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“The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.”

-Alvin Toffler

Part 1: Essential Beliefs

It is essential that you create a culture that promotes and encourages learning in your team and your organization, at both individual and collective levels. To do this effectively, you need to have the right beliefs to begin with, ensure your behaviors are aligned with these beliefs, and take specific actions that demonstrably promote learning and growth in your team and/or the wider organization.

This process or journey begins with you having the right beliefs about learning, knowledge and growth. In this part 1 of our current blog series, I will talk about these beliefs that I see as essential pre-requisites for you to create a culture of learning in your team and your organization. Part 2 next week will cover the specific behaviors and things that you can do.

So what are these core beliefs or mindsets? I believe that there are basically only two source beliefs that lead to the right behaviors and actions:

1.   The Growth Mindset

“The belief that cherished qualities can be developed creates a passion for learning.”

–      Dr. Carol Dweck, Mindset

In order for you to fully champion the learning and growth of those under your leadership, you need to believe that all their traits can grow: intelligence, abilities, skills, knowledge, character, behaviors or any other “cherished quality”. If you believe that, through their effort and learning from failure, mentoring or other initiatives (yours and) others’), others can develop their traits, you have what Dr. Carol Dweck calls a “Growth Mindset”. However if you believe the opposite, that people’s abilities and traits are largely fixed and there’s not much that can be done to change them, then you have what Dr. Dweck calls a “Fixed Mindset”.

Dr. Dweck’s fantastic book, “Mindset: The New Psychology of Success” is a great read and contains a lot more about her research on growth and fixed mindsets, and their massive impact on life outcomes and leadership effectiveness in general,  and learning in particular. If you want a quicker read on Dr. Dweck and her amazing work, here is a list of shorter articles that capture her work and its great impact:

1.   The Effort Effect, Stanford (University) Magazine

2.   How Companies Can Profit from a “Growth Mindset”- Harvard Business Review

3.   Do You Have a Growth Mindset? – Harvard Business Review

When you sincerely believe in people’s ability to learn and grow, you will naturally encourage it more passionately, consistently and effectively in your behaviors and actions as a leader. Also, when you have a growth mindset, your beliefs about failure naturally change and evolve: you see failure as a lesson to try again and not as a judgment of someone’s ability. You believe people fail, not that they are failures, especially if they learn from their mistakes and don’t give up.

“Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently.”

–      Henry Ford

So how do you develop a “Growth Mindset” as a leader?

Having a perfect growth mindset entails you believe all the time that everyone can change anything about themselves that they put their effort and will to. In my experience and honest self-assessment, I believe it is very difficult to have this “pure” growth mindset, all the time about everyone and all their traits. There will be things that we all believe can’t change about certain people. Also, the real world places constraints on our resources, time and effort, that may not allow us to give unlimited chances to fail, especially to someone who refuses to learn from failure or put in the required passion, effort and toil needed to grow in necessary areas of their work effectiveness.

However, what we can effectively strive for is to have as much of a growth mindset as possible about people and their traits. This starts with having a growth mindset about your own self, as a person, professional and leader, and all your traits. Tell yourself you have the ability to learn and grow in any area of your life that you really want to and put your sincere effort into.  Then follow this up with action and consistent effort. Learn from failure and don’t give up. See learning as an iterative process of growth through success and failure. When you eventually see growth in yourself, it will naturally spark a belief that others can do the same.

Share this belief and your story of personal growth with your team. Tell them you believe in their ability to learn and grow in anything they put their effort into. Then back this up with consistent behaviors and actions that are aligned with this belief. We will be talking more about those in next week’s blog post.

2.   Intellectual Humility

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.”

– Stephen Hawking

The second important pre-requisite belief is intellectual humility: having an awareness of the limits of one’s knowledge. You need to believe that learning necessarily has to be a constant and lifelong pursuit. It cannot and must not end for any person at any point in their lives. Again, this starts with what you believe about knowledge in general and your own learning in particular.

So why does learning have to be a constant and lifelong pursuit? One, because change is constant. And second, because collective human knowledge, overall (and even about sub-areas of larger disciplines), is infinite in comparison to the very finite existence of ALL individual human beings, Einstein or me included. Knowledge, skills and mindsets are all constantly evolving and adapting entities, and they should be given the VUCA-ness of change in our world today. That means that, no matter how much I know about anything, there will always be a lot more that I don’t know and can learn. This is true, but especially hard to accept when we consider ourselves highly experienced experts at anything. This intellectual humility is at the root of being a lifelong learner and enjoying that learning, through whatever means possible: formal training or personal and work experiences.

I have gleefully accepted the fact that, no matter how much I know about leadership or HR, there will always be a lot more to learn about. Quite apart from being unpleasant, this belief is actually very liberating and thrilling for me. There is always something to read or watch. And most importantly, I believe there is always something to learn from any person I interact with. This makes work and life a lot more fascinating.

When you sincerely believe in being intellectually humble and a lifelong learner, you will naturally act in ways that consistently encourage learning constantly in your team. You will also learn and adapt more effectively yourself.

So, how was I “intellectually humbled”?

During my early university years, I first experienced a truly large library, the kind that has millions of books and thousands of shelves. The library itself might not be something truly spectacular (since there are many like it all over the world), but what occurred to me in those first few moments has been spectacular for me. I thought: How long would it take me to just read through all these books? A few lifetimes at least, without stopping. And how long to master that knowledge? Many more lifetimes at least, again without stopping. And how many such libraries do we have around the world? Hundreds if not thousands. In that moment, I was intellectually humbled for life. Better start learning, since there’s a lot more to learn that I have time for in many lifetimes.

Learn how you can take your leadership teams through a growth model which will help them mature on a personal and professional level by following me on LinkedIn and subscribing to the Keijzer Community.

Paul Keijzer is the CEO and Founder of Engage Consulting and the co-Founder of The Talent Games, which aims to transform HR by digitising talent processes and creating more engaging and productive workplaces through gamification and mobile technology. As a global HR and Leadership Management expert, Paul knows how to combine business insights with people insights to transform organisations and put them on the path to growth.

The post Creating a Culture of Learning in your Team – Essential Beliefs appeared first on Paul Keijzer.

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My executive coaching activities have suddenly gained significant traction over the past year. I’m elated firstly because I enjoy making an impact and helping people and secondly because more and more executives are finally seeing coaching for what it truly is: an opportunity to get insights from someone who isn’t vested, other than in the best interest of the individual, to open minds, someone who holds up a mirror and pushes them beyond his/her comfort level.

I’m currently coaching a number of people. Some are part of a specific executive coaching assignment, others are part of a leadership development program. It’s fantastic to see that executives are not only starting to value coaching but that companies are recognizing that 1-on-1 coaching can have a significant impact on the development of an executive.

The response to coaching conversations have been very powerful with some having made drastic changes to the lives, ways of operating and performance of the executives. As an executive coach, what I’ve learned from these interactions, is that it’s not about the model you use, or the specific knowledge you have of the business of the coachee or having all the answers. What does matter are 3 simple qualities to be a great coach.

1. Be Present and Just Listen

Most coachees just want to be heard, to share their stories. They want the executive coach to be there for them, have their best interest at heart and nothing else. As a coach, the problem with being present and just listening, is that it’s extremely difficult and energy consuming. To silence your mind and stop if from jumping from thought to thought and making all kinds of connections, for me personally, is the most difficult. However if I start a coaching conversation with the desire to be present I have noticed it to be significantly easier.

The revelation for me was that if you’re able to top yourself from making judgments or trying to ‘fix’ the other person, over time fascinating insights will come bubbling up. Insights that I wouldn’t have been able to spot if my brain was busy doing other things.

2. Be Courageous

The other quality an executive coach needs to have is to be courageous. Let me give you an example:

In a recent coaching conversation the coachee was all over the place, his stories kept on jumping from one place to another, he clearly demonstrated energy, excitement and passion but for an outsider it was difficult to figure out what point he was trying to make. After about 15 minutes of him going on and on, I decided to make an intervention and ask him whether the way he was talking was his normal style of presenting information. He stopped and thought about it for a moment and I clearly saw him have an ‘aha’ moment. He realized how his communication style would impact the way others see him.

When I had this insight, I heard myself arguing in my mind, should I tell him or not, should I stop him and share my observation or just let it go? My Dutch directness probably helped decide that I wouldn’t be fair to the coachee if I didn’t share my insight. As a result we had a great learning moment.

3. Follow Your Instinct

For me coaching is more of an art than a science. Often, I don’t have a plan before I start. I just let the conversation flow and let the coachee be in charge. That makes me feel very uncomfortable since I’m not in charge, whereas the coachee (and the paying organisation) expects me to add value, each moment, every time. I had to let go and trust my instincts that by being present, listen and be courageous I would be able to connect the dots, hold up a mirror and be able to observe things that may not be as visible to others.

Of course instinct is based on experience and judgement doesn’t comes automatically – it’s something that you nurture. You can’t be locked in a ‘my-view-is-right’ attitude. You have to adjust and admit when you’ve got it wrong, and learn from it for next time.

Of course you can apply some of the things I’ve learned from coaching people in your repertoire. If however you’re not in the position to be an executive coach, I’d like to request one thing of you. Someone a long time ago give me some awesome career advice which I’ve cherished and one element which I attribute my personal growth to.

If there’s one thing you can do to take your career to the next level it’s to BE COACHABLE.

Looking forward to heading about your experience in either coaching others or being successfully coached. What were the things that made it work for you? Share them below or connect with me on Twitter!

Learn how you can take your leadership teams through a growth model which will help them mature on a personal and professional level by following me on LinkedIn and subscribing to the Keijzer Community.

Paul Keijzer is the CEO and Founder of Engage Consulting and the co-Founder of The Talent Games, which aims to transform HR by digitising talent processes and creating more engaging and productive workplaces through gamification and mobile technology. As a global HR and Leadership Management expert, Paul knows how to combine business insights with people insights to transform organisations and put them on the path to growth.

The post 3 Ultimate Skills Every Executive Coach Needs for Leaders appeared first on Paul Keijzer.

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Leading a large company, division or department isn’t easy. However I promise you that it doesn’t compare to the challenges of leading a startup company to success. Limited cash, talent, time, untested business models, technology, customer needs – everything needs to be acquired.  Some startups pull it off and enter the ‘Whatsapp’ zone of billion dollar valuations. Other fall by the way-line or are overtaken by faster, nimbler and smarter competitors.

Leading a startup company isn’t for everyone. To succeed you of course have to first have a billion dollar idea. However transforming an idea into actual success is only the tip of the iceberg. The ‘graveyard of failed start-ups’ is filled with brilliant ideas – according to Forbes, 90% of startups fail. That’s huge.

According to CB insights, success requires:

  1. A market need
  2. Enough cash
  3. The right talent
  4. Ability to move fast
  5. The right cost structure

Of course it also requires the right leader to start the new-born company through its infancy stage. Inc.com and BusinessCollective separately interviewed 26 successful founders to find which traits define great startup leaders. The interesting thing about the answers from these successful startup leaders is that they’re paradoxical. You have to be able to do one thing and at the same time display the opposite of the same traits.

Here are the 5 Paradoxical Leadership Traits of Successful Start-up Leaders

1. Vision and Detail

Obviously, startup leaders need a vision of the customer’s requirement of the product or service. They need to be able to understand how their offering would contribute to a better world. However, even as overarching visionaries, startup leaders need to be able to stop viewing the stars alone and see what’s going on at ground level to resolve operational details and issues.

2. Abundance and Scarcity

Although a startup leader should always view opportunities through the prism of abundance and not let his dream and passion be restricted by any borders, the day-to-day limitations in talent, money and time must be kept in mind. Startup leaders need  to quickly switch their views between abundance and the natural scarcity of resources that he has at his disposal.

3. Creative and Focus

In order to solve the millions of problems and restrictions that a startup will face the leader needs to be either the embodiment of creativity or be able to get the creative juices of his team flowing. At the same time creativity should not come in the way of a a clear and determined focus on where you want to end up. There must be a healthy balance of the two.

4. Confidence and Adaptable

If there’s anyone who should believe in the concept of the startup, it has to be the leader of the company.  Unequivocal and unwavering confidence in the success of the venture is the key ingredient of a successful startup according to Derek Flanraich of Greatest. However, according to Matt Peters of Pandemic Lab, this paranoid confidence should go hand in hand with an ability to adapt. Competition is everywhere and plans don’t usually work out as they should, so the startup leader has to be ready to adapt to succeed.

5. Ambiguity and Perseverance

Josh Linker in his Forbes article writes that startup leaders “have to be able to live in a state of uncomfortable – and be comfortable with it.” Predicting the course of a startup is like predicting the weather 5-days ahead in Washington DC; impossible. But while you have to be comfortable with discomfort, you also have to have the stamina to see it through. For most startup’s success isn’t a linear line. It’s a bumpy road with huge ups and downs, cheers and scares that can only be navigated with generous doses of perseverance.

I’m telling you it’s a challenge. But the personal satisfaction of achieving success is incomparable. If you’re thinking about getting involved with a startup, make sure you’re the right personality for it. There’s no shame for wanting stability. But if you’re on the startup train like I am, sign up to the blog and lets take this journey together.

Learn how you can take your leadership teams through a growth model which will help them mature on a personal and professional level by following me on LinkedIn and subscribing to the Keijzer Community.

Paul Keijzer is the CEO and Founder of Engage Consulting and the co-Founder of The Talent Games, which aims to transform HR by digitising talent processes and creating more engaging and productive workplaces through gamification and mobile technology. As a global HR and Leadership Management expert, Paul knows how to combine business insights with people insights to transform organisations and put them on the path to growth.

The post The Truth About Leading a Startup Company – It’s Even More Confusing Than You Think appeared first on Paul Keijzer.

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I’ve talked numerous times about the importance of creative conflict to improve the performance of teams or organisations. We all know that there are benefits to creative conflict and constructive critism; Hawkeye consulting lists the following 6 benefits of constructive conflict for teams and organisations:

  • Increased participation in decision making
  • Better information
  • Better choices
  • Reduces anxiety
  • Encourages collaboration
  • Increases understanding

Despite all these benefits the ‘state of creative conflict’ in the workplace is dismal. 85% of managers in a recent survey across America and Europe (and I’m sure it’s even higher in Asia) indicated that they were afraid to raise an issue in the organisation if they disagreed. The reasons for this were either

  1. the fear of repercussion,
  2. not knowing how to handle it, and/or
  3. how to move on from it.

On an intellectual level we all know that healthy conflict can benefit organisations and in many cases avoid disastrous decisions (remember the Challenger Space Shuttle). But on an emotional level we try to stay away from it.

In order to nurture the willingness and ability of a team to raise, deal and get the best out of creative conflict I’ve listed suggestions below on making it easier for employees to raise their voice.

1. Dare to Disagree

In a previous blog I shared the communication issues that caused Asiania flight 214 to crash. First and foremost was the inability of the junior pilot to disagree with his senior. The courage and ability to disagree is a very powerful element for pairs, teams and organisations as a whole to work better and create significantly more value in the negative scenario avoid disaster.

In an interesting Ted Talk; Margaret Hefferman states that people that were able to solve issues of significant importance didn’t do this by agreeing with the status quo. They dared to challenge and were seeking out ‘thinking partners’ that weren’t echo chambers but people they could have good conflict with. They saw having creating conflict as thinking.

[Tweet “On a personal level it’s important to find the courage to disagree.”]

Most people can only do this if they really care about the issue and if they have accepted that the ‘worse thing that could happen is that they get fired’ is not that bad anyway.

On a team or organisational level it is all about leaders creating a safe environment for people to speak up. As Susan Heathfield says: foster an organizational culture or environment in which differences of opinion are encouraged.  As a leader, you must make people feel like healthy debates are expected and the norm in the team. A way of doing this is by creating specific ‘challenge events’ in which people are encouraged to questions norms, raise issues and the way we do business.

2. Constructive Conflict is a Skill

It’s not only about having the courage or the environment, it’s also a matter of skill on how to handle disagreement. My favourite book on this topic is from Kerry Patterson: Crucial Conversations. It explains in very practical terms on how to conduct tough conversations (not only if you disagree). For this reasons it’s important that a leader not only helps and guides her subordinates in learning these skills but also selects team members that already do this.

3. Set Rules

Even if people are willing to challenge, know how and got the right environment to do so, healthy conflict can still go wrong. It’s important to set rules on how, what and when to challenge. Rule #1 should always be to see conflict as creative thinking and never ever make it personal. Discuss it with your team and agree on how you can encourage disagreement, how you would like people to voice it and how to deal with it.

Even when you set rules, conflict can still sometimes go out of control. For this it’s important to have agreed in your team the way people can escalate conflict and/or distance themselves from it. Look for signs that conflict is getting out of hand and notice whether tension is becoming unhealthy. Listen for criticism of fellow staff members and negative comments about the solution or process. Are ‘hush-hush water cooler’ meetings emerging?

4. Maybe You’re The Reason

And if after all this you find that the team still doesn’t come up with different ideas, challenges the status quo or doesn’t come up with ideals that go against the politically correct view points than maybe, just maybe you as their leader might be the reason. Maybe your leadership style has traditionally been seen as autocratic and you don’t expect your authority to be questioned. Maybe you come down hard on people when they fail or make a comment that doesn’t make sense. Maybe you dont give people the time for them to share their point of view, maybe your team has an ‘I-scratch-your-back-if-you-scratch-mine’ way of working in which people don’t publicly disagree with each other, maybe team members go to your colleagues to ‘vent’. Reflect, introspect, ask for feedback, talk to your peers, see how others do it and bring the importance of healthy conflict up in your next team conversation. 

[Tweet “As a leader, you must cultivate personalities and environments for healthy conflict to take place.”]

It’s a conscious effort you have to make and of course, most importantly, you have to accept that healthy conflict is a necessity. It helps to connect with the latest trends in leadership so that you have an arsenal of knowledge at your disposal to motivate and encourage your team members. Make sure to share any experiences you have below with healthy conflict stories (and any unhealthy ones we can all learn from).

Learn how you can take your leadership teams through a growth model which will help them mature on a personal and professional level by following me on LinkedIn and subscribing to the Keijzer Community.

Paul Keijzer is the CEO and Founder of Engage Consulting and the co-Founder of The Talent Games, which aims to transform HR by digitising talent processes and creating more engaging and productive workplaces through gamification and mobile technology. As a global HR and Leadership Management expert, Paul knows how to combine business insights with people insights to transform organisations and put them on the path to growth.

The post How to Encourage Healthy Conflict in Your Teams appeared first on Paul Keijzer.

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There are endless articles and books on innovation leadership – about how the mix of different leadership styles are used to create better teams and organizations. And of course there’s no arguing the concept. But today, I’d like to approach the topic from a different angle, by identifying all the legacy habits that so many leaders, especially those in Asia and other frontier markets just have a hard time letting go of.

1. Autocratic Leadership

I believe that one change we’ll see in leadership studies in the next ten, maybe twenty years is the elimination or at least minimization of autocratic leadership from leadership books and studies. In all fairness, if you consider how the business world works now a days, one person dictating how to complete a project or task won’t work for very long. Of course this varies based on the skills of the individuals involved but for the average business this is true.

Tip 1: You must have faith in your teams and foster a culture of upward communication to be a modern day leader.

2. Laid Back Attitudes

Even as I was writing this point, I was wondering if in fact it should be the opposite. But the doubt lasted for just a few seconds because we all know that truly driven employees actually thrive when they are pushed (reasonably of course) to do their best. I know of one company where when you walk into the office at 8:30 am you can see people working on their tasks for the day with full blown energy. However, at another company the office is still half empty and those who are there are still waking up. I personally feel that a lazy office environment will lead to lazy teams and that just won’t do.

Tip 2: Push people to reach their maximum potential. They’ll thank you for it.

3. Following the Industry

You know that place called your comfort zone? Get out of it. It’s the only way you’ll make waves. It’s far too easy to just follow where the industry is going. It’s safe, if everyone’s doing it, it must be the right way to go. But really it’s the same as the age old saying “If everyone jumped off a bridge would you jump too?”. The natural next question is how do you get out of your comfort zone when it comes to an entire industry? Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne explain how to create untapped market space thus making competition irrelevant. It’s logical. It’s powerful.

Tip 3: Don’t follow other companies, pave your own path and take customers to places they only dreamed of.

Just by definition innovation leadership requires constant work. Once you’ve mastered implementing the tips above you’ll need to move onto other technique that will keep you and your team mates on your toes. After all, being passive is the first step to taking the easy way out and that’s not where you’ll find exciting business victories. Join me in discovering other ways to step up your leadership game and have a great week.

Learn how you can take your leadership teams through a growth model which will help them mature on a personal and professional level by following me on LinkedIn and subscribing to the Keijzer Community.

Paul Keijzer is the CEO and Founder of Engage Consulting and the co-Founder of The Talent Games, which aims to transform HR by digitising talent processes and creating more engaging and productive workplaces through gamification and mobile technology. As a global HR and Leadership Management expert, Paul knows how to combine business insights with people insights to transform organisations and put them on the path to growth.

The post Innovation Leadership – 3 Practices You Need to Let Go Of appeared first on Paul Keijzer.

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Building high performing teams is one thing, building high performing leadership teams is a completely different kettle of fish! If you’ve worked anywhere near a leadership team before, you know that getting the synergies of key thinkers aligned is a pretty difficult task. So how do you build high performing leadership teams? Your first understand why they’re inherently on the path to self-destruction.

The 6 Steps of Self-Destruction

Let’s first identify why leadership teams are different from ordinary teams. There are many reasons but the ones that stick out for me are:

1. Most executives are appointed on the basis of:

  • Individual leadership skills
  • Their professional competency
  • The results they have delivered

They’re almost never assessed on their ability to

  • Be a constructive team player, or
  • How their style compliments the rest of the team

2. Executive leadership teams are often not “real” teams since they have members that are either there on historical, temporary or worse political reasons. CEO’s usually take the easy way out by letting people join a leadership team without having an actual reason to be there, just to avoid confrontation.

Spot Check: Ask your CEO and each executive team member how many members they think are on your company’s leadership team. I promise you that the answers even from the people that are on the team will vary wildly.

3. Leadership teams don’t untangle the different functions they have (decision making, coordination, information sharing) and combine them into one meeting. They assume that every team member needs to be present in each meeting, creating confusion, boredom and often frustration amongst its members.

4. Executive leadership teams are often either bogged down by the operations of the business or have the opinion that they should focus solely on strategy. Few leadership teams create a clear division between their two main roles: delivering results today and building capabilities to deliver results tomorrow.

Spot Check: Ask each individual top team member what the purpose of their leadership team is. Don’t confuse the team purpose with the company’s strategy. See how many different answers you get.

5. Most leadership team members are like the United Nations and see themselves as the representative of their function/division/department. Few see their main role as leading and making the best decisions for the entire company.

6. Few CEO’s understand the power of a high performing team and see little value in investing in team building and creating conducive team dynamics. Building a high performing team is hard work and requires significant conviction and investment from the leader as well as other members.

Spot Check: When was the last time your company leadership team spent a significant amount of time together, not talking about the company’s results or strategy but how they as a team could lead the company better?

What Leadership Teams Should Be Doing

Now that we know why leadership teams are so different than “regular” ones it becomes easier to identify what they should be focusing on. Being able to check off the 5 points below will ensure that your leadership team is on its way to success rather than destruction.

1. Real Team: Make sure you only have people on the team that need to be there, have the motivation and skills to add value to the team. Take out (no matter what the short term consequences are) people that don’t add value, are de-railers or are in the team for the wrong reasons.

2. Team Charter: Create clarity on the roles, responsibilities and what your team’s purpose is. Agree on how you’ll work together and how you to hold people accountable for delivering on their commitments and behaving in the agreed manner.

3. Team Governance: Discuss and agree how you will make decisions, involve and inform stakeholders, prepare for meetings, set agenda’s, follow up on results and how you will structure your meetings to ensure you delineate the operational, strategic and team maintenance components

4. Team Meetings: Structure your team meetings around the different functions you play. My favorite meeting structure is Patrick Lencioni, who in his book The Advantage advocates to have:

  • Daily 10 minute huddles to discuss issues
  • Weekly ops meetings to discuss results and operational items
  • Ad-hoc specific topic meetings, and
  • Quarterly ‘feet-in-the-air’, how-are-we doing, what is happening in our industry discussions and are we on the right track conversations.

5. Invest in Team Dynamics: At a regular interval, ideally a 2 day session once a year and quarterly 1/2 day follow up sessions, talk about how you as a team are performing, investing in forging personal bonds and discussing how you are leading the organisation. Do a pulse check of all your stakeholders (not only employees) to understand how they assess your team performance and get clarity on future expectations.

Let me know how your company’s leadership team is performing on the spot checks above. As always you are invited to leave your thoughts and personal experiences below.

Learn how you can take your leadership teams through a growth model which will help them mature on a personal and professional level by following me on LinkedIn and subscribing to the Keijzer Community.

Paul Keijzer is the CEO and Founder of Engage Consulting and the co-Founder of The Talent Games, which aims to transform HR by digitising talent processes and creating more engaging and productive workplaces through gamification and mobile technology. As a global HR and Leadership Management expert, Paul knows how to combine business insights with people insights to transform organisations and put them on the path to growth.

The post 5 Ways to Stop Leadership Teams from Self-Destruction appeared first on Paul Keijzer.

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