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Growing up, my parents told me “do what you love, and the money will follow.” I think they were surprised, however, when my identical twin, Chloe, and I decided to take their advice and pursue music careers. In June 2017, we formed the soft-rock band Chloe and the Steel Strings, and our lives have never been the same.

In less than a year, we have added 3 more members to the band, recorded and released our self-titled debut album, and have performed a few hundred shows. Reflecting on the past year, I am still amazed at how far we’ve come both personally and professionally because of this band.

There are still people who doubt Chloe and me regarding our ability to be successful with our music, and I understand why. The industry is rocky, there’s a lot of competition, and there are no guarantees of success. However, these hurdles are ones that everyone faces, no matter the career. I’ve found that many of the skills and lessons I’ve learned from the band also apply to my other goals.

Here are 3 small pieces of advice that I’ve learned during this process for anyone who is pursuing a dream:

Have a plan

This is something we learned early on – you can’t record music and then drop a link online the next day, hoping that people will listen. Releasing music is all about strategy and planning – most of these plans are 3-4 months in length, when you must start planting the seed to ensure that people are anticipating your release.

The same planning strategy goes for everything we do. When booking shows for 2018 in January, we realized that many venues had already booked out their weekend openings a few months before – in October and November of the previous year. While this information was a surprise to us, it solidified the fact that if we want to reach our long-term goals, we must have a long-term plan. Since then, we have created a 5-year plan for both the band and for our own personal goals.

Work to pursue your goals everyday

The difference between reaching a goal and failing to reach a goal often comes down to the simple, yet painful truth that your success is based on the amount of time you commit. I’ve heard many young people talk about their dreams and plans for 10 years down the road, but on a day-to-day basis, those people aren’t doing anything to reach their long-term goal.

With our music, Chloe and I try to spend at least 30 minutes per day on making progress for the band. Whether that be emailing venues, planning social media posts, or practicing for shows, there are many small ways that we work every day to reach long-term success.

Don’t compare yourself to others

There is unavoidable competition in almost any life path, and with that comes self-doubt and comparison. Comparison can go both directions – you can compare yourself to someone who is doing better than you, or you can compare yourself to someone who is doing worse. Both modes of comparison are harmful because they move your focus from the path that you’re on, to one that someone else is on.

We’ve realized that every artist and musician is on his or her own path, and that we’re the only people we can be. While we have learned a lot from the companionship and leadership of older, more established bands, we try to avoid comparing our success to theirs, since we’re not on the same path.

Whether you are starting your own band or perusing a different life goal, I hope this advice from Chloe and the Steel Strings will help you in the pursuit of your own goals. Never lose sight of what is important in life- and that’s your own happiness! Pursue your dream and the money will follow – just be sure that you have a plan, you work diligently to achieve it, and you don’t let the competition ruin your motivation.

Pearson Students: What’s your dream are you hoping to pursue? What your first step to achieving it? Share by commenting below!

Anna Wagenhauser is a Junior at the University of Toledo in Toledo, Ohio. She is currently majoring in Economics and Psychology with a minor in Piano Performance. She’s involved in her sorority, Alpha Chi Omega, and serves on the exec board as Vice President of Intellectual Development. Anna is also the Pearson Campus Ambassador for University of Toledo.

Anna is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Pursuing a Dream: Lessons From a Part-Time Musician appeared first on USA.

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Living in a fast-paced world in which we are often in a rush, striving to be eco-friendly appears to require extra effort when in reality it does not! Here are small (and smart) changes you can make in your regular routine that can help protect the environment while also helping to lower your bills – something any college student loves! 

Turn off the tap

Conserve water and don’t leave the water faucet running! It is not a rare sight to see a water faucet left running at a public restroom, or while people are shaving or brushing their teeth. Saving water and being conscious of your water usage in general can mean lowering water bills as well as helping conserve clean water, an invaluable resource we all depend on to live.

Rely on reusables

Switch from plastic to reusable containers and bottles. Whether it be to pack your lunch or other things you are carrying with you on campus, you can limit waste by using reusable containers. This change can also apply to disposable plastic water bottles and coffee cups in favor of reusable ones. Some coffee shops even offer discounts to customers who use reusable coffee cups!

It takes more than 450 years for most types of plastic to degrade, some even 1000 years. By switching to reusables you can do your part to help reduce this form of pollution and also save by not having to purchase disposable plastic bags or bottles. If you happen to find yourself using disposable plastics like water bottles, at least deposit them in your nearest recycling bin to be recycled.

Pull back on purchases

Make the most of the things you have. You might desire the newest gadgets and new trendy clothes, but do you really need all of it? There is nothing wrong with treating yourself, but try to be conscious of your shopping habits. Make sure that you aren’t buying things that you don’t need or things that can be easily shared with your roommates. Get the best use of the things you already have. Don’t throw it away when it still has potential. Use it as much as you can and get creative!

Think global, act local

Stay informed. Join an environmental club at your campus or start one! Look into local organizations or follow national and international environmental organizations. It’s important to be informed about current issues and ways that you can help with conservation.

It’s cool to carpool

Drive less! Carpool, walk, and use bicycles more. Opting to carpool with your classmates, ride your bicycle or walk to college are great ways to reduce your carbon footprint, plus have fun in the process!

Reduce paper waste

Try buying digital textbooks and consider printing double-sided when you do use paper. Use digital calendars on your electronic devices to keep your assignments and schedule easily organized. These changes will not only save you money, but also lower your paper needs and conserve more paper.

Switch off, unplug, save

Unplug chargers and turn off lights that aren’t being used. Many electronic appliances continually consume electricity simply by being plugged in. Make sure to turn off the lights, air conditioner and television when you aren’t in the room.  Take advantage of natural light when you can. These actions will lower your electrical consumption, which will lower your bill!

In the words of astronomer Carl Sagan, as inhabitants of Earth it is our responsibility “to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.” By striving to make small but efficient changes in your routine, you can lower your environmental impact, lower your bills, and incorporate more eco-friendly practices in your life! Earth is our home, so it’s important to protect it, respect it, and celebrate it with our everyday actions and thoughts.

Pearson Students: How do you support sustainability on your college campus? Share by commenting below!

Doralicia Giacoman-Soto recently graduated from Tallahassee Community College with her Associate in Arts degree and is pursuing double majoring in Mass Communication and Film. She plans to become a film director and writer for media, film, and television. When she’s not recording short films and writing, she enjoys drawing cartoons and traveling. She is active in recycling efforts and taking care of the environment.

Doralicia is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Protecting the Environment: Eco-Friendly Changes Every College Student Can Make appeared first on USA.

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Summer. A time to relax, unwind, and enjoy what the sunny season brings. From movies and concerts to picnics and hikes, summer has loads of activities to offer. Although after a few weeks most teens and young adults run out of things to do and end up with the “I am bored on the couch watching TV” type of summer.

Luckily, I am here to put an end to that mindset and jump start your summer with 41 bucket list ideas that apply to any city!

  1. Go to a drive through wildlife safari or the zoo
  2. Visit your local Farmer’s Market
  3. Volunteer at a Humane Society
  4. Float in nearby river
  5. Go tour your state’s capitol
  6. Try kayaking
  7. Find a recipe and make it
  8. Have a bonfire
  9. Attend a live concert
  10. Meet someone new
  11. Visit a friend in another city or state
  12. Read a book
  13. Go thrift shopping
  14. Watch the sun rise
  15. Go to an art gallery
  16. Participate in karaoke night
  17. Take a pottery class
  18. Go on a hike or walk a trail
  19. Celebrate your half birthday
  20. Go to an amusement park
  21. Watch a movie at a drive-in
  22. Attend your state fair
  23. Make your own popsicles
  24. Go to a baseball game
  25. Relax by the pool
  26. Wakeboard or water ski at the lake
  27. Visit a local coffee shop
  28. Go fishing
  29. Plant a flower or a tree
  30. Participate in a running or walking 5K
  31. Rent or use a bike and ride around your city
  32. Attend the premier of a movie
  33. Go to the beach
  34. Clean out your closet and make some summer money
  35. Go rollerblading or indoor ice skating
  36. Fly a kite
  37. Stargaze
  38. Attend a yoga class
  39. Have a favorite movie marathon (Disney, Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings)
  40. Go camping
  41. Document it all

Inspired by this list are some common themes. For example, enjoy the outdoors. Stargazing and flying kites might remind you of your youth, but the carefree days outdoors don’t have to be over. Grab a friend and hit the park, you will not be disappointed by the adventure it brings.

I strongly encourage you to use this as a muse for your own bucket list. Enjoy this summer, mark things off the list, take pictures to remember each activity by, and make a bucket list collage when you finish!

Pearson Students – which of these ideas do you see yourself trying this summer? Share by commenting below!

Danielle Foster is a student at the University of Mississippi, known more commonly as Ole Miss. She is majoring in Hospitality Management with a minor in Business, and serves as a Pearson Campus Ambassador. Danielle loves being busy and is heavily involved on campus due to her passion for Ole Miss. She is an Orientation Leader and participates in many campus organizations including Phi Mu, Safe Ride, and the Associated Student Body. Danielle also works for Ole Miss Athletics as a student manager for football and as an intern for the Ole Miss Admissions office. Originally from San Antonio, Danielle’s favorite things include Texas, Ole Miss, running, and Drake.

Danielle is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post A Bucket List for Summer Fun appeared first on USA.

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Have you ever been in a slump looking for a job, internship or a new connection with someone in your field? Finding an internship can be stressful, competitive and extremely time-consuming. Here’s how I’ve used networking to land jobs and internships.

Look nearby

I always tell people that they shouldn’t be afraid to ask their family and friends for help. People love helping others and you never know who someone may know in the industry you want to work in. I landed my previous internship from one of my brother’s friends, all because I asked him if he knew anyone in public relations.

Get social

LinkedIn is key for so many reasons. I always try to stay on top of my LinkedIn profile and my resume so my information is up to date. Include that you are seeking an internship or job in your LinkedIn profile. You would be surprised by the number of recruiters and users who utilize this tool to find employees or interns. It is okay to search someone in the field you want to work in and connect with them on LinkedIn. You have nothing to lose by messaging someone and asking them for their time and knowledge.

Ask professors

Asking professors for help or advice is a great place to start. I have had many professors recommend my school’s career center. After completing a mock interview there, I ended up gaining key knowledge on improvements I could make, plus I made a connection with the instructor who interviewed me.

The best advice I ever received when looking for internships was to be persistent. If a job or internship doesn’t work out, that’s okay because something better will usually come your way if you have an optimistic view! Don’t be afraid to ask friends, family, and professors for help! Use social media, such as LinkedIn to help amp your leverage, and you will be set for success in internships!

Pearson Students: Do you have an internship? What have you learned from it? Share by commenting below!

Sydney Summers is a junior at the University of Kansas majoring in Communications. She is also the Pearson Campus Ambassador at University of Kansas. She is involved in the Student Senate and she enjoys hanging out with friends. In her free time, Sydney runs a food Instagram with over 20,000 followers –  @sydandmadeats. Her favorite snack in the entire world is chips and guacamole!

Sydney is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Networking: Tips from My Experience appeared first on USA.

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When students must choose between textbooks and food or gas money, the latter wins. But without course materials, students often find classroom success elusive.

A student entering his or her first year of college can expect course materials to cost between 5 to 10 percent of total expenses. At the same time, student populations are changing from the traditional 18 to 22-year-old to campuses that are more diverse, including older adults and returning veterans, all with unique financial challenges. But one financial concern remains consistent: course materials are expensive are often the first college expense cut when money gets tight.

The steep rise of textbooks

In 2016, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released a Consumer Price Index for college expenses. Between 2006 and 2016, tuition costs jumped 63 percent. Over that same period, textbook prices increased 88 percent. Covering that same time period, a study conducted by the Florida Virtual Campus revealed more than half of students spent more than $300 on books in a semester, while nearly a fifth shelled out more than $500.

More importantly, the Florida study showed how the high cost of materials directly impacts the student’s ability to succeed. When books are too expensive, two-thirds don’t purchase them, and of those students, 37 percent earn a poor grade, while almost one-fifth end up failing. To compensate for high book costs, students are taking fewer classes or don’t register for a class they need — but that ends up extending their time in school, which costs more money. It’s an ugly, expensive cycle.

How campuses stepped up

Students began to complain openly about the price of textbooks. Faculty became concerned that students stopped purchasing the expensive materials. Educators at Indiana University paid attention.

“We started pilots in 2009, working with some publishers, to make some electronic textbook content available, and we didn’t ask the students to pay,” said Stacey Morrone, associate vice president for learning technologies in the Office of the Vice President for Information Technology at Indiana University. The students liked the change.

Indiana University now works with 30 publishers who agree that the cost of e-texts will be at least 35 percent of a hard-copy edition. They have publishers who now offer their entire digital catalog at a flat rate. And importantly, the students will be able to access the e-text throughout their college career. While digital formats are optional, more faculty are buying in because, Morrone said, it ensures every student has their materials on the first day of classes. Indiana’s data shows that students who achieve A/B grades start coursework immediately and keep reading.

The faculty benefit

San Diego State University began its Immediate Access program in 2016 with two classes. That’s since grown to 80 classes with savings of $2 million in textbook costs, with a projection of 150 classes next year and $4 million in savings.

James Frazee, senior academic technology officer and director of instructional services, said students at SDSU are charged for digital books and materials as a course fee, and they aren’t charged the fee until after the add/drop deadline. The majority of students said they access the materials before that deadline and felt this access helped them academically.

“Students feel this is a good value,” Frazee said. Not only are the materials more affordable, but they deepen the level of engagement with faculty. Faculty can monitor the way the materials are used and can focus lessons around sections where it is clear students are struggling. Also, as students have access to materials immediately, faculty can conduct more frequent, low-stake assessments earlier in the semester. Having improved insight to how students are faring from day one, faculty can restructure the lesson plan that lead to improved student success.

Digital materials go beyond affordability, said Drew Miller, senior vice president of marketing with Pearson. Digital learning platforms, like Pearson’s Revel, combine content with immersive and engaged academic experiences. It allows both students and faculty to be interactive in the education process, creating a sustainable business model for both higher education institutions and the students they serve. Students are able to access and afford the materials they need to succeed while the institutions provide a learning environment that allows options that work best for all.

This content was sponsored by Pearson. See the original article here.

The technology behind digital learning shouldn’t isolate or disconnect — it can extend, connect, and expand the learning experience in ways never before possible. Our innovative digital solutions were created with one key goal in mind — to offer personalized, engaging learning experiences that help each student achieve greater success.

The post Breaking down the effect of affordable course materials on student success appeared first on USA.

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Teaching & Learning Blog By Pearsoned by Robin Beck, Contributor, Pearson - 2w ago

Diversity, communication, and other learnings that companies and higher education can take away from the World Cup.

The 2018 FIFA World Cup tournament is taking place in Russia from June 14 – July 15 and England is bringing the most diverse team it has ever taken. England has players ranging in age from 19-32 and nearly half of its players are black or of mixed identity.

Bringing together 32 nations with players speaking more than 20 languages, the World Cup is celebrated for its diversity and multiculturalism. While billions of people will watch the matches to see who will be declared winner, there is something else that businesses, in particular, should pay close attention to — team diversity and culture.

A recent article in the Harvard Business Review notes that a strong culture is implicit, pervasive, and enduring. Senior executives and HR professionals know this well. According to Deloitte Insights, 87 percent of organizations cite culture and engagement as one of their top challenges. Creating a diverse workplace with a strong shared culture is hard to build, but the rewards are far-reaching.

Avid soccer fan Ikechukwu Odum says the World Cup is his favorite sporting event. Having traveled to Brazil for the 2014 matches, he said what he enjoys most is the competition, the talent, and learning about the players’ backgrounds. “The World Cup means so much for the players and for the countries, communities, and the people they represent. Every player brings different abilities and talents, but they come together and try their best to win.”

In this way, FIFA soccer teams resemble the modern-day workplace, where different groups of people must work together to outperform the competition and reach a shared goal.

Diversity not only brings different experiences and skills to a team, but it also drives team performance. England midfielder Dele Alli said, “We’re all confident in ourselves and the team we have. We have a young, very talented squad…we just have to play as well as we know we can.” The same spirit of teamwork and collaboration should be present in the workplace.

Shideh Almasi, Director of People at Feedvisor, an algorithmic commerce company, said, “Teams at work function quite similarly to sports teams. They need to be diverse, they need to be adaptable, and they need to work together. You, of course, need the technical skills, but it’s the skills like communication, leadership, resilience, and interpersonal skills that help teams push forward to reach their goals.”

And CEOs, much like head coaches, must embrace soft skills like empathy to help guide employees to achieve success. Former Starbuck’s CEO Howard Schultz was well-known for his inspirational and touching messages to employees, driving big wins for the global company.

German soccer coach Joachim Low has a similar success story. During the 2014 World Cup championship, he told player Mario Götze, “Show the world you are better than Messi and can decide the World Cup.” Götze went on to score the game-winning goal for Germany.

Talent is the prerequisite, but the interpersonal skill of communication is what set Germany apart from the competition. Soft skills for both players and coaches prove to be crucial, driving results and positive outcomes.

Reflecting on the victory, Götze said, “…We can be happy that we have so many great and skillful players and a real good mixture of young guys and experienced players.” While there is no gender diversity among the all male soccer teams, the different ages, languages, and backgrounds make teams stronger, more agile, and more competitive.

The referees who govern the game are not exempt from using strong communication to work through language barriers and cultural differences. The 36 referees and 63 assistant referees were picked based on their skills and personality. Prior to refereeing the games, they were required to attend workshops and seminars.

FIFA Director of Refereeing Massimo Busacca said, “…the referee has to prepare himself in the best possible way in all areas…Knowing the different football cultures will help him in his performances.”

 Similarly, companies like Pearson offer employees ongoing training to help them develop a global mindset and understand cultural differences.

“It’s not always pretty if the teams aren’t organized or if there’s not a shared philosophy,” Odum says. “But you hardly see bickering or egotism, because the players know they represent more than the game.” Companies that take time to build their culture with diverse teams and shared values have employees who work effectively with others toward the mission and vision of the organization.

Almasi adds, “There’s so much you can learn by working with people who share common goals and values, but who think differently and maybe even look differently than you.” Soccer teams competing in the World Cup understand this and use diversity to their advantage. Businesses tuning into the World Cup may do the same and prioritize investing in a more diverse workforce. That’s a winning strategy — on or off field.

About the author

Robin Beck

Robin Beck is a former teacher and a staff writer for Pearson. She resides in Atlanta.

The post Soccer lessons appeared first on USA.

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Technology has proven to be a great tool in society. Can you imagine where we would be without it? This blog certainly would not be here! Technology not only impacts the way we communicate and exchange information, it also plays a big part in our education. Computers, tablets, cell phones and other electronic devices have perks for students. Whether you take courses online or on campus, here are some tips on how technology can enhance your education.

Taking online classes or modules

Online students and professors use technology for teaching, learning, and testing. Using online learning connects people together for a purpose. Students and professors can easily have access to course materials via computer, smartphone, or tablet. Instead of having students travel long distances to campus, the classroom comes right to the computer. Some professors even take the time to upload recordings of themselves lecturing. Plus, professors and their teaching assistants can respond to questions about material quickly via emails or discussion boards when using the online platform.

Testing

Online courses complete testing through a computer. For some courses, teachers may include a video monitor to watch students as they take their test. It’s important to know that even though you can take your test virtually anywhere, look for an ideal location.  Take your online exams in a place that is free of distraction, comfortable and familiar to you, and has strong internet connection.

Studying

In some of my courses, my instructors have included material widgets to help students practice key concepts. Basically, these are computerized games like hangman, crossword puzzles, or matching to help you practice and learn vocabulary and other concepts. Many students use phone apps or apps on websites to help study for tests. Quizlet is one of the most popular apps. I have also been in classes where students connect through GroupMe, an app for students to have an ongoing group chat. Most of my online classes have discussion threads where students ask questions and participate in assignments.

Homework

Many online courses and seated courses have online learning tools for you to complete homework in a fun and engaging way. For example, Pearson’s MyLabMath not only facilitates how you complete your homework, but also allows you to seek help when stuck on a tricky question. The “Help Me Solve This” button will open up a separate question similar to the one you are working on and walk you through the steps of solving it. Study tools like this are helpful in learning difficult concepts.

Technology is amazing to help students excel in academics! Whether it be for online classes, tests, studying, or homework – you can use technology to improve your learning.

Pearson Students –  How do you use technology for your academics?

Jennifer Brown is a senior at the University of Central Florida, majoring in psychology. She recently enlisted in the Navy to receive training as a Hospital Corpsman. She enjoys working with people and has a career goal of becoming a counselor.

Jennifer is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Technology Tools Enhance Education Online and On Campus appeared first on USA.

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Luke Reinsma recently retired from Seattle Pacific University, where he worked as Professor of Medieval Literature since 1986. His approach to teaching has inspired generations of students, including Melody Joy Fields.

Melody Joy Field's story - #InspiringTeachers - YouTube

It was Melody’s freshman year at Seattle Pacific University, and as she says, “I didn’t know anyone — or anything.” She was taking a class and a teaching assistant asked her if she’d met Dr. Reinsma yet. “You MUST meet Dr. Reinsma,” the TA told her.

“She walked me up to Luke’s office — completely book-lined walls, classic professor’s office—and he immediately invited me to come in, sit down, and tell him about myself.”

The traditional professor/student dynamic had always bothered Luke. From early in his career he had tried to find ways to bridge that gap. He felt that if professors and students could talk to and learn about each other as equals, the outcomes would be better for everyone.

His first approach to teaching was a simple one: by getting to know his students as individual people, he felt they’d open up to him, enabling them to learn more and understand better. He spent more than half of his time talking with his students to learn about them and their backgrounds. And more often than not, it happened outside of the classroom.

As Luke puts it, “I’m not sure the best learning happens inside a classroom, so I make sure to leave the classroom behind and change the context now and then.” Often that meant one-on-one office hours, meetings at the local coffee shop — even organized group hikes in the coastal forests.

Only after he’d gotten to know each student would he tackle the essays they’d written for his class.

Melody recalled learning a lesson from Luke the first time she met him to get feedback on an essay.

“He made me realize that you never know what’s going on in students’ lives. They don’t always come to class ready to learn — I certainly didn’t. Only after he’d really figured out who I was and what I was bringing to the classroom every day did we discuss my essay.”

His dedication would be inspiring in any person but it’s exceptional in a teacher.

— Melody Joy Fields, Adjunct Professor

With the professor/student hierarchy broken down, Luke would often write as much feedback on the papers as content Melody had written. His responses delved deeply into her opinions and ideas, which he would always value over grammar or grades. She responded well to this mutual respect.

“Luke excelled at finding something incredible rather than only seeing problems,” says Melody. “He always managed to find at least one elegant sentence so that I left his office knowing I could do it. His dedication would be inspiring in any person, but it’s exceptional in a teacher.”

That empathy and desire to find something beautiful in every essay also gave Melody the confidence to begin the revision process.

“He’d find a passage I’d written and say, ‘That’s ordinary. What’s extraordinary about this?’ And that taught me what revision is all about. It’s rethinking and revisioning what it is you really want to say, and saying it in the best way possible.”

Now a professor herself, Melody credits Luke with inspiring her to become a teacher.

“I didn’t know I was going to become a teacher. Certainly not a professor. I didn’t think I was smart enough. But I really wanted to be just like Luke. I wanted to read amazing stories, find incredible moments, and help others see that. To have someone take the time to see the world with you and give you fresh eyes — that’s what Luke did.”

Melody also credits Luke with her approach to teaching.

“Luke is why I teach the way I do. My experience as a student was so much more about a relationship, and not just about passing along information or skills. Yes, teaching is about skill building, but the best way to learn a skill is to see it modeled in front of you. And I saw the most valuable skills modeled by Luke every time we spoke.”

The post Professor blazes a trail to find the best learning appeared first on USA.

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I grew up in a family that didn’t believe mental health was a “real thing”. So when I started having migraines and panic attacks in my early adult years, I had no idea what to contribute it to. Five years later and (surprise!) I’m still learning about my anxiety and how to cope with it. Here are just a few suggestions that have helped me make it through my college years: anxiety and all.

Counseling

You knew it was coming, I knew it was coming, we’re just going to get this out of the way first thing. Counseling, therapy or whatever you want to call it is one of the best options for a stressed out student. Going to a counselor for the first time can be intimidating, but once you find the right one for you it really pays off. Most universities have psychological services on campus where you can attend individual or group therapy sessions at a time convenient for you.

EFT Tapping

Okay, this one is probably the weirdest on the list but stay with me. EFT stands for “Emotional Freedom Technique” and is also known as “Tapping Therapy.” The reason I love this option is because I can do it wherever I am–in my room, on public transportation, in the middle of the library during a study session… as long as I feel comfortable that I can disguise my “tapping” as mindless fidgeting. Basically the theory is that you can release negative emotions by tapping on different meridian points in your body. I don’t know all the science behind it; I just know I feel more peaceful when I finish, and it didn’t require me scheduling an appointment with a therapist or doctor.

Meditation

I’m just glad my five-year-old self can’t see my 23-year-old self sitting on the ground with my legs crossed and a towel over my head (to block out the light). But what five-year-old Whit didn’t know is that meditation is one of the best preventative practices for anxiety. Anxiety is usually caused when our mind starts racing about all the things we can’t control, so it makes sense that the way to counteract it is by practicing living in the moment. Some schools have guided meditation programs that they will refer you to. If not, there are some awesome apps. My favorite is “Calm” which has a lot of free sessions and great background noise. After you finish all the free sessions you can pay for the subscription. Give up buying one Chik-fil-a sandwich for a month of mindfulness. It’s worth it.

Diet Changes

I’ll rip this one off like a band-aid. If you can’t control your anxiety, stop eating sugar. Spend 30 seconds on Google Scholar and you’ll agree with me. It’s also possible you may have allergies you don’t know about that are increasing your anxiety–in which case you should look into getting tested for food sensitivities (some chiropractors offer acupuncture and allergy testing). Common sensitivities to be tested for are sugar, gluten, and eggs.

Medication

As I mentioned before, I was raised in a pretty conservative family when it came to mental health and medication. I was hesitant to try it, and I DO think it’s important to be careful with it, but anxiety medication is one of the best things that has happened for my mental health. Although I would suggest that it should be a short term option until you get all the other factors sorted out, it’s a great choice for someone who is struggling to get their health under control.

For a while I thought anxiety was going to be a one-time fix thing, and after reading some self-help books and seeing a doctor I would be mostly fine. I soon found that this is not the case. Being in the anxiety battle for the long-run can seem daunting, but that’s why it’s important to get down these practices now while you’re young. You CAN have anxiety and get a degree–if you rely on your resources.

Pearson Students: How do you deal with anxiety? Do you see any of Whitney’s tips working for you? Share by commenting below!

Whitney Larson is a Junior studying Public Relations at Brigham Young University. She is the Pearson Campus Ambassador for her university. She plans on getting her Masters in Student Affairs and becoming an Academic Adviser. In her free time she loves to read and write music. Her alternate plan is to move back to Arizona and open up an event center where she will continue her work in Floral Design.

Whitney is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post 5 Ways for College Students to Cope With Anxiety appeared first on USA.

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Teaching & Learning Blog By Pearsoned by Caroline Leary, Manager, Pearson - 2w ago

A new report responds to The Future of Skills by exploring its implications for education systems and offers up practical solutions for higher education to more closely align with what the workforce needs.

We are excited to share a new report by Jobs for the Future (JFF) and Pearson that explores the changing world of work and provides recommendations for shifting from the traditional route to employment to a network of pathways that is flexible, dynamic, and ultimately serves more learners.

Released at the Horizons conference in June, Demand Driven Education: Merging work and learning to develop the human skills that matter looks at what is required for transitioning to the third wave in postsecondary education reform – demand driven education.

The first wave – access – was focused on getting more people to enter higher education. The second wave was focused on improving achievement – getting more students to earn degrees and certificates.

In this third wave, the worlds of education and work will converge producing programs that ensure students are job-ready and primed for lifelong career success.

Adapting to the needs of both the learner and the employer, “demand driven education takes account of the emerging global economy — technology-infused, gig-oriented, industry-driven — while also striving to ensure that new graduates and lifelong learners alike have the skills required to flourish.”

The report states, “as the future of work unfolds, what makes us human is what will make us employable.”

While technological literacy is critical, learners need educational experiences that cultivate skills, including fluency of ideas, originality, judgment, decision-making, and active learning, all supported by collaborative academic and career paths.

Higher education and employers are making headway in this arena with innovative programs like University of North Texas’s Career Connect and Brinker International’s Best You EDU.

In a recent interview, Joe Deegan, co-author of the report and senior program manager at JFF, said,“although technology such as digital assessment might enable educators to make programs faster and more adaptive, the most significant change is one of mindset.”

The future is bright. And there’s a lot of good work to do through active collaboration and partnership to create rewarding postsecondary learning experiences that are responsive to our changing world and inclusive of all learners.

Learn how our Career Success Program helps learners discover, develop, and demonstrate their best professional selves to get their targeted job and achieve lifelong career success.

The post New report: Demand driven education appeared first on USA.

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