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BioLite’s first headlamp is very well designed – it’s comfortable and power packed! From the moment I put the BioLite 330 lumen headlamp on, I could feel the difference. A quick lumen comparison test revealed an immense advantage in visibility, I could see farther and in more detail. The BioLite 330 Headlamp lights up the darkness!

Form Fitted

The BioLite 330 headlamp is very low profile, it fits better than your favourite pair of shoes. I can run or bike with it and it stays put, zero bouncing. Awesomeness. The front is soft neoprene material and the light housing is embedded into the band. The other half of the band is a regular headlamp style band and fully adjustable. The battery pack sits at the back and is very light considering its a 900mAh (milli amp hour) lithium ion battery.

You can wear this headlamp for hours and hours, forgetting it’s even there.

Powered by Lithium, Charged by Fire

BioLite states 900 mAh will last 40 hours on low and 3.5 hours on high, that’s really good for the size of this battery! These times apply to my experience and testing of the headlamp over about 2 months of steady use. BioLite’s power packed 330 Lumen Headlamp delivers on visibility

It’s rechargeable. Which I was nervous about at first. I love that this means less battery waste, but was unsure of how I could recharge it in the field. You can opt to carry the BioLite CampStove 2 and charge while you cook, carry a Power Bank, use one of BioLite’s SolarPanel 5+ and more. While on my 8 day West Coast Trail Hike, I carried a small battery bank but on low mode, the BioLite lasted all 8 days.

Blinding Brightness

At 330 lumens, the BioLite 330 packs a powerful lumen punch that will blind your tent mate or help you hike out in the dark. This headlamp lights up the dark like no other headlamp I have ever used. I recently used this headlamp on my 8 day West Coast Trail hike and it’s power lights up the darkness in bear country! Very important for me and midnight runs to the bathroom. My favourite setting though was the red light. It’s perfect for inside the tent, when you both still need to see to get organized but do not want the blast of white/blue light before bed.

Something I had to learn was the BioLite 330 Headlamp doesn’t get dim, it just dies. On the up side you have full power and visibility right to the end, but not much warning when it’s getting low. This is due to the lithium ion battery needing to shut down when it hits a minimum voltage. Biolite did put LED indicators on the back, so just be sure to check them once and a while if you’re planning to use your headlamp heavily such as when caving.

Can it get any better?

The BioLite’s only little (and I mean tiny) downfall in my books is that it’s not fully waterproof. It is resistant to water splashes from any direction (rain) and given an IP4 rating, which for most users should be sufficient. However, I do prefer my outdoor tech products to be fully waterproof. Maybe this isn’t possible with Li-ion batteries or something but imagine!

We think you need one!

Overall, this is a super duper fantastic headlamp and I love it! It’s so comfortable to wear, it’s user friendly, and it’s packed with lithium lumen power. Will and I will be using ours all summer, and if you want in on this amazing headlamp, please consider buying though our affiliate link here.

The post Gear Review: BioLite’s Power Packed 330 Lumen Headlamp appeared first on Outdoors & On the Go.

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Your skin does it all – it’s waterproof yet breathable, affected by the sun and wind, and acts as your barrier against bacteria, viruses and more! As adventurers and outdoorsy folks, we tend to spend a lot of time exposed to the elements. This mini guide “On the Go: Skin Care for Adventurers” is here to help everyone enjoy both their outdoor pursuits and healthy, nourished skin.

Step 1 – Keep It Clean

Like your outdoor gear, your skin works better when it’s clean. Will and I both use Artistry Hydra-V Fresh Foaming Cleanser to get the sweat and grit from the day off. I have been using Artistry for over 20 years, using both the Foaming Cleanser and the Toner to avoid black heads, tone my skin and I always take these along with me in tiny 20ml bottles, even in the backcountry.

We recommend washing your face 1-2 times daily, like brushing your teeth. I prefer a morning wash and a before bed wash, while Will prefers just a before bed wash. Whatever you decide, do it daily, and use a high quality product.

Step 2 – Nourish It

Moisturizing your skin might be the most essential part of your skin care routine. Everything dries out your skin! The wind, the sun and the cold. Plus there’s UV damage, micro wounds, and wrinkles to content with. As critical step two of Skin Care for Adventurers, ensure you moisturize at least once daily, ideally before bed.

Designed for outdoor skin, Colorado Aromatics Springtide Gold Face Cream delivers a nourishing punch to sun or wind exposed skin. Will and I have been using this lotion daily for a month and we are both seeing and feeling its nourishing effects.

Will has dry, sensitive skin and finds that the Colorado Aromatics Springtide Gold Face Cream is the first one that delivers on it’s claims for hydrating the skin without being greasy or causing further irritation. He uses it both morning and evening, finding relief from his red, dry and sometimes itchy skin. I have combination skin and prefer to only use a very light moisturizer during the day. I started using this lotion before bed and after just a few days was noticing my skin was softer than usual.

We both have sensitive skin and never buy over the counter creams, wary of the harsh chemicals and overpowering scents. Colorado Aromatics uses all natural ingredients and has a good balance of nourishing and hydrating without too much weight or scent.

  • Before
  • After
Sun Damage Repaired?

The Springtide Gold Face Cream also boasts anti-inflammatory properties. Being spring, it was inevitable that I would get my first sun burn of the season. 24 hours after the burn, I applied the Springtide Gold Cream to my upper back and shoulders. I kept applying each day for about 4 days and my back never peeled – that’s a first! This lotion is deeply nourishing and helps to repair sun damaged skin.

Step 3 – Protect your Skin

Avoid sun damage by wearing protective clothing or sun screen. Being fair skinned, I burn very easily. My favourite sun screen is Neutrogena Sunscreen Stick SPF 50+ because it’s easy to apply, not greasy and keeps me from turning red!

We recommend using sunscreen daily, as part of your morning routine. Wash, tone, moisturize and then apply sunscreen to your face. Even on a cloudy day! Add more sunscreen as needed throughout the day and liberally to all areas of your skin that are exposed. I love a good hat to also help reduce my sun exposure.

Final Thoughts

Will and I are diligent at caring for our skin, especially our faces. I wear no make up and prefer to invest that money into nourishing, healing creams so I can flaunt my skins natural glow.

We have just added Colorado Aromatics Springtide Gold Face Cream to our routine and after a month of steady use, we are very pleased with our results. I have noticed my skin tone is more even, I had no breakouts all month, and the fine lines around my eyes are even finer. Win! Will’s skin has also evened out and he had no red skin flare ups or dry patches for the last 2-3 weeks. His skin is the happiest it’s been in a long time! We would both recommend you add this lotion to your daily self care routine at home but especially in when you’re the field or on the trail!

Products We Use

Click the links below to view and/or buy. The links below are affiliate links, meaning we receive a small commission when your purchase. There is no added cost to you, yet your purchase here still helps support the blog!

~ Artistry Hydra-V Fresh Foaming Cleanser

~ Colorado Aromatics Springtide Gold Face Cream

~ Neutrogena Sunscreen Stick SPF 50+

What’s your daily skin care routine?

The post On the Go: Skin Care for Adventurers appeared first on Outdoors & On the Go.

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2 girls. 75 km. 100+ ladders. 1 suspension bridge. 3 orcas. 1 black bear. Just a few fast facts to give you a sense of the magnitude of the West Coast Trail.

About the Trail

Shipwrecks dot the sea floor along the trail reminding us of the rough history that carved this survival route into the coastal rainforest. Light house to lighthouse it twists and winds its way between the forest and the coastline. Originally a telegraph line maintenance route, the trail was maintained through the early 1900’s to assist shipwreck survivors in escaping the pounding Pacific coast. Now this trail exclusively sees hikers. People come from all over the world to experience this great Canadian trail that elegantly showcases our massive coastal rainforest and traditional Indigenous territorial lands.

Planning When to Go

We booked our permits back in January, taking a total gamble on the weather and WON! 5 days of sunshine or clouds and just 1 day of drizzle at the very end. May was lovely! Warm and sunny, but not too hot. Very few hikers on the trail yet meaning less traffic at ladders, cable cars and campsites as well as just a general feeling of remote and wild. May’s challenges can be the spring rain but also damage from the winter may not be cleaned up yet so many trees had fallen and this required some bushwalking and minor detouring. Boardwalks and ladders are also just getting fixed, so you have to go carefully.

May 9-14 was our 6 day hike days, but the total trip was May 8-15 due to needing a day to get in and a day to get out, so 8 days/ 7 nights total.

Logistics

Getting in and out of the trail does require some advanced planning.

  • For ease, use the West Coast Trail Express Shuttlebus to get in and/or out from the trail. Pricey, but easy.
  • For cost savings (if more than 2 people), run your own shuttle with 2 vehicles or leave your vehicle at the end and shuttle back to the start.
  • The shuttle runs through the active logging areas inland from the trail. Roads are rough and require good clearance to get through. Full details here.

You can camp at each trailhead for $25. Bamfield has a taxi from the Pachena Bay trailhead to town, another $10. We stayed at the Bamfield Centennial Park campground to be near the town (for hot meals and stuff to do).

Route planning is always important for a multiday trek. Plan the days out in advance to help with scheduling the bus and so you can leave the plan with someone who can activate help if you are 24-48 hours delayed. Always make a plan B, so you can be flexible and flex as needed along the way to allow for a safe and enjoyable trip. Here’s my post about Planning to Hike the West Coast Trail.

Day 1 – Gordon River to Campers Bay – 13 km – 8 hours

WX: + 20C

Boy were we glad we started on this end! Moving less than our planned 2km per hour (1.6km/hr to be exact), we still managed to make it to Campers Bay before dark. Orientation at 10am, then 11:30am ferry, we got moving on the trail right around noon. First up, a vertical 50 foot ladder. If you can’t do this, go back now! The ladders are a thing most people complain about, but I liked them. I like them because they are protecting the steep slopes from erosion and because its faster and safer than trying to scramble up and down those gnarly banks. Up and down and up and down we climbed. Over and Over. This section of trail feels more like an obstacle course than a hiking trail. It’s fun, but also exhausting.

We were in the forest exclusively today and our mantra became “HEY BEAR!” pretty quick. Bears can only hear about as well as me (which isn’t very good) so you have to make a lot of noise as you move through the dense undergrowth to avoid any surprises.

At Campers Bay, we had our first cable car. What an excellent way to get across a river! No wet boots, no rock hopping, just load the packs and jump in. The campsite was lovely, with options for beach camping or a forest site, fresh water right there as well as access to the ocean for sunset! We had a late dinner, around 9pm, cleaned up and hit hay.

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The count down is on! It’s now just 1 month until Alice and I hike the West Coast Trail!

Image: www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/activ/activ6a

We are in full on planning mode and thought it would be helpful to share with all of our readers our Route Plan and Packing Checklist document.

This document is hosted in Notion and you’re able to comment there if you have questions. You are able to ‘export’ a PDF copy for your own use or share the link with anyone you think would find this helpful. If you like Notion, you can click here to sign up. This can be used as a general outline for any long distance, back country trip planning tool. We will be editing the Notion doc as we continue to prepare and I will link our Menu Plan once it’s developed.

Image: www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/activ/activ6a

Back to preparations! We have our Discovery Pass, gear is being maintained and organized, we have been out hiking, skiing or snowshoeing with our packs half loaded, and we are both working out weekly (running, cycling, weight lifting, and yoga). WCT – here we come!

Parks Canada emailed me today with the following;

Despite a significant investment of time and resources each year into maintaining the 75-km trail, it continues to be an extremely rustic and challenging hike. There were several major storms this winter that will likely cause some re-routes. It is possible some camping areas will need to be temporarily closed due to log piles. All of this will be communicated once we have done a thorough inspection of the trail.  Among the hundreds of ladders, bridges and metres of boardwalk, you are also sure to encounter some rotting wood and aging infrastructure. 

Dave Tovell – Parks Canada
Image: www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/activ/activ6a

We are writing to offer a reality check just in case you have underestimated this incredible adventure. The West Coast Trail is a gruelling hike. You will need to thoroughly prepare yourself both physically, mentally and through proper gear selection to lower your chances of becoming injured or ill during your trip. Injuries and illnesses are a common theme along the West Coast Trail, from minor cuts, blisters and bruises to the 1% of West Coast Trail hikers who sustain more severe injuries or illnesses and require emergency evacuation.

Dave Tovell – Parks Canada
Image: www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/activ/activ6a Resources

He goes on to outline some things you can do to get ready for your hike (below) and this is all accounted for in our Route Plan above.

·         Review the attached West Coast Trail: 2019 Hiker Preparation Guide in detail  https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/visit/brochures

·         Continue to practice hiking long distances with a backpack and ensure the hiking boots you are wearing are well broken in

·         Review all of the gear you plan to bring considering its usefulness, weight and your familiarity with it. This webpage on packing for the hike will help:https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/activ/activ6a/iv

·         Consider cancelling your hike and aiming for a future season if you have concerns about your or your group’s readiness. Learn more about our refund policy here: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/activ/activ6a/iii

We have found some great resources and we will be adding them here as we go.

Have you hiked this trail and if so, any tips?

The post Preparing to Hike the West Coast Trail appeared first on Outdoors & On the Go.

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Scotland is a beautiful country – and without a doubt a hiker’s paradise.  Historic castles and dramatic mountains provide a fantastic backdrop for some great day hikes.  

However, with more than 6,000 miles of coastline, it also has some beautiful beaches to explore.  What’s more, Scotland has some very camper-friendly laws which allow camping on most unenclosed land.  This means there are some terrific beaches you can wild camp on (provided you follow the Scottish Outdoor Access Code!).

To help you get started, we’ve listed below our top 5 beaches for wild camping in Scotland:

1. Silver Sands of Morar

As the name suggests, the Silver Sands of Morar are a collection of beautiful sandy beaches on the west coast of Scotland.  The sands are so bright and the water so blue, that if you get some decent weather, you would easily be forgiven for thinking you were somewhere more exotic than Scotland!

Most beaches can be accessed by a short walk from the main road.  The nearest town is Mallaig, a 3.5 hour drive from Glasgow.

2. Luskentyre Sands

Located on the Isle of Harris in the Scottish Outer Hebrides, Luskentyre is a beautiful beach.  In fact, such is its reputation, it was recently named as one of the UK’s best beaches in the TripAdvisor Travellers’ Choice Awards.

Camping here also provides some breathtaking views out to Taransay, the setting for the British TV series Castaway 2000.

3.  Calgary Beach, Isle of Mull

The Isle of Mull is the second largest island of the Inner Hebrides off the west coast of Scotland.  Calgary Beach provides another glorious white sandy beach – a perfect setting for Summer camping.

And did you know that the Canadian city of Calgary was actually founded in homage to this Scottish gem by Colonel James Macleod, a Scottish born Mountie who had a summer retreat at Calgary Beach?

4.  Sango Sands, Durness
coolcamping.com

If you’re looking for somewhere a bit further afield, then be sure to check out Sango Sands.  Situated within the village of Durness on Scotland’s north coast, it’s surrounded by dramatic cliffs with amazing views out to sea.

The weather can be pretty extreme this far north, but if you’re visiting during summer then be sure to check out the local surfing on offer!

5. Claigan Coral Beach, Isle of Skye

In recent years Skye has become one of Scotland’s top tourist destinations – and it’s easy to see why.  From the dramatic Cuillin Mountains to the majestic Fairy Pools there’s plenty to see and do.

But as a result of its increased popularity, it’s becoming harder and harder to secure accommodation – particularly over the summer months.

So if you’re looking to do a bit of wild camping, be sure to check out Claigan Coral Beach on the north west coast of the island.  The beach itself is approximately a 1 mile walk from the road, but it’s well worth the trip!

Summary

So there you have it – our top 5 beaches for wild camping in Scotland.  Whether you decide to visit one of these beaches, or one of the many other fantastic beaches Scotland has to offer, please remember to plan ahead and pack appropriate gear.  From your choice of tent to your choice of footwear – just remember that the weather in Scotland can be unpredictable, so pack for all eventualities!

Guest Blogger

Craig Ramsey from Explore Outdoors HQ blogs on all things relating to camping and hiking.  From inspiration for your next hike, to a roundup of the latest gear and equipment, Explore Outdoors HQ aims to be the go-to blog for outdoors enthusiasts!

The post 5 Best Beaches for Wild Camping in Scotland appeared first on Outdoors & On the Go.

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Well, we all need a little dose of nature every now and then. What can be more soothing than a long hike to the mountains or a family trip to the woods? To be honest, hiking is one heck of an activity with multitudes of mental and physical benefits.

Ok, so you really want to go hiking but are unsure of how to find a trail, navigate or call for help if needed.

There are some pretty powerful apps available now that can help you with all the nitty-gritty details of planning a hiking adventure.

Since we are hiking fanatics, we have gathered some high utility Android and iOS apps that have come handy for all sort of outdoor adventures including hiking, camping, hunting, and backpacking. Since we really want you to pack your backs and go out hiking high up into the mountains or deep into the woods, we have tested all these apps for you, so you can stay safe and on-track.

A cell phone is not a full replacement for a GPS, paper map, compass or 2 way satelite messenger device such as SPOT.

So, let’s not waste any more time and move on to our top 10 best hiking apps that you should definitely check out before your next hiking trip!

No.1 MapMyHike

We haven’t placed this amazing app on top position for no reason. It’s a high utility app that doesn’t just track your hike, rather gives you a complete feedback for multiple health and fitness indicators including calories burned, distance covered, speed and a lot more metrics.

What we really love about MapMyHike is it’s fitness centered orientation that has at least helped me to keep a close track of my fitness levels during regular weekend hiking adventures. You can also easily record and share your hiking track and other metrics with friends. It also helps you find the most popular hiking tracks and local routes to traverse and compete. It’s freely available for base models, while the premium features are reserved for the paid version that unlocks the real-time tracking feature along with a bunch of other amazing features.

www.mapmyhike.com/

To be precise, MapMyHike doesn’t overpromise for its capabilities. As said earlier, it’s a hiking app that’s centered on health and fitness metrics and it does that like no other app. You can record all your hikes, performance indicators and insights that let you keep a close check of your fitness. There’s even an option to set personal goals and milestones. Though not as solid as some of the other apps that we will be detailing in the post below, MapMyHike does let you find some great hiking routes nearby, while you can share your track with other members as well.

Pros

Great for nearby hiking adventures

Fitness centred app

Cons

Doesn’t have any large databases like many other apps

Limited utility in terms of adventurous hiking trips

No.2 SPYGLASS

If we just talk about aesthetics and appearance and forget every other aspect for a moment, I don’t think there is another app that can come anyway near to Spyglass. It’s simply one of the coolest, neatest and most visually impressive navigation app that you’ll find online.

Coming on to the features and functionalities, I don’t want to disregard traditional GPS systems at all, but I have to admit that this amazing hiking app comes with most complete GPS features suite that you’ll ever need on a hiking trip. The app comes with an awesome interface, an all-powerful augmented reality view, and tracking features. There’s a highly reliable built-in compass along with gyrocompass, altimeter, inclinometer, speedometer, angular calculator and bunch of other super cool features that you can think of.

It’s a paid app that will cost you around $10 (very nominal) in the US. However, given that it comes with complete GPS kit, it is certainly one of the best and high-utility apps that can help you traverse anywhere across the world.

Pros

The most complete GPS Toolkit you will find online

A range of useful features

Reliable navigation tools

Augmented reality display

Cons

Paid app

The interface might not seem user-friendly to first-time users

No.3 Peakfinder

Here’s the app that will save the day for you and your partner when you’re tussling over the peak name; yeah I am pointing to the tussle that we talked about at the starting of the blog.

So, Peakfinder is basically your day saver when you are looking to hike on to the adventurous mountainous terrain. It comes in two different flavors one for the Alps and another for the Western USA. You can purchase and download the flavor where you intend to travel. It was developed by Fabio Soldati; a Swiss national (yeah you can already feel where the love of mountains is coming from). The databases for mountains can easily be installed on your phone, which means you don’t need to worry the remoteness of the place or internet connection and you will still be able to trace the right peak.

https://www.peakfinder.org/mobile/

The vector database has neatly rendered graphics with complete coordinates and height information for each peak. All you need to do is to point it towards the landscape and it will show all the peaks in surroundings with names. Tap a mountain peak and you’ll have the complete coordinates and height information. Moreover, it also offers a 360 panoramic view from the peak. So, while you might not have the strength to climb all the way up to the peak, you can still enjoy some breathtaking scenery and landscape from the peak of any mountain.

Pros

Precise Accelerometer and Compass sensors

The database is updated regularly

Built-in binoculars to view hidden peaks

Cons

There seem to be no cons of the app.

No.4 AllTrails

The previous app that we talked about was all about finding the right peak, but not everyone is interested in finding the mountain names. So, if you are just a curious backpacker who likes to hike to remote mountainous tracks without bothering about the names of mountains that AllTrail is all you need.

It’s a neatly designed app that offers a detailed library of tracks and trails for mountainous terrains. Apart from finding different trails in the surrounding mountais, the app also rates your hike as compared to other hikers. To expand the database and keep it as useful as possible for passionate hikers, there’s a review and feedback system where you can submit your experience for other hikers to be better prepared before coming. Oh and AllTrails isn’t only for hikers or backpackers, but also offer complete database for rock climbers, bikers and other outdoor adventure enthusiasts.

Overall, the app is nicely built with organized database and precise navigation tools that comes handy for all sorts of outdoor activities including trail running, backpacking, rock climbing and all sorts of other outdoor activities.

Pros

Easy to use clean interface

Intuitive maps

Great Navigation tools

Cons

Limited database

Depends on feedback from users to expand the database

No.5 Cairn

Cairn is yet another great outdoor utility app with the downloadable database, which means you can use them at remotest places without signals of connection concerns.

What makes it slightly more interesting than other hiking apps that we have talked about is the safety features. It offers real-time distance and GPS features, while also giving you safety information about the track you’re currently tracking.

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After years of carrying my camera through the toughest terrain and conditions, with a series of strap concoctions, I think I finally found the solution I’ve been looking for: The Skout!

Since I’ve received this strap in the midst of winter, I thought I’d put it to the true winter test: backcountry snowboarding (and snowshoeing).

As an adventure/lifestyle photographer, I consistently bring my camera on multi-day hikes, biking excursions, and backcountry snowboarding trips. Most of the time, my 24-70mm lens sits on my Canon Mark III making it a pretty heavy set to carry for long distances. For my petite size, carrying a holster style strap weights down one side of my backpack and is annoyingly uncomfortable. My best solution to this a taking a side sling strap and attaching it to the top and side of my backpack taking the weight off my shoulders but the camera still sloppily bangs around my hip on those big climbs or descents. Let’s see what the Cotton Carrier Skout does to fix some of these issues…

So what do you get?

Twist and Lock (Easy to take on and off) camera mounting system with Zip-up stash packet (which comfortably fits extra storage cards, lens cap, credit/debit cards, money)

Quick Release Tether Strap

Slip-over all-weather cover

Anodized aluminum camera hub and rubber washer

Allen key and mounting hardware

3-year warranty against manufacturing defects

Fit and Thoughts
Skout Pros

I was pleased with its mesh back design and reinforced shoulder strap. It’s very easy, comfortable and lightweight to wear under a backpack. Though I haven’t yet tried it out on a multi-day hike (so it wasn’t worn for extremely long periods of time), I am confident it will perform well.

The Quick Release Tether Strap conveniently and easily clips your camera into the strap; it’s a good length between not hitting the ground when unhooked from the twist and lock, and long enough not to annoy you when shooting.

The Twist and Lock system is quick and easy to use and allows your camera to slightly sway left and right while walking which is great to hold side to side when your lens gets in the way – particularly with a long lens in situations such as walking uphill. The Skout system is certainly big, durable and distributes the weight well. I was able to snowboard short distances when needed and lock and load quickly for the next destination.

The camera hub is very durable and well thought out with a tripod screw-in mount to avoid taking it off when using tripod extensions.

Skout Cons

Though I really liked the twist and lock ability to allow the camera to slide side to side, when bending over to release bindings or tie a shoe, it’s possible that the camera could release. However, I don’t see this as a true issue as once you take note of this, you can easily position it so this doesn’t happen (hold sideways along your knee for example). Additionally, the extra tether strap saves the day if it does happen to slip out.

The all-weather cover would perhaps be convenient for long distance hikes in the rain, however, it was very snug with a 24-70mm lens attached. Personally, I’d rather clean the snow off my camera after then deal with the cover at the time – it’s just as quick to throw in the backpack.

Lastly, this could be an issue that would perhaps only apply to me. With no winter jacket or extra clothing on, the strap is too loose.  I don’t fit into the “one size fits all” category so the strap doesn’t tighten up enough. I will have to cut and re-sew it and make it fit me. This is something to keep in mind for those who are slim, short and have a very short torso as I do.

Final Thoughts

Overall, I’m a big fan of my new Cotton Carrier Skout. It’ll certainly be a new necessity for my backcountry and travel adventures. It’s comfortable, durable and I can always keep my camera right in front of me – ready for when I need it.

To learn more about this carrier or buy yours, head over to Cotton Carrier. 

Would this camera sling be a game changer for you?

Share your thoughts in the comments below!

The post Gear Review: Cotton Carrier Skout – Sling Style Camera Harness appeared first on Outdoors & On the Go.

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What a week it’s been! Will and I have officially launched our new online gear store – Adventure Sport Outfitters!

This idea came to us while we were traveling in Italy this fall. We got thinking about gear and the cost associated with always buying brand name items. It’s so expensive nowadays to get geared up to spend time outside.

Friends have raved about the gear they found on Amazon (for a fraction of the price) but complained about hard it was to determine quality or if it would meet their needs. For people who are new to the outdoor adventure world, the world of gear can be very daunting. Power fill what? 4000mm waterproofing hun? 20 D nylon means what?

We found a problem that needed solving. We have the skills and knowledge to help people shop for the gear they need and not break the bank!

And that’s how our store was born.

Owned and operated by Katie & Will!
Questions of Quality

People tend to assume that if you pay more, you get better quality. I know I have had this association forever. But what if this was not the case? We started questioning this assumption by comparing brand named gear specs to unknown brand specs and have realized we’ve been wrong!

Look at your favourite brand name jacket – where was it made? Likely China, Vietnam, Cambodia or somewhere else in Asia. Mine is from China and retails for just over $200CAD. So what if you could get the same quality item for a fraction of the price?

There are likely other considerations you may have of products produced in Asia. Environmental sustainability? Fair Labour standards? etc. These are real concerns and as a person of this planet, you should be ensuring your fellow humans are treated well. We care about this too.

With Adventure Sport Outfitters we are dedicated to sourcing good quality outdoor gear from manufacturers who offer details about their factory operations. We will watch for injustices as best we can and will not hesitate to change suppliers if we find some information we don’t agree with.

Though our research we have learned that the gear we are selecting competes with most name brand items in regards to production. More info to come in future posts about what we are learning.

Companies like Patagonia, are industry leaders in regards to sustainability and if you’re able to afford to support them, please do! You are always voting with your money.

The rest of the big brands, however, have left us questioning how our China-sourced gear is really any different than theirs, other than price?

Spend Less, Adventure More

Our mission with Adventure Sport Outfitters is to provide our community with affordable outdoor gear that has just as good specs as major brands and that they can feel good about buying. We do all the spec and price matching, company reviews, and soon, gear testing so you can feel confident buying your next piece of outdoor gear from us.

We are going to be the change we want to see in the world.

We want to be a business that can provide jobs, donate to good causes (read about our 5% program), build a community of open-minded outdoorsy people, and help drive adoption of cryptocurrency use by being one of the first outdoor stores in Canada to accept Bitcoin.

Join the GeaRevolution!

If any of this resonates with you, we hope you will join us for a GeaRevolution! The first 100 subscribers over on our store will get 20% their first order. Why not try us out?!

The post A GeaRevolution Begins! appeared first on Outdoors & On the Go.

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Moved to BC.

New touring set up.

Avalanche knowledge.

AST or Avalanche Skills Training level 1 is the place to start. With our local hill, Whitewater Ski Resort offering this training, it was the perfect time to build the skills and start to learn about the local area.

Day 1 – Feb 1

We all met at Selkirk College to begin our learning. Most outdoor courses start with an indoor session to cover the theoretical background knowledge required to be successful in the following field days. We had a mixed group; folks from all over Canada, the USA, and Australia, expert skiers as well as newer ones (like me) and mixed experience with backcountry. With one common purpose, we were all engaged and ready to learn.

Day 2 – Feb 2 Weather

Cloudy, light snow, SW < 12km/hr, -3C

Bulletin Notes

< 24 hrs post-storm, ~30 cms new snow, main concerns: storm slab (all elevations & aspects) and persistent slabs (W, N, E aspects, @tree and below), skier trigger avi LIKELY, size 1-2, watch for ‘step down’ and ‘tipping point’ (1mm=1cm)

Simple terrain + below tree line = moderate!

Simple terrain + @ or above tree line = considerable!!

Weather & Avalanche Resources

We started the day reviewing all the available online resources for acquiring the info needed to plan a backcountry ski day.

https://www.avalanche.ca (avalanche reports form the pro’s)

https://www.snow-forecast.com/ (great weather forecast for all resorts)

https://spotwx.com/

http://arfi.avalanche.ca/ (google map view, weather & snowpack reports, weather cam’s)

backcountryskiingcanada.com (route info)

Mammut Safety App (clinometer, altimeter, compass, SMS, and more)

If you live or play in a region without an avalanche bulletin, use the Dangerator , local forecasts and online discussion forums (like Facebook groups) to determine your avalanche danger rating.

Route Plan

Sliver King Ridge, simple terrain, then ski down to resort

Day Notes

10:15 – Met at H2O Avalanche bulletin board and reviewed the sign in/out sheet, the resort specific avi bulletin, and tested beacons.

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