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Regina Cat Rescue by Rachel Molnar - 1M ago

We hope everyone enjoyed a peaceful holiday season. As we move into 2018, we wanted to take the opportunity to share a recap of 2017 – it was another busy year!

The Community Cat Team was kept hopping as they trapped, neutered and returned (TNR) 36 cats in 2017 – nearly double from 2016. They continued to manage 31 RCR colonies while also supporting 49 independently managed colonies. Volunteers also conducted outreach to Moose Jaw's cat rescue, SCRAPS, by providing a trapping demonstration and Q&A session about TNR. One of the challenges faced by the Community Cat Team was the difficult task of trapping sick or injured community cats to get them vet care.

In 2017, The Pet Rescue Team was tasked with limiting intake to 400 cats in an effort to prevent volunteer burnout and ensure financial stability – and they came very close finishing the year with 403 rescues. This measure was necessary after the record-breaking 473 rescues in 2016 that put extreme resource pressures on the organization. Adoptions for 2017 hit 433 – the highest in our history. And a record number of foster homes were active throughout the year with an average of 83 homes.

Besides the daily operations of the Community Cat, Pet Rescue, Fundraising and Communications teams, RCR also worked on new initiatives, policies and partnerships. Some of the highlights include:

  • RCR began work on the Community Cat Coalition with the Regina Humane Society, the City of Regina and local veterinarians. Expect to hear more about the coalition and its work later this year.
     
  • An adoption fee increase since was implemented - the first since 2013. The increase was necessary to help offset just some of the costs associated with rescuing cats and kittens such as sterilization surgeries, vaccinations, anti-parasitic treatments and other veterinary care.
     
  • We formalized our partnership with the Excalipurr Cat Café which opened in December and has already facilitated over 20 adoptions.
     
  • RCR introduced a policy opposing declawing. As an animal rescue organization that sees firsthand the negative short- and long-term effects of declawing, RCR is proud to add its voice to the choir of those in opposition of the unnecessary amputation.
     
  • The Fundraising Team developed important partnerships with local businesses most notably with Metro Pet Market to present the 2017 Winter Raffle and with Yoga Mala to host the city’s first cat yoga event.

We want to extend a warm and heartfelt thank you to everyone who supported RCR throughout 2017 whether that be by adopting, sponsoring, donating, educating or volunteering. We hope we can continued to count on your support in 2018!

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Regina Cat Rescue by Alanna Whippler - 1M ago

Tiny Rocky was found in a plastic bag in an alley during the first severe cold snap of the winter. He was a little fighter, but couldn't overcome the neurological damage he suffered.

Regina Cat Rescue (RCR) is fortunate to have many dedicated volunteers who care for our rescued cats and kittens - from the tame kitties placed into foster care to the community cats who are happiest living on the streets with the support of our Community Cat Team. 

We do the best we can for each and every rescue, but sometimes no amount of love or veterinary care is enough to save fragile lives. 

We experienced our share of heartbreak in 2017, including the loss of several kittens to one of the nastiest cat viruses out there, panleukopenia. We also had to let go of a precious young kitten named Rocky due to neurological damage from unknown causes and one kitten who simply failed to thrive.

Whether it was a vulnerable young kitten who succumbed to a killer virus or an elderly feral cat who became overwhelmed with health problems, each and every cat knew love from dedicated caregivers and the benefit of the best veterinary care that we could provide. We are grateful to generous donors and an extraordinary fundraising team for enabling us to provide that veterinary care.

Kayley was a pretty young kitten who simply failed to thrive and passed away in foster care.

Tiny Hulk couldn't overcome the severe symptoms that affected him and his siblings shortly after rescue. We had to say goodbye to Hulk, but are grateful his siblings survived.

Lanni was a spunky kitten that loved life to the fullest before succumbing to panleukopenia.

Tiny Eloise was found scared and frozen in early November when the really cold winter weather set in. We had high hopes for a bright future for Eloise, but instead we were forced to witness her give in to panleukopenia after a valiant effort to survive the disease.

This beautiful baby, Torie, fought as hard as she could and we thought she would beat the horrible panleukopenia virus, but sadly it overcame her after four days of fighting.

Little Harry and his mom and sister survived the challenging conditions of living stray at an industrial complex with only some wood pallets for protection as winter set in. Sadly, he passed away due to suspected panleukopenia shortly after rescue. 

We are also grateful to the caregivers who accept these cats into their hearts and homes, and to the Community Cat Team that spend countless hours with our colony cats. It isn't always easy, but it is always appreciated by the cats and RCR.

Long-time community cat Juliette suffered a lot in her short life, from a leg injury that required amputation, to dental disease to a tumour which ultimately forced us to say goodbye.

Yoda was TNR'ed in 2014 and died at his colony in February 2017 where he was safe, warm, fed and loved.

Harley was TNR'ed in 2013 and passed away en route to the vet in May 2017 after volunteers noticed his behaviour was off.

Audrey also passed away in 2017.

Libby was TNR'ed in 2014 and sadly passed away in 2017.

RIP to the sweet felines who crossed the rainbow bridge in 2017. We're proud to say they left the world knowing love.

-Alanna, Regina Cat Rescue

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A HUGE thank you to all of the volunteers who worked the Western Pizza Booth at stadium events in 2017. Whether you volunteered for one game or put in 80 hours like some of the “regulars,” your commitment translated into valuable dollars for Regina’s abandoned cats and kittens. Between the concerts, special events, Riders, Rams, Regina Thunder and high school football games, volunteers served pizza, beer and hot chocolate for a whopping 1,964 hours! Pat yourselves on the back for a successful inaugural season in the new stadium! Thanks to Wayne Gemmell Photography for capturing some of the memories for us.
















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Regina Cat Rescue by Rachel Molnar - 3M ago

In 2014, The Leader-Post participated in a "ride along" with RCR community cat volunteers to better understand the plight of these animals in Regina. Click through for more of RCR in the news throughout the years.

This weekend marked the 35th anniversary of Regina Cat Rescue's incorporation date in 1982. When the organization incorporated on Nov. 18, 1982 its primary goal was educate the public about the cruelty of the fur industry, but it wasn't long before the group of animal lovers saw the need for a cat rescue in Regina and took action. They undertook the creation of a Pet Rescue program for tame cats and a Trap, Neuter, Return program for community cats - two programs that exist to this day. To learn more about RCR's early days, check out this Q&A with Pat Vogt, one of the organization's longest-serving volunteers.

In celebration of 35 years of cat rescue, we wanted to extend a heartfelt thank you to all of the volunteers, donors, sponsors and adopters who have supported RCR over the years. As a volunteer-run organization, we rely on the generosity, hard work and dedication of Regina's citizens and businesses. As we reflect on some of our key milestones we hope all RCR supporters feel good about all that we've been able to achieve together.

Milestones

One of PFA's earliest logos

Nov. 18, 1982 - The Association for the Protection of Fur-bearing Animals is created. Later renamed People for Animals of Saskatchewan (PFA).
April 8, 2009 - PFA became a registered charity with Canada Revenue Agency enabling the organization to become adoption partners with PetSmart Charities leading to an increase in adoptions and funds.
Oct. 18, 2010 - Community cats registered to PFA become exempt from City of Regina licensing requirements saving valuable funds that could now be used for sterilizations instead of fines.
December 2012 - PFA received its first corporate sponsorship.
June 1, 2013 - PFA adopted pediatric spay and neuter policy so that no kitten leaves the organization's care unsterilized.
September 2013 - PFA received its first PetSmart grant to be used for targeted sterilization efforts.
May 2014 - People for Animals of Saskatchewan adopted new trade name of Regina Cat Rescue.
2016
- RCR set a new rescue record with 473 cats rescued in one year.

If you want to help Regina's abandoned cats and kittens, check out our volunteer job descriptions, sponsor a spay or neuter, support our fundraising efforts like the winter raffle, adopt a cat or donate - there's so much more work to be done!

-Rachel, Regina Cat Rescue

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Regina Cat Rescue (RCR) is asking for financial help to pay for veterinary care for two young cats in need of medical treatments.

Casey in his foster home awaiting treatment.

Casey is a 14-week-old kitten who came into RCR’s care in August as a neo-natal kitten in need of bottle feeding. He was a typical wee kitten until he started to develop what first looked like a bloody, swollen bum. After multiple veterinarian consultations, Casey was diagnosed with an atresia ani type 1 (atresia ani is an anorectal anomaly in small animals). The recommended treatment in Casey’s case is balloon dilation.

Last week, Casey was taken to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in Saskatoon, SK for the balloon dilation, and the process is scheduled to be repeated again this week. Following the second treatment, Casey has a great prognosis and is expected to live a long and healthy life. The cost of Casey's diagnosis, treatment and care is $1,000, and while this is a considerable sum we weren't ready to euthanize this sweet, young boy because of a treatable condition.

For photos of Casey’s condition, click here. (Note – some readers may find these images graphic.)

Casey awaits surgery so he can live pain free.

Chip is a five-month-old kitten who came into RCR’s care with an injured leg unable to bear weight. X-rays revealed that Chip is suffering from a fracture through the digital growth plate of his tibia. The fracture is not congenital which means it’s an injury that happened after he was born - and it causes Chip considerable pain.

Because of the location and nature of the fracture, Chip requires an orthopedic surgery - pins will be inserted to keep the bones in place and then Chip will be in a splint for three weeks. Of all the surgeries that we contemplate for our cats, orthopedics are the most expensive and Chip's procedure will cost $1,200. Thankfully, Chip - like Casey - is a young and otherwise healthy cat with a great future ahead of him.

In total, RCR is asking for your help to raise $2,200 to treat Casey and Chip. We know this is a considerable ask, but these two sweet, loving kittens deserve a chance at pain-free and happy lives.

RCR’s biggest expense is veterinary care. So far in 2017 we've rescued over 350 cats and kittens all requiring varying levels of vet care - from anti-parasitic treatments, vaccinations, spays, neuters, dental surgeries and more. We hold numerous fundraising activities each year to cover these expenses but in times of extra demand – like now – we reach out to the community and hope that our supporters and animal lovers will give generously.

Donations of $10 or more qualify for a tax receipt. Donate directly at our Go Fund Me campaign or by cheque, e-transfer, PayPal. Any funds raised beyond the $2,200 for Casey and Chip will be used to help other abandoned cats and kittens requiring veterinary care.

RCR is a registered charity and member of the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies. If you'd like to learn more about RCR's governance and finances, please visit our governance page.

-Rachel, Regina Cat Rescue

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Regina Cat Rescue by Alanna Whippler - 4M ago

Buster is a playful and friendly kitten who is the only one left of a litter of 8.

Every year, Regina Cat Rescue (RCR) rescues multiple litters of kittens and sends them on their way to loving homes. Many kittens are adopted very quickly once their adoptions ads are posted, but there is inevitably one kitten in almost every litter that sticks around a little longer and struggles to find a home.

Buster, Molly, Quinn, Hei-Hei and Benz are the summer kittens left behind, and have been waiting patiently to find homes of their own. Their siblings were all adopted several weeks ago while these little cuties have yet to steal someone's heart. Their foster families love them, but they need forever homes of their own. All are sweet, affectionate and playful cats fostered in multi-pet homes and are well socialized. They just haven't met the right match yet.

Hei Hei has rely on toys to play with now that his siblings have forever homes.

Handsome Quinn was the only boy in his litter and has yet to find a home.

As kittens get adopted, it opens up foster space for new rescues, which is always in demand.  RCR is seeking help from our supporters and followers to help us get these kittens adopted! If you or someone you know has been waiting for the right kitten to come along, consider one of these sweet kittens. The perfect one may have been waiting for you all along!

Sweet but shy Molly needs a quiet home without small children. 

Benz is wondering why he hasn't been adopted yet!

-Alanna, Regina Cat Rescue

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On August 5, 2017, Regina Cat Rescue (RCR) announced an intake freeze which remains in effect until further notice. This was a difficult decision during a busy rescue season when so many cats are in need, but RCR is run entirely by volunteers and every individual cat rescued requires many volunteer hours.

From picking up and trapping cats, coordinating foster care and veterinary visits, home visits to vaccinate and provide anti-parasitic treatments, running cats to and from their spay and neuter appointments, photographers ensuring each cat has photos for their adoption profiles, writing adoption profiles and publishing them on this website, posting cats on social media, and fundraising to ensure all rescue-related expenses can be paid - rescuing even one cat can take dozens of hours. So far in 2017 RCR has rescued over 200 cats and kittens in need.

RCR volunteers are passionate about animal rescue, but can only help so many cats on their own before they face burn out and resources are depleted. But there is a solution to help RCR control the cat overpopulation crisis in Regina - collaboration!

What does collaboration look like? Essentially, collaboration means being ready and willing to work with RCR to achieve a good outcome for the cat you want to be rescued.

It looks like a business donating funds for their "shop" cats to be sterilized by RCR; an individual providing foster care for a stray cat hanging out in their back alley; ensuring un-owned cats in your neighbourhood are spayed and neutered; donating funds to cover veterinary care for sick and injured animals; being willing to hold a cat in your bathroom or spare bedroom overnight;  and so much more.

We have two great examples - one from a business and another from individuals - who worked collaboratively with RCR to help demonstrate how effective collaboration can be.

Skittles & Oreo
These two neonatal kittens were just a few days old when they were abandoned by their mother. Unsure of what to do, Rhonda and Rob contacted RCR for help. But in this very busy season, RCR was struggling to find an available volunteer bottle feeder to take on the orphaned siblings. That's when Rhonda and Rob offered to take on the task of caring for Skittles and Oreo. RCR was able to provide support like advice on feeding and stimulation, supplies like formula and syringes and veterinary care, while Rhonda and Rob took on the responsibility of feeding, burping and stimulating the babies every two to three hours until the kittens can do it on their own. In the coming weeks, RCR will provide anti-parasitic treatment, vaccinations and sterilization surgeries, while Rhonda and Rob continue to provide the love and care of a foster home. By working together, Rhonda, Rob and RCR were able to secure the best possible future for kittens who would have perished without human intervention.

Skittles

Oreo

The Mercedes Benz/ TitanAutomotive Cats
RCR received an urgent call for help in May when the staff at a local car dealership discovered a litter of kittens in their recycling bin, hungry and screaming for food. This wasn't a big surprise as the dealership is home to several community cats, but with no mom in sight, they were desperate to save the kittens. Luckily, a kind RCR foster mom works at the dealership and volunteered to take on their care, taking the kittens to work daily to keep up with bottle feeding the babies and ensuring they got lots of love and attention.

While the team was happy to have the kittens safe and on their way to the good life, they remained concerned about the adult cats. They were happy to provide food, water and shelter to the cats and continue to care for them on site, but they weren't in the market for more. That's where the RCR Community Cat Team came in! They easily trapped the cats so they could be sterilized and returned to the only home they know.

This is a great example of a win-win situation in which RCR partnered with a community business for a positive outcome:  the kittens are safe, the adult cats are sterilized and the local business assisted in raising funds for the sterilizations to prevent overpopulation.

Cat overpopulation is truly a community problem and only by working together can we achieve a solution. So the next time you have a cat or kitten who needs rescuing, please consider the ways you can work with RCR to help.

- Rachel & Alanna

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Regina Cat Rescue by Rachel Molnar - 7M ago

Kittens get a lot of attention this time of year - and rightfully so! They’re cute, playful and fun, after all. But adult cats have so much to offer too and are often overlooked in favour of younger kitties. So during this very busy kitten season we wanted to highlight just some of the awesome adult cats who have been waiting months to be adopted.

Dixie (8 months in foster care)

Dixie has been available for adoption since January. She was rescued after being shot with a pellet gun, but that rough start hasn’t got Dixie down. She’s still a sweet and friendly girl who loves to cuddle and purr.

Luna (6 months in foster care)

Luna has been available for adoption since March after being rescued from the cold this past winter. In her six months in foster care, she’s proven to be a friendly and loving cat who does well with children.

Snowy (5 months in foster care)

Like many mother cats, Snowy has been patiently waiting for her forever home long after her kittens have all been adopted. She’s an easy going girl who prefers to be an only cat.

Annabelle (5 months in foster care)

At 10 months old, Annabelle is barely out of kittenhood herself, but this clever, curious and confident cat has been waiting since April for her forever home.

If you’re looking to add a loving feline friend to your family, consider adopting an adult cat! Adult cats like Dixie, Luna, Snowy, Annabelle and so many more are in need of homes. Plus, when you adopt from Regina Cat Rescue (RCR) you're actually helping two cats - the one who you've adopted and the new cat that RCR is now able to rescue from the streets and place into foster care. You can definitely feel good about that!

Check out our catalogue for more adult cats hoping for their forever homes. If you spot a cat you'd like to adopt, please complete the adoption application.

-Rachel

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Regina Cat Rescue (RCR) has introduced a new policy defining its position on the declawing of cats. As an animal rescue organization that sees firsthand the negative short-term and long-term effects of declawing and works to prevent unnecessary pain inflicted on cats, RCR affirms its opposition to the practice of declawing cats.

Declawing is an amputation, isn't medically necessary and causes unnecessary and avoidable pain. The procedure can also lead to behavioural issues such as litter box avoidance and biting. Scratching is a normal feline behaviour that cats use to mark territory. Claws help cats balance, climb and defend themselves. 

To this end, RCR will no longer adopt cats to applicants who intend to declaw. RCR recommends the following actions in lieu of declawing:

  • Cat guardians should provide suitable objects for scratching, including scratching posts and pads, cardboard boxes, carpet or fabric remnants, logs, etc., and should encourage cats to use these objects by providing catnip, treats and praise. 
  • Cat guardians should consider temporary synthetic nail caps. 

  • Cat guardians should trim their cat’s claws regularly. 

  • Cat guardians should consider deterrents such as double-sided tape and motion-activated compressed air to protect furniture, and offer alternatives like a scratching pad or post near their furniture for cats to redirect their scratching.

In the past, RCR left the decision to adopt a cat to an applicant planning to declaw up to that cat's foster care provider, and the vast majority of RCR's foster care providers elected not to adopt their foster cats to applicants planning to declaw. This new policy formalizes and strengthens RCR's position on the practice. 

RCR joins other organizations, including the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association in taking a stand against the practice of declawing cats. The surgery is also prohibited or significantly restricted in multiple countries, including Australia, Brazil, Israel, Finland, Sweden, Germany and the United Kingdom, among others.

To learn more about declawing, please check out the following resources:

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For only $140, you get at least $340 worth of investments into your cat!

This past year was a record-breaking year for Regina Cat Rescue, in every sense. We broke our own records for the number of rescues we took in and the number of cats we adopted out.

Sadly, as a strictly volunteer-run organization funded solely through fundraising, this type of effort isn’t sustainable.

The amount of work it takes to rescue 473 cats is enormous, and we’re grateful to everyone who had a hand in moving these sweet kitties from the streets and into their forever homes. Unfortunately, the toll this takes on our volunteers and funds is huge – and we need to take steps to ensure we don’t deplete either of these valuable resources. We also care for hundreds of community cats daily whose costs of care are never recouped through fees.

Currently, RCR spends an average of $340 on each adoptable cat, which includes the costs for sterilization, vaccinations, deworming and earmite treatments. On top of this are the costs for treating cats with additional health issues and litter/food for the duration of their stay in foster care.

Effective May 1, RCR is increasing the adoption fee to $140 per cat and $200 for a bonded pair.

 *Illness and behaviour issues to be identified and documented by Pet Rescue Chair.

To further help support volunteers, RCR has instituted a cap of 400 rescues for 2017. The organization has a small core group of volunteers to manage the day-to-day operations. It takes a lot of time, effort and skill to operate an animal rescue, and volunteer burnout is always a risk. RCR encourages its volunteers to balance RCR activities with family, friends, work and other interests.

If you have any questions about the new fees, feel free to contact us at reginacatrescue@gmail.com.

 

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