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Rosenberg Center by Amy.lesher@rosenbergcenter.com - 6M ago

Body Image and Kids- Part Two

Let’s talk about positive steps you can take to build positive body image for your child by modeling it yourself. 

1.        When talking about yourself (or others) compliment all bodies.  Say things like “I feel beautiful” when looking in the mirror or “This dress looks great on me.”

2.       Don’t talk about dieting in front of your child.  Model a healthy balanced approach to eating.  Honor your physical cues for hunger and fullness.  Don’t deprive yourself.  Enjoy a wide variety of foods in a moderate way.  If you, as an adult, struggle with this there are mental health providers who specialize in this area.

3.       Turn jokes about body size into teachable moments.  Share your values about size diversity (and all diversity) with your child.  Depending on your child’s age and ability level this can be a good opportunity to discuss stereotypes and the importance of treating all people with respect.

4.       Teach your kids to have a healthy relationship with food.  This is going to be hard for some people, but, there is no “good” food or “bad” food.  Honestly.  For real.  Talk about foods in a non-judgmental way and help your kids recognize and honor hunger and satiety cues.  Children can learn what foods help them grow, what foods are nutrient dense and what foods are less nutrient dense. 

5.       Do not treat your children differently based on their size (or what size they should be because of gender).  Whatever behaviors are expected in your family should be consistent between children. 

6.       Focus on physical activity as a joyful and enjoyable activity that allows one to move their body.  Encourage all kids of all sizes to participate in sports or activities that appeal to them. 

7.       Do not compliment or comment on someone’s weight.  Again, this can be hard for people, but these comments indicate that weight loss is always “right” and good.  Easy rule:  It is best to say nothing. 

8.       Instead of focusing on a child’s weight or making appearance based comments talk about how strong or smart your child is. 

Teaching kids to accept all differences is important in becoming an accepting tolerant adult.   One of the main points of teaching and modeling self-acceptance is to help a child build a healthy relationship with food that prevents dieting, binging and possible eating disorders as a child gets older.   

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Rosenberg Center by Amy.lesher@rosenbergcenter.com - 6M ago

Body Image and Kids- Part Two

Let’s talk about positive steps you can take to build positive body image for your child by modeling it yourself. 

1.        When talking about yourself (or others) compliment all bodies.  Say things like “I feel beautiful” when looking in the mirror or “This dress looks great on me.”

2.       Don’t talk about dieting in front of your child.  Model a healthy balanced approach to eating.  Honor your physical cues for hunger and fullness.  Don’t deprive yourself.  Enjoy a wide variety of foods in a moderate way.  If you, as an adult, struggle with this there are mental health providers who specialize in this area.

3.       Turn jokes about body size into teachable moments.  Share your values about size diversity (and all diversity) with your child.  Depending on your child’s age and ability level this can be a good opportunity to discuss stereotypes and the importance of treating all people with respect.

4.       Teach your kids to have a healthy relationship with food.  This is going to be hard for some people, but, there is no “good” food or “bad” food.  Honestly.  For real.  Talk about foods in a non-judgmental way and help your kids recognize and honor hunger and satiety cues.  Children can learn what foods help them grow, what foods are nutrient dense and what foods are less nutrient dense. 

5.       Do not treat your children differently based on their size (or what size they should be because of gender).  Whatever behaviors are expected in your family should be consistent between children. 

6.       Focus on physical activity as a joyful and enjoyable activity that allows one to move their body.  Encourage all kids of all sizes to participate in sports or activities that appeal to them. 

7.       Do not compliment or comment on someone’s weight.  Again, this can be hard for people, but these comments indicate that weight loss is always “right” and good.  Easy rule:  It is best to say nothing. 

8.       Instead of focusing on a child’s weight or making appearance based comments talk about how strong or smart your child is. 

Teaching kids to accept all differences is important in becoming an accepting tolerant adult.   One of the main points of teaching and modeling self-acceptance is to help a child build a healthy relationship with food that prevents dieting, binging and possible eating disorders as a child gets older.   

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Rosenberg Center by Amy.lesher@rosenbergcenter.com - 7M ago

How do I Discuss Body Image and Weight with My Kids

A recent study of 111 girls shows that by age five,  50% of these children think that being thin is very important.  Kids who feel bad about their body size and start dieting as children are three times greater risk for binge eating, weight gain, and eating disorders later in life.

Helping kids feel good about their bodies can be hard when there are a many messages in media and in society that are giving negative input. 

In week one of this blog post we are going to give you a list of Don’t Do This!

If you follow us on social media you know we aren’t about DON’T but rather we prefer the DO THIS.  That will be next week!

·         Don’t bash your own body!  Be nice to yourself!

·         Don’t promote dieting behaviors!  Encourage healthy and balanced eating.

·         Fat jokes aren’t funny.  Don’t make them, don’t laugh at them. 

·         Don’t refer to food as good or bad.  This can be hard to grasp for lots of people, but food isn’t good or bad.  Promise.

·         Don’t treat children differently based on their size. 

·         Don’t encourage exercise as a way to lose weight.  This is a tough one to grasp…  We will get to it next week!

·         Don’t compliment or comment on people’s weight loss or gain.

·         Don’t focus on a child’s weight.  There are certain exceptions in a medical setting, but we will discuss this next week.

Process all of this and next week we’ll talk about the DO aspect of this!

*source “The Body is Not an Apology” by Judy Matz

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Rosenberg Center by Amy.lesher@rosenbergcenter.com - 1y ago

Sensory Symptoms and Autism Spectrum Disorders

Generally studies have shown that children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) experience more sensory symptoms than age-matched peers that are neurotypical and developmentally delayed. 

Sensory symptoms generally appear in patterns of being hypersensitive, hyposensitive and sensory seeking.  Being hyperresponsive means to overreact to sensory input, being hyporesponsive means one under-reacts to sensory input, and sensory seeking behaviors include unusual sensory interest in items.

Sensory symptoms are estimated to occur in 69-93% of the population with ASD. 

New research indicates that sensory symptoms may occur as early as social and communication symptoms occur.  From age 2 years on there has been consistent documentation about sensory symptoms in children with ASD.

Functionally sensory differences have the potential to interfere with an individual’s day to day functioning.  This includes things like self-care, participation in family activities and routines, and participate in school.  Higher rates of sensory behaviors are also linked to family unit stress. 

*Source:  McCormick, Hepburn, Young and Rogers.  Sensory symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorder, other developmental disorders and typical development: A longitudinal study

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Rosenberg Center by Amy.lesher@rosenbergcenter.com - 1y ago

Helping Kids Eat in a Healthy Common Sense Way

Many busy families struggle to eat meals together, eat healthy meals and eat at home.  While running kids to activities it is often easy to go through a drive through restaurant and pick up something quickly.  If your child struggles with feeding issues or is a very picky eater mealtimes can be even more challenging.

Busy families can try to increase the healthy food they eat by serving more whole foods.  What does this mean?  Foods that aren’t overly processed are whole foods.  This means some strawberries instead of fruit snacks or maybe carrot sticks instead of potato chips.  Of course treats are something everyone wants and needs, but we will get to this later.  Focus on eating fruits and vegetables at every meal.  Family members should eat a lean protein at every meal.  Again, there is room for a treat here and there, but following these basic guidelines will make a big difference.

One of the best ways you can eat in a healthier way is by cooking at home.  Lots of things can be made “to-go” if this is better for your family.  Try to shop the perimeter of the grocery store.  This is where the majority of the whole foods are found.  A good rule of thumb is the shorter the nutrition label the healthier an item probably is!  Fruits, vegetables, grains (like rice), nuts, eggs, meats, beans and yogurt are all great examples of nutritious whole foods.

Kids with special needs often struggle with constipation.  Increasing the fiber in one’s diet is a great way to naturally combat constipation.  Fiber is also filling, keeps blood sugar stable (less highs and lows in mood!), and helps with weight management.  Examples of high-fiber foods include:

·         Vegetables (canned, frozen, or fresh)

·         Fruits (canned in juice], frozen, or fresh)

·         Beans (dried or canned)

·         Nuts and seeds

·         Whole wheat items whenever possible

Potassium is also important for kids.  Potassium is important for muscle function, nervous system functioning and maintain good hydration levels.  Examples of foods rich in potassium incluce:

·         Artichokes

·         Avocados

·         Bananas

·         Cantaloupe

·         Leafy green vegetables

·         Orange juice

·         Prunes

·         Papaya

·         Potatoes with skin (white potatoes have more potassium than sweet potatoes)

·         Beans and peas

·         Fish, shellfish and clams

·         Dairy

·         Nuts

Protein is a building block for muscle and helps your body repair itself.  It is a component in stabilizing blood sugar.  Lean protein is the best choice for almost all meals.  Ideas for protein include:

·         Eggs

·         Reduced fat cheese

·         Lean beef and chicken (and other meats)

·         Low-fat milk

·         Yogurt

·         Beans

·         Nuts and seeds

·         Whole grains

·         Rice

All children need fat in their diet.  It helps with brain development and growth.  There are better fat choices you can make for your child.  Omega-3 fatty acids are very important for kids.  Great fat sources include:

·         Fatty fish like salmon and tuna

·         Eggs with omega-3

·         Nuts

·         Seeds

·         Olive oil

·         Canola oil

·         Ground Flaxseed

Try to have a good fat, protein and carbohydrate source at every meal and snack.  A good rule of thumb for treats is 3 a week.  It is okay to not follow the healthy eating plan three times a week.  It is ok to have fried chicken, ice cream or whatever is pleasing to you!

If you have a picky eater or need help with your child’s weight and nutrition please give us a call at 651-636-4155.

*Source:  Eat to Perform, “Helping Kids Eat Healthy”

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