Loading...

Follow Rize Inc. - Industrial 3D Printer on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

You can safely and affordably build durable, full-color and composite parts on one 3D printer. Consider the possibilities…

This is only the beginning. Let us show you how full-color 3D printing with XRIZE can transform your organization.

The post Accurate Full-Color 3D Printing Provides Infinite Possibilities appeared first on RIZE Inc..

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

How did color photography change your life?

How did color film change your life?

How did color document printing change your life?

Adding color to these technologies improved communication, understanding and provided more engaging lifelike experiences.

Full-color 3D printing can too.

Contact us to learn how.

The post Imagine…How Could Full-Color 3D Printing Change Your Life? appeared first on RIZE Inc..

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Founded in 1943, IRA Green Inc. (IGI), headquartered in Providence, RI, USA, is a full-service manufacturer and distributor of nearly 40,000 unique uniform items and accoutrements that are earned and proudly displayed by military personnel worldwide.

IGI’s tool shop is focused on manufacturing coining and blanking dies. They also produce small fixtures for welding and polishing made in Delrin, metal or wood.

With high demand for IGI products, new fixtures are required every day. However, each job had to wait in a queue for several days before it could begin, resulting in bottlenecks and lead times of several days to weeks, from job request to fixture delivery. Moreover, each fixture required 8 hours of CNC programming and setup of pockets, or contour electrodes for tool steel and wire EDM flat pockets. IGI spent $300 for every fixture.

IGI’s Manufacturing Manager, Bill Yehle, justified that fixturing with RIZE 3D printed parts instead of tool room sawed and wired EDM and CAM of fixture nests would reduce the tool room backlog, while maintaining headcount. He proposed that manufacturing fixtures with a RIZE™ 3D printer would enable IGI to place the fixture work in the fast-response CAD group instead of the overburdened tool room.

“Implementing RIZE 3D printing as part of a strategic process shift has completely transformed our production process,” said Bill. It has added tool room skills to higher skilled CAM and machine building tasks, so fixture design can be accomplished at the time of product design to parallel-path the design/manufacturing development process.

Prior to using RIZE, machine operators clamped the piece down on the machine, which required considerable trial and error to get the placement right. They also tried melting the mold into nylon to hold it in place, but this also required a time-consuming process of trial and error – “turning and burning,” as Bill calls it, and did not meet IGI’s accuracy requirements.

Precision is critical. The RIZE manufactured fixtures hold the piece while it is being nailed in the welder. The 3D printed fixtures ensure the precision and accuracy of the nail placement. This speeds the process because it eliminates the need for repeated manual adjustment of the fixtures. It also saves time from machine operators placing one nail at a time using traditional machining. Using RIZE fixtures, IGI has been able to standardize the center of the fixture for nailing the piece without requiring adjustment.

Since implementing RIZE 3D printing less than a year ago, IGI’s design team has printed approximately 300 fixtures. They use their RIZE™ ONE 3D printer every day to reliably manufacture fixtures in 50 minutes at a cost of $2.00 per part. This enables IGI’s design team to produce 7 different versions of fixtures per day that can be used for welding and polishing. Using RIZE, IGI is able to standardize the molds and the nails, resulting in faster setup and changeover, repeatability and increased accuracy. Said Bill, “We have realized an 80% time savings in setup and changeover alone using RIZE and virtually eliminated errors.”

Further, RIZE’s unique ink marking capability enables IGI’s designers to print work order numbers, line numbers and pictures of the piece on the fixtures for identification and instruction for part use and storage. These markings also serve as three points of verification for machine operators to prevent errors.

When IGI plans to fabricate steel fixtures to sustain heavier loads, they use their RIZE ONE 3D printer to print functional prototypes for steel molds. They iterate the prototypes until they get it right and then they turn to the tool room for final steel fixture manufacturing. Previously, they iterated fixture designs 2 to 3 times in steel at a cost of $300 and lead times of 2 days per iteration. RIZE enables IGI to produce 7 prototypes per day at $2 each.

IGI continually evolves their use of RIZE ONE for fabricating fixtures. They regularly iterate their fixtures to enable easier removal of the molds from nail and welding machines and to further enhance the standardization and repeatability of the production process for increased speed and accuracy.

Some of these enhancements include printing fixtures within fixtures – the base fixture is a standard size while the fixture insert is customized for the piece, threading the molds for screws and printing spacers that enable selected molds to fit securely on certain machines.

IGI is also considering using RIZE to manufacture service and spare parts on-demand for their machinery to reduce the time and cost of sourcing and ordering machined parts, especially when parts are obsolete or suppliers have gone out of business.

“The process we are using with RIZE gives us a unique competitive advantage,” said Bill. “And we are looking to expand the use of RIZE technology to applications in other areas of the company.”

The post Manufacturing Fixtures on RIZE ONE Yields Ira Green ROI in <5 Months and $120,000 Annual Savings appeared first on RIZE Inc..

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We are delighted to announce a new partnership between RIZE™ and Wichita State University National Institute for Aviation Research (NIAR). The partnership, focused on research and academia, is dedicated to digitally reinventing the way aviation customers approach advanced product development and manufacturing through the use of intelligent additive manufacturing.  The partnership includes NIAR’s purchase of an XRIZE™ 3D printer for their state-of-the-art 3DEXPERIENCE® Center at WSU. The 3DEXPERIENCE Center is designed to help companies implement new technology to accelerate innovation.

RIZE’s patented Augmented Deposition additive manufacturing platform enables users to build intelligent parts in engineered polymers and carbon composite for prototyping, manufacturing and service. Users can produce Digitally Augmented Parts by printing an immutable QR or bar code onto the part that connects the part to their entire digital ecosystem. This capability provides new experiences using AR/VR, assembly and service instructions and marketplaces to deliver smart spaces that enable engineers to drive accelerated innovation.

Ideal for academic institutions, RIZE 3D printers are purpose-built for safety, strength, accuracy and ease of use. The capability of XRIZE to print functional full-color parts, carbon composite parts and digitally augmented parts in our RIZIUM™ engineering-grade thermoplastic, provides educational institutions with exceptional value, enabling a wider range of applications across academic departments. RIZE 3D printers offer safe materials and a safe process, without hazardous chemicals. RIZIUM provides zero hazardous emissions and is twice as strong as ABS, with industry-leading Z-axis strength.

Shawn Ehrstein, NIAR director of CAD/CAM and Emerging Technologies said, “We are very excited to add the XRIZE patented technology to our portfolio of additive manufacturing equipment and ongoing research. We look forward to the integration of the printing capabilities to enhance seamless digital continuity.”

RIZE President and CEO, Andy Kalambi added, “Our mission is to drive additive manufacturing at scale by making it safe, easy and digitally connected. NIAR is a premier research organization and will help push the boundaries of our technology to deliver smart solutions for innovation in design, production and service. Their unique abilities in leading edge areas like generative design, AR/VR align well with our building new solutions like Smart Spaces for the 3DEXPERIENCE® Center.”

The post RIZE Announces Partnership with NIAR at Wichita State University appeared first on RIZE Inc..

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you’re an Additive Manufacturing lab manager or a model maker in a company’s AM lab, you face a unique set of requirements:

  • Differentiation of materials – you serve a variety of applications and functions at your company, which means you need to be capable of providing a range of materials and different approaches to printing.

  • Faster part turnaround and delivery – you need to turn around part requests very quickly, especially when a request is urgent or when the deadline is just one day. AM labs that can meet fast-turnaround requests will be far more effective than those that can’t meet these demands.
  • Maximize throughput and efficiency – sometimes you receive large orders, or many orders come in at one time, as in the case of a small lab that serves hundreds of engineers across the company.
  • Track requests from many internal clients and track multiple iterations per part – with all of those orders and associated parts, how do you keep track of the versions and customers? There are different approaches to addressing this, some more effective than others.
  • Manage space and infrastructure requirements of the lab – this typically applies to smaller labs that must meet capability requirements, but do not have the space to house a fleet of different printers, each with its unique and narrow set of capabilities. It is beneficial to conserve space while maximizing capabilities with printers that can address a broader range of applications and requirements. In addition, many industrial 3D printers require venting or special tanks and chemicals for dissolving support. Not only do these items require space, they introduce a safety requirement that can be very expensive.

RIZE addresses these challenges with Augmented Deposition:

  • Functional Full-Color/Carbon Composite on one platform: XRIZE™, our all-in-one industrial desktop 3D printer, delivers the widest range of applications in prototyping, production and MRO.
  • Speed and Simplicityfastest time to part in hand with minimal, clean post-processing in seconds or minutes and highly-automated pre-processing. You can deliver parts to your customers faster than any other printer.
  • High Strength – Our base material is an engineering and medical grade thermoplastic with best-in-class Z-strength that mimics injection molded parts. It also provides other unique industrial material properties, for use in a wide range of functional applications:
    • Approved for skin & food contact
    • Negligible moisture absorption update of <.01%
    • Clean and recyclable
    • Low surface energy
    • High chemical resistance
  • Intelligent parts – RIZE 3D printers enable secure ink marking for printing QR/bar codes onto parts that connect the parts to your entire digital ecosystem, including design systems, data management systems and manufacturing systems. You can also print part/version numbers, instructions and more for tracking, authentication and compliance.
  • Safety – Unlike other 3D printers, our material emits zero-VOCs – no venting or other equipment is needed. This provides a people-safe and environment-safe process.

Sample Applications:

Functional Prototypes

  • Functional Prototypes in Full-Color
  • Casting Molds – Elastomeric Parts

Tooling & Manufacturing

Service Parts

Engineering

Geography, Geology & Architecture

Product Design

Download these case studies to see how other additive manufacturing labs are using RIZE 3D Printing:

Take advantage of this special, limited-time offer!

The post How Additive Manufacturing Labs Can Meet Expanding Application Needs appeared first on RIZE Inc..

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There are many unique challenges and requirements for 3D printing in Education:

  • Value/use across multiple departments – each academic discipline has a different set of 3D printing requirements. Some departments need functional materials with high strength, or perhaps specialized material properties. Other departments care about the visual appearance of parts, requiring them to have superior surface finish or be in full color. Still other departments are concerned with the precision of parts to ensure they stay within tolerances or can achieve fine features with high accuracy.
  • Bottlenecks during busy periods – The production schedule of the 3D printer is, in some cases, at odds with the academic schedule. Everyone who needs to use the printer requires it at the same time for assignments, especially at the end of each semester. This creates bottlenecks at times when people most need the 3D printer and have the tightest deadlines.
  • Safety and sustainability – EHS requirements and the need for changes to infrastructure (i.e.; ventilation), as well as regulations around safety and sustainability, are at odds with today’s most popular 3D printing technologies. In fact, many 3D printers release dangerous chemicals into the air that must be carefully regulated.
  • Student access to technologies used in industry – Educational institutions want to provide their students with a set of experiences that can be used when they enter the professional world. Therefore, it is wise to provide students with experience on a range of technologies that they will likely use in their careers.
  • Upfront and ongoing costs – Educational institutions provide academic departments with set budgets that can only be spend during a given period of time. This can limit the technology they can procure.
  • Reliability (uptime) – Educational institutions cannot afford to have non-functioning printers for 2 or 3 months. Having a non-functioning printer for that long can mean that an entire class will not be able to use the printer.
  • Traceability – Since there are so many different users and a large number of parts at academic institutions, it can be difficult to properly track the parts to ensure they reach the right students after printing and to ensure proper tracking of material charges.
3D printed part with QR code for traceability.
  • Ease of use –It can be challenging to train a large number of students to use the technology. The 3D printer should be easy enough for students to learn and use so they can spend most of their time learning how to harness the value of the technology rather than spending most of the semester learning how to use the printer.

Flexible 3D printing technology provides value across academic departments

RIZE’s patented technology, Augmented Deposition, is a hybrid process, combining industrial material extrusion of thermoplastic with material jetting of functional inks. This enables easy, clean support removal and ink marking on any part surface.

RIZE provides the capability of tracking and authenticating of parts with marking ink. You can add text or QR codes and other information to the part. Using this ability, you can attach all types of information, including student names, ID numbers, dates of part submission and other metadata about the part. This capability is also useful for applying use and assembly instructions, as well as how to connect the part to a model file online that identifies where the part came from and how it is to be used.

RIZE provides wide application flexibility. Our XRIZE™ 3D printer can produce carbon composite parts as well as full-color functional parts. This is useful for many applications in education, such as life sciences (i.e.; medical and chemical models), geography, geology, architecture, product design, the arts, engineering and more.

Safety First in Education

A major challenge for 3D printing in Education is safety. Many of the most popular thermoplastic filament 3D printers each emit more than 200 harmful VOCs (volatile organic compounds). And without proper ventilation, storage, disposal and handling considerations, this can place users, including students who are in the vicinity, at risk, exposing them to harmful chemicals without realizing it.

RIZE developed a proprietary engineering-grade thermoplastic called RIZIUM™, which provides several benefits:

  • RIZIUM is safe and clean and is comprised of medical-grade materials approved for skin and food contact. RIZE 3D printers extrude RIZIUM at a much lower temperature than the decomposition temperature so no harmful chemicals are emitted and, therefore, no venting is required.
  • Best-in-class Z-axis strength, very strong interlayer bonding
  • Low moisture absorption, <.01%, without the need for special storage requirements
  • RIZIUM is recyclable and sustainable

3D Printing Logistics in Education

  • Training infrastructure – With an estimated 6-month turnover of student users, it is important that 3D printers be simple enough to use so that students can get up and running fast. This reduces or eliminates the infrastructure needed to extensively train students on the technology.
  • Production bottlenecks – 3D printers must be reliable and produce parts fast, without post-processing that can jam the system. This is especially important leading up to final projects.

RIZE 3D printers are so easy to use, even our customers with no 3D printing experience are up and running in <20 minutes.  And with minimal post-processing, RIZE provides the fastest time-to-part to a part in hand.

  • Highly automated software – no expertise required
  • Easy to use printer – no need to level build plate, change tips, etc.
  • Minimal material management – no special storage, handling or disposal
  • Because we jet Release Ink between the part and its supports, post-processing takes just seconds or minutes, leaving a smooth surface finish. No soaking in chemicals, washing, drying, removal of residual material or coating are required

Download FIRST Robotics Case Study to learn how RIZE 3D printers can benefit students or learn about our Special Offer for Education: 2 printers for the price of 1.

The post Expanding Applications for 3D Printing in Education appeared first on RIZE Inc..

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Founded in 1943, IRA Green Inc. (IGI), headquartered in Providence, RI, USA, is a full-service manufacturer and distributor of nearly 40,000 unique uniform items and accoutrements that are earned and proudly displayed by military personnel worldwide.

IGI’s tool shop is focused on manufacturing coining and blanking dies. They also produce small fixtures for welding and polishing made in Delrin, metal or wood.

With high demand for IGI products, new fixtures are required every day. However, each job had to wait in a queue for several days before it could begin, resulting in bottlenecks and lead times of several days to weeks, from job request to fixture delivery. Moreover, each fixture required 8 hours of CNC programming and setup of pockets, or contour electrodes for tool steel and wire EDM flat pockets. IGI spent $300 for every fixture.

IGI’s Manufacturing Manager, Bill Yehle, justified that fixturing with RIZE 3D printed parts instead of tool room sawed and wired EDM and CAM of fixture nests would reduce the tool room backlog, while maintaining headcount. He proposed that manufacturing fixtures with a RIZE™ 3D printer would enable IGI to place the fixture work in the fast-response CAD group instead of the overburdened tool room.

“Implementing RIZE 3D printing as part of a strategic process shift has completely transformed our production process,” said Bill. It has added tool room skills to higher skilled CAM and machine building tasks, so fixture design can be accomplished at the time of product design to parallel-path the design/manufacturing development process.

Prior to using RIZE, machine operators clamped the piece down on the machine, which required considerable trial and error to get the placement right. They also tried melting the mold into nylon to hold it in place, but this also required a time-consuming process of trial and error – “turning and burning,” as Bill calls it, and did not meet IGI’s accuracy requirements.

Precision is critical. The RIZE manufactured fixtures hold the piece while it is being nailed in the welder. The 3D printed fixtures ensure the precision and accuracy of the nail placement. This speeds the process because it eliminates the need for repeated manual adjustment of the fixtures. It also saves time from machine operators placing one nail at a time using traditional machining. Using RIZE fixtures, IGI has been able to standardize the center of the fixture for nailing the piece without requiring adjustment.

Since implementing RIZE 3D printing less than a year ago, IGI’s design team has printed approximately 300 fixtures. They use their RIZE™ ONE 3D printer every day to reliably manufacture fixtures in 50 minutes at a cost of $2.00 per part. This enables IGI’s design team to produce 7 different versions of fixtures per day that can be used for welding and polishing. Using RIZE, IGI is able to standardize the molds and the nails, resulting in faster setup and changeover, repeatability and increased accuracy. Said Bill, “We have realized an 80% time savings in setup and changeover alone using RIZE and virtually eliminated errors.”

Further, RIZE’s unique ink marking capability enables IGI’s designers to print work order numbers, line numbers and pictures of the piece on the fixtures for identification and instruction for part use and storage. These markings also serve as three points of verification for machine operators to prevent errors.

When IGI plans to fabricate steel fixtures to sustain heavier loads, they use their RIZE ONE 3D printer to print functional prototypes for steel molds. They iterate the prototypes until they get it right and then they turn to the tool room for final steel fixture manufacturing. Previously, they iterated fixture designs 2 to 3 times in steel at a cost of $300 and lead times of 2 days per iteration. RIZE enables IGI to produce 7 prototypes per day at $2 each.

IGI continually evolves their use of RIZE ONE for fabricating fixtures. They regularly iterate their fixtures to enable easier removal of the molds from nail and welding machines and to further enhance the standardization and repeatability of the production process for increased speed and accuracy.

Some of these enhancements include printing fixtures within fixtures – the base fixture is a standard size while the fixture insert is customized for the piece, threading the molds for screws and printing spacers that enable selected molds to fit securely on certain machines.

IGI is also considering using RIZE to manufacture service and spare parts on-demand for their machinery to reduce the time and cost of sourcing and ordering machined parts, especially when parts are obsolete or suppliers have gone out of business.

“The process we are using with RIZE gives us a unique competitive advantage,” said Bill. “And we are looking to expand the use of RIZE technology to applications in other areas of the company.”

The post Manufacturing Fixtures on RIZE ONE Yields Ira Green ROI in <5 Months and $120,000 Annual Savings appeared first on RIZE Inc..

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Smart Spaces are ‘connected, interactive and intelligent environments’ that enable companies to deliver sustainable and inclusive innovation. At RIZE, our customers are creating Smart Spaces in several areas for Product Innovation, Manufacturing Innovation and in Service and MRO parts. RIZE, with Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS products, helps customers create these Smart Spaces integrating design, manufacturing and AR/VR.

The customer stories with RIZE are remarkable – accelerating Go-To-Market per product by 3+ weeks, cost reductions up to 90%, new designs leveraging Generative Shapes, all with a return of investment of less than 3 months. The customer case studies are compelling and, at the same, time inspiring.

RIZE delivers a technological breakthrough that allows for full, voxel-level 3D printing, digitally augmented parts that are intelligent and connected, leveraging engineering polymers and Carbon composites. We focused on key aspects that enable Smart Spaces – a 3D printer that is easy to use by engineering, manufacturing and service organizations, safe with zero emissions and the ability to print parts that are trusted and traceable for IP protection. With the fastest time-to-part, best in class Z-strength and a safe print process, RIZE enables scalability across the organization.

RIZE 3D printed parts

Innovation is iterative in its very nature, and an ability to iterate on the same day with a haptic experience of the design idea is critical to success. The haptic experience can be visualizing with touch and feel the design ideas to functional prototyping and end use production parts. RIZE is an All-In-One polymer printer that prints RIZIUM WHITE and BLACK, Carbon and Color on the same machine.

SOLIDWORKS Design and Simulation (L) and RIZE 3D Printed Part, Simulation in Color and in Carbon (R)

Contact us to learn how you can create Smart Spaces and drive innovation in your company.

The post RIZE Smart Spaces to Drive Innovation appeared first on RIZE Inc..

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Additive manufacturing

Additive Manufacturing (AM), or 3D printing, has seen wide enthusiasm from various industries for its potential to revolutionize the way custom products are designed and made. Until now, products on the market have not seen wide adoption due to their lack of an economical and scalable model. Industrial-grade quality 3D printers are known to be expensive (>$100K + significant material costs) and have a large footprint. Most of the time they require complex processes, including time-consuming post-processing, venting of toxic emissions, and storage and disposal of harmful chemicals. In addition, only a handful of companies offer color printing and multi-material printing options. These limitations have prevented businesses from realizing the full potential of 3D printing as they did not provide a justifiable return on investment.

With recent advancements in materials science, software and hardware, we are starting to see wider applications of 3D printing, not only in advanced prototyping but also in low-volume end part production and design engineering.

RIZE plays at the forefront of AM innovation. Its game-changing technology was recently recognized by IDC (“2018 Innovators in Plastic-Based 3D Printing”) and Frost & Sullivan (“2019 Best Practices in Technology Innovation Award for Zero-Emission Polymer Material Additive Manufacturing, North America”).

Meet RIZE

RIZE, based just outside Boston, has a portfolio of 3D printers that offer a step change in safety, speed, ease of use, and part strength all at the lowest cost of ownership for industrial printers.

Color parts produced by the XRIZE. Photo courtesy of Innospark Ventures.

Their hybrid desktop industrial printers, the RIZE ONE and XRIZE, are tightly-packed and feature-rich. Both offer high efficiency, require essentially no post-processing, have Zero VOC emissions, and produce parts with superior Z-strength; the XRIZE even enables printing in “full, voxel-level color.” In addition, both printers run polymer and composite materials, including carbon fiber material.

The RIZE ONE enables “the production of replacement and custom tooling, fixtures, jigs and end use parts.” With XRIZE, companies can leverage color to further “manufacture full-color parts for FEA and stress analysis, tooling with safety instructions, end-use consumer products such as eyewear, package design, GIS mapping, realistic anatomical parts for patient/clinician communication, pre-surgical planning and education and parts for marketing and entertainment in an office, on the production floor or in the field.”

Why We Invested

First, we are strongly aligned with RIZE’s management team’s mission of “Safety First,” ensuring zero emissions and zero non-toxic materials to provide an inclusive approach to 3D printing that drives adoption among all users. RIZE’s management team brings along decades of expertise in Chemical Engineering, 3D printing and Enterprise Software. Eugene Giller, Founder & CTO, developed RIZE’s technology with a highly scalable and safe method, which enables RIZE to pursue high-impact applications in disaster relief, education, healthcare and space exploration.

Second, we believe that RIZE is well-positioned to benefit from the shift toward software and AI in the space. The lines between physical and digital are blurring, and we are seeing potential for generative design and IoT integration. For instance, RIZE’s printers can print a QR code directly into a tool or part, providing enhanced digital traceability and asset tracking, as well as the potential to quickly and easily access instructions, logs, or other digital records. Another is the concept coined by RIZE and its partner, PSMI, is the “digital tool crib” where a company can keep a digital library of tools, fixtures, and parts that can be created on demand, reducing storage footprint. Generative design uses AI to produce highly optimized parts that reduce waste and perform better all in a fraction of the time it would take engineers to design with an iterative approach. These are a few opportunities RIZE can leverage to augment their 3D printing technology. Andy Kalambi, CEO, brings 25+ years of expertise in enterprise software and manufacturing, critical to the development of RIZE’s unique software solutions.

Eugene Giller, Founder and CTO of RIZE, demonstrates the XRIZE to Sophie Meralli, an Associate at Innospark Ventures. Photo courtesy of Innospark Ventures.

Finally, we invested in RIZE because their products are truly innovative: highly efficient, minimal post-processing, best-in-class Z-strength (that mimics injection molded parts), small footprint and simple to use. They have found a way to make 3D printing as easy as 2D printing which will empower an entire wave of entrepreneurs, innovators, and exciting new applications. Their desktop-sized industrial-grade products have created an entirely new market sub-segment with leading quality and precision. As they explore new materials and techniques we expect their market leadership to widen. What is most exciting for potential customers is that all of this comes at a fraction of the price of the competition; with such a low cost it is easy to realize a return on investment in a RIZE printer.

Looking Forward

RIZE has received many prestigious awards and we believe its superior combination of features and functionality make RIZE’s products the best in class. We’re thrilled to work with the RIZE team and are excited for what the future holds: further innovation in desktop industrial 3D printing technology and exciting developments in software leveraging Artificial Intelligence.

Innospark Ventures is a Boston-based VC investing in founders and ideas that leverage advanced AI to create a differential, disruptive impact for our economy and society. Learn more about them, here.

The post Why We Invested in RIZE appeared first on RIZE Inc..

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Headquartered at the Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey, The United States Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), is the primary research and development group for the US Army’s armament and munitions systems. The ARDEC team works on advanced materials and technologies with a focus on material properties. This effort led ARDEC to expand into additive manufacturing, specifically, to identify the types of materials that can be used in AM equipment to meet the needs of the US Army.

Matthew Brauer, a scientist for the Advanced Materials Branch of ARDEC, said that with approximately 25 3D printers in their lab, ranging from small, $500 hobby-class desktop machines to large $500K+ industrial-class additive manufacturing equipment, they are always looking for the latest equipment to test and use for their unique applications in the field, where soldiers need spare parts and custom tools on demand.

For functional use in the field, 3D printers must be easy and safe enough for soldiers to operate on temporary or permanent field bases and able to withstand the rigors of various and sometimes harsh environmental conditions. The materials must also be safe given the strict storage and disposal regulations of many countries around the world and the parts must meet performance requirements.

Rize caught the attention of the AMTB team (Advanced Materials & Technology Branch within ARDEC) for its unique hybrid Augmented Deposition process that enables the simultaneous extrusion of engineering-grade thermoplastic and the jetting of functional inks from print heads for traceability. They were also impressed with Rize’s minimal post processing after printing.

“It’s easy to peel away supports from intricate geometries, and that provides a faster part in the soldier’s hand.” -Matthew Brauer, Scientist, Advanced Materials Branch of ARDEC. James Zunino, Materials Engineer at ARDEC, added how useful Rize’s simple and clean post-processing can be in regions where water resources can’t be wasted for post-processing parts.

They were also impressed with the Z-strength of Rize parts, which is important for the Army’s wide variety of functional part applications.

AMTB’s Rize One 3D printer is used to produce spare parts, such as robot wheels and vehicle parts. For example, soft skin Humvee window knobs and handles break off easily, preventing soldiers from getting in and out of the vehicle. They needed a way to quickly and easily manufacture new ones on the fly. They reverse engineered the originals and print them on Rize One. Previously they printed these parts on an extrusion technology, but the parts needed to soak in a caustic solvent for 4-6 hours following printing before they could be used. Using Rize One, the parts are available for installation immediately after printing. This amounts to a savings of up to 6 hours per part; which can mean the difference between getting the part in one day vs. two days.









“A system can go down because of one missing part and something like 3D printing can get you back in the fight. That’s a huge benefit to the Army,” said James. “If a handle is broken on purge pump or wheel is damaged on an EOD robot, you can print a new one.”

ARDEC also uses Rize One to produce a wide range of tools needed in the field. For example, 55-gallon drums are used to store chemicals. Unaware that there is a specific tool for removing the drum cap, new soldiers often try use whatever is handy – screwdrivers and other sharp instruments – that can cause them injury and destroy the cap. A replica was reverse engineered using SOLIDWORKS and ARDEC printed the tool with Rize One, enabling easy and safe removal of the cap. If the tool is misplaced or left behind during a move, a new one can quickly and easily be printed on the fly in less than one day.

Another tool that ARDEC prints with Rize One is a generator wrench that is easily lost during moves. Using 3D Scanners, they reverse engineered the wrench and print electrically neutral replacements on demand with Rize One.

Rize One is also used for mission critical applications, including forward grips that mount to the picatinny rail on rifles. ARDEC downloads the publicly available files, customizes them as needed and prints them on Rize One. Soldiers prefer the unique and custom rifle grips and having ARDEC produce them with Rize One enhances their performance.

Rize’s digitally augmented parts add traceability and an extra layer of confidence in the Army’s 3D printed parts. This capability is used to embed serial numbers and QR codes into parts that create a secure digital thread back to the ARDEC database for detailed part information, such as the printer operator, operator training, print parameters, room conditions, part specifications and use and much more.

“I think having accountability and provenance of a part is huge in the general acceptance of AM parts,” said James. “A lot of it is trust in the new technology and this really helps build some of that trust.”

“Considering one of the assets that could be 3D printed is a grenade launcher, knowing that an experienced technician made it (and not a first-year grunt) is something a field commander would want to know. Would you buy a vehicle if it didn’t have a VIN on it? You’d probably question it.” -James Zunino, Materials Engineer, ARDEC

The post RIZE Helps Soldiers Get Parts Faster; Builds Trust into Critical Parts appeared first on RIZE Inc..

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview