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Nonfiction authors write for one primary reason: to become an influencer. Whether your book is self-help, business-oriented, historical, or autobiographical, chances are you wrote it to help others better understand themselves or their world.

To become an influencer, though, you must build authority as an author.

If you were hoping your book will secure you as an authority figure on its own (as in, write it and they will come), we have some tough news for you: You’re not Kevin Costner, and it won’t. It’s a great step in the right direction, but there’s a reason book firms like us exist. We can do much of the heavy lifting for you, but it’s up to you to be the author of your own destiny when it comes to building authority.

To help you get started, we compiled the following tips on how to market a book in a way that builds your authority. You’re well on your way when you gain clarity, create irresistible and shareable content, and give social media a warm embrace.

Gain clarity

Who are you and what’s your book about? If you can’t answer those question in less than 20 seconds, you need more clarity. This clear definition needs to be at the heart of your authority-building efforts. It’s necessary for social media and speaker profiles, it’s critical for media interviews and networking, and it’s just plain essential for building your audience, selling more books, and strengthening your authority.

If you’re having trouble in this area, enlist the help of those who know you and who have already participated in your book’s journey thus far. That could be your colleague who read the book and offered a review, your neighbor who served as your proofreader in exchange for a six pack of beer (what a great neighbor, by the way) or, yes, your book firm.

In an ideal world, you should have tackled this part already for your book summary and author’s bio. What commonly happens, though, is that these elements get written by someone other than the author. They may not be in your own words. If that’s the case, you may be struggling to really “own” what’s already written.

But you need to find a way to own it now.

Dissect these descriptions and boil them down into a statement that makes you think, “Yes! That’s exactly what I’m all about!” and prompts others to respond, “Wow! Tell me more!”

Create quality, shareable content

We know what you’re thinking: You just wrote a book, and now we’re telling you to write more? Yes, we are! Creating a steady stream of content on your very own blog can help catapult your influencer status immensely by:

  • Breaking down your book’s major points into bitesize pieces. You shouldn’t give away all your book’s secrets, but you can share important bits of information to entice readers into wanting more and positioning yourself as an authority in those areas.
  • Using the individual posts to pitch media interview, contributed article, and speaking topics. Rarely will a media outlet or organization simply want you to tell them about the book you wrote. But they will be interested in compelling, consumable ideas that happen to be in your book.
  • Increasing your search engine optimization (SEO). When a potential fan searches for a topic relevant to what you write about, you want Google and other major search engines to include you in their results. But a static website is practically invisible to search engines. A blog that is updated regularly from your site will give you a fighting chance.
  • Staying relevant. A tweet sent two minutes ago can be pushed off someone’s first-page feed without them ever seeing it. To ensure your book doesn’t become old news the same day it’s released, you need to stay top of mind (and top of feed) with fresh, new, shareable content on a consistent basis.

As your online content grows, so will your credibility. Get started or supplement your efforts by writing contributed articles or guest blog posts for other influencers (which could also help expand your audience). Video is also a great way to create epic, shareable content that gives audiences an alternative way to digest the information.

Build authentic, brand-worthy social profiles

Author Seth Godin is famous for “not participating” in social media. Instead, he credits his daily blog and newsletter for adding to his author authority and says that starting his blog back in 1989 (as an email newsletter) helped it grow self-sufficiently. But get this: Seth Godin “the brand” DOES rely on social media. From his website, he points fans to his active Facebook page and a Twitter account that shares his blog feed.

So if Seth Godin—author of 18 bestselling books and professed social media cynic—still relies on social media to build his community (whether he admits it or not), who are you to keep ignoring it?

They key to making a social feed work for you is to keep it simple and authentic. We could write an entire post on the subject (and don’t worry, we will) but, for now, consider one or two social spaces you know you’ll be able to update consistently. Use a profile picture/bio and start posting in a way is genuine but also professional.  Almost always—for any author—the idea of “business casual” language and style are a home run.

Then, once you’ve established where you’ll participate in social media, it’s time to make friends. There’s a classic Twitter strategy called the 80/20 rule that works for most social media participation. The idea is to broadcast or self-promote less than 20 percent of the time on your social channels. The other 80 percent (or more) of the time, you should be lifting others up in the way of retweets and engagement (asking/answering questions and commenting on what others post). Follow and engage with the influencers you hope to emulate, but always with this rule in mind.

How to make it happen

The great news is that so much of this can be done on your own, for free nonetheless. Posting to social media, blogging, and building relationships with fellow influencers are all well within your reach. You should start right now. After all, a book can give you 15 minutes of fame, but digital relevance in needed to take you from author to influence. Feel free to contact us for a free author to influencer assessment today. It may be just the thing you need to jumpstart your authority.

The post 3 Ways to Build Authority as an Author appeared first on PR by the Book.

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Digital marketing is a science that’s rapidly evolving. As soon as you have it figured out, Google or Facebook algorithms change and your visibility sinks back down into obscurity. One thing has remained constant in recent years, though, and that’s the importance of content in marketing, especially as it related to social media for authors.

Content marketing–or using compelling stories to sell your product–is something that all major brands do. Brands like Nike, Kraft, and Dove spend millions of dollars on content marketing each year. But you have a distinct advantage over these household names:

You write books. You already have content.

Now you just need to know how to utilize it as marketing material. Here are three simple steps you can take to make it happen:

Create Community

The purpose of book marketing is to, of course, sell more books. But the way content marketing does this is by creating connections that will, in turn, build community. Base this on high-quality content that your audience can empathize with or finds so fascinating that they simply must know more.

The content might include:

  • Pulling out singular ideas within your book that resonate particularly well with your audience. Content marketing is all about taking one single idea and adding meaning behind it. Each chapter or even subhead of your book may be a compelling standalone topic for content marketing.
  • Telling your backstory. Fans love a great backstory. Take Marvel Comics fans, for example. The characters’ backstories are what make Marvel’s superheroes like Iron Man, the Guardians of the Galaxy, and the Black Panther so fiercely popular. Yes, you’re no Capital America, but you can also build stronger fan connections by revealing how you got to where you are today, why you wrote your book, and where you hope your journey will take you.
  • Taking fans behind the scenes. With social media, giving fans “a day in the life” peek at your experience as author and influencer is easier than ever–and fans love it, especially if it’s authentically honest. As author Elizabeth Gilbert confesses, “Attempts at originality can often feel forced…but authenticity has a quiet resonance that never fails to stir me.” Check out her Instagram for inspiration.
  • Starting a dialog. One of the best ways to build an immediate connection with another person is to ask them questions and then listen, listen, listen. Draw your fans into your content marketing by asking them what’s on their minds, what they think about the story you just shared and encouraging them to ask you questions, too.

Choose Your Vehicles

Now that you have an idea of what to share, how will you share it? There’s no one answer to that question because you need to find what works best for you. The key is to focus on vehicles that not only drive the most traffic but that you can use consistently well.

Here are some ideas:

  • Your own blog. You need a “home” for all this great content you’re about to share and there’s no better place than your own website. Build your ideas there and then share them out. If you’re not ready to maintain your own blog, get started through blogging platforms like Tumblr, Medium or publish articles on LinkedIn.
  • Contributed articles and guest posts. Newspapers and magazines are still very thirsty for contributed content. For maximum content marketing value, look for publications that have an online presence. Some sites like Forbes and certain business journals, trade publications, online magazines, and syndicated sites will even republish pieces you’ve written elsewhere, like on your blog.
  • Email marketing. Visit many bestselling author websites, from John Grisham to Gretchen Rubin, and you’ll immediately see a popup window asking if you’d like to join the author’s email list. Why? Because email is gold. Many authors use email distributions to make book and appearance announcements, but others use it for content marketing. Even mass emails can be personalized so that the stories that show up in your fans’ inbox feel intimately authentic.
  • Emerging technology. The more fans you have, the harder it is to engage with each one-on-one, which is why the most innovative authors are experimenting with technology like chatbots. You’ve likely interacted with chatbots before, using a customer support chat feature while shopping. Chatbots are useful in content marketing, too, because they help you respond 24/7 with custom content that the fan is asking for in real-time.
  • Get social with video. Yes, video is content, too! In fact, YouTube is second only to Google as the most used search engine. Live video platforms like Facebook Live are popular, too. Author Brene Brown expanded her reach when she read chapters from her book Braving the Wilderness live on Facebook. Arianna Huffington is also a fan of videos on Facebook–both recorded and live.

Balance Analytics and Authenticity

Notice that although content marketing is traditionally based in science and analytics, we’ve hardly discussed that aspect of it. Why?

Authentic human connections come first.

Search engine optimized keywords and expertly crafted titles can help, but not at the risk of losing your authentic voice. Even Google agrees. It’s constantly updating its algorithm to measure content for relevance and quality. Basically, your content needs to be interesting and useful to the people it’s trying to reach.

We’ve got some extra tips in our guide 3 Ways to Build Authority as an Author. You began your journey as an influencer when you wrote your book. Now it’s time to add publicity, influencer marketing, and digital relevance (including content marketing) to the mix to build what we call The Road to Influence.

Learn more about how we can help you navigate the journey here.

The post How Authors Can Win With Content Marketing appeared first on PR by the Book.

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One of the best ways to build your authority as an author is to become a speaker. Nonfiction authors including subject matter experts, consultants and memoir writers often marry book sales and speaking events to strengthen their influence. Fiction authors, too, rely on bookstore appearances and speaking at literary festivals and events to build and connect with their audiences.

Maybe you became a writer to help strengthen your speaker clout. Or, maybe you never even considered that becoming a speaker could be part of your author journey. Either way, consider the following steps to build influence through speaking.

  1. Identify your strengths. Not everyone is a natural when it comes to public speaking. That’s why we work with authors to identify their top influencer traits first. Maybe you’re better as a panel speaker as opposed to a keynote speaker, or maybe you’re great with podcasts but speaking in front of a live audience terrifies you. While getting comfortable as a speaker takes time and practice, don’t force it. There are ways to find speaking opportunities that fit your specific strengths.
  2. Find a speakers agent. A speakers agent is similar to a literary agent, only they focus on–you guessed it–securing speaking opportunities. Working with a professional in this capacity is important because these agents know what opportunities exist, who to contact, and how to get the gig (on the terms you want). Now, we’ll be the first to admit that a great speakers agent is hard to find. In fact, many will only work with authors who already have a successful speaking track record. So when you come across one with the right relationships and know-how, don’t let them go.
  3. Book early. Often, the more significant the conference or speaking engagement, the earlier you need to pitch your topic. Long-running major events like SXSW and the Texas Women’s Conference take speaker submissions 8-9 months in advance. Other trade conferences and organizations will gladly rebook successful speakers so, as you complete a successful appearance at an annual or regularly occurring event, don’t wait to follow up. Talk to the event planner immediately about a repeat performance.
  4. Iron out the logistics. “Who’s got the books?” We’ve heard far too many speakers utter that question in a panic. Don’t assume the event planner you’re working with will take care of everything for you. Iron out details like who will be providing your books, how they’ll be sold or distributed, whether there will be a book signing, even down to who will have the Sharpies. Do the same for the technology you’ll need for your presentation. Leave logistics to chance and you’ll risk leaving an unprofessional impression for both the attendees and event planners.
  5. Capture the audience’s info. Your purpose in speaking is to gain followers, so be sure to have a system in place to stay connected to your audience long after the event. Incentives are a great way to do this. You can send a powerpoint or summary of notes or freebie to participants with incentives to sign up for a newsletter or to follow you on social media, for instance. Or you could offer a giveaway of your product or service as a free product sample (FPS) in exchange for adding them to your email list.
  6. Be social. Ignore social media leading up to and during the event at your own peril. Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter are all valuable tools to help get the word out about your speaking event. Ask the event planner what social media they’ll be using to promote you and be sure to monitor those channels early and often. Retweet and share promotions and respond to chatter and questions about your session. During and immediately after the event, be sure to monitor and respond to feedback and questions on platforms like Twitter.
  7. Go live online. Also in the social realm, consider a Facebook or Instagram Live video for the Q&A portion or some other section of the event. Doing so will broaden your audience and give you a lasting video recording to promote. If live video isn’t allowed, find out how you might be able to record a portion of the event. If you’re unsure how a recording might help you build your influence, think about TED Talks. Authors like Susan Cain and Brene Brown both broke through on YouTube with more than 8 million viewers each of their recorded TED Talks (Cain’s on the power of introverts and Brown’s on the power of vulnerability).

There’s no more direct way to get your book into the hands of your audience than through speaking engagements. It’s an important step in the process that takes you from author to influencer. Learn more about what we call The Road to Influence–and how speaking fits.

The post 7 Tips on Building Influence as a Speaker appeared first on PR by the Book.

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Is your new book about to hit the shelves? Congratulations!  It’s an incredibly satisfying and exciting time, but the hard work is far from being over. For many authors, the “home stretch” of publicizing and marketing their book is invigorating, but it can also be overwhelming.

Garnering publicity for books is its own art form. As authorities in the book PR and marketing space, we’ve put together a short but comprehensive guide that will help you approach the process like a seasoned pro. Use these proactive tips to reach the widest audience from the very start of your book launch and beyond.

  1. You’re the Expert. Whether your book is fiction or nonfiction, a cookbook or a memoir, a children’s book or a business book, you are now a go-to source. Your book offers a timely opportunity to discuss your viewpoint, your research, your experiences, and your expertise to a wider audience. It’s also an opportunity for you to be an influencer, someone with a strong core group of followers who share your expertise and champion you to their own communities. To learn how to harness your influence, read our 3 Ways to Build Authority as an Author.
  1. Seasonal Tie-Ins Work Great. Is your book about the best national and state parks in your area? Spring and summer show a big uptick in visits and vacations to these parks, offering a perfect tie-in. Consider posting blogs or guest articles at those times when online searches among your audience is high. Does your book examine the science behind global warming? The lead-up to Earth Day is prime time to get the word out. You’ll find many TV news reporters, newspapers and magazines searching for experts to interview. Is your book about children and technology? If your local library is hosting an event for parents and children on the topic, don’t miss the opportunity. Be on the lookout for ways to tie your book and your authority back to a seasonal topic that offers another way to bring your book to a new audience.
  2. Start in Your Backyard. Another crucial step in book publicity is to cover all the local bases. Explore opportunities with your hometown newspapers, radio shows, microblogs, online forums, libraries, neighborhood bookstores, meetups, YMCAs, and schools.  These avenues provide opportunities like speaking and workshops, book readings, contributed articles, interviews, and guest lecturing. Your neighbors will always champion authors in the community, so make sure they know you have a book!
  1. Don’t Be Afraid to Partner Up. Look for ways to build ongoing or long-term opportunities. Perhaps you could hold a regular workshop for your local chamber of commerce, a professor could adopt your book as a course addition, a national organization could list your book as a resource, or a reading club could champion your book as a featured pick. Hook into groups and organizations that will give your book added visibility to the right audience.
  1. It’s Never too Late to Think Visually. While you may be a word person, don’t devalue pictures (a picture is worth a thousand words, after all). If your book includes scientific research, consider creating highly shareable infographics that explain the ideas in visually compelling ways. A bookmark or business card that recaps your message can be popped into copies as they are being sold. Need more than just a stand-alone image? Consider a SlideShare presentation. If you have compelling footage, images, or photos, look into creating a simple book trailer. If you have beautiful quotes or superb endorsements to share, create compelling social media images that can go viral.
  1. Yes, Social Media Is Important. If you don’t have a voice on the big social media networks, the time is now. Not sure where to start? Read our primer on Social Media for Authors. You don’t need to be on every social network, but you should choose one or two to give your book publicity a fighting chance. Love taking photos with your smartphone? Instagram may be perfect for you.  Facebook can give you a great start with friends and family and help you build up a following. And LinkedIn is important if you’re looking to broaden your business brand and connect with fellow professionals.

Now that you have a better understanding of how to market your book like a pro, remember: It’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon. Pace yourself and look at the publicity and marketing process as requiring diligent and daily “training” that creates the foundation for a well-executed campaign. Along the course, be ready for unexpected opportunities to break from the pack. A well-cultivated relationship may provide a new avenue for you to share your book with a fresh audience. A breaking news story may provide a moment for you – and only you – to show off your background. That’s when the daily work you’ve put into your campaign will pay off.

Marketing your book isn’t easy, but it’s critical as you navigate what we call The Road to Influence. That journey starts with your book, but publicity along with a strong brand and digital marketing is what will take you from author to influencer. And the best news? You don’t have to navigate the journey alone. Find out here how we can help.

The post The top 6 things every new author should know appeared first on PR by the Book.

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Can you promote your book and build your authority without social media? Perhaps, but we wouldn’t recommend it. With more than one billion people seeking and sharing content every day, social media is a must. Even non-social promotional routes like speaking engagements, contributed articles and media appearances now tie back to social media. Wherever you go, whatever you do, people are going to want to tag you, quote you, follow you, and get to know you better on social. Without it, you’re facing an uphill battle with no traction.

So where do you start?

As experts in social media for authors, we‘ve listed out the top social media platforms for promoting your book with an overview of how and why to integrate them into your book campaign. Don’t worry: You don’t need to be on every platform. But we hope this primer inspires you to choose one or more that are right for you.

Instagram. This is the fastest-growing social network (seriously, it now boasts 1 billion users). If you’re a visual person and are handy with your smartphone camera, Instagram is for you. It’s a visually driven platform that can expand your author profile with a powerful photographic punch. The content should be driven by your personality and interests, rather than solely about your book. Authors on Instagram share their lives behind the book, showing where they write and find inspiration, how they get ready for interviews and events, and other images that enhance their personal backstories. Draw in new followers with fresh and unusual images, smart captions, hashtags, and videos.

To start: Engage with the hashtag #bookstagrammers to find book lovers who will give your book a look.

Facebook. While it’s not growing as quickly as Instagram, Facebook sits steady with 1 billion registered global users itself. Used in conjunction with your website, it can serve as a way to roll out your book launch and build up a strong fan base. You can share relevant content, news, and upcoming events. You can even pre-sell your book, reveal your book’s cover, run surveys, and host a Facebook Live event. Facebook can be as creative and as expansive as your own imagination, with one caveat: Constant changes to its news feed and algorithms can make it a tricky marketing tool to master. Find a reliable resource to stay on top of changes and be prepared to put some well-placed ad dollars behind your posts to expand your reach and target new readers.

To start: Join a group and interact with potential fans. Create your own book page and invite friends to “like” it.

YouTube. Into video? YouTube is more than just a place to store them. It’s the second-largest search engine after Google (and by no coincidence owned by Google), so your videos could be the reason a significant number of new fans to stumble upon you. Short videos add another dimension to your book campaign by showing you in action, a necessity if you’re a capable speaker looking to solicit more speaking engagements. It’s perfect for unpacking a big idea or rolling out a series of topics related to your book. Link back to and share the videos on your other social channels and website, and create tags to increase your searchability.

To start: Create a channel and post a book trailer or a series of videos of you discussing or reading from your book.

LinkedIn. With over 550 million global users, LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional social network. Use this platform to connect with specific business communities and select groups, pinpoint fellow thought leaders, and share and create relevant content that can position you as an expert and authority in the business world. Work with a LinkedIn expert to help you refine your background and other profile elements to help you put your best face forward. Showcase your thought leadership, share relevant business-related content, publish and share blog posts, and participate in specific groups that will get you noticed.

To start: Create a profile or update an existing one to reflect your current book or personal brand.

Twitter. This virtual cocktail party lets you dip in and out of conversations. The more people you “talk to” (and follow and tag), the more followers and engagement you’ll get. The original spot for hashtags, Twitter makes it easy to use them to locate relevant content and people to follow. Just be sure to keep your interactions professional, please.

To start: Write a short, smart bio, and then follow the people you’d like to follow you, whether it’s fellow authors, bookstores, or other industry influencers.

Now that you have a general overview of the big platforms – and there are more, including Pinterest, Snapchat, Tumblr, and Reddit, among others – check them out. Look for boards, threads, groups, and especially authors whose work you admire and want to emulate. Pick the right ones that are best for your book, your brand, and the audience that you think will give you the most engagement. Remember, the key word is engagement. Choose vehicles to interact with potential fans directly and understand more about what drives them and gets them excited.

In other words, get social!

Social media is a critical step on the journey we call The Road to Influence. The road starts with your book, but the journey is fueled by book publicity, influencer marketing, and digital relevancy. Whether you need advice on how to get started or need a fresh set of eyes to help you create more engaging content, we can help. Find out more about what we do here.

The post Social Media For New Authors: Where to Start appeared first on PR by the Book.

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By Marika Flatt

I love speaking at Pub U—it’s like a homecoming for me. I get to see former clients, current clients and get introduced to future clients. I get to see industry friends who are scattered across the country (it feels like the sorority I was never in!). I get to hear brilliant people share their book industry wisdom. And, if I’m lucky, I get to dance!

A few weeks ago, I was part of the faculty teaching at Pub U and it really was a homecoming because it was in Austin where PR by the Book’s headquarters is located.

Here’s a few things we heard or learned at Pub U:

  • We love “Brooke’s books,” what people know as She Writes Press. Brooke Warner is one of the most intelligent, driven and dedicated leaders in the indie publishing arena. We love everything she stands for are excited she’ll be leading IBPA’s board next year.
  • “In our books, the reader is transformed by nature. Our books are encouraging people to be more reflective on their lives,” said Karla Olson, Director of Publishing at Patagonia Books. We’re honored to have handled their publicity for six years.
  • We learned so much more about the effect of influencers on Instagram from Corrin Foster of Greenleaf. She helped us realize what a big part of book promotion they have become.
  • Kathy Strahs of Burnt Cheese Press reminded us of one of our favorite quotes that give us goose bumps: “The learned household has many books.”

IBPA is already planning for next spring’s Publishing University on the East Coast. Find out more here https://www.publishinguniversity.org.

The post 4 Things We Heard at IBPA’s Publishing University appeared first on PR by the Book.

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Reasons You Need Media Training to Sell Your Book

 Think you’re “good enough” on camera – let a network producer decide

By Paula Rizzo

Most authors and experts think they’re pretty good at speaking and getting their messages across. You may speak all the time as a keynote speaker giving talks for thirty minutes or even an hour. Or maybe you lead workshops and discussions.

Guess what?

None of that will prepare you for being interviewed in the media, especially when it comes to television. You may think you’re up for the challenge but when put on the spot you might not be as slick as you think. You have mere seconds to get your message across and make your point.

I’ve spent nearly two decades as a television producer in New York City and even won an Emmy award. Most recently I was the senior health producer for Fox News Channel for over a decade. That means I’ve conducted a lot of interviews and booked a lot of guests throughout my career.

And I’ve seen it all – experts who freeze on camera, who babble their way through an interview or there was even the one who turned bright red the entire time and never returned to a normal hue until we hit the commercial break. It was heartbreaking because all those media snafus can be prevented.

On the other side of the coin – do you know what the experts who were booked and asked back again and again had in common? They could hold their own on camera and gave my audience information they could use. Not to mention they also knew how to get a producer’s attention and become a go-to expert.

I’ve got you covered – I put together a complete checklist to become a media go-to that you can check out here.

I’ve left network news and now I’m a media consultant and train authors and experts. Having someone who’s been on the inside and knows what will really get you asked back can make or break your appearances.

Here are just a few benefits to being media trained:

  1. Confidence On Camera: What if you’re asked a question you don’t know the answer to? Or what if the host is combative in some way? Yikes! Being able to practice these scenarios and your go-to responses is like gold for any expert.

Some people don’t like being seen on video or being interviewed on camera. Practice makes perfect. When you’re being interviewed you want to come off cool, calm and collected. Plus you want to be sure your stomach isn’t in knots.

  1. Get Your Message Across: I’ve always looked at media as a public service and as an expert you should do the same. You want to get your message across but don’t forget why you’re doing it. It’s to inform and to change someone’s life for the better.

Be generous with the information that you share and never say, “oh it’s in my book.” Nope! A producer will never bring you in again again if you come off as too promotional. Media training will help you to get your message across so you come off as an expert, not a salesperson.

Let’s be honest – television is a visual medium. You need to look good. As soon as you grab a producer’s attention with your pitch idea they want to see what you look like and hear what you sound like. Media training will get you ready to pass any producer’s test and ensure you wear the right thing, sit the proper way on set and gesture appropriately without looking like Kermit the Frog flailing about. (Yep – I’ve seen this happen too!)

I know you might be thinking this all makes perfect sense but without going through some mock interviews and really trying it out – you’ll never know who you’ll perform. Nailing a media interview can make or break the success and life of your book. I’m an author too and believe me it pains me to know that the media isn’t interested in doing a commercial about my book. But they just don’t. They want experts who have an opinion and who can help their viewers or readers in some way. You have it in you but sometimes it takes a little media training to pull the genius out!

Check out my complete checklist to become a media go-to here for more insider tips and tricks.

About Paula Rizzo

A best-selling author and Emmy-award winning television producer for nearly 20 years, Paula has produced health, wellness, and lifestyle segments with a range of top experts, including JJ Virgin, Jillian Michaels, and Deepak Chopra. Most recently she served as the senior health producer for Fox News Channel in New York City for more than a decade. Today, she works with experts, authors, and entrepreneurs on how to position themselves for media (traditional as well as blogs and podcasts), build their lists, and engage customers and fans for their brands, books and businesses.

Paula’s also the co-creator of Lights Camera Expert – an online course geared towards helping entrepreneurs, authors and experts get media attention.  

Paula’s the founder of the productivity site ListProducer.com and best-selling author of Listful Thinking: Using Lists to be More Productive, Highly Successful and Less Stressed, which has been translated into 12 languages and has been featured on many media outlets including Fox News, Fox Business, Prevention, Business Insider, Entrepreneur, Brides and made it on Oprah.com’s list of “Self Help Books That Actually Help.”

Get Paula’s “Checklist for Becoming a Media Go-To” at PaulaRizzo.co.

The post Guest Post: 3 Reasons You Need Media Training to Sell Your Book appeared first on PR by the Book.

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Many authors rely heavily on reviews and author spotlights from book bloggers and bookstagrammers, and we have compiled a great network of these folks that we work with on a regular basis. We recently sent out a survey to our bloggers, and we learned quite a bit. With over 65 individual responses we feel we are now able to better accommodate bloggers as their needs and audiences evolve with quality content to post on their blogs and social media. We want the content offerings from our authors to elevate each of these blogs and increase readership, and no one knows what works for their readers better than the bloggers themselves!

Here are a few interesting statistics that we learned from our survey:

  • Almost 65% of the bloggers we surveyed liked to offer book giveaways to their readers. And, only 3% preferred not to.
  • The average number of pitches a blogger gets a week from publicists/self-published authors can vary, around 25 pitches per week.
  • Lastly, if a blogger is pitched for a Virtual Book Tour, the ideal amount of lead time needed is 4 weeks (42%) followed by 6 weeks (34%).

In exchange for responding to our survey, each blogger was entered into a random drawing for a prize. The grand prize winner goes to Alexa from the blog http://www.alexalovesbooks.com. We will be mailing her a prize box filled with goodies and she will also receive an email with a Gold Access Pass to the Nonfiction Writers Conference ($225 value)

And since we had so many responses,  we also have a runner-up who won a one full-year Authority Membership to the Nonfiction Authors Association ($190 value). This lucky runner up is Mike Figliuolo from Thought Leaders, LLC. He will get an email to claim this wonderful prize.

Thank you to all of the bloggers who took the time to complete our survey. With the ever-changing demands of blogs and social media, we found this survey to be very helpful to PR by the Book and our clients.

The post Blogger Bonanza Survey appeared first on PR by the Book.

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Austin is a huge city with an equally huge population. Shockingly, a survey taken in 2016 shows that 8.2 percent of workers in Austin telecommute (it’s #1 city for telecommuters in the country!). That means that about 44,485 people are working remotely in Austin.

Working remotely comes with many benefits: no commute time, comfortable clothing, easy access to all the luxuries in your home, and a flexible schedule. However, there can be downsides to working from home: a lack of community, few face-to-face interactions, overworking, or feeling like you’re confined to your office.

Luckily, Vessel Coworking has the benefits and solutions to make remote work feel like home without actually being at home!

Vessel Coworking is conveniently located off I-35 near 183 and offers amenities such as:

  • Private phone booths
  • High-speed internet
  • 24/7 secured access for members
  • Spacious wood desks
  • Cuvee Black/Blue Cold Brew on tap
  • Hot coffee on drip
  • Slack channel
  • Conference room with TV
  • Snacks
  • Free parking

Vessel Coworking strives to be a space for anyone and everyone, from social organizations to business entrepreneurs. For the more structured worker, you can opt for a place in the general area or a dedicated desk. Vessel has a kitchen, standing and seated desks, a conference room, and two “phone booth” rooms that are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

It’s a convenient place to hold meetings or to work individually in a room full of quiet, dedicated people. We at PR by the Book use it for our monthly team meetings and most weeks, you can find one of our campaign managers there, working hard promoting our authors.

This coworking space affords quite a bit of flexibility with deals on daily punch cards and weekly memberships with plans that range from day passes to a 24/7 dedicated desk. The first day of coworking is free. Memberships ranging from $65-$350 per month with full-time members having 24/7 access to the space. Email info@vesselcoworking.com for tours or more information.

The post Tired of working in your PJs? You should try coworking at Vessel. appeared first on PR by the Book.

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Women and women’s issues are celebrated in March during Women’s History Month – with March 8 also marking both International Woman’s Day and A Day Without Women. At PR by the Book, we’re delighted to commemorate and encourage the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in America – including the terrific authors and advocates we represent:

Captain Liz Clark is a surfer and environmentalist who has been sailing the seas on her 40-foot sailboat, Swell, since early 2006. She is the author of Swell: A Sailing Surfer’s Voyage of Awakening (Patagonia, 2018), was featured in the film Dear and Yonder (2009), and was nominated for National Geographic Adventurer of the Year in 2015. She holds a BA in Environmental Studies from UC Santa Barbara. For more than a decade, she has lived a nomadic ocean lifestyle, often sailing alone in places where you don’t see many women traveling alone. Together with her “sea sisters,” Liz works to raise awareness and address social, environmental, health and safety concerns, particularly for women, in the places she visits, through the Changing Tides Foundation.

Hattie Bryant is an author, TV host/producer, and palliative care educator and advocate, whose most recent PBS series, “I’ll Have It My Way with Hattie Bryant,” is based on her palliative advocacy. Her book, I’ll Have it my Way, is a tool for patients and their families to minimize, if not avoid entirely the pain, suffering, confusion and disagreements that can arise when their end-of-life healthcare wishes are not clearly spelled out and known in advance – an issue particularly troublesome for women. Practical, informative and written in laypersons terms, I’ll Have it My Way is a how-to book made personal as it answers questions that will help readers select a proxy, and to provide friends and family with a few simple instructions and wishes.

Dr. Melissa Deuter is an expert and trendsetter in the world of mental health care. She founded Sigma Mental Health Urgent Care and in doing so is redefining how psychiatric services are delivered. Her new book, Stuck In The Sick Role: How Illness Becomes an Identity, addresses “failure to launch” young adults (and their families) who are stuck in a mindset of disability. Why are so many young women and men lacking jobs and basic life/social skills? Why are they not leaving for college with the life skills we had, one generation ago? Dr. Deuter demonstrates how changes in parenting, coupled with an increase in healthcare and mental health care consumption, have led too many to become “stuck in the sick role” indefinitely.

Dr. Reyzan Shali, born in Iraq, has refused to live a life defined by a society that minimizes women. Her journey as a physician began many years ago when she lost her father to cancer; that devastating event led to her lifelong goal of helping as many families and individuals as she can to improve their odds against this illness. Her new book, TEAMING UP AGAINST CANCER: Simple, Powerful Ways to Beat the Odds and Take Your Life Back, offers support for patients and caregivers, as well as a roadmap to remove cancer-causing elements from your environment and diet to live your healthiest life.

We celebrate these women, and all the talented women authors and experts we work with…

We’re proud to showcase the exciting work they do!

The post Celebrating Women’s History Month appeared first on PR by the Book.

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