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The Stockholm-based duo has known each other since they were about ten years old and always been making stuff together. So, in that sense, the company started long before Atelier Saman Amel was established in 2012.

— We started sewing garments — ties, shirts, and jackets — on a small scale by ourselves, says Dag Granath. After I had studied tailoring for three years, we started to visit Italy frequently to learn more about their approach to tailoring. We launched our atelier offering custom made tailoring in 2015 which was hence our first year in real action.

Tailoring has been associated with formality and expressing hierarchy in the workspace. Today, as fewer situations demand a formal way of dress people, clients are looking for other things from their tailoring.

— It [the client] can be a 20-year-old artist or a 60-year-old banker. That’s what I am most happy about: that our stuff appeals to a broad variety of people, says Granath.

Today, they launch a special capsule for Mr Porter.

— When they reached out to us, we were particularly glad to hear that we share a common value set as well as an analysis of what tailoring is today and what it will become. Mr Porter realizes that tailoring and what function tailoring fills for a modern man is changing. They want to be part of that process, as do we.

Which are the highlights in the collection?

— I am particularly happy seeing the collection as a whole and how well the pieces can be worn separately and mixed up together. The off white linen/wool/silk jacket is a must in the Atelier Saman Amel clients’ wardrobe. It is much more versatile that one might think, although it is a step outside of a lot of guys’ comfort zone. The black wool/mohair dinner jacket that can be worn with faded denim or as a tux jacket alike is another piece I am particularly glad to show. It is the perfect balance of sexy and elegant. Lastly, I want to highlight the wider leg trouser, crafted from a unique canvas cotton fabric that has a beautiful texture to it.

This September, Atelier Saman Amel has their first trunk show in New York.

— Visiting us at our trunk shows is a way for us to give the client a personally curated experience of what Atelier Saman Amel is about. During trunk shows, we build customized fits for each and every client and hopefully we can build strong relationships that will last for many years. Over the past few years, we have had a great deal of clients from NYC and elsewhere in the US that has been travelling to meet with us in London, Seoul or Stockholm so it only felt natural to extend our services to the city. We are very grateful to have had such a great reception there before even coming over. We are still relatively unknown to the greater public outside of the tailoring scene. In NYC, we hope to change that.

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Norway highlights equality on its Constitution Day

Today marks both the Norwegian National day and the International Day against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia.

May 17 has been the Norwegian National day since 1814, the year the Constitution of Norway was signed at Eidsvoll. Constitution Day is traditionally associated with children’s parades, Norwegian flags, marching bands, russ students, traditional costumes known as bunad and loads of ice cream and pølser (hot dogs).

On a very special day for Norwegians and fans of Norway from all over the worldVisit Norway changes its logo to the colours of the rainbow and “Powered by Equality”, in order to raise awareness on LGBTIQ rights for the International Day against Homophopia, Transphobia and Biphobia.

From the 13th May to the 15th May, a few days before Constitution Day, Oslo hosted the IDAHOT+ Forum 2019 focusing on LGBTIQ policies and challenges. The conference included a Nordic ministerial meeting hosted by the Norwegian Minister of Culture and Equality, Trine Skei Grande. The 34 countries that make up the network all signed a joint decleration with a call for a renewed commitment from the Council of Europe and its Committee of Ministers, from the EU institutions and from European states to further work for LGBTI rights and inclusion.

Norway is currently the fourth best country in the world for LGBTIQ rights, according to ILGA Europe and the second best country in the world when it comes to gender equality.

Not everything is perfect, though. This is the reason why Visit Norway raises the rainbow flag together with the Norwegian flag on Constitution Day. Because we are proud of the Norwegian values and democracy, and of all people living in our country, no matter orientation.

As His Majesty King Harald V of Norway declared in his speech from 2016:

“Norwegians are girls who love girls, boys who like boys, and girls and boys who are fond of each other. (…) When we in our national anthem sing; “Yes, we love this country,” we must remember that we also sing about each other. For it’s we who make up the country. Therefore, our national anthem also is a declaration of love to the Norwegian people.”

— We are proud to see how far the Norwegian society has come in terms of equality. With this initiative on Constitution day, Visit Norway wishes to stress that there are still challenges to overcome. Norway is a country that welcomes everyone, no matter who you love, says Bente Bratland Holm, Director Visit Norway.

Luke Edward Hall x Svenskt Tenn

The LUKE EDWARD HALL x SVENSKT TENN exhibition shows one interpretation of the artist and designer Luke Edward Hall’s studio and creative work. An interior design collection, exclusively designed for Svenskt Tenn with colourful motifs and Hall’s characteristic faces in watercolours, is being launched here.

The 29-year-old London-based artist and designer Luke Edward Hall founded his studio in 2015. Since then, there has been a succession of prestigious assignments, such as collaborations with Burberry, Christie’s and the Royal Academy of Arts. The collection for Svenskt Tenn contains a pair of products that will be included in the range, as well as limited edition bags, cushions, ceramics and lampshades that are all designed in Hall’s characteristic style.

— The world can be pretty dark and gloomy, so it feels meaningful for me to embrace bold colours. I have always loved to surround myself with colour – to live with it, wear it and create things with it. I guess it is about optimism; colours bring happiness, says Hall.

Inspiration for the exhibition comes from Hall’s studio in London and a table setting with his characteristic aesthetic and playfulness is also on display.

— Luke is a multi-talented creative soul with an interesting design philosophy and positivity in his creations which makes him an exciting person in our time. We are looking forward to showing off his artistry and having our worlds meet, says Thommy Bindefeld, marketing and creative director.

— I have admired Svenskt Tenn and Josef Frank for many years so it feels great to actually get to work together. Frank’s fabrics are so playful and vibrant. I remember when I bought my very first Svenskt Tenn cushion seven or eight years ago. It was, and still is one of my absolute favourite things, says Hall.

The collection includes three printed cushions and a tray as well as limited editions bags, cushions and lampshades designed exclusively for Svenskt Tenn. For the exhibition, they also have a limited edition of products selected by Luke Edward Hall on display, such as ceramics, tea containers, glasses and carafes.

The exhibition runs from May 17 to August 12 on Strandvägen 5 in Stockholm. You can also visit ARSENALSGATAN 3 in Stockholm to see more of Luke Edward Hall’s artistry.

svenskttenn.com

A next level Scandinavian fashion retail experience

Kristian Rajnai and Kalle Tollmar founded APLACE as a fashion magazine to be able to write about all their talented friends working with fashion, art, and music. Influenced by other progressive platforms like Fashion East in London and Hyeres in France, they initiated trade fair +46 which also worked as a platform for progressive Scandinavian fashion brands. It housed brands like Our Legacy, Dagmar, Rodebjer, and Hope showcasing their early collections. The fashion competition connected with it attracted exceptional jury members such as Kim Jones, Nicola Formichetti, and Diane Pernet.

— After a couple of seasons, one of the big department stores in Stockholm gave us the opportunity to open a store. We obviously did it mainly about the Scandinavian fashion brands that we love. 12 years later we still do it, says Rajnai.

After running their flagship store at Brunogallerian in Stockholm for nine years, they re-open it today after an extensive renovation by Ray Atelier.

— We have many regular customers who have visited our store since the start and the remodeling is partly to give them something new and amazing. We also believe that retail today needs to provide a really good experience to have a justified existence. With this new concept, we believe that this experience in our store will be really good, he says, continuing,

— Ray Atelier has developed our new store concept based on the best from Scandinavia in the materials and raw materials we have around us. That includes bricks from one of Sweden’s oldest brickworks, steel, wood, textiles, and glass. We now carry Kajsa Melchior’s sand sculptures, recently exhibited in Milan during Design Week. Our fitting rooms have stools made by students at Beckmans Design College and the music is played through Teenage Engineering’s speaker OD-11, which is a carefully rebuilt version of Stig Carlsson’s famous speaker from 1974.

Focusing on Scandinavian brands, which ones would you like to highlight?

— Definitely Adnym Atelier for their denims and All Blues for their contemporary take on the jewelry industry. Martin Asbjørn, which we will carry from this fall, and Per Götesson are both inspiring and pushing the boundaries.

How will APLACE develop onwards?

— We want to continue doing the same as we have done in the last decade; being a progressive platform for Scandinavian creativity. The bigger our platform gets the more impact and support we can offer for the brands that we work with. Especially the smaller ones. It is and always has been one of our biggest driving force to help them continue blessing us and everyone else with their creativity.

APLACE runs two stores (the other one in Malmö, Sweden) and second-hand store Pearl in Stockholm. The latter will also have a space in their re-opened flagship. They still produce their own fashion magazine called APLACE Magazine.

Photography: Per Orchideen

aplace.com

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Alexander Stutterheim grew up in a village near the city of Borgholm and his early summers were often spent on Öland.

— It is the most magical island where I can relax and create and work in a much better way than Stockholm, thanks to its overwhelming beauty and calmness, he says.

In March, he was approached by the new owner of Hotell Borgholm, who, after renovating the hotel, asked if he was interested in starting his own Concept Store for Stutterheim and John Sterner in the building.

— I constantly need to create and invent and turn ideas into reality. I am soon done with everything I ever dreamt or fantasied, both in my private life and in my work with my brands. Also, I do all this best on my favorite place: Öland. There will be special pieces and special events taking place in store and on Öland, for instance, new exciting launches for both Stutterheim and John Sterner. I see both the store and the islands as my canvas to make engaging content and deepen the communication with customers and followers.

This month sees several of the mentioned drops taking place.

— It will be intense, says Stutterheim. I launch handmade wellies in natural rubber, a new, thinner raincoat that I simply think is great as well as a collaboration with a very exclusive and famous brand. For John Sterner I am launching new sweaters, wool duvets, and pillows in eco wool from Öland. And perhaps also something else, I’m waiting for samples now and if they are nice and I can afford, I will put them in production.

What are your future plans?

— They are so vivid I can’t grasp or comprehend them but a mix of calm, focused work on Öland and in Stockholm and total megalomanic super projects.

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It started out as an experiment. Kämäräinen began his career 20 years ago as the store manager at Levi’s first Scandinavian store in Stockholm. During his time at the iconic department store, Nordiska Kompaniet, where he ran several multi-brand concept stores, he started visiting fabric fairs and eventually tried the market with his own small labels.

— I came in contact with the best factories and learned a lot, after many years of beginner’s mistakes. It all culminated in 2007 when me and my co-founder Peter came up with the idea to start Human Scales. The name means that the clothes you wear should be a part of yourself as a second skin, he explains.

With a background as a retailer, rather than a designer, Kämäräinen’s perspective is different. Human Scales put their entire focus on the end consumer. They are consciously keeping the design aesthetics simple and minimalistic. And daily contact with its European factories means full control over production and ensures that the making, the fit, and the quality is perfect.

— We’ve become like a family since we have been working with the same factories since the start. And one of the fundamental strategies that has given the success with more than 350 retailers all over Europe is that we’ve worked long term and built mutually trusted relationship with our suppliers. This motivates them to deliver a good product and we almost become the factory’s own brand — thus keeping a lower price for higher quality.

— And everything becomes more easy and clear when you put all your energy on the one thing you do best and skip the rest. So, since last year, our full focus is on shoes and jackets in premium leather, Kämäräinen says.

— Our classic sneaker Henry is made in a natural milled calf leather for the best look and comfort. And they also come in purple if you want to stand out. In our line of dress shoes, we have made full calf leather oxfords with a soft leather sole and unlined penny loafers made of thin suede. Our super soft, distressed, and unlined leather shirt Rickard is one of my favourites as well.

You might consider the leather industry as a really dirty one. But Kämäräinen looks at every part of the production to secure that it’s all done in the most sustainable way.

— It is a very comprehensive work. We’ve been lucky to find suppliers who, apart from the fashion industry, are also serving the Personal Protection Equipment (PPE). They’re required by law that all products must be certified by a certified lab before they are allowed to be sold in the European market. The PPE suppliers are checked during production runs and also have un-notified audits by the labs throughout the year to ensure that they honor the requirements. Our suppliers have SA8000 certificates, which are the most comprehensive compliances accredited audits by SGS, one of the most reliable certification companies in the world.

— I go and visit the factories every month and have lunch together with the factory staff. We do not ship any leathers from The Far East and are almost entirely using vegetable tanned leathers from the best local tanneries. One final point is that our leather supplier already has very clean production, but the city where it’s based is currently working on moving all tanneries to a tannery zone outside the city. The local government is setting up a central wastewater system to ensure no tanneries are polluting the environment. It is just a nice feeling that our supplier is located in such a community.

His love for leather is clearly visible in the latest addition to Human Scales. The diffusion line White Line’s first product launch is a collection of biker jacket available at retailer Carlings’ stores across Scandinavia. A range of unisex bags and a lot more is about to drop in the coming seasons.

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Our Scandinavian identity is founded on values and driven by storytelling. Together with Oscar Jacobson, we’ve gathered eight personalities that innovate our times within music, movies, food, and interiors.

Can you tell us about what you have done and what is happening for you now?

—I’ve worked in retail for a couple of years, at Storm in Copenhagen, and co-founded a brand named (di)vision in Copenhagen with a friend. Now I’m working on a whole new project, putting all my time and effort in to that.

What does your background mean for you as a designer and entrepreneur?

—Being that I do not really have a background in fashion, other than retail, or entrepreneurship, I feel like we live in a time where if we really want something, we can make it happen. And that is what I am doing. Being a creative is my passion.

In what situation do you feel the most inspired?

—When I’m home with a cup of tea. But I definitely do get inspired being with others, there is just something special about being home in your own space.

How important is your appearance for your ability to convey your message?

—It is important to stay true to myself and reflect that in my style and appearance… but at the end of the day it is just clothes.

What are the most important themes of the fashion industry today?

—I think putting more focus on the environment is important. Saving it together while also challenging us to think and create in new and more innovative ways. It’s also nice to see gender-neutral fashion on the rise across the fashion industry… and more love and positive energy all around.

What values do you most value in others?

—Being yourself and staying true to that. My friends are my biggest inspiration and I love them for that! They are all creatives in some aspect.

How important is your Scandinavian identity?

—Identity is everything. And we have to stay true to it. It’s important for me to try and mix my Scandinavian identity, such as simplicity or minimalism, with all the weird and crazy ideas in my head.

What is your next step as a creator?

—Keep creating and trying out new things as well as just getting better at it. I really want to be more involved in all the things behind the scenes as well. Like styling, photography, and so on.

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Haglöfs’ story began in Torsång, Dalarna back in 1914, when Wiktor Haglöf made the first stitch in a backpack.

— From that day, it’s been our mission to inspire people to get outside, says Erica Wigge, Global Publishing Manager. From our Swedish heritage, with a commitment to sustainability and innovation, we have continued to create progressive outdoor products at the highest level for hiking, mountaineering, and freeriding.

— We have a unique heritage of more than 100 years of craftsmanship and innovation, making the most outstanding outdoor products to withstand the harsh Nordic conditions, while at the same time being committed to limit the impact our products have on the planet.

The last-mentioned — to put sustainability at the core of everything they do, to always improve and find solutions that will reduce the impact their business has on the environment — also fuels their creative process.

— And that’s how we created the Leftover Sleeping bag. We wanted to find a way to use unused material left over from our production processes and making them into colorful sleeping bags turned out to be a great idea, says Wigge, continuing,

— Our long-term goal is, of course, not to have any leftover fabric to turn into products. But while we are working hard to reduce the amount of leftover fabric in our main production, we will keep ensuring we are actively reducing waste by turning something that would have been forgotten about, into something genuinely useful and high-quality. In time for next winter, you’ll see some more great leftover accessories being added to the range.

How do you work with sustainability?

— Being passionate about the outdoors, speaking for both Haglöfs as an outdoor brand and me personally, I just can’t emphasize enough how important it is that we all care more for the environment. So that we, and future generations, can keep enjoying time in nature. At Haglöfs we believe that a sustainable outdoor industry is possible. We do our best by, first and foremost, producing high-quality products with a long life-span. We are also working to continuously reduce our C02 footprint, with carbon-compensating our travels and by spreading information about climate change. These are several contributions to lessen our total impact, but we also know that more work is needed.

Anything else?

— We also have some other exciting news coming up. In the fall we are bringing back one of our most iconic products ever. Stay tuned for that…

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”Personally, I try to eat only greens once a week and my small kids at home love it”

One of Stockholm’s leading food destinations, tapas restaurant Boqueria, has done several special events since the opening in 2012. This week, they remove their, by every year increasingly popular, Spanish menu for a vegetarian one.

— Our previous events have focused on meat, game, and seafood but never 100% on vegetables. We see clearly how the trends are developing and wanted to follow them and present something that stands out. We know how to cook good food and really want to show our guests how flexible we can be. It’s also a very good season right now, says Fredrik Larsson, Executive Chef and Creative Director.

You mention the developing trends, which are the biggest ones at this point?

— Locally farmed, always in season, zero waste, and as little footprints on the environment as possible. And, last but not least, a bigger awareness of the health aspect of things.

How can we manage to eat even more vegetarian food?

— Try to find products in season! Asparagus during the spring, mushrooms after the summer. Logical. Also, don’t think about vegetarian food as something that is lacking a product. Good vegetables are equally as good as a perfect steak or fish. Personally, I try to eat only greens once a week. My small kids at home love it, says Larsson.

How will you continue your work with vegetarian food?

— We will do a survey after the week is done and see what our guest feedback is. A lot of the dishes will probably hit our regular menu. During the summer months, we will have lighter dishes on the menu where vegetables are perfect.

boqueria.se

FRENN x Stig Baumgartner

Antti Laitinen and Jarkko Kallio have over twenty years experience in the textile and clothing industry and founded Helsinki-based FRENN in 2013, before opening their first flagship in their native city last spring. The brand offers a menswear line filled with relaxed sophistication and spiced with a sporty and contemporary feel.

Continuously inspired by art and architecture, they considered it to be natural to continue last season’s creative collaboration with award-winning artist, painter and friend Stig Baumgartner with another drop. The artist’s rough sketches, which never ended up becoming finished paintings, have been the inspiration for FRENN’s SS19. Bright blue is the key colour for details in shirts, prints, and sweatshirts, as well as in Baumgartner’s two-piece capsule collection.

frenncompany.com

Power couple in New Balance’s new campaign

For the Nordic launch of the iconic 990 v5 sneaker, New Balance teams up with Scandinavian profiles Trine Kjaer, Mads Axelsen, Freja Wewer, Karoline Dall, and Anna Lotterud to illustrate the everlasting relationships in a series of images shot by photographer Frida Vega Salomonsson within the concept My Better Half. Also included is Swedish power couple, stylist Hilda Sandström and photographer Ludvig Rönn.

The concept explores the essence and beauty of the rare relationships among true partners. Whether it’s a sibling, friend, co-worker or lover. The thrill relies on defining your true better half. Who is he or she? Who’s the person you call even though you don’t have anything to say? Who’s the someone that still keeps up with you despite your bad morning attitude or when hangry? Who’s that person you’d say know you better than yourself?

— For the release of the new 990 v5 we wanted to create a timeless take on an iconic style. The concept My Better Half certainly plays with the spirit in one of our most significant styles, the 990v5, says Hanna Löfberg, Marketing Manager at New Balance.

newbalance.com

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