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Teaching & Learning Blog By Pearsoned by Jessica Albright - 2d ago

Students: you have a voice on your campus and in your community; it’s up to you to use it! If there is something that you don’t think is right, you should address it with the proper administration or officials. For example, I am a huge animal lover and I do not tolerate the exploitation of animals for any reason. Here are ways I learned to speak up and be an advocate on my campus.

Seek out those with similar interests

I found other students with similar interests by starting an Animal Rights Club. It was the very first Animal Right Club at Missouri State, and therefore posed challenges in getting it started, but it was well worth the feat! I encourage you to start your own club on your campus as well. Read my blog about starting a club on campus.

Identify a goal

Together, we advocated for reform on campus. We started with the goal of increasing vegan options available in our dining halls. We talked to the executive chef, and through collaboration we were able to get a full vegan meal offered at every meal of the day, including Silk milk machines and vegan desserts! The executive chef said that he didn’t realize there was a demand for these options until we showed him! Read my blog about this experience.

Seek compromise

A concerned student reached out to our organization regarding the petting zoo that was scheduled to come to our campus. We talked to the programming board that was bringing the petting zoo to campus, and they did not have any remorse. Undeterred, our members researched the petting zoo for USDA violations and found that it wasn’t even registered. That turned out to be a violation of our school policy. We were able to compromise with the programming board to not bring the petting zoo, and instead the  host an alternative event for the student body.

Look for ways to educate

Our campus hosts a circus  each Spring. I organized with local activists in the area, as well as college students to have a big protest to help educate circus-goers of the cruelty animals endure to become circus acts. I was even interviewed by a local news station!

We each have our own unique passions and challenges. No matter your interests, I encourage you to speak up for what you believe in. Without our efforts on campus, there would not be a voice for animals. You can be that change in the world. You can make that difference. It only takes one person to initiate the movement, and others with the similar passion will follow.

Pearson Students: What are you eager to speak up about? Please share by commenting below!

Jessica Albright completed her bachelor’s degree in Marketing at Missouri State University in May 2017, and jumped right into the Accelerated Masters of Business program at MSU, where she is currently working towards her MBA with an emphasis in Data Analytics.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with family and being outdoors. She is a huge animal lover, and founded her school’s first Animal Rights Club, which she currently leads. She enjoys being a Pearson Campus Ambassador, and the Student Blog Editor in Chief for Pearson Students.

Jessica is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Speak Up! appeared first on USA.

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This series, produced with The Edtech Podcast, explores the implications of and questions around future tech for education. Listen for insights from experts — including contrarians — from across industry, research, and academia. Get caught up with episodes 1-7.  

What initiatives are supporting teachers and students to co-create games together? In this episode of our Future Tech for Education podcast series, hear from educators, gaming companies, and researchers on the evolution of games-based learning from “content” to “creation”.

Pearson Ep #8 - Draft_1 - YouTube

Subscribe to the Future Tech for Education on iTunes.

About the Author

Dr. Kristen DiCerbo

Dr. Kristen DiCerbo is the Vice President of Education Research and Learning Design at Pearson, where she leads a team of researchers and learning designers embedding what they know from learning science and assessment research into K-16 digital learning environments.

Kristen’s work centers on interactive technologies for learning and assessment, particularly the use of evidence from learner activity in games and simulations to understand what learners know and can do. She jokes that she only works with things that have three letter acronyms starting with E: Evidence-Centered Design, Exploratory Data Analysis, and (dabbling in) Educational Data Mining.

Kristen has been fortunate enough to participate in some exciting simulation- and game-based assessment projects, including work with GlassLab developing SimCityEDU and Mars Generation One. She also participated in the White House Game Jam.

Prior to joining Pearson, Kristen provided research support to the Networking Academies at Cisco and was a school psychologist in a local school district in Arizona.  She has a Bachelor’s degree in psychology and sociology from Hamilton College and received her Master’s Degree and Ph.D. in Educational Psychology at Arizona State University.

The post Games-based learning from “content” to “creation” (Episode 8) appeared first on USA.

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Every time the Southern New Hampshire University commercial would come on, I would tell myself I have to look into their online programs. I had found that it was hard trying to start a career without having a degree. In June 2014, I decided that it was finally time to go back to college and get my degree in Human Resource Management.

There are many challenges to overcome when going back to college. Some of my personal challenges include stress, life’s obstacles, and not knowing my strengths or weakness. However, starting my degree online changed everything for me.

Making a plan

My personal development plan was to go back to college to eventually gain a better understanding of myself, improve my career goals, and improve my life’s goals. My vision for this plan is to receive my Bachelor’s degree in Human Resource Management. The classes I am taking are helping me prepare for my future. I’m learning that dreams can come true if you are willing to work hard enough and try your best.

Investing in my future

Weighing the expected investment and return, college was worth it to me. The time I spend investing in my college degree will benefit me tremendously. I have even become interested in furthering my education beyond an undergraduate degree. Now I hope to pursue graduate degrees in human resource management and law.

Opening doors

To me, online education opened doors allowing me to better myself and has continued to improve my knowledge of new things. Achieving my degree will allow me to work for a better employer. I hope to be able to buy a home. My good grades have opened doors to me allowing me to become a member of the National Society of Leadership and Success, the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, Delta Mu Delta International Honor Society in Business, and Pearson Student Insiders.

No matter the challenges you face, higher education is available to you. I highly recommend anyone who is juggling work and wanting a quality education to check out online education!

Are you pursuing a degree online? Share your experience in the comments!

Kimberely Casey is a student at Southern New Hampshire University. She is currently working on her Bachelor’s in Business in Administration with a concentration in Human Resource Management and Minor in International Business. Her dream career is to become a lawyer.

Kimberely is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Opening Doors with Online Education appeared first on USA.

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This series, produced with The Edtech Podcast, explores the implications of and questions around future tech for education. Listen for insights from experts — including contrarians — from across industry, research, and academia. Get caught up with episodes 1-6.  

In episode 7 of our Future Tech for Education podcast series, we explore: What is personalized learning? What is it not? Is there an evidence base yet for personalized learning and what does the research evidence show us about the contexts where personalized learning works best? What is the role of student, software and teacher in a personalized learning context? What questions should we be asking?

Pearson Ep #7 - Draft_2 - YouTube

Subscribe to the Future Tech for Education on iTunes.

About the Author

Dr. Kristen DiCerbo

Dr. Kristen DiCerbo is the Vice President of Education Research and Learning Design at Pearson, where she leads a team of researchers and learning designers embedding what they know from learning science and assessment research into K-16 digital learning environments.

Kristen’s work centers on interactive technologies for learning and assessment, particularly the use of evidence from learner activity in games and simulations to understand what learners know and can do. She jokes that she only works with things that have three letter acronyms starting with E: Evidence-Centered Design, Exploratory Data Analysis, and (dabbling in) Educational Data Mining.

Kristen has been fortunate enough to participate in some exciting simulation- and game-based assessment projects, including work with GlassLab developing SimCityEDU and Mars Generation One. She also participated in the White House Game Jam.

Prior to joining Pearson, Kristen provided research support to the Networking Academies at Cisco and was a school psychologist in a local school district in Arizona.  She has a Bachelor’s degree in psychology and sociology from Hamilton College and received her Master’s Degree and Ph.D. in Educational Psychology at Arizona State University.

The post Student, software and teacher in “personalised learning” (Episode 7) appeared first on USA.

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(part 3 of a 3 part series)

Studying abroad can be a very eye opening and insightful experience! To ensure you have the most memorable time, it’s important to consider your technology usage. I enjoyed five months in The Hague, Netherlands, while also learning a lot about the country and the culture. Technology helped enhance my experience. Here are some tips to keep in mind while using technology abroad.

International mobile plans

Talk to your mobile phone provider about their international plans to see what they offer. I have Verizon and all their plans were extremely expensive and you don’t get much for the price. If you have T-Mobile, you are in some luck since they started in Europe and have decent service and an international unlimited plan. One of my friends switched to T-Mobile right before he left America and did not have any complaints. I did not get any sort of international plan and was fine using wi-fi the entire time.

Using WiFi for communication

If you take this route, I recommend the messaging app “WhatsApp.” Most Europeans use this too, so it is a great way to communicate with any friends you meet while abroad. WhatsApp allows you to text, make phone calls, and even facetime all for free but you do have to be connected to wi-fi to do so. The only drawback to this app is that it is slow to send pictures over text but you still have the ability to do so and that feature is free, too. Lastly, for everyone with an iPhone, you can create a shared folder in the Photos app and it will save over the cloud. Whoever you share this folder with will be able to see the photos at any time and the folder will update instantly as you add more pictures.

Charge up

Depending on what country you visit, you may need to buy a converter to charge your devices, as not all countries have the same voltage! Be careful. Simply plugging your phone charger into a wall in Europe may instantly fry any of your electronic devices with their 220 volts! That’s nearly double what we have running through our cords in America. I bought a converter kit that came with converters for every part of the world.

Save the screen time

I know you will want to check your social media or talk with your friends and family from back home, but this trip will be a great time to stay off of your phone and soak in this great experience while you have the chance. If you do not believe there are benefits for staying off of your phone, please read Delaney Stockford’s blog about how to “Take a Break from Technology.”

Studying abroad is a very memorable experience, and I highly encourage anyone to do it if they get the chance. With technology being an inevitable part of our society, it’s important to consider how and what we use it for during our study abroad trips. Through my experience, it’s best to use the WiFi, and to buy a converter to charge your devices, but best of all  –  live in the moment, and enjoy the experience in real time.

Pearson Students – are you planning on studying abroad? How will you use technology as part of your trip? Share with the Pearson Students community by commenting below!

Kristopher Medina is a senior attending Colorado State University (CSU) studying Business Management with a minor in Sports Management and Marketing. Kristopher is the Pearson Campus Ambassador at CSU. His ultimate goal is to start and own his own business one day. He is also the vice president of the Student Center for the Public Trust, an ethics club. Kristopher is wildly curious about anything and everything that crosses his path. Furthermore, Kristopher enjoys watching his Denver Broncos and spending time with his friends and family any chance he gets.

Kristopher is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Studying Abroad: Technology Tips appeared first on USA.

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Most students agree that LinkedIn is not as fun as other social media apps and outlets. As a college student that loves LinkedIn, I want to share with you why I think it’s so great! Whether you use it to connect with peers and colleagues, or to network for a future job – LinkedIn is an important social media tool that you need to start using today! I will help you get your LinkedIn started and cover a few tips!

“LinkedIn is hard to create and develop” – FALSE!

It’s not any more difficult than your Facebook page! While creating your LinkedIn profile is time-consuming at first, it is very easy to maintain. A well-tended profile is a clearer representation of your work history than a resume. A resume is a one page document of relevant experience for job or scholarship applications. Think of your LinkedIn profile as an ongoing story of your work history. It’s much easier for you to update and maintain than a resume.

Look through the eyes of an employer

LinkedIn is the future of employment. Resumes will be phased out all together since an employer can easily go online and glance through all your work history. When creating a LinkedIn, you want to think of it as if you are an employer.  What would you like to see from an applicant? Post things that are professional, but that show your personality.

Profile pictures are important

This picture should reflect the job that you want. For example, a person desiring a career in art may not be dressed in as formal attire as a person looking for an internship with a bank. Your background picture should be appropriate as well. I feature a famous quote on my background. Tailor yours to show how you would like to be perceived by an employer. All pictures should portray confidence in who you are and should be representative of work that you can do.

Your personal statement

This should represent who you are as a person –  professionally. Obviously, you want to be appropriate and be honest. If you have a compelling story, add in some teasers so that employers can reference this in an interview.

Include all types of experience

LinkedIn gives you an opportunity to express everything in relation to your work history. With work history or “experience” you can put anything from being a board member of an organization on campus to any job and internship that you have had. Be sure to add any volunteer experience. Employers value candidates who give back to their communities. If you have projects or published content (such as a blog for Pearson Students!), you can add links to your content in this section.

Feature skills to complete your profile

This section should be vague and relevant to potential career skills needed. Public speaking, leadership, computer design, java, and event planning are all examples depending on your job focus and what your strengths are. Your followers will endorse you for skills and possibly add skills they think are relevant to you.

LinkedIn is nothing to fret about! It’s not any more difficult than creating a Facebook account and it will actually help you get employed! Create your LinkedIn today, and comment below with any ideas or questions you may have! If you want to connect with me, here’s my Link.

Erick Jenkins is a student at East Carolina University majoring in Communications and is a Pearson Campus Ambassador. He takes pride in service learning and volunteers for several organizations including VoteEverywhere and the National Society of Leadership. He also started an event on the ECU campus to discuss racial tensions call “Race in Our Space”. Over the summer Erick traveled abroad to South Korea to study business and education. He has also attended many Pearson events around the U.S.

Erick is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Getting Started with LinkedIn: Tips for College Students appeared first on USA.

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My dream job is to work in a museum as an archivist or curator. So far, I’ve been doing well to achieve these goals. After I complete my bachelor’s degree in Social and Cultural History, I plan to earn my master’s degree while working an internship through a museum. Entering the museum workforce is a unique but rewarding experience! I will share with you three helpful tips that are applicable to success in any career field.

Studying allows you to stand out

Many students have the same goals you have. One of the best ways to stand out for internship, scholarship, and graduate school applications is to get good grades and have a high GPA. Stay on top of your coursework and take advantage of every study support resource available through your college.

Internships give you experience

The number one advice I’ve been given is to complete multiple internships at different places. This allows you to gain experience in a variety of areas. Not only does this help you stand out to graduate schools, but it shows employers that you have well-rounded experience.

Networking gets you hired

Get your name ingrained in as many heads as possible. Email a leader in your target field. Ask for their advice. Leave them with your resumé so if a position opens, you’ll be on the top of the pile.

Whether you’re working towards a career after college or looking ahead to graduate school, it’s important to realize that your dream won’t be achieved overnight. It takes studying, strategic planning, and networking to achieve your dream job!

I’m looking forward to my career as an archivist. What’s your dream job? What are some tips you would share as you make your way through the process?

Tulin Babbitt is a junior and the University of Maryland – College Park. She’s majoring in Social and Cultural History, and hopes to work in a museum after graduating. Tulin currently serves on the board of UMD’s She’s the First club, which raises awareness of the importance of girls’ education.

Tulin is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Majoring in…Museum? Tips for Landing Your Dream Job appeared first on USA.

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Being in college means pulling all nighters because you waited until the last minute to study for a huge test. College means scraping together five dollars from the cushions of your couch and the depths of your car so you can buy a pizza with your friends. It also means moving to a town four hours away from home and realizing you have to start all over with the whole “making friends” thing. Luckily, even with all of the stress and newness that college brings you, there is something extremely special about it.

New school, new friends

When I came to college I was unsure of pretty much everything. Am I going to make friends? Are my classes going to be hard? How do I study? What do people wear to class? So naturally when it came time to actually move into my dorm I was scared for my family to leave me in such an unfamiliar place. As a junior it’s kind of funny to look back at this moment of uncertainty in my life. This is because the friends that I have made, and the people I have surrounded myself with have completely made all the difference in my life.

Showing kindness no matter what

If you’re wondering how you can make a difference in someone’s life like my friends did for me, it’s actually quite simple. Love them right where they’re at. It seems so easy, doesn’t it? Being there for someone when they need you, understanding their flaws and loving them anyway. Although in actuality it can be really hard. When your best friend comes home and tells you she’s dating this guy that you absolutely dread, it may be hard to support her. Or perhaps your roommate has gone out to party for the fourth night in a row and comes home completely loud and destructive. Again, it becomes kind of hard to show that person kindness when you’ve had a total of 12 hours of sleep over the last four days because of them. This is exactly what you must do though, show them kindness no matter what it is that they’re going through because that is what makes the biggest difference in people’s lives.

Two friends who made a difference

There was a time where I didn’t know what I was doing. I didn’t know how to study, I didn’t know how to organize my time, and there were some traumatic things happening in my family. I didn’t know where to turn, but you want to know what made all the difference? Two people chose to take the time to love me right where I was, flaws and all. I’m so very thankful for my best friends Lexie and Kamika. The coolest part is that it doesn’t matter what time it is or what they’re doing, they will always be there for me when I need them. That is truly what has made for such a strong and loving friendship. They really changed my life, and I don’t know how I would have made it through my first two years of college, in such an unfamiliar place so far from home without them.

Christian Stafford is a student at Oklahoma State University and plans to go to nursing school. She is a Pearson Campus Ambassador and an active member of Pi Beta Phi. In her free time she enjoys drinking coffee, snuggling with her cat, and learning about Jesus.

Christian is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Friendship: Lessons Learned in College appeared first on USA.

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(part 2 of a 3 part series)

I spent five months in The Hague, Netherlands! (Yes, it’s a small town, and if you want to know WHY I choose this location, please read my previous study abroad blog about location and weather. )  If you are even considering studying abroad, DO IT! Taking the leap of faith and stepping out of your home country, let alone state, can seem unimaginable but will be worth the experience. As fun as it may seem, you truly do a lot of learning while abroad. You will learn a tremendous amount about a new culture and even more about yourself. Since the whole process may seem daunting at times here are some tips that I wish I had known before studying abroad.

Packing

There are two things to think about when packing: packing to leave home and packing for shorter trips throughout Europe. First off, the contents needed in your suitcase will largely be based off the country you choose to study in and how many souvenirs you want to bring back. I recommend taking two suitcases. Stuff one to the fifty-pound limit and leave the other one about half full.

Think about attire

If you want to fit in, and not look like a tourist, it’s important to consider what they wear in that culture. People tend to dress nicer in Europe than we do in America, so I would recommend taking a pair of nice looking shoes to go out in and a pair of comfortable shoes to walk around in all day. Leave your graphic tees at home and stick to more plain tops; patterns are fine too. If you want to stick out like a sore thumb wear American flag tees. Please do not forget a pair of comfy pants and a pair of nice looking jeans. Female students need to be aware that some tourist attractions, like St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican City, require your knees and shoulders to be covered out of respect for the monument. Also, leggings and yoga pants are not as popular in Europe. My girlfriend only took two pairs and never wore them outside of the house. If you insist on wearing them out I would recommend dressing them up. Finally, pack a lighter jacket, like a hoodie, and a heavy coat if you want to visit colder countries.

Luggage matters

For people studying in Europe, the flights between european countries are cheap but they will nickel and dime you for everything else. This means you are only taking a carry on and some airports will ensure that every carry-on is the right size. Therefore, you may want to check the airline’s guidelines before traveling. I just used a backpack. Once I watched a man break the wheels off of one those hard shell roll-able carry-ons so that it would fit the size requirement! These may be convenient in the states but they may have some limitations in other areas of the world. Also be aware that every liquid you pack must be in a plastic bag. Some people just bought toiletries in every country they visited and left them there.

Packing is a important aspect when traveling abroad. Everything from your clothing to your technology matters. Check out part 3 of my blog where I’ll discuss technology and things to consider when taking your tech with you on your study abroad experiences. When it comes to packing for your study abroad trip, it’s important to consider the attire you will wear, how you pack your items, and to follow restrictions per country or airline to avoid them confiscating your items at security or customs.

Pearson Students: are you packing for your study abroad trip? Where are you heading? What are you looking forward to most? Share by commenting below!

Kristopher Medina is a senior attending Colorado State University (CSU) studying Business Management with a minor in Sports Management and Marketing. Kristopher is the Pearson Campus Ambassador at CSU. His ultimate goal is to start and own his own business one day. He is also the vice president of the Student Center for the Public Trust, an ethics club. Kristopher is wildly curious about anything and everything that crosses his path. Furthermore, Kristopher enjoys watching his Denver Broncos and spending time with his friends and family any chance he gets.

Kristopher is a Pearson Student Insider. To learn more about the program and apply, click here.

The post Studying Abroad: Packing Tips appeared first on USA.

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I grew up in rural Indiana. My earliest memories are of my family’s farm. Because of the love for agriculture that my family planted within me, I have found my home in agriculturally related organizations. As a ten-year 4H member, I served as President of my township club for three consecutive years. Exhibiting pigs at the county 4H fair led to my involvement in my county’s Livestock Evaluation Team. As a member of this team, I was exposed to FFA and immediately knew I belonged in that particular organization. I spent countless hours after school in my school’s agricultural building preparing for national competitions, chapter events, and building relationships with my peers in FFA.

Leadership at the state level

After serving as my chapter and district’s President, I decided to run for Indiana State FFA Office. I was elected and served as the Indiana FFA State Southern Region Vice President. This prestigious position offered irreplaceable professional development opportunities. I deferred my first year of college and traveled across Indiana to present speeches and leadership workshops. I networked with sponsors, members and stakeholders of our organization.

Working towards the future

At the conclusion of my year of service, I enrolled in Lincoln Land Community College. In addition to my studies, I’ve continued my livestock judging career, traveling the country with my teammates to represent my school in national competitions. In the fall of 2018, I will be transferring to Purdue University to major in Agribusiness and minor in Political Science. Eventually, I envision myself advocating to lawmakers in Washington D.C. on behalf of American Farmers and Ranchers.  

Becoming a Pearson Scholar

In the Fall of 2017 I was selected as a recipient of the Pearson Scholarship for Higher Education. The financial reward aspect of the scholarship has alleviated some of the stress regarding my financial future. I have been able to feel less obligated to work extra hours and instead dedicate that time to my studies. I feel much more comfortable with my grades and courses.

Meeting my mentor

Pearson’s financial help has been appreciated, but the mentorship program that goes along with the scholarship has been very beneficial. I speak with my Pearson mentor, Chris, quite often and we discuss life. Our personalities sync perfectly! Being able to ask Chris for guidance has allowed me to find success during internship interviews and additional scholarship applications.

Other influential mentors

I find great value in mentorship. In my mind, it is the key to finding success in life. From a young age, I have been fortunate with influential mentors. My high school agricultural teachers were, and still are, my greatest mentors. I constantly found myself in their offices discussing life’s latest events. Each served as a friend, brother, father, or coach when I needed one. When I was looking for larger leadership roles, they gave me constructive feedback and allowed me to grow as a leader before I stepped up and took new roles. They built me up when I needed confidence, and brought me back down to reality when I was soaring too high. They reminded me of my strengths, and reminded me to do all I could to help others find their strengths as well. I hope to one day have an impact as a mentor the way they have had an impact on me.

Mason is a recipient of the 2017 Pearson Scholarship for Higher Education. Each Pearson Scholar is paired with a Pearson professional mentor who provides support as Scholars progress toward degree completion. We are incredibly proud of all the Pearson Scholars. Please check back as we continue to highlight each scholar’s story!

The post Love for Agriculture Fuels Drive for Leadership appeared first on USA.

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