy schedule (such as late night study sessions), can all negatively affect sleep.

Change the Direction of the Sails

Given the data regarding the dangers of poor sleep, and the possibility of later addiction or other effects on health or wellness, one can see the importance of setting patterns for healthy sleep in young people. But if the ship is already sailing off course, how do you change directions and help correct sleep behavior?

Depending on the age of the child, you can either directly improve sleep, or provide the necessary education for a young person to make better sleep choices themselves. Some suggestions include:
Establishing a bedtime
Setting a curfew
Having a cutoff time for all electronics, at least an hour before bed
Creating an atmosphere of calm at the end of the day, in preparation for bedtime
Setting rules about consumption of things such as sugar and caffeine (at least a cutoff time)
Making regular exercise and healthy eating part of family life and the family routine
Increasing time in nature during the day, which may improve sleep and/or health
Monitoring the lights in the house, such as opening blinds to allow light in the morning, but closing them and dimming lights in the evening
Setting an appropriately-lengthed nap time, which for teens should be less than an hour if at all, so as to not interfere with bedtime
Setting healthy limits on activities. As much as young people may feel like they need to be involved in everything to succeed, learning to say “no” is also an important life skill

If all of these behaviors become part of the family routine, you can not only improve sleep patterns, but quite often also improve overall health, attention, and performance at school.

Addiction in Teens

If you suspect that a young person in your life has become addicted to alcohol or drugs, it’s important to get help before it is too late. Many of the negative health consequences of abusing drugs or alcohol while young may be reversed, provided that behavior changes quickly–the sooner you get help, the better the outcome.

At Serenity we have experience working with teens. We can help them understand the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and change course and get back on track. Our caring and professional staff understand the experiences and difficulties of teenage life and addiction, and can help them find their way back.

Contact us for a confidential assessment and stop the cycle of addiction.

The post Are Children’s Sleep Patterns Indicative of Future Drug Addiction? appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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Sharing on social media is a convenient way to keep in touch with friends and loved ones. It’s also helpful when we read news articles someone has posted, or informative items we may not have seen otherwise. There’s always something on there to laugh about or to share.  Many of us like to give regular updates about our personal life such as vacations, new cars, job promotions, new relationship status, and so on. We feel connected and noticed. Of course, with this daily exposure into our personal lives, we should be careful about the specifics of some of the details we share. For instance, in recent years, we’ve been advised not to post our vacation plans until after we return because the wrong person can find out our home is empty for a few days and rob us blind while we’re away.

Sharing on Social Media: How Much is Too Much

Besides the obvious dangers of sharing too many details online, there are some other things we should be extremely careful or sensitive about sharing. For instance, if an addicted friend or loved one has died from drug or alcohol abuse, it is wise not to post too much about their drug overdose facts on social media.  There are a number of reasons why you need to be very selective about what you share on social media regarding this loss. For instance, there are some things about a person’s death you should not make public such as:

  • Never post about a person’s death before a family member approves.
  • Don’t post pictures of the funeral.
  • Posting “selfies” of yourself at the funeral is highly insensitive.
  • Have respect for the family. Don’t post pictures or letters or other things that were personal between you and the deceased.  Offer, in person, to make those things available to the family if they have a desire to see them.
  • Don’t announce the funeral arrangements. That is up to the family to share. Once they have announced the information, then it acceptable to share the plans.

Sometimes, it’s just not all that important to be the first one to make a post about something. When it comes to posting about someone’s unfortunate death, it’s more important to show that you can be considerate and respectful when sharing on social media.

Reaching Out for Support on Social Media

When a loved one dies, many people reach out across the miles to seek solace from loved ones by using social media.  Also, they receive a lot of condolences and support from friends and strangers by sharing their feelings online.  Using Facebook or Twitter or any of the other popular social media platforms, we can talk to hundreds of people in a short time span and gain a sense of not being alone in our grief.  However, we need to remember that the sympathy and support are short-lived and all those posts will dwindle away in no time at all. If you participate in sharing your grief on social media, be prepared to see something that could upset you or cause you to feel worse than you already do. There’s always that one person who manages to say the wrong things at the wrong time, and they’re on all the social media all day, every day.

If your friend or loved one had a drug or alcohol problem that caused his or her death, how much about the drug death facts do you think you need to be sharing on social media?  Of course, it’s an entirely personal decision. However, it is advisable that you avoid telling too many details as a preventive measure. The less you reveal, the fewer unsavory comments you’ll be subjected to seeing.  Share the good memories, but keep the other ones to yourself for your peace of mind.

For More Information, Call and Speak with one of Our Representatives

You can learn more about the pros and cons of sharing grief online by calling our toll-free number today.  One of our representatives will be available to answer your questions about this and any subject regarding drug overdose statistics and treatment for addiction.  Call today.

The post Sharing on Social Media: The Loss of an Addicted Loved One and What to Share appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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Addiction and low self-esteem or a lack of confidence go hand-in-hand. Studies have shown a link between low self-esteem and specific self-destructive behavior, including drug addiction, theft, and prostitution. The use of drugs or alcohol, and continual self-betrayal of trust can lead to further decreased confidence, but in most cases, the low self-esteem preceded the drug use. As an individual begins rehabilitation, finding self-confidence in recovery becomes an important aspect of long-term care. Here’s what you should know, and what can be done to develop confidence after dealing with drug addiction.

Low Self-Esteem and Negative Self-Worth

The childhood chant, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me,” has been proven to be quite false. Words can have lasting detrimental effects on self-worth. Self-esteem is the evaluation of one’s own worth. Low self-esteem “is a condition that keeps individuals from realizing their full potential,” often for many, many years.

That self-reflective value is set in early life, and it can take many more years to undo a negative appraisal. Some children naturally struggle with self-worth and some children get told that their worth is low, but the combination of those two factors is the worst for self-esteem.

Adults such as parents or teachers, naturally in a position of power or authority over children, who say things such as, “You’re stupid,” “You’re no good,” or “You’ll never amount to anything,” burn a lasting negative image into the mind of a child.

Peer struggles, like bullying, also can have a lasting negative impact on a child’s self-worth. The term social capital has become more common in conversations about success in school, and emotional health afterward. Social capital is a term for the networking power of school-aged children. Those who have it easily get others to follow along with them; those who lack it find themselves socially outcast.

For those individuals who lack social capital, the tendency to experiment with potentially self-destructive behavior is higher, particularly when peer pressure is involved (and a desire for social acceptance). Those who have social capital but also want to yield that power may also engage in self-destructive, “attention-getting” behavior, which is often also rooted in a negative self-image. Regaining self-esteem after years of negative self-worth is possible, but it takes focused efforts.

Life Skills in Recovery

The first stage of addiction recovery is detox, a necessary component which often gets the most attention. Safe recovery from the immediate effects of drugs or alcohol is very important, but without addressing the underlying behavioral and psychological components of recovery, relapse is more likely. Researchers have proven time and again that treatment “must address the whole person.”

After that initial detox, then, an individual in treatment needs support, but also life skills therapy. Important life skills after recovery include:

  • Getting and keeping a job
  • Balancing a household budget and paying bills
  • Cleaning and maintaining a place of living
  • Making healthy food choices (for physical and emotional wellness)
  • Choosing positive social activities and navigating that peer interaction
  • Communicating with friends and family well, including having healthy relationships with a potential partner
  • Learning persistence and handling setbacks

Perhaps even most importantly, an addict will need to learn these life skills in recovery and be able to do all of these things, while maintaining a healthy self-image so as to not spiral back out of control (turning back to drugs or alcohol for that “high”).

Tips for Finding Self-Confidence in Recovery

Even if all of the roots for poor self-esteem have been ingrained since one’s early years, a positive and confident view of oneself can be learned. Finding self-confidence in recovery is like addiction recovery itself; it is not a quick fix, one-and-done sort of action. Boosting confidence takes practice, and then attentiveness (when it starts to slip you have to address it again) continually taking the necessary steps to feel your best about yourself.

Here are some ways to make confidence part of your self-image (which you can also use to help a friend or a loved one who is finding self-confidence in recovery):

  • Become Your Own Friend — People with low self-esteem often engage in negative self-talk, talking about yourself or to yourself in ways in which you would never speak to a friend. Apply some self-discipline and learn to speak to yourself in an encouraging way, the way that you would to a friend.
  • Focus on Your Positives — Everyone has strengths, but you might have had a hard time seeing yours. As lame as it might sound to make a list, making a list of positive attributes can be a helpful exercise. Then, instead of trying to “fix your faults” focus on enhancing your positives.
  • Acknowledge Accomplishments — Those who lack confidence also tend to not acknowledge themselves for accomplishments and instead beat themselves up for shortcomings. Practice reversing this: take a moment to pause and reflect when you meet a milestone or complete a task, acknowledging yourself for a job well done.
  • Stay in The Present Moment — In whatever techniques you have learned to do so (such as mindfulness) do your best to stay in the present moment and not compare yourself to past shortcomings/weaknesses/failures, particularly when encountering setbacks. Even just in day-to-day life, though, building your self-confidence is best done by staying in the present moment of recovery.
  • Surround Yourself With Support — Environment can have a great deal to do with recovery, as well as emotional health and confidence. If the people around you insult you, expect very little of you, or tend to enable you, it can reinforce your negative self-image. Instead, surround yourself with a positive workplace, friends and peers who celebrate your recovery, and a healthy living environment. If you must interact with people who give you a hard time, stay in control of the situation, stay positive, and return to your “healthy place” as quickly as possible.
  • Maintain a Healthy Lifestyle — Healthy eating and regular exercise have been linked to a more positive self-image. As you learn in a holistic addiction recovery program, the “feel good hormones” that get released when using drugs or alcohol can be naturally generated, in a healthy and sustainable way, through good foods and, especially, through exercise. Exercise shouldn’t be a substitute addiction, but if done in conjunction with a healthy lifestyle, it can make a big difference in self-confidence.
  • Keep Working At It — Failures, setbacks, and disappointments are an inevitable part of life. How you handle them, your emotional resiliency, as it is sometimes called, occupies a big part of your self-image. If you expect yourself to never fail, you will likely be disappointed.  If you allow yourself to learn, grow, and persist, you can feel good about yourself.
Finding Self-Confidence in Recovery from Addiction

When you undergo recovery at a life skills treatment center, you address yourself as a whole person, and not just a person with an addiction. Addiction can feel like it defines your life, and in many ways it probably did. Habitually seeking the resources to get and use drugs, using drugs, coming down from them, and then seeking them again was probably a big part of life. Life also likely revolved around concealing that drug use from certain people and associating with others who encouraged that use.

Recovery is about building a new life, one that instead revolves around activities of your choosing, a job, a creative endeavor, starting a business, whatever you desire, can become the basis of your new life. Finding self-confidence in recovery is about discovering a new you!

The post Finding Self-Confidence in Recovery After Dealing with Drug Addiction appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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When it comes to anger and addiction, there’s a bit of a “chicken and the egg” situation. Did anger lead to the desire to use substances as an escape, or is the anger a result of alcohol or drug abuse?  However it comes about is irrelevant, since addiction fuels anger and anger fuels addiction. Anger management in addiction treatment is often overlooked, when anger is, in fact,  a necessary issue to confront when attending addiction rehabilitation.

Addiction treatment, to be effective, must include some behavioral changes; that’s what the research shows.  In the very definition of addiction, according to the American Society of Addiction Medicine, “Addiction is a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry.  Dysfunction in these circuits leads to characteristic biological, psychological, social, and spiritual manifestations.” 

Specific behaviors, for the addict, get “hardwired” into the mental circuitry, and breaking down that wiring stands the best chance of lasting and effective treatment. When rehabs provide anger management in addiction treatment, clients are better equipped for long-term success.

The Science of Anger

In a cartoon, when a character gets angry, their faces turn red and steam come out of their ears.  We describe anger by saying things such as, “That makes my blood boil!”  Steam and boiling: the dangerous explosion of hostility.

Reality isn’t that far off. Anger’s effects on the body are quite similar to our cultural expressions and illustrations.  Anger can:

  • Raise blood pressure
  • Increase the risk of heart attack
  • Increase the risk of stroke and brain hemorrhage
  • Turn skin red, which can cause some forms of skin damage or dermatitis over time
  • Decrease oxygen levels in the lungs
  • Cause or increase physical pain: all of those increases in stress hormones wear down on tissue and joints, inflaming them

Beyond just the physical impact on the individual with an angry outburst or regular anger management issues, anger affects relationships in many ways.  Anger can:

  • Stress, strain or damage personal relationships
  • Lead to increased incidence of physical violence
  • Lead to crime and possible incarceration
  • Increase severity of crime, such as leading to destruction introduced in a crime
  • Elevate a situation where physical force is used in response to the angry individual (anger is, essentially, contagious)
  • Get you fired from your job

Over time, unless handled, anger and hostility can wear down both the physical body and emotional relationships, making healthy, happy living virtually impossible.  But it’s also a trap: the angry individual tends to see plenty of “reasons” for the hostility and anger, making it even more difficult to diffuse.

Anger and Addiction

With so many aspects of self-control in addiction being part of the problem, why focus on rage?  Why include anger management in addiction treatment?

The scale of anger can vary widely, from some small amount of hostility, to outwardly expressed violence and threats of violence. Without addressing that anger and hostility, and learning how to treat anger issues within oneself and in one’s life, the anger can accumulate and surface again.

The cycle of addiction can repeat. Even if you get treatment and stay away from drugs and alcohol, without anger management in addiction treatment,d lead back to using.  On the one hand, a user may have been an alleviation to emotional stress or pressure, including anger, which means that when triggers occur again and the emotional response of anger occurs, an individual is more likely to use again.  On the other hand, if an angry outburst does happen, the individual can wind up in a spiral of self-loathing, which is another type of emotional trigger for using.  So either as a direct result of the anger itself or in the aftermath, multiple triggers can occur which lead to using, unless the individual learns to manage those angry feelings healthily.

Specific populations are at higher risk for needing assistance with anger management, including addicts.  Other at-risk groups include those who have experienced emotional trauma or meet the diagnostic criteria for PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder).  Compounding the situation, those at-risk groups also tend to have higher rates of addiction.  So the emotional trauma leads to more intense emotion, entwined with anger, intermingled with addiction.

It’s a complicated knot, and addressing the anger is one of the ways to help untie it.

Anger Management in Addiction Treatment

While it would be impossible to summarize an entire anger management program in a few paragraphs, there are tools that anyone can apply to help regain emotional control and better handle the anger they experience.  Here are a few tips which you or your loved ones can use to get anger under control:

  • Allow yourself to feel what you feel – Accumulating anger can cause even worse outbursts.
  • Acknowledge that what you are feeling is anger – You can control your own emotions.
  • Think before you speak – Collect your thoughts before saying or doing something that you will regret.  Mindfulness meditation or journaling are two techniques for collecting one’s thoughts, which will work for many people.
  • Give yourself time – Taking longer before expressing one’s thoughts or feelings isn’t a sign of weakness, sometimes it’s a sign of strength.
  • Do express your emotions – When you’ve had a chance to collect your thoughts, do voice them.  People who manage feelings of hostility well do so, in part, because of expressing emotions instead of letting them accumulate and explode.
  • Let off steam – Exercising, going on a walk, punching a punching bag, whatever way you let off steam; it can release some of the energy and force of anger, without hostility aimed at another human being.
  • Laugh it off – Finding the humor in a situation or life can have a powerful effect on reducing anger.
  • Be solution-oriented – Working toward finding a solution, instead of just complaining, can help reduce hostility.
  • Take responsibility – Much of anger management therapy will focus on this crucial point, where one learns to cease to blame and instead focuses on taking responsibility for actions.
  • Ask for help – For many, gaining control of one’s anger is very similar to other aspects of treatment, it’s an ongoing process and one for which you might require some help. Learning to ask for and accept help can go a long way toward healing relationships weighed down by hostility.
  • Be willing to make changes – Removing oneself from triggers isn’t always only about changing one’s inward self, sometimes it also requires making life changes.  If a workplace or a relationship trigger too much anger, sometimes making a life change can be an essential part of healing.
Regain Control

At Serenity, we understand the complex issues and factors involved with addiction.  We can help you or your loved one address not only the detox of alcohol or drug abuse but also the underlying thought process and behaviors associated with addiction, including anger.  We recognize the importance of anger management in addiction treatment and will help you take the steps you need to regain control.  Each program is customized so that anyone in recovery can work out and discover the techniques and approaches that work best for themselves.

Working with our team of professionals, we can help you uproot anger and stop the cycle of addiction.  Contact us to find out how.

The post Why Anger Management is Often Overlooked in Addiction Treatment appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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Addiction treatment, to be effective, must include some sort of behavioral changes–at least that’s what the research shows.  In the very definition of addiction, according to the American Society of Addiction Medicine, “Addiction is a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry.  Dysfunction in these circuits leads to characteristic biological, psychological, social and spiritual manifestations.” 

Essentially, certain behaviors, for the addict, get “hardwired” into the mental circuitry, and breaking down that circuitry stands the best chance of lasting and effective treatment.

When it comes to anger management and addiction, there’s a bit of a “chicken and the egg” situation: did anger lead to the desire to use, as an escape, or is the anger a result of alcohol and drug abuse?  However it comes about in the first place is basically irrelevant, since addiction fuels anger and anger fuels addiction. 

When you treat the addiction, if you also approach treatment for anger management, you help the individual in recovery get better setup for long term success.

The Science of Anger

In a cartoon, when a character gets angry, their faces turn red and steam comes out of their ears.  We describe anger by saying things such as, “That makes my blood boil!”  Steam and boiling: the dangerous explosion of hostility.

Reality isn’t that far off. Anger’s effects on the body are quite similar to our cultural expressions and illustrations.  Anger can:

  • Raise blood pressure
  • Increase the risk of heart attack
  • Increase the risk of stroke and brain hemmorage
  • Turn skin red, which can actually cause some forms of skin damage or dermatitis over time
  • Decrease oxygen levels in the lungs
  • Cause or increase physical pain: all of those increases in stress hormones wear down on tissue and joints, inflaming them

Beyond just the physical impact on the individual with an angry outburst or regular anger management issues, anger affects relationships in many ways.  Anger can:

  • Stress, strain or damage personal relationships
  • Lead to increased incidence of physical violence
  • Lead to crime and possible incarceration
  • Increase severity of crime, such as leading to violence introduced in a crime
  • Elevate a situation where physical force is used in response to the angry individual (anger is, essentially, contagious)
  • Get you fired from your job

Over time, unless handled, anger and hostility can wear down both the physical body and emotional relationships, making healthy, happy living virtually impossible.  But it’s also a trap: the angry individual tends to see plenty of “reasons” for the hostility and anger, making it even more difficult to diffuse.

Anger and Addiction

With so many aspects of self-control in addiction being part of the problem, why focus on anger?  Why include treatment for anger management?

The scale of anger can vary widely, from some small amount of hostility, to outwardly expressed violence and threats of violence. Without addressing that anger and hostility, and learning how to treat anger issues within oneself and in one’s life, the anger can accumulate and surface again.

The cycle of addiction can repeat. Even if you get treatment and stay away from drugs and alcohol, without rehab for anger management, a situation can spiral out of control and lead back to using.  On the one hand, using may have been an alleviation to emotional stress or pressure, including anger, which means that when triggers occur again and the emotional response of anger occurs, an individual is more likely to use again.  On the other hand, if an angry outburst does occur, the individual can wind up in a spiral of self-loathing, which is another type of emotional trigger for using.  So either as a direct result of the anger itself, or in the aftermath, multiple triggers can occur which lead to using, unless the individual learns to manage those angry feelings in a healthy way.

Certain populations are at higher risk for needing assistance with anger management, including addicts.  Other at-risk groups include those who have experienced emotional trauma or meet the diagnostic criteria for PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder).  Compounding the situation, those at-risk groups also tend to have higher rates of addiction.  So the emotional trauma, leads to more intense emotion, entwined with anger, intermingled with addiction.

It’s a complex knot, and addressing the anger is one of the ways to help untie it.

Treatment for Anger Management

While it would be impossible to summarize an entire anger management program in a few paragraphs, there are tools that anyone can apply to help regain emotional control and better handle the anger they experience.  Here are a few top tips from pros which you or your loved ones can use to get anger under control:

  • Allow yourself to feel what you feel – Accumulating anger can cause even worse outbursts.
  • Acknowledge that what you are feeling is anger – You can control your own emotions.
  • Think before speak – Collect your thoughts before saying or doing something that you will regret.  Mindfulness meditation or journaling are two techniques for collecting one’s thoughts, which will work for many people.
  • Give yourself time – Taking longer before expressing one’s thoughts or feelings isn’t a sign of weakness, sometimes it’s a sign of strength.
  • Do express your emotions – When you’ve had a chance to collect your thoughts, do voice them.  People who manage feelings of hostility well do so, in part, because of voicing feelings instead of letting them accumulate and explode.
  • Let off steam – Exercising, going on a walk, punching a punching bag, whatever way you let off steam, it can release some of the energy and force of anger, without hostility aimed at another human being.
  • Laugh it off – Finding the humor in a situation or in life can have a powerful effect on reducing anger.
  • Be solution-oriented – Working toward finding a solution, instead of just complaining, can help reduce hostility.
  • Take responsibility – Much of anger management therapy will focus on this key point, where one learns to cease to blame and instead focuses on taking responsibility for actions.
  • Ask for help – For many, gaining control of one’s anger is very similar to other aspects of treatment, it’s an ongoing process and one for which you might require some help. Learning to ask for and accept help can go a long way toward healing relationships weighed down by hostility.
  • Be willing to make changes – Removing oneself from triggers isn’t always only about changing one’s inward self, sometimes it also requires making life changes.  If a workplace or a relationship trigger too much anger, sometimes making a life change can be an important part of healing.
Regain Control

At Serenity we understand the complex issues and factors involved with addiction.  We can help you or your loved one address not only the detox of alcohol or drug abuse, but also the underlying thought process and behaviors associated with addiction, including anger.  We recognize the importance of anger management in recovery, and will help you take the steps you need to regain control.  Each program is customized, so that anyone in recovery can work out and discover the techniques and approaches that work best for themselves.

Working with our team of professionals, we can help you uproot anger and stop the cycle of addiction.  Contact us to find out how.

The post Anger Management: Why it’s Often Overlooked in Addiction Treatment appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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Serenity Rehab Center by Admin - 1M ago

What is Diazepam?

Diazepam is a type of benzodiazepine mainly used to relieve anxiety, seizures, muscle spasms and to ease alcohol withdrawal symptoms.  It works by affecting the chemicals in the brain by lessening hyperactive brain function to diminish stress and anxiety.  It is a long-acting benzodiazepine, meaning that each dose lasts two to four times longer than short-acting benzodiazepines thus limiting the frequency with which one takes the drug.  For diazepam to be effective, it is meant to be taken on a regular basis.  However, this leads people to addiction and the inability to think and function without the drug in their system.  Addiction to diazepam almost always starts with a prescription, and because of the nature of the drug, progresses rapidly towards dependence.

Signs of Diazepam Use

This drug greatly affects the brain, therefore many of the signs and symptoms of diazepam use are visible on the faces and the bearing of individuals abusing the drug.   Here are a few of the major signs and symptoms of diazepam use:

  • General Sedation
  • Memory loss or even amnesia
  • Dilated Pupils
  • Drowsiness
  • Muscle Weakness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Blurred or double vision
  • Loss of interest in sex

The symptoms become exponentially worse with heavy use ranging from confusion and hallucinations to seizures and loss of bladder control. 

Another sign of diazepam use is that a person may become a poor driver.  Because of the sedation effects of this drug, a persons ability to gauge distances and react to hazards on the road will not be very quick.  They may swerve in and out of lanes as they are not able to focus on the lines and their surroundings.  Diazepam is a long-lasting drug and because of this, it may impair a persons ability to drive the next day if they have taken it the night before. 

A person abusing diazepam may also find they have impaired judgment.  They no longer make safe decisions.  It may start to seems acceptable to mix diazepam with other drugs like alcohol or other opiates which can result in serious injury or death. 

Loss of inhibitions is yet another sign of diazepam use and abuse.  This is very dangerous as it can lead to a person harming themselves or others and partaking in hazardous activities such as unprotected sex.

Because diazepam is legal, many people make the mistake of thinking that it is safer and less addictive than harmful street drugs like cocaine and heroin.  However, this misconception has all to often led to addiction or overdose.

If a person is overdosing, there may be just a short amount of time to get help before it is too late.  Here are a few signs of diazepam overdose:

  • Drowsiness
  • Weakness
  • Double vision
  • Trouble breathing
  • Uncoordinated movement
  • Bluish lips
Diazepam Addiction

Diazepam, like other benzodiazepines, is in a class of drug that is highly addictive.  People generally take this drug to relieve stress and anxiety -in other words- they take it to feel normal.  When a drug is used not only to get high but to just be able to function in life, it opens the door to problems and addiction.  Part of the reason why it is so easy to become addicted is that a person can easily build up a tolerance to the drug and soon require more of the substance to achieve the same effects.  Tolerance occurs when a person uses, or abuses, a substance for a prolonged period of time causing their body to build up a resistance to the substance.  This means that their body needs more of the substance to get the same results.  Even when prescribed by a doctor the dosages will need to be increased if a person is to take it for any length of time. As the amount taken goes up, however, so does the intensity of the side effects.  Prescribed or obtained and abused illegally, anyway this drug is taken can lead to addiction.

Though tolerance to the drug is the first and main sign of addiction, there are several other signs to look out for as well.  These include but are not limited to:

  • Neglecting agreements and Obligations
  • No longer interested in once enjoyable activities
  • Isolating oneself from friends and family
  • Strong and overwhelming cravings for the drug
  • Continuing to use the drug while being aware of the problems it causes and harmful side effects

Once addiction is present and acknowledged, it is time to look towards where to find help and how to get sober.  There are many programs available to aid in the treatment of diazepam addiction.

How to Treat Diazepam Addiction

As with every addiction, a person trying to come off of diazepam will find themselves experiencing withdrawal symptoms.  Diazepam directly affects brain function, so this can be a very sensitive area of recovery and it is not generally suggested to come off of this drug without help.

It is widely agreed upon that diazepam rehab should last at least 30 days, though the amount of days in a rehab program is dependent upon the severity of the addiction.  With a good support team at home, a one month-long treatment is usually sufficient for most.

The first step once the rehab program has been chosen is to fill out all the paperwork regarding past medical and drug history.  This is important because it allows the treatment counselors to know enough about your background to make a workable treatment plan for you.

The next and most intense step is to detox the drugs from your body.  In this step, the aim is to break the physical addiction and dependency to diazepam.  This is done under close supervision to ensure the least amount of discomfort for the individual. 

After detoxification is complete, it is time to move on to counseling to handle the cognitive addiction to the drug.  Depending on the rehabilitation path you have chosen, you can participate in individual or group counseling.  Individual counseling is beneficial to those who have feelings of shame or regret and are not yet ready to open up and share their experiences.  Group counseling is great for those who want to know that they are not alone in their addiction.  In group counseling, people can share their stories and find camaraderie and support amongst new friends.  Of course, many treatment plans include both individual and group counseling to provide a complete approach to cognitive recovery.  Regardless of the path one chooses, all of the counseling will be sure to cover how to stay clean after recovery and how to reintegrate into normal life.

Life after Diazepam Rehab

Once a person has completed their rehab program and is now sober, they may find it difficult to regain common skills such as how to communicate with others, how to choose the correct people to be around and how to rebuild self-image and self-respect.  These points will more than likely be covered in a rehab program, but it will take time to master and be comfortable with these skills again.  With time, patience, and dedication to remaining sober, life can become meaningful again.   

The post Diazepam appeared first on Serenity Rehab Center.

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