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Webinars and online meetings present a unique challenge in how you keep your participants and your attendees interested and occupied in the event that you are conducting, so in today’s quick tip, I am going to share with you three simple techniques that will help you keep your webinar attendees or your online meeting participants actively engaged in what you’re saying and what you’re trying to achieve.

How to keep webinar and online meeting attendees engaged - YouTube

The first step is remembering a webinar, an online meeting, is a completely different event. In a in-person event, you can make eye contact. You have that peer pressure that exists to keep people actively engaged. In an online event, people can easily be distracted by their Facebook accounts, by their social media, by emails, by anything else that’s in their vicinity, and you have very little control over it.

What you do have control over though is a technique to keep them engaged.

Engage the Eyes

Firstly, make sure that their eyes are engaged, so if you’re presenting a PowerPoint on screen, keep it text light, image heavy. Keep it actively changing, so that it gets people constantly engaged. You’ve gotta treat this almost, in one sense, a bit like a TV show, gotta keep that screen image moving and changing to keep people engaged.

Engage the Ears

Secondly, you’ve got to engage their ears as well, so that means using stories, keeping them actively listening to what you’re saying, so using voice modulation, stories, and asking pertinent questions. When I say pertinent questions, they’re you-focused questions. If you want to know more about those, check out my Speak to Influence programme. There we go into a lot of detail around you-focused questions, and how you can incorporate them.

Engage the Fingers

And thirdly, and most importantly, don’t forget these things here. Keep their hands occupied. When you ask questions, when you are engaging with them verbally, prompt them and ask your meeting attendees to actually type in answers. You use the chat facilities that are available within most webinar and online meeting tools so that you keep them engaged.

So remember to engage your audience and keep them interested in your webinar or online meeting, keep their eyes engaged, keep their ears engaged, and keep their fingers active.

If you want more help, check out the other tips here at Public Speaking Skills Academy. We have a range of articles, videos that will help you not only increase your influence, it will help you increase your impact, become the trusted authority in your field, and ultimately increase your income.

The post How to keep your webinar and online meeting attendees engaged appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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Where to find great stories - YouTube

Welcome to this very quick tip. Now, one of the fundamentals of great speaking and the ability to truly influence people is as you get them to buying to your vision and the best way to do that is through the use of stories to illustrate all your major key points with stories. Now, the question is where can you find great stories? Well, let me touch on a couple of obvious places.

Your background

First, go and have a look into your background. What experiences have you had that might be relevant? Look at it. Go right the way back through the childhood, what your parents, what your grandparents potentially taught you and told you. There’s some great opportunities there for stories.

Your organisation

Then have a look around your organisation. Go through whether or not it’s your … Go through your current customer list, your past customer list. Have a look there. There are going to be plenty of stories that you could incorporate. Go through and also interrogate your complaints department. There are opportunities there for you to share stories that actually will teach and inspire people to learn the lessons so take a hold of them and use them as opportunities to illustrate your points using real tangible examples. So these are just some really very simple, very quick places that you can go and have a look at and go and find and mine and uncover great stories. Put them into your story file so they’re there for future reference when you need them.

Remember, stories are what is going to illustrate your key point. We buy firstly based on emotion and reinforced in logic. Stories are you key to unlocking the emotional appeal to your message. So again, we’ll go through this and show you how to tell great stories in my speak to influence programme. If you want to have a check out of that, then go and visit the PublicSpeakingSkillsAcademy.com. Also, go in and inspect the blog because there is a great range of tips and free articles, great range of advises there that will help you increase your influence and increase your impact and ultimately when that happens, guess what, your income increases as well so go check out all the public speaking articles on my blog.

The post Where to find great stories appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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4 Types of gestures you need to include in your presentations - YouTube

In this short tip, I want to share four different types of gestures you need to include in your physical communications skills. When you’re up speaking to an audience or whether you’re just having a one-on-one conversation, these are the gestures that you need to be thinking about, how you can incorporate to help make your message more memorable, make it more understandable, and importantly, increase your ability to influence and make that impact that you want.

What are the four gesture types?

Descriptive Gestures

First, let’s start off with the simple one, the descriptive gestures. These are the ones that will help you articulate and communicate something through description, whether it’s showing someone the shape of something, showing them something along those lines that will help them visualise what it is you want them to understand. That’s where descriptive gestures come in.

Emphatic Gestures

Your next one is your emphatic gestures. These are the ones that will, whether it’s through your face or through your arms and body movement, it implies energy and it shows how important something is to you from an emotional perspective. That’s the second type of gesture you want to put in there.

Suggestive Gestures

The third type of gesture is, basically, a suggestive. It’s a suggestive gesture to say, maybe shrug of the shoulders, maybe things aren’t as important to the point that you’re making. It’s really, again, just helping just put a suggestion, it’s not about directly saying something. It’s just allowing your body and your gestures to suggest ideas to your audience, so that they pick up on it.

Prompting Gestures

Finally, prompting gestures. These are the ones that are important, particularly as calls to action, ’cause it helps lead people and prompt them to what to do next. The obvious, simple on is if you’re MCing an event, you start clapping to prompt the audience to start clapping. Now, the question is, for your speeches, for your presentations, when you’re communicating, what do you want to prompt people to do next? That’s where you think about what kind of gesture would help you make that prompt.

We’ve got four types of gestures that you need to be incorporating to get participants, you might speak to influence progress and practise these and get to develop these as part of the assignments they work on. Think about how you can apply these gestures to your communication. Think about, importantly, what types of gestures will help you enhance your message.

The post 4 types of gestures you must include in your next presentation appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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How to develop your confidence and overcome the fear of public speaking - YouTube

In this short tip, I want to share with you five different ways that you can start to develop your confidence, and really kick your public speaking skills, your presentation skills into a new level. Now, how can you start to develop confidence when you are someone who is potential nervous and really afraid of getting up in front of an audience?

Your audience wants you to do well

Firstly, I want you to remember this. Your audience wants you to succeed. I challenge you with this question. When did you last sit through a speech or presentation and go and see a speaker and you want to see them fail? The reason I ask this is because, as an audience member, you want to see the speaker do well. So flip this around and realise that when you’re standing in front of an audience, your audience members want to see you do a good job as well. So use that, harness it to use that positive energy to help yourself develop that bit of confidence.

Visualise success 

Also, visualise yourself giving the presentation successfully. Just that inner working of picturing yourself up in front of your audience, doing a great job, getting a great reception and achieving the outcome you want goes a long, long way to helping you develop your confidence.

Get ready and get setup early

You can then also get to the room early. This will help you just get comfortable and get familiar with the environment will help you build that little bit of confidence.

Meet and Greet

Meeting and greeting the audience does exactly the same thing. Starts to build up allies and helps you recognise that people want you to do a wonderful job, so use this all coming together.

Get Experience

Importantly and finally, get experience. Experience is how you’re going to get better. Recognise that the first time you give a speech or you deliver a presentation, it might not go perfectly. It’ll go okay, but it might not go as well as you maybe would like it to. The only way that’s going to happen is when you get experience.

One of the things I teach through the Speak to Influence Programme is really about getting lots of practise, which is why through the whole precept to that course there is plenty of exercise, plenty of practical exercise, because it’s important that you get experience.

So there’s five very simple ways that you can start to develop your confidence, build your confidence so that you overcome any fears and any nervousness you have around public speaking. If you want more help, why don’t you check out the blog at the Public Speaking Skills Academy? There you’ll find heaps of quick tips and articles that you can read that will help you develop your confidence and develop your skills.

The post How to develop confidence and overcome the fear of public speaking appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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What level of speaker are you? - YouTube

In today’s video, I really want to challenge you and ask you the question, which level of public speaker are you now? I see that there are three levels of public speaker you need to work through as you improve your public speaking skills.

Level one speaker – focussed on themselves

Level one, this is the speaker is just completely petrified, and nervous. They’re just focused purely on themselves. In other words, when they get up, and when you stand up in front of an audience, you’re thinking purely about yourself. In other words, can the audience see that you’re shaking? Can they see that you’re nervous?

Level two speaker – focussed on the message

Level two speaker is a speaker who has moved on from the nervousness, and a level of confidence standing in front of the audience, but they’re then starting to be concerned about their message. In other words, is their message right for the room that they’re talking to. In other words, is it right for that particular audience?

Level three speaker – focussed on the audience

Level three speaker is someone who is comfortable to stand in front of an audience, comfortable with their message, and really then just focused on the audience members getting the value from the message. Are they understanding what is being said? Now this is important, because level three is where influence happens. If you want to persuade people, if you want to influence people, you’ve got to move through level one, level two, and get up to level three.

I’ve worked through with a lot of my contacts and clients in the Speak to Influence programme, in my Mastermind. It’s really about helping them get from level one, through level two, and then up to level three, because level three is where the power is. Level three is where you can influence audiences, and make changes happen.

Answer the question, which level are you? Are you level one nervous? Level two, you’re starting to focus on your message? Or level three, are you someone who is focused on getting your message understood and appreciated by your audience? Level three is where you want to be. If you’re one or two, work on it, and think about how you can get up to level three.

The post What level of speaker are you? appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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How to make effective eye contact - YouTube

Today’s tip is all about making eye contact. Now, eye contact is a vital skill for you to master in communication because eyes are the windows to the soul. It’s how your audience, how the people you’re communicating with judge your veracity. In other words, are you telling the truth, can you be believed? They’re going to look to make eye contact with you and assess you based upon that and it’s the same way that your kids and you interact in terms of you judge your kids, if you have kids, around if they’re telling the truth based on their ability to make eye contact with you.

How can you make effective eye contact?

Well you got to basically hold it until you feel that there’s a connection. Now generally it means that you look at a person in the eye and hold it there for maybe two seconds, maybe three depending upon the person, no more than that and you’ve got to share it evenly around the room. Now in my Speak to Influence programme we talk about depending upon the room layout how you can do that, because obviously small rooms it’s easy, larger rooms it becomes more challenging. Effective eye contact requires you to make that physical connection so that you and the other person that you’re looking at know that you’ve made that connection. Hold it for one, two maybe, no more than three seconds and you’ll have effective eye contact.

The post How to make effective eye contact appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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How to answer the question "what do you do?" - YouTube

The post How to answer the question “What do you do?” appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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What is influence? - YouTube

The post What is Influence? appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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How often do i need to publish content? - YouTube

The post How often do I need to publish content? appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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How to follow up with somone you have just met at a networking event - YouTube

The post How to best follow up with clients you have met at networking events appeared first on Public Speaking Skills Academy.

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