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To make your camping trip a success, every time, you need to make sure you plan accordingly.  Lots of things can go wrong but if you follow our 10 camping tips, you’ll have a great experience every time you head out into the great outdoors!

Let’s get started:
  1. When packing for your camping trip, use baskets or plastic containers to keep all your items organized and securely put away.  Make sure to include a few empty ones for things you might gather along the way.
  2. When packing, make sure to store the heavy items in bottom shelves or cabinets.  This might seem like a no brainer, but while traveling, keeping the weight at the bottom will help keep everything in its place.
  3. When packing food, set aside some pre-made or frozen meals for the first day.  If you’re like we are, you’ll be anxious to get to your destination.  Having meals that just need to microwave for a minute will help you avoid long stops to feed your family.
  4. Precook all your meals before you go!  If you take care of the prepping and cooking at home before you leave, you’ll have lots more time to spend enjoying camping, not cooking while you’re supposed to be relaxing.
  5. If you’re packing items from home, make sure you bring older things with you.  Pieces like cutlery, bowls, or mugs, are easily misplaced during camping trips.  Don’t bring anything you couldn’t bear to lose with you.
  6. One of the benefits to an RV is that you can bring more of the luxury items you need such as a coffee pot, full set of cookware, or even a fryer.  Whatever you think you’ll want or need, make sure it gets in the RV before you go.  Better yet, as you invest in your RV over time, start purchasing items to belong only to the RV.
  7. What’s better than BBQ while out in the wild?  Make sure to bring your utensils, favorite sauces, and even your barbeque.  There’s storage underneath your RV.  Make good use of it!
  8. For the rare but devastating rainy days while you’re camping, be sure to bring some indoor items to enjoy.  Things like videos, coloring books and crayons, board games, and playing cards are all great items to have around, especially if you have children accompanying you.
  9. Stock up on paper plates, utensils, and other throw away items.  If you end up in a place where water is scarce, you’ll be thankful you brought these with you.
  10. Invest in heavy duty plastic waste bags.  When you camp, you need to carry out what you brought in with you.  If you’re planning a longer stay, you may need to hold onto your waste for some time.  Having good quality plastic will help keep the smell down.

In order to enjoy your camping trip as much as possible, take note of these great tips before you go! Spend your time relaxing and enjoying your experience, not worrying about being unprepared.

Happy RV Camping!

 
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We’ve all seen news stories and articles featuring celebrities on set or on the road in their incredible motor homes. While on location, celebrities often have RVs that are more luxurious than many of our homes! But some celebrities have fallen in love with the RV lifestyle and spend more time than they need to enjoy them.

  Here are a few well known people who travel and relax in their RVs, just like so many of us do.

Actor Jeff Daniels has an RV, a Gulf Stream Tour Master, that he has nicknamed “The Bus.”  Daniels and his family often take their vacations in “The Bus” and have spent plenty of time in it. According to Daniels, “I don’t think you can call yourself a true American until you’ve been behind the wheel of an RV.”

Another actor, Sean Penn, was even more committed to his RV. His Airstream trailer was home to this celebrity. Penn lived in the RV on 50 acres of pristine mountain property until he lost his home to the Malibu fires in 2007.

Country singer and icon Dolly Parton enjoys RVing with her husband.  As well known in America as she is, Parton says that she loves the anonymity of traveling by RV and does it as often as possible.  

There are numerous other celebrities, athletes, politicians, important figures, etc., who have come to love the RV culture and lifestyle.  Olympian Bode Miller, Rob Lowe, Shia LaBeouf, Davis Love, and Gordon Elliott are just a few of the names you’ll recognize.  

When it comes time for your next RV adventure, keep a sharp eye out.  You might just run into someone you admire or you have always wanted to meet!

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While traveling, keeping your friends and family updated about the adventures you have, and the places you explore, has never been easier!  With sites like Facebook, you can quickly and easily update the people in your life about what you’re doing.  For a visual app that focuses on sharing the breathtaking images you capture, you need to look at Instagram

Instagram only works from a mobile device and is the social media place to share your pictures.  With filters and editing tools built in, Instagram makes getting that perfect photo a breeze!  

These are some ways that you can enhance your experience and tailor it to you RV adventures.

 

When posting a photo, you have the option to disclose your location.  By choosing to do so, you are letting others know where they can see the beautiful landscape you’re sharing for themselves.  You may also connect with other people in the area, people you could share an evening meal with, or maybe make some life long friends!

Instagram uses hashtags to connect related images with each other.  Try searching for some popular RV hashtagsthat you could start tagging your photos with.  This can connect you with other RVers, allow you to see images of places you’ll be going, get travel tips, and include you in an entire online community of people who are doing just what you love to do!


And lastly, when you’re taking photos to share of your RV adventures, be mindful of what you post.  What would you most like to see if you were browsing through another RVers photos? Include pictures of RV in all the amazing places you visit and you’ll have a wonderful timeline in photos of all the travels you make over the years.

Do you need help getting there? (where ever there is for you) JD Sanders RVs can help you get to those Instagram worthy spots!
 

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You’ve been daydreaming about it for years and now you’ve finally done it.  You saved your money and got yourself your very own RV to see the sights, meet new people, and find new adventures to tackle. Getting your own RV and starting to camp can seem a little daunting at first, but have no fear, newbies, you won’t be left sitting in the dark. (literally) Camping with an RV gives you all the comforts of home on the road.  Everything from electricity to a full kitchen to a television to a toilet, yes you’re very own bathroom.  We’ve also compiled a few tips to give you a head start on your camping game. 

Dress Your Best – Layers are a Major KEY

Dressing in layers is the perfect way to prepare yourself for any weather, hot or cold.  Too hot? Remove your sweatshirt.  Too cold? Add your jacket.  Knowing what type of layers to wear is also important in prepping your body for camping.  Starting at the first layer for cool weather a pair of long johns, although not as stylish, are a life saver.  These are great for trapping in the heat and keeping you warm.  Doubling up your socks is also a great way
to stay warm and also prevent blisters from long days out.  For extreme weather be sure to pack wind or water resistant jackets, nothing is worse than coming back soaked to the bone from a day out and about.  And finally for hot weather hats and sunglasses provide some added protection from the sun, you can even get UV protected sunglasses to keep those lookers safe.

Building a Campfire

Campfires are essential to a great camping trip.  This is where the real memories are made.  All cozied up, huddled around a warm fire, reminiscing about the day, exchanging stories.  It’s fantastic!  So what are the steps to get this all started?

Step One: Clear the area.  Make sure to avoid building too close to tents, dry brush, or low overhanging branches.

Step Two: Gather some rocks to build a fire ring.

Step Three: Start by burning your tinder (or use a fire starter as discussed below) which are small dried out twigs or brush.  Slowly add more and more and then start to throw in some kindling, which are slightly larger sticks.

Step Four: Once the fire begins to build, slowly add in your larger logs until you’ve go yourself your very own roaring campfire.

Step Five: Sit back and enjoy!

Fire Starters

All these tricks can help you in getting that first spark to develop into a roaring campfire!

  • Charcoal packed into a cardboard egg carton
  • Lint from your dryer
  • Vaseline covered cotton balls
  • Dried pine needles
  • Crumpled newspaper
  • Pinecones covered in wax
Tick Tip

Ticks are some pretty nasty pests that may give you Lyme Disease.  So it’s best to avoid
these suckers at all costs.  Firstly, try to stay on trail and avoid wandering into grassy and brushy areas.  As for clothing try to cover as much of your skin as you can.  That means long sleeves, tucked shirts, tucked pants into socks, the whole shebang.  Additionally, if you are wearing lighter colors you will be able to detect ticks easier.

Now if you happen to still get a tick heres what you do.  Try to tweeze it straight out, pinching as close to your skin as possible.  Avoid bursting the body for this might release the toxins straight into your skin. After removing the tick sanitize your hands with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.

Bugs Be Gone

To keep those other pesky bugs, like mosquitos, away try doing these: 

  • Avoid strong smelling fragrant
  • Avoid wearing dark colors
  • Try dabbing on catnip oil, which is found to be more effective than DEET
  • Keep Citronella candles or oil around the campsite
  • Stay away from wet, grassy areas
Bears? No thanks.

Look, its great being in the wild, the great outdoors but its best to avoid intrusive encounters.  The best and most effective way to do this is to pack your food away!  Put it away either in your RV or even hang it up in a tree, but don’t just leave it out on the picnic table.  This is an open invitation to creatures like wolves, raccoons, or even bears.

Now that you’re practically a pro, sit back, relax,  and enjoy camping!

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These days RVers have it so much easier than RVers of the past. And we’re not complaining about it one bit. Things such as auto leveling, electric awnings and easy access to day trips are so often taken for granted, but with out them RVing would be so needlessly difficult.

1. Auto Leveler

Pull up to the campsite, push the auto level button and you’re level! No need to worry about doing it manually which is not a fun process.

2. Electric awning

Talk about how up until modern tech they had to do them manually, now it’s at the press of a button. The weather turns and you need to pull it in before the storm gets worse, just push a button.

3. Access to day trips

Having the opportunity to go shopping, eating, biking, hiking, climbing, dog beach, etc everyday within an hour or so from the campground.

4. Waterfront Property

Lot’s of campgrounds offer waterfront property in the form of a lake, ocean or river. It’s a great feature to have when you’re in need of a relaxing, zen getaway!

Do some super quick research on #1+#2 so you have a basic knowledge in the future for these features.

Hope this helps!

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When you take your RV out, you may cringe every time you have to pull in for gas. It costs a lot to fill a vehicle that big!  Even with gas prices going down, it still hurts to think about the money you’re putting in the gas tank.  There are some simple things you can do to get the most out of each tank of gas though!  Here are two simple tips to help you save put a few bucks back in your pocket.

1. Lighten the Load

While RVs make packing everything you might need on your trip possible, hauling all those heavy items really hurts your MPG.  Before your next trip, take some time to go through the cupboards and storage spaces in your RV.  Is everything you’re packing a necessity?   Take out those extra items and see how carrying less affects and improves your MPG.

If you’re headed someone near civilization, consider purchasing all your food and drinks, filling water tanks, etc. once you get there.  Driving without the weight of all the provisions you usually bring could make your MPG jump up big time.

2. Reign in the Lead Foot

A very simple MPG fix is to take your foot off the pedals!  Gas mileage takes a hit when you drive at uneven speeds, or you brake too often.  You’re expending energy by speeding up and wasting it every time you have to slow back down.  This all requires gas.  By using the cruise control, you’ll save your gas.  It takes less energy to maintain speed which means you’re using less gas.  Makes sense, right?  Also if you can, keep your speed to under 60 MPH.  For every five miles you go over this 60 MPH guideline, it’s like adding 10 cents a gallon at the pump.  Slow down, maintain your speed, and you’ll see a great improvement in you MPG.

These two tips cost nothing to attempt to save some gas on your next RV trip.  There are lots of other ways to increase your MPG but before spending the money on equipment, or maintenance you may not need yet, try these tips and see how much your gas mileage improves! 

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Camping in the cold or the snow is a unique and wonderful experience, but it could go wrong very easily if not properly planned for. Keep these few things in mind a when planning a chilly RV getaway for you and your loved ones.

1. Make a Game Plan

Preparation is key in any camping trip, but for cold or potentially snowy trips,
it’s more important than ever. Being ill prepared during a cold front can really put a damper on your adventure. Do research on potential areas and find out the weather patterns, location of nearest facilities, potential hazards, etc. Plan the route you want to take and plan a couple different ones in case of emergency or detours. Talk to people who have been there before online or with Facebook groups and ask any questions to learn about their experiences. Besides a fun story, you can always learn from someone else’s mistakes. Avalanches are a very real concern in snowy areas and they’re much more dangerous than they seem in the cartoons. Make sure to specifically research avalanche safety and choose a place where it’s not likely to happen. Since you’d be taking your RV it’s doubtful you’d intend to go alone, which is good. Try to bring along at least one person who’s experienced with cold-weather camping. Camping in snowy locations with an RV requires specific procedures and supplies (like a shovel).

2. Dress to Impress

Depending on whether you plan to leave your RV often and what you plan on doing, you’ll need different supplies. Clothing is most important for your safety, and although you may have refuge in your RV from the elements, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Layers are the most common way to dress- despite looking silly, long underwear can be your best friend. Most important is that the outer layer is waterproof and breathable, so you don’t get soaked to the bone, yet also don’t roast like a turkey. Regular hiking boots can work fine in snowy terrain, but if you plan to hike a long way in the stuff, it could be good to invest in some made specifically for cold weather. Keeping your toes dry and warm is incredibly important, and not just because it feels nice. Layers of socks, hats, goggles or glasses, gloves, and so on are all accessories you should have on hand. And heck! Bring a bathing suit just in case. You never now when the opportunity to go hot tubbing in the snow might arise.

3. Good Eats

Keeping your energy up in a cold location is very essential, so make sure you eat
frequently, especially if you’re hiking or skiing. The best kind of food to have around for energy are fats, proteins, and carbs. Though it is possible to cook in your RV’s kitchen, it may do you some good to pack food that doesn’t require heat or a long time to prepare, just in case you’re in need of a quick bite. There’s nothing wrong with hot coco or some hot soup, either!

4. Concerns 

Bring your first-aid kits and emergency equipment and do your research on symptoms and ways to prevent hypothermia, dehydration, frostbite, and so on. These should be added to the concerns you’d have on any kind of camping trip!  If it’s too cold it’s always ok to take a rain check and spend the day inside under a blanket where it’s nice and warm.  Whatever you end up doing, use your best judgement, and stay cool (pun intended)!

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Some people have the misconception of an RVer as a hermit type character that wants to disconnect from the social world.  As you and I know, this is not the case! One of the best things about traveling are the new friendships and connections you make along the way.  And although it used to be difficult constantly making new friends on the road that no longer holds true. Since the internet came along RVers now have access to a bunch of tools to connect you to other like minded RVers on the road.

RVillage

Dubbed the social network for RVers, RVillage is a great way to find other RVers in any location you find yourself in.  With this site you can easily share your location and browse through the other users in your area.  Connect based on common interests such as fishing, hiking, and more.  You can even plan meet ups for you future RV destinations.  With almost 60,000 members in RVillage you never have to camp alone.

Site:  RVillage

RV With Me

Ever wondered what the Airbnb of RVing was?  Well you’ve found it.  RV With Me is an easy way to connect RVers with local hosts all in one easy, safe, and comprehensible site.  Once you’ve picked a date and location browse through the host’s sites and request a stay.  You have the option to chat and to ask questions before you book to ensure that you have the perfect accommodation. This is a perfect site to connect RVers with some passionate like minded individuals.

Site:  RV With Me

Meetup

Meetup is a website that brings thousands of people together based on common interests. It’s main goal is to connect people and have them bond by spending time doing what they love, to explore, teach, and learn new things.  And of course they have an RVing Enthusiast group with 10,000 members strong across the world.

Site: Meetup

RVing Women

RVing as woman, especially RVing solo as a woman, is often thought of as difficult or too dangerous.  And although it’s still important to be safe while on the road, this group of women provides an examples that shows otherwise. RVing Women, as the title implies is a great resource to connect woman across the US and Canada who RV.  The have chapters across theses countries that hold camping, educational, and social events.  This is a site that encourages building strong and healthy female relationships and provides a great network of experienced RVers to do so.

Site: RVing Women

RV Happy Hour

RV Happy Hour is a forum where everyone from newbie RVers to veteran RVers come together to chat, discuss, and share stories.  This is a great site if your looking for some good advice from some well seasoned travelers.  Its also great if those experienced RVers feel like sharing their wealth of knowledge with the first timers to try and give them an extra hand.

Site: RV Happy Hour

Shorelooksnice.com

Have you ever wanted to pack it all in and hit the road full time in an RV? That’s exactly what the Hannans did when they ditched the corporate lifestyle of Orange County, CA to travel across America. They work full time in the RV while visiting friends, family and the scenic areas of this country. You can follow the Hannans (and their newborn daughter!) and seek adventure.

Site: www.shorelooksnice.com.

The RV community is huge, and is growing faster than ever.  It’s full of adventurous, friendly, and outgoing campers and you should be apart of it.  With these tools hopefully it’s easier to reach out and build some great connections for your next RV adventure.

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It’s only natural to want to bring out four-legged best friend along for the fun when going camping. More likely than not, your dog with has more of a blast exploring and taking in all the sights, sounds, and smells. However, just like with anyone you care about, you’d want to make sure they’re safe throughout the journey. Here are some things to take into consideration for your canine pal.

Before anything else, make sure you check the websites or call the campground where you’re staying to make sure dogs are allowed. Most campgrounds are dog friendly which is one of the reasons many retirees RV vs taking cruises or time shares as most don’t allow pets.

Check- Up and Tag It Up

Take your pup to the vet to have them looked over and
prepped with the latest vaccines. Ticks loves dogs even more than we humans do, so make sure to ask about Lyme disease and any other questions you may have. In case of an emergency, get your pet’s latest official papers and records as well as the contact info of your vet, along with all medications and prescriptions. If you don’t have them already, of course, make sure you have ID tags with your name, address, phone number, and so on.

Make ‘Em Feel at Home

Bring your dog’s regular food and food bowls, as well as their favorite toys to play with on the trip there. Of course, collars and leashes are a must, along with lots of water for your pal to stay hydrated. Bring along a travel cage (we use plastic baby gates) and a couple blankets or towels too, just to be safe.

You Are Not Your Dogs

Although dogs often reflect their owners,
when it comes to something as big as camping, your dog will handle things differently. Always keep them in control and try to limit barking so you don’t disturb other campers or the wildlife. Dogs don’t sweat, so make sure there’s enough shade they can relax in if it gets too hot. In general, you’ll want to keep an eye on your dog and properly prepare for certain weather. Make sure they get enough water and exercise as well as rest and food. Dogs do however enjoy new and exciting activities like hiking, biking and kayaking.

Clean Up

In order to avoid breaking any campsite rules, clean up after your dog. Bring plastic bags on walks and clean up any food your dog doesn’t eat so no wildlife is attracted for the safety of you and your pet. The more dog owners clean up after their dogs the more RV Parks will be open to the idea of being dog friendly.

Take them for a Walk

Get out and check out the campground. Take your 4 legged friends out to get some exercise and all the new smells. If you have an older dog and a baby, they may enjoy riding down below.

Make sure your dog is happy and healthy and go have fun!

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Different strokes for different folks rings true for campsites. But picking the right camp site for your RVing situation is a big plus to a good trip. With so many camping options, you’ll want to consider the following when deciding on your destination.

  1. Do your research before you head to a new area. Some roads are NOT RV friendly, some are sparse for fuel, some will not have any cell service. Although it may seem fun to be spontaneous, you’re already having fun by camping so it’s best to minimize risk in case something goes sour.

  2. A flat spot can make a big difference. If you manually level out your RV selecting a level spot is a game changer. Many units however have auto-leveling but even if you’re rig is leveled automatically you’ll want your chairs, tables and anything else you use to relax outside to not be at a slant.

  3. Don’t let the rain or snow get you stuck in the wilderness! Pick a spot that seems to have good drainage so your tired don’t get stuck in the mud or your RV doesn’t get flooded. Checking the weather ahead of time is a great way to stay prepared and prevent any unfortunate surprises. If you might get some nasty weather keep in mind slippery hills that your RV might need to climb to head out.

  4. Money isn’t the answer to everything, but it sure does help. If you have a budget you’ll want to compare pricing of different camping options. Boondocking is free, campgrounds can be inexpensive, RV Resorts can be costly but some have memberships that make it very affordable.

  5. Would you like a peaceful spot with other campers or somewhere for just you and your family? Check out how busy the spot will be and what kind of camping happens there. Keep in mind there are RV Parks in Las Vegas so don’t expect just because you’re “camping” that it will be peace and quiet. Make sure ahead of time that it’s the atmosphere you’re looking for.

  6. You may need to stock back up with supplies, food, water, etc so consider how long you can survive with what you have and where the nearest place to restock is. When we are traveling long distances we will often spend a night boondocked in a Walmart parking lot and restock before we get to our next destination.

Use these tips to help YOU in finding that perfect spot for you perfect RV Vacation!

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