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During the 19th century an increase of printed materials fostered the rise in trade magazines. The content centered on information for the craft and profession. The Inland Printer was created in October 1883 “as a local trade magazine for the booming mid-western printing industry,’ states an entry in the Rockwell Center For American Visual Studies. It started small but within a decade this little monthly became the bible of the printing industry and has become a primary source of historical information especially regarding the burgeoning arts of type, typography and graphic advertising design. In 1894, The Inland Printer became the first American magazine to have a new cover designed for every issue. Some of the most influential of illustrators of the day created distinctive covers for the magazine, including Will Bradley and the brothers J. C.  and Frank X. Leyendecker

These pages from a 1902-3 volume reveal the birth of communication arts as an industry in the United States — history in the making was made.

The post When Design Was An Offshoot Of Printing appeared first on Print Magazine.

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Cardboard point of purchase (POP) displays are commercial sculptures. Perhaps not as masterful as a Bernini or Rodin yet when constructed well, they move you to think, look and buy. A lot goes into a cardboard display, its not just cut and paste. The art and craft require more than a modicum of skill and talent. The examples below are excerpted from Victor Strauss’s Point of Purchase Cardboard Displays: A Manual for the Planning, Construction, and Production of Cardboard Displays. They make me wish I went to printing arts trade school instead of studying English at NYU.

The post The Bernini Of Cardboard Sculptures appeared first on Print Magazine.

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Print Magazine by Steven Heller - 3d ago

Bernardo Bagulho is an Illustrator and designer from Évora, Portugal, a stone town between the capital, Lisbon, and Spain frontier. It’s usually a quiet place surrounded by nature and megalithic monuments. He started making posters for the indie cinema sessions in my hometown and when he moved to Barcelona, Spain, to study heI started to participate in collective publications with friends. Currently, he is a regular contributor for La Directa newspaper and La Maleta magazine in Barcelona and also self-publishing this kind of fanzines and books. His work is varied in media and dimensionality. I spoke to him about his 3D work, which fascinated me for its wit and skill.

What is your favorite project?

The project I’m must proud of was to be part of the creative team of the international biennial of puppets of Évora, I made all the illustrations and conceived communication for the public space for the city theater working and drawing live the traditional puppets from Évora.

What is the name of the book and where can it be purchased?

The book’s name is “Baggage”. It was self-published and there are no remaining copies at this moment. Right now I’m looking for a publisher to print an updated version with new sculptures and poems.

What were these images made for?

They started as a small exercise, but then I saw that a narrative was binding them together. They were telling a story about packing up before a big trip.  Do you often work with found objects?

Usually I work with stamps and paper-cuts. This project was to get away from the techniques I usually work with and to play with the objects I collected all over the years.

What do you plan on doing with the book of these artifacts?

I think I’m making a personal collection, a cabinet of curiosities. To look for what is the most important to take and to keep. To find my personal voice.  Is there any personal or symbolic significance?

Most of these works were born on paper from personal stories and conversations. The ones that I enjoyed the most to do where the ones who came out just from the play of binding two completely different objects together and then something new popped up.   What are you working on now?

Right now I’m working on a public art project for Évora. The old town sidewalk is made of granite stone and it’s irregular in a way that sometimes it suggests drawn faces. My project is to make 13 stone sculptures of relatively known 13 faces of the town and to embed them on the sidewalk surface. It could be a funny route to know better the old town.

The post Narrative Of Things appeared first on Print Magazine.

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Print Magazine by Steven Heller - 4d ago

We the Women is in search of real change. Their site says: “We believe we can and should empower other women to build a new approach. Women, women-identifying and non-binary folks can represent the rights of women in our country and when we bring our perspective to the forefront – it can be a catalyst for that change. Feminism also is not exclusive to women and for the purposes of this project, we see feminism as “organized activity on behalf of women’s rights and interests.” (Merriam-Webster dictionary).”

Designers and organizers, Michele Cooper and Kelly Holohan, asked women designers to contribute their talents in the form of poster designs. Each designer’s unique perspective is represented in the collection and is a response to the attacks on women’s rights.

Noopur Agarwal.

Lauren Vajda.

Katy Galvin.

Soonduk Krebs.

Anne Gianguilio.

The post We The Resistance appeared first on Print Magazine.

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We wish a very happy 95th Birthday to pioneering mid-century modernist George Tscherny. (And 69th wedding anniversary to Sonia and George too.)

George Tscherny was born in Budapest in 1924, but was raised in Germany from the age of two. “Hungary,” he says, “exists for me only on my birth certificate.” His mother, a Hungarian with a fervent anti-Fascist bias, so disapproved of her nation’s dictator, Admiral Horthy, that she vowed never to let her children speak Hungarian. His father was Russian, so not even the name Tscherny is Hungarian, rather a German spelling of the Russian word for black. Read my AIGA 1988 Medalist biography here.

Go to the RIT Graphic Design Archive here.

See the SVA Subway Series Hall of Fame video here.

Read DesignCulture interview here.

The post George Tscherny 95 Years! Today! appeared first on Print Magazine.

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Print Magazine by Steven Heller - 1w ago

Spartan Holiday Books is the publishing house associated with DB Dowd, a writer, illustrator, curator and critic in St. Louis, Missouri; he is a professor of art and American Culture Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, and a senior faculty member in the new (2019) MFA in Illustration and Visual Culture (IVC) at the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, is also the Faculty Director of the Modern Graphic History Library, which was renamed in his honor in 2016.

He publishes the illustrated journal Spartan Holiday, a non-fiction serial tracking his travels to diverse locations, including Shanghai, China; Paris, France; and the Western United States, now in its third issue. The intriguing publication, designed by Scott Gericke, is a fine example of “artrepreneurism” providing outlet for the artist as author. I asked him about the goals and ethos of the work on the occasion of the new edition. Oh, yes, and the sanity it brings to his life.

This is #3 of Spartan Holiday. What is your rationale for these “zines”? And why is it Spartan?

Above all, drawing is a kind of sense-making for me, a strategy to remain sane. As you have plainly noticed, judging from some of your recent posts, we are living through a plague of bad faith. What is true? What can I be sure of? I can use my senses. The observed world has come to seem quite urgent. Listen. Look. Make marks. Describe first, interpret second. That’s what’s “Spartan” about the “holiday.” Pencil and paper. Drawing and writing.

As for the zine itself, the fact that I am a writer and curious about other places guarantees me interesting subjects to report on. So I go here and there, near or far, and take on the role of correspondent, both verbal and visual. (I am also interested in visual journalism for publications. Trials, conventions, sports, day-in-the-life, etc. Spartan is proof-of-concept in certain respects.)

Tell me about this edition about Paris. Do you just sketch everywhere you go?

I find it takes me at least a week to get my bearings. What’s superficially noticeable may not be particularly germane. So drawing isn’t always the best investment right away. I walk, I shoot photographs, and write in my little book. Sometimes I make design notations for pictorial ideas, more diagrams than drawings. I am looking for a beat in the story, and ultimately an argument. For example, in Paris I made a drawing of the 13th-century city wall that’s still visible along rue de la Jardins-Saint-Paul in the Marais.

The Spartan text reports as a historical matter that Paris repeatedly outgrew its walls, only to be contained by the périphérique, the Paris ring road (an “inner belt” to Americans). How do you show that? It took me a long time to figure it out. Finally I made four little gouache paintings from surveillance camera images of selected “city gates” (Portes) of Paris, accessible on the Internet. I was nowhere near Paris at the time.

What does doing a zine do for you? What does this make you feel?

 Earlier in my career I struggled with focus. I would make promising starts, then get bored and move on. The Spartan Holiday project is a consistent problem—40 pages of content, maybe 1500 words—that can be solved across infinite range. Drawing, painting, photography, lettering, type, spot color palettes—that’s a lot of room to maneuver. I have invented an engrossing problem for myself. I could make 20 issues.

Meanwhile audiences seem to respond well. Diverse readers have reported to me that the zine makes history and culture interesting and engaging. As an undergraduate history major many years ago, that pleases me.

There’s also a sub-theme of the history of visual culture. Each issue excavates illustration history in some way, which touches on the work I do as a curator and critic. I like crediting and engaging with the work of other times and places. I redraw historical works, like the sunken submarine from a 1905 issue of Le Petit Journal illustrée. Also, I cite everything compulsively in the notes at the back.

For you drawing is design. What is design then?

 Drawing is learning, first and foremost. I apprehend something structurally by drawing it. But you are correct that two-dimensional, compositional structure—the way things are put together—is of immense interest to me. The integration of drawing and design in the work of others inspires me deeply. Maybe another way of saying that I savor the tension between description and abstraction.

Spartan Holiday is designed by Scott Gericke, and we work very collaboratively—intensely so, really. (He also designed my book Stick Figures: Drawing as a Human Practice last year, and did so beautifully!) Scott brings a typographic intelligence that I simply do not possess. His work on the project highlights tension, too—like negative leading in Didot italic, or use of scale shift to dramatically shrink an illustration to my dismay, followed by surprised relief.

I assume that everything in this issue satisfies an aesthetic lust. What is your favorite piece?

Lust is quite the word. My friend Craig Yoe just told me he thought that Spartan Holiday was “text-and- image coitus XXX rated”, which alarmed but pleased me. I guess I am fondest of the opening spread with my baroque self-portrait with CDG airport, the lost submarine spread, and the heroic football mural overlaid by David’s Napoleon Crossing the Alps. But I love all my children!

What’s next in the Spartan 4?

I recently made an extended driving trip through Western Nebraska and South Dakota to Wounded Knee, the Badlands, the Black Hills and the Powder River Basin in Eastern Wyoming. I will return to do more reporting, writing, and drawing. Spartan Holiday No. 4, as yet untitled, will engage the northern Great Plains as a historical and contemporary site. Release date early 2021.

The post Remain Sane: Draw! appeared first on Print Magazine.

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Print Magazine by Steven Heller - 1w ago

Ezio d’Errico (1892-1972) was writer, painter and playwright, born in Agrigento. He died in the most guilty isolation, surrounded by his paintings and with only his wife next to him. Author of thrillers published with Mondadori, of theater works translated and represented also abroad, among the first abstract painters in Italy, d’Errico, a sort of Renaissance genius, is still a universe to be explored.

His biographical events seem wrapped in an aura of mystery: soon left Sicily moves to Paris, where he attempts the adventure of a painter and where he meets important artists. Then, he returned to Italy, to Turin, to teach drawing: among his students, Armando Testa, who, as he later admitted, knew the works of Picasso, Chagall and Mirò thanks to his small reproductions in the magazine “Graphicus,” for which the same Ezio d’Errico draws, among other things, the first abstract cover in Italy.

The post Another Renaissance Genius? appeared first on Print Magazine.

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Over the course of two years, I corresponded with Italian caricaturist, illustrator and designer Paolo Garretto, amassing dozens of autobiographical letters chronicling his professional life. The more I see of Garretto’s work, the more I believe he was an important transitional modern artist, who was born at the right time in the wrong country – Italy at the time of Fascism. I have collected considerable printed magazine covers, book covers, posters and assorted ephemera signed with his two tier signature. During the 20s and 30s he worked for many American, French and English companies, when the war broke out he was deported to Italy as an enemy alien. He did apolitical and political work. Here is a lighthearted cover for, Scene Illustrata (1939) one of Italy’s popular journals and a startling modernistic cover a Fascist militiaman for La Rivista (1930), an avowed arm of Mussolini’s regime. Also a poster for the Black Shirts (1933) generously loaned from the collection of the Fondazione Cirulli). He notes in his letters that he avoided doing propaganda but clearly a few pieces were produced. I am planning on editing these letters into the fascinating “pen pal” biography that we shared. For now, here is a short excerpt from a much longer typescript to whet your appetite.

[The following is excerpted from a letter to me from Paolo Garretto]

I remember that when I arrived in the USA at the age of 10 (in 1913), I explained myself at school, knowing only a few words of English,  with drawings on the blackboard . . . !

We were there with my father and mother because father was charged by the most important publisher (then) to write a history of the United States as there was none in Italian. The  publisher was Ulrico Hoepli in Milano, and my father was picked out of a bunch of young graduate[s] from the University of Pisa, on advice by his professor Pasquale Villari, the most important historian in those years .

In 1917 we came back to Italy because my father had to serve in the Italian army. At the end of the war he became professor literature and history (and Latin, Greek, etc.) in Milano and there I started going to the Fine Art School of Brera.

But I always had trouble with my professors inasmuch I liked futurism and cubism and the did not like the way I saw our models. . . ! In fact I did some sketches of the professors and they did not like them.

In 1920/21 my father chose to go to a Roman university, instead, so I went to the Fine Art Institute in Rome. There I started to do little humorous drawings for some humorous papers like “Il Travaso . . . and started to like newspaper work. I did everything, from then on, also writing little pieces that I illustrated and doing also work for the movies (posters, decoration, articles). In fact I thought I would be able to work in the movies (worked as a decorated interpreter (of English) with Fred Niblo when he came to make his “Ben Hur.” My professor of decoration at the Fine Art Institute (Fuilio Cabellotti) was in charge of scenery and brought us with him to work there, in the studios. When Fred Niblo heard that I spoke English he hired me as his interpreter because the ones he had were Italo-American who knew very little Italian. I hoped to go on in the movies but I soon found out it was “not for me” as a discipline. I have always been quite independent – too much for my dear parents also.

So I went on with magazines and papers and suddenly in 1926 I made for caricatures in color that were very much admired by Marinetti, Depero and the other futurists but they also said that in Italy there was no magazine who printed in colors.

So I went to Paris, where a couple of friends of mine were already working, in advertising and textile drawings . Through one of them I went to see their boss, of the Dorland Advertising (in Paris), a Mr. Moss, who advised me to go to London where The Great Eight [magazines] published in color and so I did, leaving with them my four caricatures – then went to Paris and back to Rome. I said that to myself it was a useless trip. . . well, not at all: one day in Rome, the year after, a friend of mine called me. . . and asked me “how did I get to be published in England with my drawings.” A ran to the nearest book and magazine shop and there in The Graphic (Feb 28, 1927) were my four caricatures, in color. They thought I was French inasmuch I had come to them from Paris, and then everything happened. They were looking for me in Paris, I was told by my friends at Dorland, so I ran to London and good a very nice contract for pages with color caricatures of politicans, artists, famous people, etc; two pages of caricatures twice a week.

So I married the daughter of Lucien Muratore, the famous tenor, and went to live in Paris right away – commuting to London regularly as my wife did not like London . . . !

This is how it all started. From Paris I started to be asked in USA by Fortune first (for covers) and from the Philadelphia Public Ledger, who reproduced my caricatures first, then from the New York World and many other magazines.

[Garretto continued to work for other American publications, notably Vanity Fair, and was on a Vistors Visa. As soon as Italy entered the war . . .] I was arrested as all the other five Italian newspapermen, and brought to the (I think this is the name) the Tombs, NY’s prison. From where we changed to better quarters, the Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs to join the Italian, German and Japanese ambassadors, consuls, etc., who were already there. After six months we embarked on The Gottingholm, a Swedish boat as old as Noah’s ark, and we had to cross the ocean on it, to Lisbon where wagon-lit trains were waiting to bring us to our countries.

In Rome I was asked to do propaganda for the war, but inasmuch I had promised the FBI “signing a declaration” that would do nothing against the USA as propaganda work, I had to find a way to go somewhere else – but I found the way quickly.

Before leaving Paris for Turin and my newspaper in Italy, I had patented an idea of mine: to teach language s through the movies. One would see a cartoon, a short (with live actors) and through the sound, the image and written captions could follow a serial of lessons in order to learn a language.

I showed my idea to the minster of propaganda (in Rome) informing him that a friend of mine in Paris had developed and concretized my idea (with my authorization, naturally) and had found some Swiss capitals to carry on the idea and had decided to start the “studios” in Hungary. . .  As soon as he had known from the papers that I was in Rome he called me to Budapest and it was then quite simple to convince the propaganda minister that through these language lessons of a new kind we could, after the war, teach Italian the to conquered populations . . . !

When the Italy “gave up” the Italians in Hungary had to split: some for Mussolini and some for themselves and the future. My associate chose to become [a] “New Fascist,” I didn’t and [my wife and I] were arrested by the Germans when they invaded Hungary . . . We had 9 months of internment in various camps until (the Russian were advancing) the Germans put us in a train, the 26th of December 1944, and started to look for a place, in Austria and Germany, and after the impossibility to find a place for 360 men, women and children they brought us to Italy where (in Trento) on the 4th of January 1945 our train was destroyed by an American air raid and we were saved because a few moments before the bombing the Germans agreed to have us brought to a big air raid shelter.

After the raid I had the chance to get in touch with one of my dearest friends (Filippo Anfuso) who was the minister of foreign affairs and in Venice . . .! He had the two of us freed and I chose to go to Milano where I knew that I could count on some good friends – and it was a good idea: We arrived there on the 8th of January 1945 and found help even though we were considered “suspect citizens” by the only paper we had to identify ourselves. All our friends of captivity were sent to a concentration camp in Northern Italy, but were well treated and freed the day of liberation in the 25th of April 1945, when the Americans arrived. And with the Americans a good friend of mine, from New York’s Procter & Gamble (I had worked for them in advertising), a colonel Jim Gray, who “gave” us a beautiful apartment that they did not need.

The post Garretto Political And Fashionable appeared first on Print Magazine.

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Have you ever bought something simply because a celebrity endorsed the product? Or how about lusting after a product because of an Instagram photo, or YouTube video? At the very least, I’m sure we’ve all made a purchase based on a friend’s recommendation.

These are all examples of the effectiveness of social proof. There is undeniable power in numbers. We may all like to think of ourselves as trailblazers, but in all honesty, most of us don’t want to be the first to try something. No matter what products or services you’re offering, as a company, your bottom line will benefit from social proof.

 Just consider these stats:

People want to hear what others have to say before pulling the trigger and making that purchase. It can be a crowded field out there. As a business, you want to stand out from the competition. 

One way to get noticed and pump up your social proof is by effectively using custom boxes. You can use custom boxes to build and reinforce trust in your brand. 

 Here are three ways to leverage this powerful marketing tool:

1. Amplify Your Brand

 You want your business to be memorable. What better way than to emblazon your logo on your custom box and infuse your packaging with your distinct brand colors. A custom box will give you a professional look and help create buzz. By investing in custom boxes you’re showing your customers that you’re legit and plan on sticking around for the long haul. 

2. Encourage Your Customers to Share

Being social means sharing, so make it easy. With a custom box, you can encourage your customers to promote your brand on their own social media channels. Add a relevant hashtag to your box or include your social media URLs to get the conversation started. 

The beauty product company, Bliss, added the hashtag #thisisbliss to the inside of their custom boxes to encourage customers to put their own pictures on Instagram, Pinterest, and other channels.

As the old saying goes, a picture’s worth a thousand words. Well, it’s a no brainer that people will be more inclined to share photos or videos of a beautifully packaged product – rather than a drab, generic cardboard box. A beautiful custom box is a great way to get your customers to share unboxing videos and product photos

3. Get Reviews 

Customer reviews can make or break a product. One study found that 58% of people believe the “star rating” is the most important metric to them. Ever buy a product with a one-star rating? Probably not.  

Keep in mind that reviews are often about more than the actual product. Beautiful retail packaging is an important component of the overall customer experience. You can make your customers feel pampered by giving them a personalized experience and it doesn’t have to be something big. A hand-written thank you note is enough to make your customer feel appreciated. That may be just the added touch to inspire someone to write a review praising your product.

Nail Your Brand’s First Impression

A custom box can enhance the overall customer experience. Packaging is often the first impression so it’s important to get it right. Custom boxes may be just the edge you need. Companies including T-Mobile, Adidas, MetLife, Pandora, Marriott Hotels, and small businesses nationwide choose Refine Packaging for their custom packaging needs. Visit Refine Packaging online to learn more.

The post 3 Ways to Build Social Proof With Custom Boxes appeared first on Print Magazine.

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Fire up your bookmarks: These are 50 of the best color sites for designers. Here, you’ll find sites that offer color palettes and color schemes for designers.

Color Palette Inspiration & Color Scheme Generators Color Hunt

A site that offers a curated collection of color schemes for any purpose. “By creating smart and simple compositions of several tones, we provide beautiful palettes of colors that work together.”

COLOURLovers

300,000-plus designers and color-minded folks share color palettes on this site constantly, so there’s always fresh inspiration at the ready. Bookmark this as one of the best color sites or download the free Adobe AIR application, COLOURLovers Desktop Color Finder. And while you’re it at it, COLOURLovers Blog reports on color trends and quirky color finds, with related palettes for each post.

Adobe Color CC

Create, save and fine-tune your color palette using Adobe Kuler’s online tool. Nice extra: in addition to creating free-form palettes, you can also nudge them to conform to specific rules – like complementary colors, monochromatic or triads straddling the color wheel. Then share and browse palettes with thousands of other designers.

Design Seeds

Design Seeds celebrate colors found in nature and the aesthetic of purposeful living. Search palettes by color value or by theme.

Coolors

Generate infinite color palettes for your designs and share, export or save it in your profile.

Paletton

This pay-what-you-wish app lets you create color schemes, apply rules, randomize when you’re plump out of new ideas, export in many different formats, even check for different kinds of color-blindness.

Colord

Intuitive tools and resources for inspiration, with the palette creation mechanism packing a lot of functionality into a single screen. Plenty of export options, too.

Copaso

A more robust color-palette tool for advanced users.

Colour Me Curious

A series of color palettes available for any use.

ColorMunki

Colormunki allows you to generate color schemes from Pantone swatches.

Color Palettes

A basic color palette site with nice social media integration.

ColorBlender: enter a color, get an auto-created blend online tool for color matching and palette design with export options

Color Wizard: a similar concept to Color Blender, this tool works on the single-color-in, palette-out basis.

Colordb: a little hard on the eyes, but highly functional like the color-robot it is. Enter a single color, get all relevant shades, complementaries, stats, et cetera in a single output screen.

Also worth a mention: Contrast A, SlayerOffice Color Palette, ColorToy 2.0 (the only Flash tool on this list), the ultra-simple Infohound, Visibone (similarly easy, plus available in a dozen languages) and SitePro Central Color Scheme Chooser.

Extract a color palette from a URL or image

Tin Eye Labs – Color Extraction: Upload an image, paste an image URL or use drag and drop to extract the colors from your image. The engine will display a color palette for all the colors identified in your image. Color extraction works for JPEGs, PNGs, and GIFs.

ColorHunter: enter a tag, hex code or image URL to search for color palettes matching your criteria

Double-check the color palette of any image with this color palette generator from DeGraeve.com.

Best color sites to simulate (and correct) your designs for color-deficient vision

One out of 15 people are color-blind to some degree. These tools simulate how your site appears to people with impaired color vision.

Color Vision  |  Colblinder  |  Colour Blindness Simulator  |  Accessibility Color Wheel  |  Checkmycolors.com

Sharpen your color theory skills

Color Theory from Paper Leaf: Here’s your one-page cheatsheet on color theory concepts. (You can download it too!)

Sibagraphics on international color meanings: Colors’ meanings are by no means universal across cultures. In Egypt, apparently, yellow is a color of mourning; to the Chinese, green means your wife is cheating on you; in Japan, pink is popular with both men and women. Sidestep a cross-cultural misunderstanding by screening your palettes for international projects here.

Identify colors instantly with browser plugins

Pixie
ColorZilla: Pimp your Firefox browser for color tasks with this plugin.
ColourMod: this free widget saves you from having to fire up Creative Suite every time you want to grab a juicy color you see.

Find killer background patterns

Create, browse and download background patterns for your designs. These tools can help:

BG Patterns  |  DinPattern  |  Ava7Patterns  |  EveryDayIcons patterns  |  Patterrific

Play with color more

Tin Eye: This site extracted the colors from 20 million Creative Commons images on Flickr to make the images searchable by color.

Color-Hex: This site includes hex codes for each color listed.

SpyColor: A free service that provides information about any color, including conversions to many color models (RGB, CMYK, HSL, HSV, XYZ, xyY, CIELAB, CIELUV, CIELCH, Hunter Lab and YIQ). Schemes (harmonies), like complementary, split-complementary, triadic, tetradic, five-tone, clash, analogous and monochromatic colors can be found on each color page.

RGB Challenge: In this game, try to guess the right color for the RGB code shown above. Get as many colors correct in a row and beat your friends!

Color (game): Color has you test the accuracy of your perception of color as you learn about key concepts in the theory of color and design.

Color Run: Simple game about colors. Just click on the lighter color.

HEX Invaders: Hark! Aliens are invading! You must protect the planet by matching the hex color code to the corresponding creature.

Color Sheep: A fast-paced arcade game in which players change Woolson’s color to match oncoming wolves by mixing different intensities of red, green, and blue light.

Shutterstock Spectrum: Search Shutterstock’s image database by color.

Playdots:The goal is simple; climb the leaderboards by connecting same-colored dots vertically and horizontally.

Online Color Challenge: How well do you see color? FACT: 1 out of 255 women and 1 out of 12 men have some form of color vision deficiency. Take the online color challenge, based on the Farnsworth Munsell 100 Hue Test.

Blendoku: A puzzle game that will challenge your ability to distinguish and arrange colors.

Name that Color: Want to know the name of a specific hue? Find it here.

HP IdeaLab’s Online Color Thesaurus: Hewlett-Packard’s color scientists get rigorous about colors’ names with this collaborative project.

WolframAlpha: This “computational knowledge engine” includes a color category, marrying color names with hex, RGB, CMYK and other values, temperatures and even light wavelengths. Color-nerds, rejoice. Phronistry’s Obscure Color Terms: Finally you can find out what “smargadine” or “luteolous” looks like. How puniceous!

Last but not least, a big thank-you to SpyreStudios, DesignReviver and MogDesign for their excellent color-resources lists.

The post 51 Best Color Sites for Designers—Updated! appeared first on Print Magazine.

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