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A harness and lead lets former RCR rescue Tenley enjoy the great outdoors from the safety of her own yard.

Summer has arrived, and after a long winter, most of us are eager to get outside to enjoy the all-too-short season of  sunshine and warmth! Your cat may think it's time to enjoy  the great outdoors too, but before you let him out to bask in the rays, consider these tips on why it's better to keep your cat inside.  

For one thing, the City of Regina has a by-law that prohibits cats from roaming at large.  Cats must be kept indoors or otherwise contained with a harness/ lead or cat enclosure.  If your cat is caught at large, fines may apply.

Your cat also faces many risks outside, including

  • Risk of injury from cars, fight with other animals or toxins like pesticides and antifreeze
  • Exposure to bacteria and viruses, some of which are not covered by routine vaccinations
  • Human cruelty

Another reason to keep your cat inside is songbird preservation.  Cats are natural hunters and if you live in an area where songbirds are plentiful, your cat won't be able to resist the urge to hunt.  There are many toys available to satisfy your cat's urge to hunt.

It's also considerate of your neighbours, who may not like cats as much as you do.  No-one appreciates their garden or carefully tended flower beds being used as a litter box.

Finally, it's not worth the risk that your beloved pet could embark on an adventure and get lost, unable to find his way home.  He may never make his way back to you, even with a microchip or tattoo.  Pets can also be stolen, and sometimes it is for nefarious reasons, such as bait for dog fights or to sell to research labs. 

Tablets offer many stimulating games for cats, and are just one way to keep your cat busy indoors.

When you consider all the risks, it is much safer to keep your cat indoors, even if he thinks otherwise! Keep your cat busy and active with interactive play and stimulation.  Laser pointers, cat videos,  digital games for cats on your tablet, or a food maze that makes cats work for their food will satisfy your cats urge to hunt and keep him safe at the same time.  

Source: care2.com - 7 Reasons to Keep Cats Inside

-Alanna, Regina Cat Rescue

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Regina Cat Rescue is appealing to the public for donations.

We're overwhelmed with requests from the public to help stray and abandoned cats in their neighbourhoods. But with a decline in donations of nearly $30,000 in 2017 over 2016 - our bank account is empty and we are in the difficult position of being unable to help cats in desperate need.

Our volunteers have been working harder than ever to fund raise. In 2017, our fundraising revenue increased by $14,000 over 2016. But we haven't been able to make up for the considerable decline in donations.

Where does the money go? Our greatest expense is veterinary costs. While some vet clinics support RCR with discounted rates, our veterinary care costs were still over $164,000 in 2017. Increased costs related to distemper also added to the financial strain over the last six months.

The average cost per cat rescued also increased last year - from $337/cat in 2016 to $409/cat in 2017. In response, we increased our adoption fee from $100 to $140, but again, this increase has not been enough to make up for the fall in donations.

Beemer came into RCR care with a severely damaged eye which now needs to be surgically removed.

We are now severely limited in the help we can provide. We have multiple cats waiting for surgeries - like Beemer pictured here who needs enucleation surgery. And with kitten season just around the corner, RCR is an extremely poor position to help. We ask the public to use our intake form and understand a wait list for help is now in place.

We know that times are tough and money is tight for everyone right now, but we are asking the community to show its generous spirit to help some of Regina's most vulnerable animals.

You can donate today by:

E-transfers sent to Treasurer@reginacatrescue.com. Please also email us the answer to the security question so we can accept the funds.

PayPal to donate by debit or credit card. Just follow the donate button:

For cash donations please to arrange for a volunteer to pick up the donation.

Cheques can be mailed to:
Regina Cat Rescue
PO Box 33066
Cathedral Postal Outlet
Regina, SK S4T 7X2

Tax receipts are issued for donations of $10 or more. Regina Cat Rescue's legal name is People for Animals of Saskatchewan Inc., and our Charitable Registration Number is #8996 2599 ORR 0001.

On behalf of Regina's abandoned cats and kittens, we thank you for any support you can provide.

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Regina Cat Rescue by Alanna Whippler - 4M ago

Spring arrived this week and it wasn't exactly sunshine, butterflies and blossoms! Fluctuating temperatures, snow, freezing rain, wind - the crazy weather we've been experiencing created some challenges for Regina Cat Rescue volunteers and Regina's cats.

This community cat feeding station flooded as temperatures climbed and the snow from a recent storm began to melt.

Meanwhile, a spring storm was brewing that brought another dump of snow, making things difficult for people and cats alike!

The path to this feeding station is a little bit precarious!

In spring, a young man's thoughts turn to love, but in the cat world that can mean tom cats fighting to establish dominance and woo female cats. This sweet boy is a lover not a fighter and was pretty beat up before a kind citizen scooped during the recent snowstorm.

This little mama was heavily pregnant and stray on the streets. She was scooped from the cold less than 24 hours before she delivered four kittens and narrowly escaped the latest winter storm.

If you're coming out of hibernation and want to help out Regina's abandoned cats this spring, now is the time! Donate, volunteer, adopt or foster! And please cross your fingers that we've seen the last of winter!

-Alanna, Regina Cat Rescue

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Cadence lost his short battle with panleukopenia.

This winter has been a rough one for Regina Cat Rescue (RCR), as we’ve encountered several cases of feline panleukopenia, also known as distemper, for the first time in years. Distemper is a highly contagious and life-threatening viral disease in cats. While scary, distemper is largely preventable thanks to routine and effective vaccines. Unfortunately, RCR has recently seen a spike in cases of distemper in new rescues, resulting in the loss of lives, compromised foster homes, and expensive vet bills. This virus is currently occurring in Regina and surrounding area, so RCR is advising caution to people in contact with stray cats.

Prevention

Yearly vaccination is the most effective way to prevent feline distemper. All kittens and cats that come into RCR’s care are vaccinated for FRCP, which includes feline rhinotracheitis, calici, and panleukopenia. Limiting a cat’s exposure to potential sources of the virus can also reduce their risk of contracting the disease. This is another reason to keep kittens and cats indoors or in an enclosed “catio” when outdoors.

Sweet Selena succumbed to distemper

Who’s at risk?

Feline distemper is highly contagious, and cats of any age can become infected. Most at risk are young kittens, sick cats and unvaccinated cats. The majority of cats in RCR care who have succumbed to feline distemper this year have been kittens under the age of four months. Once feline distemper has been introduced into a home, other pets are at risk as the virus can live for months on a hard surface. This is why RCR will not place any unvaccinated cats in a foster home that has come into contact with distemper for a minimum one-year period.

Graham (foreground) crossed the rainbow bridge after a battle with distemper

Symptoms

Signs of feline distemper are similar to those of other illnesses, like feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FLV). Symptoms of distemper include depression, loss of appetite, high fever, lethargy, vomiting, severe diarrhea, nasal discharge and dehydration. Because these symptoms are sudden and severe, distemper is often fatal in kittens. Diagnosis can only be done by a vet and immediate support treatment, like fluids and antibiotics, is required at the onset to guarantee a chance at recovery.

Be safe

If you take in a stray cat, it’s best to keep it quarantined before taking it to a vet – especially if you have other pets. Wash your hands and change your clothes before handling your own pets if you are caring for a rescued stray. Ensure the cat is vet-checked and vaccinated as soon as possible.

As always, please complete RCR’s intake request form if you are requesting assistance from RCR with a rescue.

http://www.reginacatrescue.com/stray-or-feral-catkitten-request-for-help/

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Regina Cat Rescue by Rachel Molnar - 7M ago

We hope everyone enjoyed a peaceful holiday season. As we move into 2018, we wanted to take the opportunity to share a recap of 2017 – it was another busy year!

The Community Cat Team was kept hopping as they trapped, neutered and returned (TNR) 36 cats in 2017 – nearly double from 2016. They continued to manage 31 RCR colonies while also supporting 49 independently managed colonies. Volunteers also conducted outreach to Moose Jaw's cat rescue, SCRAPS, by providing a trapping demonstration and Q&A session about TNR. One of the challenges faced by the Community Cat Team was the difficult task of trapping sick or injured community cats to get them vet care.

In 2017, The Pet Rescue Team was tasked with limiting intake to 400 cats in an effort to prevent volunteer burnout and ensure financial stability – and they came very close finishing the year with 403 rescues. This measure was necessary after the record-breaking 473 rescues in 2016 that put extreme resource pressures on the organization. Adoptions for 2017 hit 433 – the highest in our history. And a record number of foster homes were active throughout the year with an average of 83 homes.

Besides the daily operations of the Community Cat, Pet Rescue, Fundraising and Communications teams, RCR also worked on new initiatives, policies and partnerships. Some of the highlights include:

  • RCR began work on the Community Cat Coalition with the Regina Humane Society, the City of Regina and local veterinarians. Expect to hear more about the coalition and its work later this year.
     
  • An adoption fee increase since was implemented - the first since 2013. The increase was necessary to help offset just some of the costs associated with rescuing cats and kittens such as sterilization surgeries, vaccinations, anti-parasitic treatments and other veterinary care.
     
  • We formalized our partnership with the Excalipurr Cat Café which opened in December and has already facilitated over 20 adoptions.
     
  • RCR introduced a policy opposing declawing. As an animal rescue organization that sees firsthand the negative short- and long-term effects of declawing, RCR is proud to add its voice to the choir of those in opposition of the unnecessary amputation.
     
  • The Fundraising Team developed important partnerships with local businesses most notably with Metro Pet Market to present the 2017 Winter Raffle and with Yoga Mala to host the city’s first cat yoga event.

We want to extend a warm and heartfelt thank you to everyone who supported RCR throughout 2017 whether that be by adopting, sponsoring, donating, educating or volunteering. We hope we can continued to count on your support in 2018!

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Regina Cat Rescue by Alanna Whippler - 7M ago

Tiny Rocky was found in a plastic bag in an alley during the first severe cold snap of the winter. He was a little fighter, but couldn't overcome the neurological damage he suffered.

Regina Cat Rescue (RCR) is fortunate to have many dedicated volunteers who care for our rescued cats and kittens - from the tame kitties placed into foster care to the community cats who are happiest living on the streets with the support of our Community Cat Team. 

We do the best we can for each and every rescue, but sometimes no amount of love or veterinary care is enough to save fragile lives. 

We experienced our share of heartbreak in 2017, including the loss of several kittens to one of the nastiest cat viruses out there, panleukopenia. We also had to let go of a precious young kitten named Rocky due to neurological damage from unknown causes and one kitten who simply failed to thrive.

Whether it was a vulnerable young kitten who succumbed to a killer virus or an elderly feral cat who became overwhelmed with health problems, each and every cat knew love from dedicated caregivers and the benefit of the best veterinary care that we could provide. We are grateful to generous donors and an extraordinary fundraising team for enabling us to provide that veterinary care.

Kayley was a pretty young kitten who simply failed to thrive and passed away in foster care.

Tiny Hulk couldn't overcome the severe symptoms that affected him and his siblings shortly after rescue. We had to say goodbye to Hulk, but are grateful his siblings survived.

Lanni was a spunky kitten that loved life to the fullest before succumbing to panleukopenia.

Tiny Eloise was found scared and frozen in early November when the really cold winter weather set in. We had high hopes for a bright future for Eloise, but instead we were forced to witness her give in to panleukopenia after a valiant effort to survive the disease.

This beautiful baby, Torie, fought as hard as she could and we thought she would beat the horrible panleukopenia virus, but sadly it overcame her after four days of fighting.

Little Harry and his mom and sister survived the challenging conditions of living stray at an industrial complex with only some wood pallets for protection as winter set in. Sadly, he passed away due to suspected panleukopenia shortly after rescue. 

We are also grateful to the caregivers who accept these cats into their hearts and homes, and to the Community Cat Team that spend countless hours with our colony cats. It isn't always easy, but it is always appreciated by the cats and RCR.

Long-time community cat Juliette suffered a lot in her short life, from a leg injury that required amputation, to dental disease to a tumour which ultimately forced us to say goodbye.

Yoda was TNR'ed in 2014 and died at his colony in February 2017 where he was safe, warm, fed and loved.

Harley was TNR'ed in 2013 and passed away en route to the vet in May 2017 after volunteers noticed his behaviour was off.

Audrey also passed away in 2017.

Libby was TNR'ed in 2014 and sadly passed away in 2017.

RIP to the sweet felines who crossed the rainbow bridge in 2017. We're proud to say they left the world knowing love.

-Alanna, Regina Cat Rescue

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A HUGE thank you to all of the volunteers who worked the Western Pizza Booth at stadium events in 2017. Whether you volunteered for one game or put in 80 hours like some of the “regulars,” your commitment translated into valuable dollars for Regina’s abandoned cats and kittens. Between the concerts, special events, Riders, Rams, Regina Thunder and high school football games, volunteers served pizza, beer and hot chocolate for a whopping 1,964 hours! Pat yourselves on the back for a successful inaugural season in the new stadium! Thanks to Wayne Gemmell Photography for capturing some of the memories for us.
















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Regina Cat Rescue by Rachel Molnar - 8M ago

In 2014, The Leader-Post participated in a "ride along" with RCR community cat volunteers to better understand the plight of these animals in Regina. Click through for more of RCR in the news throughout the years.

This weekend marked the 35th anniversary of Regina Cat Rescue's incorporation date in 1982. When the organization incorporated on Nov. 18, 1982 its primary goal was educate the public about the cruelty of the fur industry, but it wasn't long before the group of animal lovers saw the need for a cat rescue in Regina and took action. They undertook the creation of a Pet Rescue program for tame cats and a Trap, Neuter, Return program for community cats - two programs that exist to this day. To learn more about RCR's early days, check out this Q&A with Pat Vogt, one of the organization's longest-serving volunteers.

In celebration of 35 years of cat rescue, we wanted to extend a heartfelt thank you to all of the volunteers, donors, sponsors and adopters who have supported RCR over the years. As a volunteer-run organization, we rely on the generosity, hard work and dedication of Regina's citizens and businesses. As we reflect on some of our key milestones we hope all RCR supporters feel good about all that we've been able to achieve together.

Milestones

One of PFA's earliest logos

Nov. 18, 1982 - The Association for the Protection of Fur-bearing Animals is created. Later renamed People for Animals of Saskatchewan (PFA).
April 8, 2009 - PFA became a registered charity with Canada Revenue Agency enabling the organization to become adoption partners with PetSmart Charities leading to an increase in adoptions and funds.
Oct. 18, 2010 - Community cats registered to PFA become exempt from City of Regina licensing requirements saving valuable funds that could now be used for sterilizations instead of fines.
December 2012 - PFA received its first corporate sponsorship.
June 1, 2013 - PFA adopted pediatric spay and neuter policy so that no kitten leaves the organization's care unsterilized.
September 2013 - PFA received its first PetSmart grant to be used for targeted sterilization efforts.
May 2014 - People for Animals of Saskatchewan adopted new trade name of Regina Cat Rescue.
2016
- RCR set a new rescue record with 473 cats rescued in one year.

If you want to help Regina's abandoned cats and kittens, check out our volunteer job descriptions, sponsor a spay or neuter, support our fundraising efforts like the winter raffle, adopt a cat or donate - there's so much more work to be done!

-Rachel, Regina Cat Rescue

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Regina Cat Rescue (RCR) is asking for financial help to pay for veterinary care for two young cats in need of medical treatments.

Casey in his foster home awaiting treatment.

Casey is a 14-week-old kitten who came into RCR’s care in August as a neo-natal kitten in need of bottle feeding. He was a typical wee kitten until he started to develop what first looked like a bloody, swollen bum. After multiple veterinarian consultations, Casey was diagnosed with an atresia ani type 1 (atresia ani is an anorectal anomaly in small animals). The recommended treatment in Casey’s case is balloon dilation.

Last week, Casey was taken to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in Saskatoon, SK for the balloon dilation, and the process is scheduled to be repeated again this week. Following the second treatment, Casey has a great prognosis and is expected to live a long and healthy life. The cost of Casey's diagnosis, treatment and care is $1,000, and while this is a considerable sum we weren't ready to euthanize this sweet, young boy because of a treatable condition.

For photos of Casey’s condition, click here. (Note – some readers may find these images graphic.)

Casey awaits surgery so he can live pain free.

Chip is a five-month-old kitten who came into RCR’s care with an injured leg unable to bear weight. X-rays revealed that Chip is suffering from a fracture through the digital growth plate of his tibia. The fracture is not congenital which means it’s an injury that happened after he was born - and it causes Chip considerable pain.

Because of the location and nature of the fracture, Chip requires an orthopedic surgery - pins will be inserted to keep the bones in place and then Chip will be in a splint for three weeks. Of all the surgeries that we contemplate for our cats, orthopedics are the most expensive and Chip's procedure will cost $1,200. Thankfully, Chip - like Casey - is a young and otherwise healthy cat with a great future ahead of him.

In total, RCR is asking for your help to raise $2,200 to treat Casey and Chip. We know this is a considerable ask, but these two sweet, loving kittens deserve a chance at pain-free and happy lives.

RCR’s biggest expense is veterinary care. So far in 2017 we've rescued over 350 cats and kittens all requiring varying levels of vet care - from anti-parasitic treatments, vaccinations, spays, neuters, dental surgeries and more. We hold numerous fundraising activities each year to cover these expenses but in times of extra demand – like now – we reach out to the community and hope that our supporters and animal lovers will give generously.

Donations of $10 or more qualify for a tax receipt. Donate directly at our Go Fund Me campaign or by cheque, e-transfer, PayPal. Any funds raised beyond the $2,200 for Casey and Chip will be used to help other abandoned cats and kittens requiring veterinary care.

RCR is a registered charity and member of the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies. If you'd like to learn more about RCR's governance and finances, please visit our governance page.

-Rachel, Regina Cat Rescue

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Regina Cat Rescue by Alanna Whippler - 10M ago

Buster is a playful and friendly kitten who is the only one left of a litter of 8.

Every year, Regina Cat Rescue (RCR) rescues multiple litters of kittens and sends them on their way to loving homes. Many kittens are adopted very quickly once their adoptions ads are posted, but there is inevitably one kitten in almost every litter that sticks around a little longer and struggles to find a home.

Buster, Molly, Quinn, Hei-Hei and Benz are the summer kittens left behind, and have been waiting patiently to find homes of their own. Their siblings were all adopted several weeks ago while these little cuties have yet to steal someone's heart. Their foster families love them, but they need forever homes of their own. All are sweet, affectionate and playful cats fostered in multi-pet homes and are well socialized. They just haven't met the right match yet.

Hei Hei has rely on toys to play with now that his siblings have forever homes.

Handsome Quinn was the only boy in his litter and has yet to find a home.

As kittens get adopted, it opens up foster space for new rescues, which is always in demand.  RCR is seeking help from our supporters and followers to help us get these kittens adopted! If you or someone you know has been waiting for the right kitten to come along, consider one of these sweet kittens. The perfect one may have been waiting for you all along!

Sweet but shy Molly needs a quiet home without small children. 

Benz is wondering why he hasn't been adopted yet!

-Alanna, Regina Cat Rescue

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