Loading...

Follow RealClearScience on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Charles Q. Choi, Inside Science
When it comes to looking for alien life, scientists mostly focus on where there is water. Now researchers suggest that looking at "bioessential" elements such as phosphorus and molybdenum could help judge a world's potential for life.There is life virtually wherever there is water on Earth, from clouds high above the surface to the deepest layer of Earth's crust. As such, the search for life outside Earth typically concentrates on worlds that are "habitable," possessing temperatures conducive to hosting liquid water on its surface.
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Hontas Farmer, Science 2.0
Every Branch of the service has ranks and uniforms which reflect their history, mission, and culture. A potential space force would not be any different in this regard. Consider the lineage it would have being mainly influenced by the US Air Force, the US Navy, and NASA. Each has a rank structure of some kind.
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Daniel Sarewitz, Weekly Standard
What separates science from other intellectual activities? The search for a distinctive logical structure of scientific inquiry and for the essence of scientific truth goes back at least to David Hume's concerns with the limits of inductive inference (does the fact that the sun rose yesterday mean that it must rise tomorrow?) and has been pursued along a variety of philosophical lines.
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Kerry Grens, The Scientist
Since 1964, when it was first identified, Keystone virus was thought to transmit only from mosquitoes to wildlife such as deer and raccoons. Now, doctors have confirmation that it has infected at least one human: a teenage boy from Florida tested positive for presence of the pathogen, researchers reported earlier this month in Clinical Infectious Diseases.
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Ethan Siegel, Forbes
Look out at a distant galaxy, and you'll see it as it was in the distant past. But light arriving after, say, a billion-year journey won't come from a galaxy that's a billion light years away, but one that's even more distant than that. Why's that? Because the fabric of our Universe itself is expanding. This prediction of Einstein's General Relativity, first recognized in the 1920s and then observationally validated by Edwin Hubble several years later, has been one of the cornerstones of modern cosmology.
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Henry Fountain, Undark
Alittle more than 24 hours after Unit 4 at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded and caught fire in April 1986, three men gathered in front of a pile of sand at a construction site a few miles away. With shovels, they started filling sandbags that the authorities planned to drop from helicopters in an effort to quench, or at least quiet, the nuclear inferno.
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Ryan Mandelbaum, Gizmodo
Renewable resources are great, but they bring a new element of uncertainty to a power grid. This element can lead to failure in surprising ways, according to a new paper.A team of researchers built a model of power grids that transport electricity from solar and wind power. That means that there are places where the grid receives fluctuating inputs of power, since levels of sunlight and wind and vary.
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Robert N. Charette, IEEE

The U.S. House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held a hearing last week looking into NASA project costs and schedule overruns. The hearing followed on the heels of a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report released in May that showed that the costs and schedules of NASA's portfolio of major projects (meaning those with a life-cycle cost of more than US $250 million) have deteriorated over the past year.
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Marina Koren, The Atlantic
The drive to the little white dome on the northern slope of Mauna Loa is a bumpy one. Mauna Loa, the Long Mountain, is a colossal volcano that covers half of the island of Hawaii. The rocky terrain, rusty brown and deep red, crunches beneath car tires and jostles passengers. Up there, more than 8,000 feet above sea level and many miles away from the sounds of civilization, it doesn't feel like Earth. It feels like another planet. Like Mars.
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Ike Swetlitz, Stat
The Trump administration has proposed a fundamental change to the mission of the Food and Drug Administration, one that would transfer most of the responsibility for regulating food safety to the Department of Agriculture and rename the FDA the Federal Drug Administration.
Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview