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Friends of PonderMed,
I hope you’re all exceptionally well and enjoying the festive period… Here is my November 2018 roundup.

November podcast releases

*Links below are to blog posts (or “show notes”) with the podcast embedded in the post. You can also find the pods on iTunes and Spotify.

PonderMed #8: Dr. Fatima Ahmed. Obs and Gynae Registrar and Clinical Entrepreneur

Fatima is an obstetrics and gynaecology registrar based in Birmingham. She is also an NHS Clinical Entrepreneur with an interest in digital health. She is currently working on a project using immersive technology to train obstetrics and gynaecology doctors with a focus on procedural and emergency skills.

PonderMed #9: Henry May. Lessons From the Frontline of Social Entrepreneurship

Henry is a social entrepreneur based in Bogotá, Colombia. He is the CEO and co-founder of Coschool, an organisation that transforms the lives of young people across Colombia by building character and leadership skills

PonderMed #10: Chris Odedun. Doctor, DJ and Radio Host

Chris is a senior emergency medicine trainee in London. He is also a DJ and Radio Host. On his show, Music Takes Me Up, he curates old and new music from a range of genres with descriptive interludes. His aim is “to bring new music to your ears, and connect it to the music of your personal and auditory youth”.

Speaking

I was asked to give My Mental Toughness Manifesto (a talk I’ve been giving fairly regularly for the last 3 years or so) at the BASICS FHPC Annual Conference in Edinburgh. You can listen to a summary of my talk on The Resus Room Podcast. Thank you Jon Barratt for the invite (looking forward to chatting to Jon on the show soon).

I was then in Cardiff for the excellent EMTA 2018 conference where I spoke about the transition from junior to senior in emergency medicine training. Here is the blog version of my talk. Thank you Carrie Thomas for the invite. The future is bright for UK emergency medicine!

I had to leave EMTA early to head off to Neuchâtel, Switzerland. There, I spoke to Swiss emergency physicians about the evolving relationship between social media and medical education, and specifically the emergence of the #FOAMed phenomenon. Thank you Christopher Richard for this wonderful opportunity.

Please do get in touch if you’re interested in me speaking to your department/institution/event/group.

My favourite podcast this month

I’ve been listening to a lot of Unfiltered with James O’Brien. The Robert Webb and Lilly Allen episodes are particularly entertaining and insightful. The Bill Browder episode is frightening… but essential listening.

A great (and very relevant) film I re-watched

My wife Caroline and I sat down to re-watch Moneyball, based on Michael Lewis’s brilliant book. It depicts the 2002 season of the Oakland Athletics baseball team. The team’s general manager, Billy Beane (played by Brad Pitt), has to assemble a team on a tiny budget with little hope of competing for silverware. Beane signs a group of players who, on the surface, seem distinctly average. He signs them based on sophisticated statistical analysis of their game productivity as opposed to the appearance of how they throw/swing the bat… which had never been done before. That season the A’s broke the all-time record for most consecutive wins (20). I love the film for many reasons (Hollywood slick, Pitt, sports), but mainly because it beautifully parallels a major issue in the acute medical environment: the frailty of gut-instinct decision-making.

Moneyball Trailer 2011 HD - YouTube

Something personal
View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Robert Lloyd (@pondermed) on Dec 3, 2018 at 3:05am PST

Last week I wrote down as many words/short phrases as I could think of to describe PonderMed on post-it notes. I then grouped similar ones together to map out overarching themes. Brand strategist Ali Vermilio, who is usually sat on the same table as me on the Ustwo Adventure Floor (the mutual workspace I frequent a day or so per week) kindly took 3 hours out of her day to facilitate this process for me. I found it incredibly useful to think about my “why”, and in our next session hopefully we’ll be able to distil it down to a single sentence. I’ve always wondered where this relentless drive to produce content for PonderMed comes from, and what my ultimate ambition is. I feel much closer to understanding now. I’ll be sure to update you as this exciting process of self-discovery evolves. Thank you Ali, I hope you enjoyed my humble offering of a white Americano and posh white chocolate!

That’s all folks!
Robbie
@Ponder_Med (twitter)
@pondermed (instagram)

The post PonderMed Roundup: November 2018 appeared first on Ponder Med.

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About Chris

Chris is a senior Emergency Medicine trainee in London. He is involved with clinical leadership and is currently on the Royal College of Physicians Chief Registrar scheme.

Chris is also a DJ and Radio Host. He creates and produces Music Takes Me Up, which is played on Netil Radio. He curates old and new music from a range of genres with descriptive interludes. His aim is “to bring new music to your ears, and connect it to the music of your personal and auditory youth”.

Show Notes

05:10 Beers we were drinking: Beavertown Lupaloid and Inhaler Hoppy Pale Ale

06:43 Does Chris lead a double life?

07:20 How does Chris categorise himself in the music game?

08:00 Storytelling and narrative in music curation. Does Chris find automated Spotify playlists annoying?

09:40 The inception of Music Takes Me Up

12:50 The challenge of self-promotion. Musicians/DJs/artists are particularly rubbish at it as they want to spend more time being creative

15:20 How has Chris achieved such deep knowledge about so many musical genres?

18:10 Chris’s love of narrative… in the musical and medical environments (i.e. taking a patient’s medical history)

19:40 The phenomenon of online streaming and how it has disrupted the music industry. How has this influenced the creation of music?

24:40 How has Chris managed two careers?

27:20 Why has Chris kept his two careers so separate?

29:20 The challenge of authenticity. Case study: Comedian and ex-UFC fighter Brendan Schaub. Unanticipated skills you pick up in one pursuit will benefit others. If you are in a band, you will try and understand other bandmates roles as that makes the team work better – same applies in a medical teams.

32:20 Overall, has Chris’s musical career helped or hindered his medical career?
10,000 hours vs Deliberate Practice
The importance of a creative outlet

37:20 How is Chris feeling about becoming a Consultant?

38:45 Where will Music Takes Me Up be in 5 years?

39:45 Three artists that have affected Chris’s life most:
Radiohead, A Tribe Called Quest, J Dilla

Want more from Chris?

Music Takes Me Up

Chris’s about.me page

@chrisodedun on twitter

@chrisodedun on instagram

Chris on Linkedin

TV series recommendation

UTOPIA - TRAILER - YouTube

Until next week.
Robbie
@Ponder_Med

PS please give me a follow on instagram. I promise you won’t regret it!

The post PonderMed #10: Chris Odedun. Doctor, DJ and Radio Host appeared first on Ponder Med.

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I recently attended the excellent EMTA18 conference, and I was asked to give a 12 minute presentation on the transition from ST3 to higher specialty training (HST). Here is the blog version of that talk…

The ST3 to HST transition is a watershed moment in the career for all EM trainees in the UK. It marks the graduation from SHO to registrar, and that new label feels significant. I have had “registrar” written on my name badge before when I was working in Australia for a couple of years after F2, but they give any junior doc with a few months EM experience that job title so it felt a little bit like I was pretending(!).

Indeed, “graduating” ACCS (i.e. years CT1, CT2 and ST3) has made me feel (more) like a proper grown-up. The sense of accomplishment and additional responsibility are palpable in equal measure. It’s worth noting that I was one of the few EM trainees in the UK to have all 3 of my ACCS years in the same hospital and, therefore, the sensation of my professional landscape transforming around me has been particularly profound.

Sure there was the occasional bit of “acting up” as an ST3 but I was knew deep down that I was just rehearsing. Senior people were always close by to bail me out if required.

Changes to my day at work that will be applicable to all EM trainees:

  • Taking charge of the department overnight (they call it being the “Medical Controller/MC” in my current place)
  • More regular clinical supervision of juniors
  • Attendance of meetings with important people
  • Taking a more active and decision-making role in clinical governance stuff

There will be plenty of info out there with guidance/tips on how to negotiate these new challenges from people far more qualified than me. I thought a more interesting approach to this talk/blog would be to share 3 reflections I’ve had as I’ve gone through the process. Of course, they are unique to my experience, but they have been pretty huge realisations for me and will no doubt be instrumental in shaping the future of my career… and my life in general.

I found ST3 a major slog, particularly having spent CT2 as a supernumerary anaesthetics/intensive care SHO. I spent that year re-acquainting myself with a reasonably normal working pattern and enjoying luxury of grabbing a few hours of sleep when working nights. The commencement of ST3 saw my nose being firmly re-attached to the grindstone, particularly with my first 6 months in the paediatrics ED which I found to be a far more relentless style of EM.

By the end of ST3 I found myself in a state of physical and cognitive exhaustion. In July I got back from a particularly busy family holiday in the US with multiple States visited and was due to start a stretch of nights the evening after I landed. Despite dosing myself up on industrial-strength American sleeping pills I struggled to sleep on the plane and when I got home. I started those nights like a zombie and I don’t feel like I got any deep sleep the entire stretch – I’ve never felt so physically damaged.

I never really recovered from that insult, and proceeded to encounter further bruising from a series of cases I was involved with in the week of days that followed. These included:

  • Making a mistake that may have resulted in an adverse outcome for a patient.
  • Two unsuccessful prolonged paediatric resuscitations.
  • Informing two young adults (and their entire immediate families) that they almost certainly had an underlying cancer diagnosis, and that their prognosis was potentially very poor.

I was emotionally maxxed out, physically exhausted and sleep-deprived. I turned up to work one morning and got told by the boss to cover resus. As soon as I walked in I felt completely unable to do the job. I knew I was an unsafe doctor in that moment and tearfully asked the boss for permission to go home. I took 3 days off sick and during that time I realised that I was dangerously close to having a full breakdown. During all of this I became acutely aware that my transition to ST4 was imminent and that gave me a sense of dread.

I knew that I needed to make some changes. I contacted my new Educational Supervisor and Training Programme Director and explained the situation. I requested a month career-break for August (my first month there) and it was immediately granted. I was overwhelmed with how understanding and supportive they were. They recommended that I put in an application for 80% Less Than Full Time Training (LTFT) – which I did.

I was able to return to finish the final fortnight at my ST3 department knowing there was light at the end of the tunnel, though it was tough. Each shift felt like a marathon. I got through it unscathed though, and spent my month off spending quality time with my wife and our friends, re-acquainting myself with exercise (mainly hot yoga), and optimising my sleep hygiene (which remains a work in progress). Midway through August I got an email informing me my LTFT application had been granted. The sense of relief (even though I didn’t even realise this was an option for me a month prior) was intense.

I’ve started ST4, albeit a month late, with a renewed enthusiasm for the job, and feel like I’m giving pretty close to the best version of myself to each shift. I also feel keen to show off my colourful feathers at work (blog, podcast etc), whereas previously I’d been purely in survival mode.

There is still plenty of room for improvement in terms of achieving an optimal lifestyle for safeguarding against emotionally maxxing out, but I certainly feel that I’ve moved my mental health up the priority list.

Is this realisation specific to the ST3 to HST career transition? Of course not, it can happen at any time in one’s career. Having said that, a considerable source of the paralysing anxiety was regularly remembering “Shit, I’m only half way through”.

This phase at work has revealed, in dramatic fashion, the fragility of my mental health. The experience has been frightening but amongst the most important of my life. I am certain that the structural modifications to my professional and personal life are critical to the longevity of my career in EM and, more crucially, my (and my loved one’s) overall happiness.

For better or for worse, I’ve always prioritised being “mates” with my juniors (F1s, F2s, CT1s etc). During my ST3 year I found myself deliberately snubbing the “senior persona” as I was afraid of sacrificing the informal, hierarchy-free camaraderie that I derive so much enjoyment from. I’m sure it’s mostly a reflection of my sociable nature and an innocent enjoyment of friendship with a group of people I feel a reasonable amount in common with… but I’m sure it’s also a desperate (and rather tragic) clinging to my youth!

The transition to ST4 has introduced a subtle but significant change in this arena. My relationships with juniors remain friendly, but there is distance between us now, both in terms of job description and how it feels during a conversation.

I’m actually chatting with my juniors on the shop floor more than I was last year, but that’s not because I’ve become more interesting, it’s because I’m being asked for advice (and my surname in the patient notes) more often. Our conversations have become purely transactional.

More than any other change in my day at work, it is this shift in my workplace relationships that has most clearly signalled that I have made a big jump forward in my career and now have a much broader range of responsibility.

Despite it being fairly sad to no longer be “part of the gang” (I didn’t get invited on to the F2 Whatsapp group this year), I’ve rapidly become comfortable in the registrar persona. I’ve found it surprisingly straightforward to ask F2s what their plans are for patients they’ve clicked on, or ask them to stop socialising on a night shift when there is a 3.5 hour wait, or sternly enquire why a particularly unwell majors patient hadn’t been discussed with me earlier in the shift. I would never have dreamt of having these kind of conversations last year as I didn’t want to jeopardise friendships… and there was always a middle grade available to do the dirty work.

Of course I was giving clinical advice to juniors as an ST3, but it felt far more informal. Had you asked me last year I would have said that a shift in my relationships in this regard was one of the things I was looking forward to least. But it has felt natural and seamless, which I could never have predicted. I have replaced the desire to be everyone’s friend with the desire to be a role model, and a doctor that the juniors think is good at their job. Being a likable bloke is a bonus. Each time I have a transactional conversation with a junior colleague it serves as a useful reminder of my new position, and nudges me to act with maximum professionalism. It’s regular signposting that I’m now a grown-up.

I’m sure this reflection is common to people across a range of careers where a ladder must be climbed. For me, it feels like the shift occurred overnight. Despite its rapid onset it feels like one of the most important and permanent adjustments to my thinking patterns that my career will ever see.

So it’s not just the changing conversations with juniors that have flagged my professional expansion. I’m being treated with more respect by everybody in the department, from the nursing students to the Consultants. Again, I guess that is par for the course when one nominally transitions from junior to senior.

I’m being asked to attend meetings with lots of important people, like senior faculty meetings, MDTs and trauma steering groups. And when I decide to stick my neck out and contribute something at one of these meetings, those important people actually listen to me (unless I say something particularly brainless).

In handover meetings after finishing a night shift, any residual small tasks get hoovered up obediently in an instant by the day team. Last year I would have done those tasks myself and stayed at work for a painful extra half hour.

When combining this new level of respect that I seem to be receiving with the sense of accomplishment having completed ACCS, along with getting my work-life balance semi-sorted, I’ve found my workplace Mojo to be at an all-time high.

This increased Mojo has manifested as three positives and one big negative.

Positives:

  • I’m trusting my decision-making more implicitly. Fewer worries about patient’s I’ve sent home etc.
  • I’m throwing myself into teaching more than ever because I feel like I actually have some knowledge that would be useful to transfer into the brains of juniors/med sttudents.
  • I’m getting myself into the mixer in resus and honing my team leadership skills at every opportunity. I’ve led more trauma calls and cardiac arrests in 3 months than I did my entire ST3 year.

Big negative:

  • There have been occasions where I’ve got drunk on my own self-importance and been rude to colleagues.

In the thrust of managing a crashing patient with flash pulmonary oedema in resus 2 weeks ago, I gave both barrels to the junior intensive care doctor for suggesting a Ddimer. And just last Friday I got into a very public row with the medical registrar for not immediately accepting my referral of an 80-year old lady who came in after a presyncopal episode in the supermarket with a trifascicular block on her ECG (which I was particularly pleased with myself for identifying… and so insisted on showing the nearby F2 how knowledgable I was by insisting on some ECG teaching… *cringe*). I got very agitated on the phone in full earshot of several patients and their families. I put the phone down and immediately felt ashamed of my lack of professionalism. I promptly called the guy back and apologised, which was fairly humiliating. The finger of blame must be pointed squarely at the recent Mojo infusion!

All of the Consultants I look up to the most have an ability to keep their necks wound in regardless of the situation. No matter how pressurised the moment, how overwhelmingly in the right they are during an argument, or how much abuse is being thrown at them, they stay calm and collected. As a result, the outcome of most situations in which they are involved tends to be favourable, no matter how dire the circumstances. Each of them has the ability to harness their enormous Mojo and apply it where needed and not where it has the potential to cause harm.

As I transition from ST3 to HST I have been entrusted with increased power. I am able to make things happen more effectively and deliver better care to my patients than ever before in my career. But a priority for my development must be to control my enthusiasm and engage my Type 2 brain as often as possible, as that power can turn rapidly into a toxic ingredient in an already high octane workplace.

Robbie Lloyd
@Ponder_Med

*Credit to Mr Bingo for slide design

The post The transition from junior to senior (blog version of EMTA18 talk) appeared first on Ponder Med.

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Here is a list of my recommended #FOAMed (EM/critical care open access online learning) resources from the above titled talk in Neuchâtel, Switzerland on 29/11/18:

First steps for getting involved

Join twitter ASAP

Follow all of the above people + EXPLORE

Use the #FOAMed hashtag to guide you to the right sort of tweets initially. You’ll soon get used to twitter and be following the right people for your specific needs. Twitter becomes intuitive very quickly.

The Life in the Fast Lane Weekly Update gets published every Sunday and is a useful place to get an overview on what’s particularly interesting that week.

If you need to improve your knowledge on something specific GoogleFOAM it.

If you feel the urge to publicly share ideas/reflect/educate via social media (i.e. blog/podcast/video)… just start. It’s that simple. The most challenging step is the first one. It gets easier.

I hope you all enjoyed my talk. Thanks so much Christopher Richard for the invitation. I have hugely enjoyed exploring beautiful Neuchâtel.

Please feel free to email me (ponderingem@gmail.com) if anyone has any follow-up questions/requests.

Robbie
@Ponder_Med

The post Recommended #FOAMed resources for Swiss EM audience in Neuchâtel appeared first on Ponder Med.

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About Henry

Henry May is a social entrepreneur based in Bogotá, Colombia. He is the CEO and co-founder of Coschool, an organisation that transforms the lives of young people across the Columbia by building their character and leadership skills.

He is also the founder of The Huracan Foundation which provides financial support to a selection of grassroots charities and initiatives in low income communities that use football to inspire children and improve education. Projects are currently being supported in Colombia, Chile, Mexico, Nepal and the Philippines.

Show Notes

1:01 How Henry and I know each other. A bit about Karnival at the University of Nottingham.

04:29 The Huracan Story (video below is Henry being interviewed on Argentinian TV)

Huracán FC London | Pura Quimica de ESPN+ | Parte 1 / 2 - YouTube

11:48 The birth of The Huracan Foundation 

14:40 My trip to Argentina

16:40 The birth of Coschool

20:37 The importance of teaching leadership/character skills as opposed to traditional subject matter in Columbia. A little about the cultural/political landscape in Colombia.

23:01 The short sightedness of prioritising traditional subject matter in schooling (maths, geography etc). A parallel with medical school curricula?

24:33 Why the ability to have difficult conversations is so crucial.

27:40 A day in the life of an emergency medicine doctor is a day made up largely of difficult conversations (repeatedly breaking bad news).

29:26 An uniformed ramble from me about artificial intelligence. Henry’s input makes up for it.
Here is Joe Rogan and Elon Musk chatting about AI

33:28 Growth Mindset vs Fixed Mindset
Mindset” by Carol Dweck (who I embarrassingly confused with Angela Duckworth)
Here is Dweck’s excellent TED talk

37:12 The Four Horseman of Fixed Mindset

38:20 Growth/Fixed Mindset applied to healthcare.

40:46 How I’m trying to adopt a Growth Mindset as I develop my podcast skills.

43:42 The importance of exercise. We discuss Henry’s morning routine (5am mountain running) and my new yoga habit.
“Discipline equals Freedom” – Jocko Willink

DISCIPLINE | Motivational video - Jocko Willink - YouTube

48:54 Henry waxes about a couple of grants that Coschool has just won from The Gates Foundation and  The Botnar Foundation.

50:16 The importance of saying no.
Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less” by Greg Mckeown
Gary Vaynerchuk

Want more from Henry?

@henrymay73 on twitter

Henry on LinkedIn

Book recommendation

How Children Succeed” – Paul Tough

(This was Henry’s official choice in when I put him on the spot… he made a couple of other book recommendations which are listed in the show notes above)

Until next week.
Robbie
@Ponder_Med

The post PonderMed #9: Henry May. Lessons From the Frontline of Social Entrepreneurship appeared first on Ponder Med.

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About Fatima

Fatima is an obstetrics and gynaecology registrar based in Birmingham. She is also an NHS Clinical Entrepreneur with an interest in digital health. She is currently working on a project using immersive technology to train obstetrics and gynaecology doctors with a focus on procedural and emergency skills.

Show Notes

06:52 Our early struggles with a career in medicine. “Imposter Syndrome

12:31 Why psychiatry was a tough F2 job for Fatima

14:36 The ED is a suboptimal environment to manage mental health patients

16:46 Fatima’s decision to pursue obstetrics and gynaecology

18:43 Unsure what she wanted to do (O+G or general surgery?)… She bravely took a year off

20:55 Robbie’s post F2 career decisions. Going to Australia = game changer

24:08 Why EM is the right specialty for Robbie

24:50 The importance of less-than-full-time training for Robbie

27:30 Fatima’s struggles with O+G

31:12 Robbie’s experience of O+G as an F2. What it’s like witnessing an unanticipated stillbirth

35:06 Fatima’s journey to becoming an NHS Clinical Entrepreneur

37:07 Fatima meeting Professor Tony Young changed her career/Outline of the NHS Clinical Entrepreneur Programme

38:52 Robbie feels like an odd one out on the Clinical Entrepreneur Programme (in a good way)

29:36 The desire for creativity

42:10 Could the success of the Clinical Entrepreneur Programme have an influence on medical training?

Want more from Fatima?

@fatima_alzara on twitter

@fatima111 on instagram

Fatima on LinkedIn

Book recommendation

Peak” by Anders Ericsson and Robert Pool

Here is Robbie’s review of the book (blog post titled The “Deliberate Practice Mindset’)

This episode of PonderMed is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Hagen Gerofke.

Until next week.
Robbie
@Ponder_Med

The post PonderMed #8: Dr. Fatima Ahmed. Obs and Gynae Registrar and Clinical Entrepreneur appeared first on Ponder Med.

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Pondering EM by Pondering Em - 9M ago

Friends of PonderMed,

You might have noticed I’ve been pumping out the pods thick and fast recently. My ambition is to “become a part of people’s week” as Pete Donaldson (my mentor on the Clinical Entrepreneur Programme) advises. In view of that advice I’ve set myself a target of releasing a fresh pod weekly, and I’ve managed to achieve that goal for October 2018.

With all this new content I thought it would be a good idea to release a monthly update (on the blog and via email) highlighting my latest stuff. It’s also a nice way of giving y’all an idea of what I’m up to/reading/listening to/watching/opinionated about etc.

October releases

PonderMed #4: Dr. Rosie Riley. Frontline Healthcare and Human Trafficking
Rosie is a Junior Clinical Fellow in emergency medicine and the founder of VITA Training which delivers training packages designed to equip healthcare professionals with the skills to identify, support and refer potential victims of modern-day slavery (human trafficking).

PonderMed #5: Dr. Adnan Raja. Clinician and Filmmaker
Adnan is a junior doctor and medical film producer. He is the producer of Nora, a film that premiered at the BFI IMAX cinema as part of TEDxNHS 2018. The film is set to be shown at several international film festivals over the course of the next year.

PonderMed #6: Dr. Liz O’Riordan. Breast Surgeon with Breast Cancer
Liz is a Consultant Breast Surgeon. In July 2015 she was diagnosed with Stage III breast cancer at the age of 40. She started a blog after her diagnosis to document her experiences as a patient. The blog has become a hugely popular (and award-winning) resource, paving the way for a “Woman of the Year” nomination in 2016. Liz is now a regular keynote speaker and media personality.

PonderMed #7: Simon Flemming. Orthopod and Anti-Bullying Campaigner #HammerItOut
Simon Flemming is a senior orthopaedics trainee and the man behind the #HammerItOut campaign tackling bullying, undermining and harassment in orthopaedics. The campaign has been so successful that other specialties are following suit and Simon has become a leading voice for culture change in the NHS and global healthcare.

*Links above are to blog posts (or “show notes”) with the podcast embedded in the post. You can also find the pods on iTunes.

Presentation I gave

A couple of weeks ago I gave a 20 minute presentation titled “Pressure Prophylaxis” to a group of anaesthetics trainees preparing for their viva (oral) examination. My mate Steve organises an intensive day of mock exams and asked me to to open the day with a talk getting their heads in the game performance-wise. “Pressure Prophylaxis” is tailored to the unique stress of viva exam conditions, but there is plenty of overlap with “My Mental Toughness Manifesto“. Feel free to get in contact for more info.

I managed to crowbar in this video of Ernie Els choking on the putting green…

Ernie Els with a 7 Putt at the Masters - YouTube

Book I’m reading

Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well” by Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen

Podcasts I’ve enjoyed this month

Joe Rogan Experience #1169 Elon Musk

The Adam Buxton Podcast EP.81 Louis Theroux

Documentary series I’m loving

Fightworld” on Netflix. I’m only a couple fo episodes in, but so far I’ve found this to be a beautifully produced series illuminating cultures with hand-to-hand combat at their core.

FIGHTWORLD Official Trailer HD - YouTube

Something personal

I’ve hinted on the podcast a couple of times that I’ve caught the hot yoga bug. I’ve been averaging 2-3 sessions/week for the last 3 months at Fierce Grace City. If my shifts in the Emergency Department permit I like to attend the morning hour-and-a half session. Practicing yoga has truly transformed my sense of wellbeing and in turn my productivity, particularly on the creative front. I foresee this remaining a part of my life for years to come and owe the discovery to my wife Caroline, who is a qualified yoga instructor. Last week I attended the halloween-themed Wednesday evening class and it was being led by Michelle Pernetta, founder of Fierce Grace and one of the most high profile yoga instructors in the UK. After the class I plucked up the courage to ask if she’d be a guest on PonderMed… and she agreed!

That’s all folks!
Robbie
@Ponder_Med (twitter)
@pondermed (instagram)

*If there is anything you think I should change/add to this newsletter for next month please get in touch.

The post PonderMed Update: October 2018 appeared first on Ponder Med.

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About Liz

Dr. Liz O’Riordan is a Consultant Breast Surgeon. In July 2015 she was diagnosed with Stage III breast cancer at the age of 40. She started a blog after her diagnosis to document her experiences as a patient. The blog has become a hugely popular (and award-winning) resource, paving the way for a  “Woman of the Year” nomination in 2016. Liz is now a regular keynote speaker and media personality. She had a local recurrence of her cancer in May 2018, and completed her treatment in September.

Liz co-authored “The Complete Guide to Breast Cancer: How to Feel Empowered and Take Control” with Professor Trisha Greenhalgh – a GP and fellow breast cancer survivor. The book was published in September 2018.

Her latest project is cancerfit.me – a website providing a range of resources regarding exercise for people living with cancer. She has plans to run an Iron Man triathlon in the near future.

Stuff we chatted about

03:44 Liz’s recent media whirlwind

06:34 The decision to pursue a career in breast surgery

09:10 Surgery is an art form

10:03 The moment Liz was diagnosed with breast cancer

12:21 What role did the “breast surgeon brain” have in dealing with the diagnosis?

13:57 How Liz has changed the language she uses when she talks to her patients/should there be a change in the medical school curriculum?

18:20 Social Media as a coping/support strategy

19:36 Blogging made the diagnosis real (and changed Liz’s world forever)

22:10 The book – “The Complete Guide to Breast Cancer”

25:09 Alternative/complementary therapies – complete bollocks?

That Mitchell and Webb Look: Homeopathic A&E - YouTube

26:47 Dr. Skylar Johnson’s CRAP test

28:33 Being a triathlon career… whilst on chemo

32:18 Cancer has come back? Planning for an Iron Man

32:46 The inception of cancerfit.me, and the evidence-base for the benefit of exercise on chemo

33:50 Isn’t yoga great?

36:00 The challenge of cancer conversations in the ED

Want more from Liz?

The Jar of Joy | Liz O'Riordan | TEDxStuttgart - YouTube

Liz’s blog – liz.oriordan.co.uk

@Liz_ORiordan on twitter

oriordanliz on instagram

What happens when the doctor becomes the patient?“- Liz and Trisha speaking to Jon Snow on Channel 4.

Liz’s appearance on “You, Me and the Big C” on BBC Radio 5 Live

You can buy a signed copy of Liz’s book “The Complete Guide to Breast Cancer” here. Order it as a paperback or e-book from Amazon, Wordery and Hive.

Liz’s Book Recommendation

The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F**k: How to Stop Spending Time You Don’t Have with People You Don’t Like Doing Things You Don’t Want to Do (A No F*cks Given Guide)” by Sarah Knight

What a podcast!

Until next week.
Robbie
@Ponder_Med

The post PonderMed #6: Dr. Liz O’Riordan. Breast Surgeon with Breast Cancer appeared first on Ponder Med.

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