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While the 2019 season is kicking off, I’m still looking back to all the amazing times I had with couples in 2018. One of the things that I’ll never take for granted is just how honoring it is to be asked to join couples on their wedding day. To be an onlooker into one of the most important days of their lives. To see the coming together of families & friends, to participate in a small way.

Victoria + Bryce chose the wilds of Kerry for their coming together, the beautiful Westcove House to be exact. They had a very personal humanist ceremony, a hog roast for the meal and then danced the night away! It was a small intimate wedding of 35 guests, closest friends and family. Their personality came through in every element of the day.








































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In case there’s any confusion, I’m not exactly the typical wedding photographer. At least, I don’t do what you might expect a typical wedding photographer does at weddings. There’s no engineering of moments, no taking off for 2 hours while your guests enjoy themselves without you, no drama, no fuss…no pressure. The reason why I’m pointing this out is simple, I want couples to be clear on what they get when they hire me to be with them on their wedding. No misunderstandings. In the promotional piece below, I’ve been careful to choose images that represent what I do at weddings, and who I am as a wedding photographer. Highest on my list of priorities are the people. The couple are the center point, of course, but not too far away are the guests. Family and friends who the couple have extended the privilege of being able to witness their coming together, the penultimate of their love story so far. These are the subjects of most of the photography I’ll create at a wedding. While I know there are plenty of photographs I’ve created hung in beautiful picture frames around the world, I also know our most cherished photos are more often stuck on fridges with magnets, or pushed into the corner of a mirror. In a way, that’s the ultimate goal. To create meaningful photography of the people you love, the one’s that to put a smile on your face and want to see and be reminded of each and every day.

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If we know one thing, weather wise the summer of 2018 in Ireland was a cracker. Without knowing for absolute fact, I’d hazard to guess I had more outdoor ceremonies in 2018 than in the previous 4 years combined. So many back to back sunny outdoor ceremonies that at one stage I forgot there was ever anything but. What a summer!



Fiona + Brian where one of the many outdoor ceremonies mentioned above, and one of many favorites of the year. A beautifully personal and meaningful celebration. Hallelujah.





































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Wedding venues are a little like buses, you wait for years to work at one, then all of a sudden, you’ve been there twice within 4 weeks. That’s what happened with me and Cloughjordan House. I’ve been seeing and hearing such great things about Cloughjordan House over the years, but for some reason or another I’d never had the opertunity to work there myself. Well, 2018 was the year Cloughjordan House and I met. My first trip there was for Rose & Stephen’s amazing party in June, then only a couple of weeks later I was back for Brinleigh and Shane’s celebration. A wedding with THREE 1st dances, I know - how is that possible? I’m not sure of the science, but I was there and saw it with my own two eyes, and the photos below prove it as fact!

Styling : Swans & Gibbons - Hair : Joanne Kelly - Make Up: Aoife Callaghan - Flowers: Absolutely Fabulous Flowers - Band: Superfly






































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I don’t normally do these pre-wedding shoots, but have to admit enjoying doing them when the opportunity comes along. This is Kate & Brian and they’re getting married in November. They thought getting some photos in the summer would be a nice idea. We took a spin around my Co. Wicklow neighborhood, had a good laugh and took some photos. Looking forward to seeing them again in November.













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Savo Wedding Photography by Eric Savoie - 1y ago

Over the years, we here at Savo Photography have had the privilege of photographing some pretty special dresses, veils, head-pieces and other fine pieces of ornamentation.

We were however, rather blown away by one particular spectacular veil - A truly glorious hand-stitch Carrickmacross  Lace veil to be precise.Every stitch made by the amazingly talented bride herself! Take a well-deserved bow - Caoimhe Woods. (Not only did Caoimhe stitch her own veil, she also stitched the handkerchiefs for her lovely groom, Eamonn, and all the groomsmen to boot!)

Now, if you are a bride-to-be and fancy having a go at this mammoth task yourself, you might want to get started at least a year in advance. Yep, that’s how long it took Caoimhe to hand-stitch her wedding veil; around 600 hours, give or take. Once you see the stunning detail you can truly start to appreciate the hard-spent hours that Caoimhe toiled away - time very well spent indeed. Now feast your eyes upon her divine work.

(A Brief History - Carrickmacross lace was introduced to Ireland around 1820 by a Mrs Grey Porter, who taught it to local women to help them earn an income. The now world-famous lace is a form that can be best described as “decorated net”. A three-layer 'sandwich' is made consisting of the pattern (at the bottom), covered with net and then fine muslin, through which the pattern can be seen. A thick outlining thread is stitched down along the lines of the pattern, sewing net and fabric together. Loops of thread known as 'twirls' are also couched along the outer edge. The excess fabric is then cut away. Some of the net is then usually decorated further with needle-run stitches or small button-holed rings known as ‘pops’).






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