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One of the most ubiquitous characteristics of communications teams is that they lack time. In virtually every workshop I conduct with communicators, the issue of a time crunch comes up.

Unfortunately, a consequence of this is that important work (such as strategic planning, evaluation, strategic counsel, research, public environment scanning) often gets shelved as teams are sucked alive by the urgent pressures of the daily grind.

I’ve found that one simple way out of the chronic time crunch trap is to take a step back and deliberately think about how much of your time a given task deserves. In the zero-sum game of resource allocation, it’s helpful to decide this in advance, and then stick to what you decided, as if your life depended on it!

Crafting a communications strategy doesn’t have to take nine months. Writing web copy doesn’t have to take two weeks. Creating an editorial calendar doesn’t have to take a whole quarter. If you think of your level of work as scalable, it unlocks the freedom of making conscious decisions about where and how you invest your time, effort and energy.

There is an old adage that says “work expands to fill the time you give it”.  Make sure you give it what you want.

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As a communications strategist, one of the cold hard facts that I face is that most communications strategies fail – that is, that they never get implemented. And yet, my experience is that a solid communications strategy (particularly one developed through a robust consultative process) can have a transformative impact on an organization`s results.

This tension has led me to try to identify practical ways to ensure that a strategy has reasonable conditions to fly. Taking a page from the wildly successful Checklist Manifesto (which has apparently been used by groups such as orthopaedic surgeons, pilots and astronauts to enhance operational effectiveness), here’s my proposed checklist for your communications strategy:

  • Validate that you have the evidence to back up your recommendations. This is particularly critical if your strategy is recommending a significant departure from your organization’s traditional approach. Look for quantitative and qualitative evidence, which might come from analyzing past metrics, benchmarking your organization against peers, or from key informant interviews.
  • Ensure that your strategy is realistic. The strategy is a statement of commitment to the organization, so it’s prudent to make sure you can deliver. If the strategy is designed to make a business case for additional resources to achieve your goals, that should be made clear to executives.
  • Design an internal process for internal engagement and alignment around your strategy. Consider building support for the strategy through internal stakeholdering and involving key partners in your process. The goal is not only to deliver a killer strategy, but also to get it approved, and ultimately executed.
  • Build a process for regularly assessing progress against the strategy, and reporting on achievements. Don’t wait until the end of the year to begin evaluating – build it into day-to-day practice so that you can act on findings and calibrate your strategic direction in real-time.
  • Integrate the communications strategy into regular operations and meetings of the organization. Make a habit of connecting ad hoc requests or issues to the strategy (for example, how can we deal with this media issue in a way that advances our strategy goals?)

Keep in mind that as Henry Mintzberg remarked, “all strategy making walks on two feet, one deliberate, the other emergent”. It’s natural and healthy for your strategy implementation to evolve and adapt to changes in the environment. The trick is to maintain laser-like focus on your stated objectives and associated performance measures – once these bookends are solid, the rest will fall into place.

For more tips on communications strategy, check out this Best Practice Paper in Strategic Communications Planning.

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Results Map by Caroline Kealey - 1M ago

I am a huge fan of podcasts, and am always on the lookout for smart, fun content that I can stream on the go.

I’ve had a few requests for recommendations of late, so I thought I’d put together a list of my favourites, particularly in the fields of communications and change management:

Under the Influence: This one’s a classic in Canada. Terry O’Reilly is brilliant, and produces a superb podcast in partnership with CBC. Terry explores the theme of influence, mainly through fascinating stories related to marketing and branding. Every episode is a treat.

Circle of Fellows: What’s not to love about Shel Holtz? With Circle of Fellows, Shel brings us some of the leading thinkers in communications, in engaging discussions spanning a huge breadth of issues facing communicators today. His guests are Fellows of the International Association of Business Communicators who generously share their passion for communications in thought-provoking and helpful conversations.

Anecdotally Speaking: This is a new addition by Shawn Callaghan who is a master in the art of business storytelling. In quick nuggets of content, Shawn shares examples of effective stories used by leaders to drive home a point on an emotional level. I enjoy the way he unpacks the elements of effective narratives and brings to life the superb content first introduced through his book Putting Stories to Work

The 1-3-20 Podcast: This is a new show produced by the amazing Daniel Pink. Daniel interviews top-flight authors about their new books in a fun format that centres around 1 book, 3 questions and a 20 minute summary of the content. Always fresh and fun.

HBR Women at Work: This is a new show produced by the Harvard Business Review. It tackles some of the common challenges that women deal with in the workplace with a degree of sophistication, humour and savvy that’s quite unique. I particularly enjoyed the first episode dealing with the perennial problem of being interrupted during meetings. Sheesh!

Change Management Review: Theresa Moulton interviews fascinating guests from all around the world, exploring a wide range of issues related to change management. I love her conversational interview style, and have discovered several worthwhile authors through this excellent podcast. I recently had the pleasure of recording an interview with Theresa on how change communications can fuel transformation

Conversations of Change: Australia-based Jennifer Frahm does a great job of identifying voices in the change management discipline and presenting short, engaging nuggets of content. Jennifer’s passion for change is contagious, and she has a knack for distilling theoretical concepts down to practical application. I had fun as a guest on her show last year.

I salute all these terrific podcasters and their communities, who put together such thoughtful and generous content for our listening pleasure each month.

I’d love to hear your favourites and recommendations!

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Results Map by Caroline Kealey - 2M ago

Over the last few years, we have had the distinct honour and privilege of working with several leaders on driving organizational change.

I often think of my role in helping clients move through change as that of a midwife – it’s not my baby, but I have a front row seat to the pain, blood and guts involved in the process of giving birth to change.

It’s from that unique and privileged vantage point that I offer some words of support and counsel to those leaders embarking on their own journeys of change, with the hope that it may help illuminate their path toward transformation.

Dear Change Leader,

I’m sure you’ve read all the articles warning that 70% of changes fail – but don’t panic. That statistic has been largely discredited, and I’m sure you’ve totally got this.

Still, it’s probably smart to jump into your change project with your eyes wide open to some of the pitfalls and dangers that you may encounter along the path. Here are a few words of support and counsel from my experience working in the trenches with leaders like you who have the guts and the discipline to step up and make change happen.

  1. This is probably going to take more time than you think. Do the best you can to plan for your change, but I’ve never seen a transformation project finish ahead of schedule, and very few arrive on time. It’s probably wise to give yourself a bit of leeway for the unexpected.
  2. You can’t do this alone. Despite your passion, goodwill and savvy, you are going to need allies to help get your change off the ground. Embrace the opportunity to rally your leadership team and recruit an army of change agents to help you get from here to there.
  3. You won’t be able to plan for every eventuality. The thing about change projects is that things change all the time. Sure, go ahead and prepare a thoughtful change management plan – that’s the responsible thing to do. But at the same time, as things go off plan, keep in mind that as long as you have a clear intent and a path forward, you can deal with unexpected challenges and opportunities and still get to where you need to go. Your canoe will zig and zag in ways that you can’t predict – but as long as you know where you’re going and have the will to get there, you’ll still move forward..
  4. Get clear on why you’re changing in the first place. I imagine it’s very clear in your mind why your change is necessary. But remember, for your troops out there, that burning platform for change is probably a whole lot less obvious. No one will rally behind your change unless they really understand in their heads – and in their guts – that the status quo is no longer an option. Take the time to really nail down the “why” behind your change, and be sure to make that very clear to the organization before you set out to shift things. There’s a bunch of evidence that shows that the #1 reason for change failure is a weak establishment of the “why”.  Be different and avoid this sand trap – you’ll thank me later!
  5. Resist the vortex of over-complication. Something happens when a group of smart people get in a room and start writing messages about a change project together. Things get very complicated and convoluted very fast. Do not fall into this trap. Rise above, and insist on expressing the intent behind your change in simple, straightforward and brief terms. This “North Star” for your change will be the centerpiece of all your change management efforts. Take heed to Einstein’s advice that “Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler”
  6. Try to focus on the “what” and let go of the “how”. Let’s be honest, you’re probably a bit of a control freak. I totally get that – and it’s probably one of the reasons you got to your leadership role in the first place. But when you’re working on a change assignment, you’re going to have to loosen up a bit. Try to make “what” you’re wanting to achieve really clear, and trust your teams enough to help figure out the “how”. This will be a whole lot more efficient and a whole lot less painful than you prescribing every move.
  7. Beware of black holes. The first casualty of change is communications. As leaders are consumed with the Herculean task of planning and executing change, they often lose track of the experience of employees who are busy with business as usual, and are probably quite unaware of what’s going on with the transformation. Develop the reflex of considering what the change looks and feels like to your front line employees, and be diligent in bridging the gap that exists between your vantage point and theirs. Otherwise, while you and your leaders try to finalize all the details of change, days without communication or updates are turning into weeks, and weeks into months for employees. This creates conditions that are ripe for black holes in information – which will be quickly filled by rumours and misinformation. Stay on top of your change communications to avoid falling into that hole.
  8. Manage your energy, not just your time. As we’ve already stated, this change adventure is going to take more time than you probably think. It also has the potential to suck your energy alive. There is a special kind of exhaustion that comes from trying to manage business as usual while also trying to get a major change project off the ground. So be kind to yourself and think about what you can do to manage your energy, not just your time. This might involve protecting your time off, making sure you have time to dis-connect, and prioritizing activities that recharge your batteries outside the office.
  9. Be the change you want to see. OK, so this may be a cliché, but it is really fundamental. As a leader, you play a huge role in modeling desired behaviours. People are watching you – they notice the way you talk, the decisions you make, the meetings you choose to attend, and those that you choose to skip. Be intentional, and be savvy – role modeling that the change is a priority and that you mean business is going to be vital to your success.
  10. Don’t be afraid of resistance. I get it – it’s not much fun to be in a room full of employees who are criticizing your change or rattling off the reasons why it can’t work. It’s exhausting. It’s demoralizing. But it can also be your secret weapon. Instead of trying to avoid – or worse yet, to quash such resistance, think of it as your friend. The energy of resistance is exactly what you need to harness and turn toward the positive. By acknowledging its force and working through the energy you can build sustainable commitment to change.
  11. Let go of perfection. When you are in the throes of change, keep in mind that your goal is not to convince everyone that your change is a good idea. That’s never going to happen. Instead, shift gears and consider that your goal is to achieve critical mass, not consensus. Some people will hate the change, and some may find that they no longer have a place on the boat as it shifts directions. That’s ok – it’s the natural consequence of change, and is a dynamic that’s not yours to control.
  12. Catch people doing the right thing. As you plough through the messy middle of change, try to make a habit of identifying and highlighting when things are going well. This is one of the most powerful things you can do – shine a light on successes and celebrate! This will go a long way toward demonstrating social proof that your change is a good idea, and can totally work.

Leading change is one of the most rewarding and satisfying adventures you will likely have in your career. Consider a few steps to set yourself up for success, and then enjoy the ride!

 

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Results Map by Caroline Kealey - 3M ago

I am often asked what our product the Results Map is all about, so I thought I’d take a moment to provide a brief answer…

The Results Map is a step-by-step process for strategic communications. We developed the model is 2004 as a response to the complaints one so often hears about communications being an unplanned, ad hoc and reactive discipline.

By creating a predictable, methodological approach to directing communications towards measureable results, our goal was to package not only a process for writing a Communications Strategy, but to help shape a clear path toward defining a strategic mindset for the function overall. 

The graphic language of a subway map is used to present the structure:

Over the years, the Results Map has grown and now includes a series of training workshops, a Handbook and an extensive proprietary database of tools, templates, worksheets and samples covering all aspects of the strategic communications continuum. We’ve also added new resources in the area of change communications and change management.

Check out this video explaining how the Results Map helps teams move from just solving communications problems, to stepping up and solving business problems through communications.

 

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Communicators are often asked to develop or work with many different types of strategies and plans – and there’s often a lot of confusion swirling around what one has or does, over the other. That’s a real problem, as it can set up a disconnect between expectations and deliverables, right out of the gate.

Here’s a quick guide to help demystify the differences in key strategic communications planning deliverables:

Communications Strategy

A comprehensive, detailed strategic planning document designed to guide the communications of an organization or of a significant initiative or issue. A Communications Strategy typically includes an in-depth Strategic Considerations section providing sound analysis of the internal and/or external environment. . It is designed to direct an organization’s high level communications, and often has a three-year time horizon, with a more detailed implementation plan for year one.

Communications Plan

A more focused, brief plan that guides the communications for a particular project, event or initiative.  A Communications Plan follows the basic structure of a full Communications Strategy but presents less analytical detail, and generally includes more specific information on implementation planning, such as a workplan.  In some cases, a Marcom Plan is developed to help direct both marketing and communications activities in an integrated fashion.

Both the Communications Strategy and the Communications Plan can be for internal or external communications.  In the case where the document provides integrated direction to both internal and external comms, we would typically use the terms “Corporate Communications Strategy” or “Corporate Communications Plan”.

Another variation to the above is a Stakeholder Communications Strategy or Plan, which includes a more detailed focus on an organization’s stakeholder groups and how they relate among and between each other.

For more resources on communications planning, check out the Results Map workshops, Handbook and online database of downloadable tools and templates.

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The one thing that all change management methodologies can agree on is that the most critical factor to transformation success is effective, visible leadership.

This is true in our experience – clients who have the most measurable success with large-scale organizational change are those with strong, courageous and unwavering executive leadership.

What’s less evident is how, in practice, a leader can be an effective champion for change. In addition to having to make the tough decisions and deal with the inevitable conflicts, the most significant responsibility the executive has is to communicate.

There are particular techniques required to mastering change communication – the highlights are presented here in an easy-to-use set of “do’s and don’ts”:

  1. Start with the “why” behind the change. Position the reason for the change as a “felt need”, appealing not only at an intellectual level, but also on an emotional one plane. DON’T avoid communicating because all of the information about the transformation is not yet clear. If you can’t share content, provide your employees with context.
  2. Keep in mind the golden rule: not communicating nothing, is communicating something. Fill the void with consistent, open, two-way communications. DON’T assume that just because you’ve sent an email, you’ve communicated. Executives tend to under-communicate in a time of change by a factor of 8-10.
  3. Consider how you can communicate your change not just through words, but also through symbols and behaviours. Consider activities that appeal at the emotional, experiential level. DON’T underestimate trust. It is the currency of change and a vital asset. Treat it carefully  taking care to communicate in an authentic, open and transparent fashion. Trust takes time to build, but can be shattered in seconds, which can be highly erosive to positive change.
  4. Remember that conversation is the smallest unit of change. Make a point of reaching out and having informal dialogue with your team. DON’T Forget that while you’ve been in dozens of meetings about the change, but your rank and file employees haven’t. They will need time to digest and process the information that may have been crystal clear to you a long time ago.
  5. Manage your energy, not just your time. Leading change is excruciatingly draining – make a point of recharging so that you can effectively model behaviours and demonstrate positive energy. DON’T fall into the trap of the Curse of Knowledge.
  6. Maintain a steady drumbeat of communication. Regular, predictable communication from a change leader is a reassuring touch point for employees. DON’T Allow mis-alignment or mis-communication among your management team. Make a solid investment in communicating with your management team, and coaching them to be allies in your change.
  7. Provide employees with line of sight. Connect the  dots for them between your big-picture change, and what it means for their day-to-day reality. DON’T fight with culture. When there is a conflict between a change and a culture, the culture always wins. Find a way to integrate your transformation into it.
  8. Leverage social capital. Tap into social networks to help create shared meaning and alignment around the change. DON’T assume that you have a read on what employees are feeling. In a hierarchical organization, it’s unlikely that the senior executive has the full picture on what employees are really feeling. Consider a quick “Pulse Check” survey to get a sense of where employees are at.
  9. Celebrate success. Positive and public feedback from leaders is a powerful cue to employees. Make a point of showcasing examples of behaviours and decisions that demonstrate alignment with the transformation. DON’T rush to eliminate or confront resistance. You will have much more success by focusing on uncovering resistance so that you can then deal with it openly and constructively.

For more tips for leaders, check out this Best Practice Paper on Change Communications.

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Results Map by Caroline Kealey - 5M ago

More and more, we’ve found that many of our clients are exploring the idea of creating communities of practice in their organizations. With an emphasis on dialogue, sharing, and flexibility, these new groups provide more informal communications tools that help share information across traditional hierarchies.

But what is a community of practice?

A community of practice is a group of people who share concerns or interests, and who build their knowledge and expertise by interacting on an ongoing basis. They’re different from a traditional “community” or “community of interest”, as a community of practice implies the idea of a shared practice. A community of practice is continually renegotiated by its members, creating a constantly evolving dialogue, and adaptive quality that allows members to organically contribute their ideas and change priorities on an ongoing basis.

If you’re interested in starting your own community of practice, here are a few core foundational areas you should keep in mind:

Develop shared understanding: Communities of practice are “nodes for the exchange and interpretation of information.” Employees participate in the creation of shared meaning around key priority concepts and goals, magnifying critical information and reducing the potential for misalignment or disconnects in day-to-day operations. Shared meaning is created over time through the collaborative nature of the community of practice.

Treat knowledge as an asset: Developing the capacity to both create and keep knowledge needs to be encouraged in a community of practice. The group is defined by knowledge rather than by a specific task at hand. When certain tasks and processes are standardized, they are developed in direct response to the needs and circumstances of the group. Knowledge is also kept in “living” ways, through the members of the group, unlike a static database.

Use social participation & collaboration: A primary focus in communities of practice is learning as “social participation”, meaning that individuals are active participants in the social community, and construct their shared identity through the community. Individuals also work to construct the identity of the community over time with a willingness to share and learn. Members have a common interest in a subject area and collaborate over an extended period of time, sharing ideas and strategies, determining solutions, and building innovation.

Maintain permeability: Flexibility lets others learn from those in the community of practice outside of traditional hierarchies, and allows for existing members to continually review the needs of the group with a fluid timeline. The involvement of those in the community can vary in different degrees depending on needs. This permeable structure creates more opportunity for learning, as new members bring in new insights, and “core members” learn from the new lens of other participants.

Focus on integrity and respect. The values of integrity and respect in a community of practice should be reflected in day-to-day behaviours. There is a culture of openness and trust in which employees feel respected through the authenticity of the members of the group. Employees trust their colleagues, leaders, and the organization, generating goodwill and underpinning commitment. This is a vital business outcome, as trust is a pre-condition for collaboration.

“Communities play a critical role in an organization’s digital ecosystem by enabling the relationship and trust development required for complex discussions”

When thinking of developing a community of practice, make sure that members of the community have the support of the organization and are legitimized through the actual experience of being in a community of practice. The organization cannot dismiss or impede these communities, but instead should strive to leverage them. And when properly leveraged, the outcomes can be incredibly successful!

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A few days ago, I spotted this refreshing tweet from the new Chief Information Officer (CIO) for the Government of Canada, Alex Benay:

My response to him was that I totally agree, and for federal communicators to be in alignment with that digital by default orientation, we should phase out the ubiquitous, but antiquated job title “E-Communications Advisor”. I see this title across government (and, by the way, only across government) on a regular basis, and every time, it conjures up images of a retro cubicle office stuck in a 1990s time warp. My twitter exchange with the CIO seemed to draw a lot of interest, so I thought I’d raise the issue on the blog.

I bristle at the odd “E-Communications” title because it seems to weirdly assume that there are somehow two distinct categories of communications: electronic and non-electronic. That flies in the face of what we know to be common and best practice in communications shops today – the trend is overwhelmingly to have integrated communications teams, driven by content strategy. The focus is on storytelling and content animated through various channels in a way that is tactic-agnostic. While communications teams used to be organized by siloed functions like media relations and speechwriting, today they are structured to provide integrated strategic support across channels. Even internal and external communications are increasingly converging in strategy and content. This strategic direction is codified in the Government of Canada’s Communications Policy and Directive.

If we take a step back and look at the big picture, can you imagine other professional groups using this approach to their job titles? Say, for example:

  • E-architect
  • E-accountant
  • E-researcher

It makes no sense because we assume that professionals are using electronic tools as part of their work in today’s digital age. If anything, communicators should be at the forefront of having a digital by default mindset and strategy in our work. Showing up to a meeting with an outdated and irrelevant title is a credibility killer – let’s take responsibility for communicating the value of our profession and start with level-setting more modern, useful job titles.

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“Adults are much more likely to act their way into a new of thinking than to think their way into a new way of action.” – Richard Pascale, Surfing the Edge of Chaos

Ultimately, all change is about behaviour. The challenge is that most people attempt to change behaviour by changing people’s minds.

If you’re trying to get employees on board with a new business model or strategic orientation for your organization, for example, no amount of talking is going to get you to where you want to go. The question then becomes, how can we change the environment so that our employees change their own minds?

Here are eight strategies for driving real change:

1. Plan backwards

While traditional strategic plans work forwards, in the context of change initiatives, it tends to be much more effective to start with a clear desired end state, and then work backwards. The idea is that you create a “scene” or a picture of what things would look like when you reach your goal. Then you work backwards to identify what steps need to be taken to get there. The bigger the change, the more valuable this technique is. Otherwise, people tend to focus on small, incremental changes rather than the possibility of large-scale transformation.

2. Unfreeze

Lewin’s change model advocates that organizations “unfreeze”, change and then “refreeze” new behaviours. Often organizations forget to articulate what it is we are supposed to stop doing. For example, if we are moving to a centralized model of record keeping, that may mean that we are no longer doing departmental reports. This has to be made clear, as it tends to be a source of a lot of friction and frustration with change.

3. Speed or buy-in

In business, there is a saying, “you can have it good, you can have it fast, or you can have it cheap – pick two out of the three.” In organizational change, there is also an essential trade off: you can have it quick, or you can have it with buy-in, but you can’t have both. There is a binary relationship between speed and buy-in, and it’s an act of leadership to make a decision as to which one is most important. This is one of the biggest pitfalls in change, because the decision is often unintentional, rather than being a deliberate choice. For more on this trade-off, see “The Change Leader’s Trade-off.

4. Concentrate on allies

One of the biggest problems in change is that an organization drains its resources on focusing on those that are most entrenched in their resistance. This is a losing battle. You’ll have more success in focusing relatively more effort on your champions and early adopters and energizing them in order to create a flywheel effect. Not everyone will get on board with your transformation, but remember change is not about consensus, it’s about critical mass.

5. Tap into social capital

An organization is a system based on relationships, not hierarchy. Think about tapping into peer influence, particularly people who work cross-boundary. This organic approach to change is much more effective and sustainable than relying strictly on a top-down model.

6. Embrace learning and risk

A changing organization is a learning organization. Part of fuelling a successful change initiative is to contribute to a culture that embraces continuous improvement and risk taking. There has to be a sense of emotional safety that it’s okay to learn and try new things, and that we accept that some of them may fail. Otherwise, people become paralyzed and entrenched in the traditional, familiar way of working.

7. Plan for resistance

Resistance is an expected part of change. In fact, if you have no resistance, that’s a signal that you have a real problem – either people don’t trust you enough to express their view, or the social system is so weak that no one has a sense of affinity to the organization. Treat resistance as a normal, multifaceted, and moving energy. It can be useful to change your perspective on resistance and see it in a positive light. After all, a resistant employee is an engaged employee, because he cares enough to resist.

8. Focus on measurable outcomes

As the saying goes: “In God we trust, all others must have metrics”. A disciplined focus on measurement is an important success factor in managing change. It’s the essential ingredient to ensuring that you are making evidence-based decisions so that you can course correct as you go. Measurement is also an important source of fuel for change – demonstrating progress to staff, identifying wins and identifying areas for further improvement. For more Results Map blogs on Measurement, see here.

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