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Sabine Hossenfelder, Backreaction
When I first learned about black holes, I was scared that one would fly through our solar system and eat us up. That was 30 years ago. I'm not afraid of black holes anymore but I am afraid that they have been misunderstood. So here are 10 things that you should know about black holes.
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Marina Koren, The Atlantic
Go beyond Earth and deeper into the solar system, past the craggy terrain of Mars and the shape-shifting storm of Jupiter, through the delicate rings of Saturn, beyond the silky clouds of Uranus and Neptune, and you will find a mysterious zone of small, icy objects.
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D. Michael Langford, The Hill
Left, right or center, politicians tend to view climate change as a political issue rather than in a logical, technical manner limiting policy solutions to short-sighted, ideologically-driven approaches. The truth is, both parties are to blame for overlooking technology-neutral climate proposals, resulting in inadequate climate policy.
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Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker
Aging, like bankruptcy in Hemingway's description, happens two ways, slowly and then all at once. The slow way is the familiar one: decades pass with little sense of internal change, middle age arrives with only a slight slowing downa name lost, a lumbar ache, a sprinkling of white hairs and eye wrinkles.
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Corey Powell, NBC

We've all lost track of time at one point or another, but astronomers really go all in. Recent studies show they may have overestimated the age of the universe by more than a billion years a surprising realization that is forcing them to rethink key parts of the scientific story of how we got from the Big Bang to today.
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Kelsey Piper, Vox
Most new publications, upon their launch, seek to promote their content as novel, surprising, exciting.A new journal that began publishing this week does ... the opposite of that.Start with the name: Series of Unsurprising Results in Economics (SURE). The journal publishes papers with findings that are, well, really boring so boring that other journals rejected them just for being boring. Its first paper, published Tuesday, is about an education intervention that was found to have no effects at all on anything.
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Karen Hao, MIT Tech Review
We've touched previously on the concept of adversarial examplesthe class of tiny changes that, when fed into a deep-learning model, cause it to misbehave. In March, we covered UC Berkeley professor Dawn Song's talk at our annual EmTech Digital conference about how she used stickers to trick a self-driving car into thinking a stop sign was a 45-mile-per-hour sign, and how she used tailored messages to make a text-based model spit out sensitive information like credit card numbers.
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Richard Lovett, Cosmos

Military researchers are closing in on using cell phones to detect the location of snipers from a single shot.The technique is a sophisticated version of one developed as far back as World War I by Australian-born Nobel laureate William Lawrence Bragg, who developed a technique known as sound ranging, based on the difference in the arrival times of sound waves at two different microphones.
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Quirin Schiermeier, Nature News
Biomedical-research funder the Wellcome Trust has announced an ambitious initiative to improve the treatment of snakebites in poor countries. Snakebites kill tens of thousands of people a year, partly because they are treated with archaic antivenoms that often work only for one species.
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Venkatesh Narayanamurti & Bruce Alberts, Science Mag
Last month, the House Appropriations Committee of the U.S. Congress began drafting its Fiscal Year 2020 funding bill. Among the promising news is the committee's support for a $2 billion increase above Fiscal Year 2019 for the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), the first step in what is likely to be a long and contentious budget process.
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