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Photo By Jessica Nelson

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Deer Hiding in the Bushes” by Jessica Nelson. Location: Maryland.

“Having a very long lens comes in handy when you’re hiding in the bushes and the deer look directly at you,” says Nelson.

See more of Jessica Nelson’s photography at www.thegagglephotography.com.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Jessica Nelson appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Outdoor Photographer - The Blog by Text & Photography By Carlton W.. - 1d ago

Florida is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world. Our 21 million residents are joined by 120 million visitors who flock to the Sunshine State each year. Now Florida is best known for Disney World and beaches, yet its first draw was its natural attractions. Much of Florida’s original nature is still here but often hidden in plain sight of the amusement parks and coastal cities.

Moonrise Over Caladesi II, 2010. The full moon rises over Caladesi Island in the evening twilight just after sunset over Clearwater Beach and the Gulf of Mexico. Fringing Florida’s most densely populated county, this state park and its sisters, Honeymoon Island and Anclote Key, provide rare experiences with the region’s original nature.

As a conservation photographer, I have dedicated my career to raising awareness of Florida’s lesser-known natural treasures with the purpose of inspiring their protection. I got my start as a professional photographer working with Smithsonian scientists in the rainforests of Central Africa. But after four years of expeditions on the other side of the globe witnessing relatively pristine nature, I grew increasingly concerned about the rapid loss of wildlife habitat at home and moved back to make Florida my full-time focus.

I am an eighth-generation Floridian and fortunate to have connections to our lesser-known heartland. That is where I began my photographic quest. Through photographing Florida black bears that were relying on Everglades cattle ranches, I learned from biologists how much connected habitat bears need to survive and at the same time realized how rapidly new housing developments and roads were cutting wildlife habitat into smaller and smaller pieces. I also saw that the lands of cowboys and black bears were virtually absent from Florida’s identity and were not getting the attention they deserved.

That led me to found the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, a conservation campaign working to inspire protection of a statewide network of contiguous land, 17 million acres in total, that keeps wild Florida connected. Through two major expeditions in 2012 and 2015, I have hiked, paddled and biked more than 2,000 miles through the length and width of Florida. In addition to producing books, films and numerous media stories along the way, I also added to a lifetime shot list of amazing places I want to revisit, several of which I am going to share with you now.

Wild Florida: Favorite Places

We will start our journey along the Gulf of Mexico at Caladesi State Park, a barrier island near the city of Clearwater, where I grew up. Caladesi is one of the last wild places in the most densely populated county in the Southeast and has always been an oasis for me. I developed strong connections to nature here as a boy, and it is the first place I revisited as a photographer when I came home from college. You can reach Caladesi by a ferry boat from Dunedin or by walking two miles north along the sand from Clearwater Beach (thanks to Hurricane Elena in 1985, which filled in a land bridge between the two islands).

One of my favorite views of Caladesi is standing on the edge of Clearwater Beach looking east through the sand dunes across a shallow lagoon with layers of mash grasses, mangrove, palm and pines stacking toward the horizon. At dusk before the full moon, you can catch it rising just above the trees within moments of when the sun has melted into the Gulf behind you.

Caladesi Island is one of Florida’s 175 award-winning state parks. If you visit Caladesi, I recommend making the short trip to Honeymoon Island State Park and Anclote Key Preserve State Park on neighboring barrier islands. The afternoon light coming in low over the Gulf of Mexico on Florida’s west coast is the most powerful and brilliant I’ve seen anywhere in the world. In the summertime, be on the lookout for cold, dark thunderheads marching seaward over the peninsula to provide intense contrast with the warm sunset rays. The juxtaposition will awaken your senses.

Reef at Loggerhead Key, 2014. At the far reaches of the Florida Keys, where the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean meet, a coral reef rises close to the surface along the west side of Loggerhead Key. Here, in Dry Tortugas National Park, the reefs host about 30 species of coral. While coral reefs are in bad shape worldwide, especially in the upper Florida Keys, where runoff from development and pollution have been leading causes of decline, the reefs in the Dry Tortugas survive in relatively good health thanks to being 65 miles from the closest human population and safeguarded within a marine-protected area.

The next stop, Dry Tortugas National Park, is also on the Gulf of Mexico. Seventy miles west of Key West, this maritime outpost is as far south and west as you can go and still be in Florida. The only way to get there is by boat or seaplane, and there are regular ferries and flights from Key West. There are fantastic subjects throughout the Florida Keys, but the remoteness of the Dry Tortugas makes it one of my favorite places in the world. You can camp on Garden Key by the old fortress at Fort Jefferson and travel by boat 3 miles to the next island, Loggerhead Key, where a 150-foot lighthouse stands over the shoals and reefs where the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean meet. If you have a water housing, you won’t want to miss the chance to explore some of America’s most vibrant coral reefs. If you have a dome port, you can try split-level shots that show the reef and either Fort Jefferson or the Loggerhead Key lighthouse in the background.

Ten Thousand Islands, 2015. Everglades National Park is the largest subtropical wilderness in the United States and protects the largest wilderness and largest contiguous mangrove forest in the western hemisphere. The park has been declared an international Biosphere Reserve, a World Heritage Site and one of the Wetlands of International Importance, one of only three locations in the world to appear on all three lists. The boundaries of the park protect about 20 percent of the original land area of the Everglades.

From the Dry Tortugas, we’ll travel back north across the Gulf to Everglades City. This frontier community is nestled between Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge and Everglades National Park. Together they contribute to the largest protected mangrove coastline in the western hemisphere. From Everglades City, you can take airboat tours into the backwater creeks and sawgrass, or powerboat tours through the labyrinth of mangrove islands between the estuary and the Gulf. Some on the mangrove islands can make iconic silhouettes at sunrise and sunset with a backdrop of watery wilderness wide open to the Florida Keys and beyond. I love to see the Ten Thousand Islands from above, where you can find intricate patterns of islands and water that put the whole region in context.

For wildlife and landscape photography in the Everglades, you can’t go wrong with the Shark Valley and Anhinga Trails. Driving east from Everglades City on U.S. Route 41—one of my favorite roads with Big Cypress National Preserve on your left and Everglades National Park on your right—the Shark Valley Visitor Center is halfway to Miami, near the Miccosukee Indian outpost and airboat tours. At Shark Valley, you can hike, bike or ride a tram down a 7-mile trail straight into Shark River Slough. On a sunny day, there will be dozens of alligators to see up close along the way. At the end of the trail, there is a tall observation tower to climb for panoramic vistas of the “River of Grass.”

For excellent bird photography, you don’t have to walk or ride quite as far. A series of ponds and boardwalks close to the visitor center is a perfect place to see iconic water birds like anhingas, cormorants, wood storks and a variety of egrets and herons. These birds are used to seeing people, so getting close enough for a full-frame photo is not difficult. My photograph of a great blue heron in this article was taken there during an Everglades assignment for Smithsonian magazine.

Everglades Blue Heron, 2006. A great blue heron forages at dusk in the Shark River Slough, the main aquatic artery of Everglades National Park. Wading bird populations have declined by 90 percent since the 1930s, primarily from loss or alteration of habitat. While some species continue to decline, Everglades restoration and continued habitat protection offer hope for partial recovery.

Closer to Miami, you can enter Everglades National Park from the east near Homestead. From there, the first stop for bird photography should be the Anhinga Trail. Bird sightings will be best in the dry season, typically from January through May, when less water elsewhere in the Everglades helps concentrate birds and the fish they eat around deeper ponds near the visitor centers.

The Everglades is the largest subtropical wetland in America and Florida’s best-known wilderness. With conservation areas such as Big Cypress National Preserve, Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park and Picayune Strand State Forest, there are 4 million acres of contiguous public land combined with Everglades National Park. But the Everglades watershed is much larger still. The headwaters of the Everglades are near Orlando within the boundaries of Disney World. The watershed encompasses nearly half of the Florida peninsula and provides water for 9 million people.

Public lands alone are not enough to protect the Everglades from suburban development that is pushing out from urban cores to accommodate 1,000 new residents moving to Florida every day. Corridors for water and wildlife are needed to keep Everglades National Park connected to its headwaters, and one important piece of the conservation puzzle is the Florida cattle ranch. America’s first cattle and horses arrived in Florida with Ponce de Leon in 1521, and ranches encompass nearly 5 million acres of Florida today. Because Florida ranches retain a lot of forest and often historic prairies, their habitat for wildlife can be as good as public parks.

Econ Cowboys, 2013. Cowboys from the Yarborough family drive a herd through Little Big Econ State Forest, which their family owned for generations before selling it to the Florida Division of Forestry. The Econlockhatchee River flows east of Orlando through the historic Yarborough Ranch to a confluence with the north-flowing St. Johns River. Cattle ranches comprise nearly 6 million acres (or one-sixth) of Florida’s land mass. Because ranches are often excellent wildlife habitat, helping ranch owners protect their properties through conservation easements and other tools is essential to keeping the Florida Wildlife Corridor connected.

Forever Florida near Kissimmee is one place to see and learn about historic ranches. Some of Florida’s best state parks and forests were formerly cattle ranches. The St. Johns River flows north from south of Orlando to the Atlantic Ocean near Jacksonville. Florida’s longest river and second-largest watershed next to the Everglades, the upper St. Johns is largely protected by a patchwork of public lands and private ranches. One of my favorite places is Little Big Econ State Forest, where picturesque palms rise above the floodplain and line the waterways at the confluence where the Econlockhatchee River meets the St. Johns. I recommend paddling and camping along this waterway that flows east from Orlando. You might see cowboys on horseback gathering herds along the banks.

Freshwater springs might be Florida’s greatest hidden treasure. North Florida is said to have the highest concentration of freshwater springs in the world. A great place to see them is along the Florida National Scenic Trail in Ocala National Forest, where they supply pure water to the St. Johns. Or, further west, the Suwannee River and its tributaries are lined with springsheds, where crystal clear water flows up from underground aquifers. The water is 72 degrees year round, refreshing in the summer and relatively warm in the winter. Many springs provide important warm-water refuges to migrating manatees.

Longleaf Pines, 2012. In a longleaf pine habitat seen here in Ocala National Forest, an open understory of sweeping wiregrass is maintained by frequent fire. The natural diversity of a healthy longleaf pine forest can be comparable to that of tropical rain forests, with more than 40 species per square meter. Protecting and restoring longleaf pine forests is important for connecting the Florida Wildlife Corridor.

Ocala National Forest is also a fantastic place to photograph longleaf pines. This forest type once covered 90 million acres of the southeastern U.S. but was reduced by logging to just 3 million acres today. Groups like The Nature Conservancy and The Longleaf Alliance are working to restore longleaf to more of its historic range, which is critical for regional wildlife corridors. Longleaf forests and savannahs are biodiversity hotspots, with species diversity approaching that of tropical rainforests. When photographing pine forests, I enjoy using a moderate telephoto lens to compress the scene and focus on the patterns the layers of trees and grasses present. In spring when the wiregrass is seeding, the ground cover dances with texture and depth. Other great places to photograph longleaf pines are Apalachicola National Forest, Blackwater River State Forest, Eglin Air Force Base and Tall Timbers Research Center.

The Suwannee River originates in Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in southern Georgia and winds through historic longleaf country. I strongly recommend exploring its upper reaches, from Big Shoals State Park, where you can photograph flowing rapids, upstream toward the Georgia Florida line. On Day 96 of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition, that’s where I photographed an Ogeechee tupelo tree in fresh spring foliage reflecting over the dark tannic waters oozing out of the Okefenokee. In the dry season, when water is low, shallow white sand bars will color the brown water orange. Carry a polarizing filter to reduce the reflection and increase saturation of vegetation and to help see through the water.

Ogeechee Tupelo, 2012. An Ogeechee Tupelo spreads its branches over a shallow sandbar colored orange by tannin-stained water flowing from the Okefenokee Swamp. The Suwannee River runs 240 miles from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in southern Georgia through the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge to the Gulf of Mexico near Cedar Key.

As the Suwannee flows southwest, blue spring water mixes with the dark tannic waters along the way. Awesome underwater photos can be made where the two waters converge, in places like Ginnie Springs or Manatee Springs State Park. After 240 miles, the Suwannee spreads out through Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge into the Gulf of Mexico north of Cedar Key, which is a great jumping off point for freshwater and saltwater adventures. People working oyster beds in the shallows can make great subjects, as will flocks of white pelicans gathering in winter months.

This region around the Suwannee is known as Florida’s Nature Coast. Nearly 1 million acres and 160 miles of coastline are protected from north of Tampa to the Big Bend south of Tallahassee. Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge, Homosassa Springs State Park, Weeki Wachee Springs State Park, Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, Rainbow Springs State Park, Aucilla River Wildlife Management Area and St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge are just a few of the amazing places to explore.

Aucilla River Delta, 2015. The St. Marks River meets the Gulf of Mexico at the edge of St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, which protects nearly 70,000 acres, including wintering grounds for endangered whooping cranes that migrate 1,117 miles from Wisconsin.

During the cooler months, magical fog often lingers over warmer springs and creeks, making for magical light. On Day 10 of the 2015 Florida Wildlife Corridor Glades to Gulf Expedition, I set my camera on a tripod and used its intervalometer to capture a photo of myself paddling off into the misty sunrise at Chassahowitzka.

Chassahowitzka Dawn, 2015. During the Glades to Gulf Expedition, Carlton Ward paddles Crawford Creek, exploring a palm-studded tidal creek near Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge, the southern reaches of Florida’s Nature Coast, which wraps the Gulf from north of Tampa toward Tallahassee and is protected by a combination of state, federal and private land.

Further west, the Nature Coast transitions to the Forgotten Coast near the town of Apalachicola. This is a charming base camp complete with seafood restaurants and cafes where the Apalachicola River flows through a million acres of protected land to meet the Gulf. Shrimp boats line the docks in a town where 80 percent of households still rely on Gulf fisheries for their livelihoods. From the pristine beaches of Dr. Julian G. Bruce St. George Island State Park and St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge to oyster boats tonging in the shallows of Apalachicola Bay to massive cypress trees lining the vast floodplain of the Apalachicola River, the challenge will be picking which subjects you want to explore first.

See more of Carlton Ward’s photography at www.carltonward.com.

The post Florida’s Hidden Wild appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Photo By Jeff Sullivan

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Spring Shower Dogwood” by Jeff Sullivan. Location: Yosemite National Park, California.

“I caught this dogwood ‘flower’ as a spring shower was tapering off in intensity,” explains Sullivan. “What appears to be the ‘petals’ of a dogwood blossom are actually leaves, which don’t have enough chlorophyll to appear green. That’s why you can commonly find them with four, five or six white ‘petals’—the tiny flowers are actually in the buds in the center.”

See more of Jeff Sullivan’s photography at www.jeffsullivanphotography.com.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Jeff Sullivan appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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The clean good looks of the Tamrac Pasadena recall the brand’s earlier, iconic design language.

My very first camera bag was a Tamrac Model 602 top-loader that could be carried over the shoulder or worn as a waist pack. It had room for a camera body and a couple of smaller lenses, with nice details like a suede leather handle. As my gear collection expanded, I outgrew the bag, but I always liked its look and organization features.

Over the years, Tamrac’s style evolved along with the current trends in camera pack design, departing from the iconic look of the bags that I had grown up with. Aesthetics are admittedly not the most important consideration when choosing a pack, but I was pleasantly surprised when Tamrac introduced its “Traditions” line of packs that recall the classic details of the brand’s early packs.

Tamrac Pasadena (left) and Tamrac Runyon (right).

The first two bags in the new line are the Tamrac Runyon and Tamrac Pasadena. The smaller Runyon ($99) looks like the backpack you lugged around in high school and is best suited for a mirrorless or smaller DSLR camera, a few lenses and a tablet. The roomier Pasadena, which retails for $125, can accommodate more and larger gear, plus a 13-inch laptop.

Tamrac sent me the Pasadena model to try out, and spoiler—I really like it. Part of my affinity is nostalgia for the design, but it’s more than just the clean good looks. It’s a lightweight, versatile bag that’s customizable and has thoughtful storage for the accessories most photographers are likely to carry in to the field.

Check out the Tamrac Pasadena at B&H!

The Tamrac Pasadena has two compartments: the main compartment for cameras and lenses, and a smaller compartment on the front of the bag with pockets for smaller accessories.

If you’re especially hard on your gear or headed to a very harsh environment, the Traditions line may not be the best choice—Tamrac’s Anvil models are perhaps a better match. But for everyday use, the Pasadena is a very versatile bag, and it’s not without protective features. Details like weather-resistant fabric and a flap that covers the main compartment’s zipper provide moderate protection from the elements.

The bag’s main compartment includes two long, padded dividers and ten smaller ones that attach with Velcro and can be repositioned to suit your system. I removed six of the smaller dividers entirely and moved a few of the others to accommodate a hefty pro DSLR, a mirrorless camera with a 24-70mm zoom attached, a large 80-400mm zoom, plus three additional zoom lenses and a mount adapter. That’s an ample selection of gear for most purposes.

The interior of the Tamrac Pasadena’s main compartment as shipped (left) and after customization (right).

The interior of the main compartment’s cover incorporates a padded pocket that easily fit my 13-inch MacBook Pro. (Note that the product page on Tamrac’s website states that the bag can accommodate “Tablets and laptops up to 15-inches,” and while that may be true for some laptop models, my older 15-inch MacBook Pro wouldn’t fit.) The cover panel also includes two see-through zippered pockets ideal for holding filters, memory card wallets, camera manuals or other similarly flat objects. A smaller compartment on the front of the bag has a clip to secure your keys, along with additional pockets for pens, chargers, batteries and personal items.

Close up view of the organizational features provided in the smaller compartment on the front of the bag.

On either side of the pack are two lash tabs (also called “pig snouts”) to thread with straps for attaching a tripod. The Pasadena includes two straps which feature a snap lock that makes them smooth to use. The pack is a good match for a medium-size tripod.

The snap locks on the included tripod straps are easy to use.

With exterior dimensions of 12x17x10 inches when fully loaded, the Tamrac Pasadena will pass most airlines’ carry-on restrictions. In actual use, with the gear I listed above, it was closer to 8 inches front-to-back, so if you don’t completely overstuff the pack, you should be fine.

Side view of the Tamrac Pasadena with a tripod attached.

Overall, the Tamrac Pasadena is a solid bag and a good value. It’s larger than what I’d carry when I’m trying to keep my gear to an absolute minimum, and not the one I’d choose for extreme weather, but it’s a great option as an “everyday” bag when I want to carry multiple bodies and lenses—plus accessories—in retro style.

Check out the Tamrac Pasadena at B&H!

The post Tamrac Pasadena: An “Everyday” Photo Backpack With Retro Style appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Photo By By Laura Roberts

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Waiting out the Rain” by Laura Roberts. Location: Lincoln National Forest, New Mexico.

“On a rainy day in Lincoln National Forest, we waited patiently in the car until the rain stopped just long enough for the sun to peek out,” says Roberts.

See more of Laura Roberts’s photography at www.aov.photo.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Laura Roberts appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Photo By Jessica Nelson

“This white poplar tree has been one of my favorites since building our house on this wooded property,” Jessica Nelson explains. “I’ve always gazed out the back of my house looking at the massive tree cavity thinking it would be a wonderful place for wildlife to build a nest. Well, earlier in the year, I was lucky enough to see a mama raccoon emerge from this nesting area, and then a few weeks later, I got to witness her raccoon babies playing around this same cavity.

“This photo was taken a few months later when I believe one of the raccoon babies returned to its nesting spot to take an afternoon nap. I happened to be in the yard doing some nature photography when I spotted the raccoon taking a snooze way up in the tree cavity. The raccoon emerged for just a few minutes to check out what I was doing before settling back inside for more sleeping. It was quite dark in the woods that late afternoon, but I was still happy I was able to capture this wildlife shot.”

Canon EOS 7D Mark II, Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | C at 562mm. Exposure: 1/200 sec., ƒ/7.1, ISO 12800.

See more of Jessica Nelson’s wildlife photography at instagram.com/gagglephotog.

The post Last Frame: The Raccoon Visitor appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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The Olympus Tough TG-6 is incredibly capable on its own, but really shines with optional accessories.

When we think of “rugged” compact cameras, the Olympus Tough line is the first to come to mind, and the new Olympus Tough TG-6 announced today continues the company’s leadership in the category. What distinguishes the Olympus Tough line— apart from the cameras themselves—is the array of accessories that Olympus offers. It’s not just a camera, but a complete system that can be tailored for specific uses. Optional accessories include three optical converters, two ring lights, an underwater housing for deeper dives than the camera can do on its own, plus protective equipment like a lens barrier and floatation device.

Top view of the Olympus Tough TG-6.

Like its predecessor, the Tough TG-5, the 12-megapixel Olympus Tough TG-6 is waterproof down to 50 feet, dustproof, shockproof for drops up to 7 feet and freezeproof to 14 degrees Fahrenheit. It features a 4x optical zoom lens, providing a 35mm-equivalent focal length range of 25-100mm, which can be extended on either end of the range with the optional lens converters. At its widest setting, the lens has a maximum aperture of ƒ2—especially beneficial when shooting in low-light conditions underwater. The lens stops down to a maximum aperture of ƒ/4.9 at the tele end of its range.

Check out the Olympus Tough TG-6 at B&H!

The Olympus Tough TG-6 system includes optional converter lenses. Shown here is the Fisheye Converter FCON-T02 that’s capable of both circular fisheye photography and diagonal fisheye photography via a zooming control.

The Olympus Tough TG-6 also boasts impressive macro capabilities for a compact camera. In Microscope mode, it can focus on objects as close as 1 centimeter (0.39 inches) using the optical zoom, for 35mm-equivalent magnification of 7x. Also useful for close-up work is the camera’s ability to do Focus Stacking in-camera, merging 3 to 10 frames into a single image with expanded depth of field. For even greater control in post-processing, there’s a Focus Bracketing mode that can capture up to 30 frames while shifting the focal point in small increments. To help achieve the most even lighting possible for macro shots, the LG-1 Light Guide and FD-1 Flash Diffuser—the latter of which can also be used underwater—are optional accessories.

Olympus Tough TG-6 with the optional FD-1 Flash Diffuser attached.

Another new feature of the Olympus Tough TG-6 is an Underwater White Balance option with 3 modes, each optimized for shooting at different depths: Shallow, for depths to 3 meters; Mid Range for depths to 15 meters; and Deep for depths greater than 15 meters. The Deep mode is especially useful when using the optional PT-059 Underwater Case, which allows the camera to operate in depths up to 45 meters (approximately 147 feet).

The PT-059 Underwater Case extends underwater capabilities of the Olympus Tough TG-6.

The Olympus Tough TG-6 will be available in “late June” with a list price of $449. For additional information, including system accessories, see the official press release below, as well as the Tough TG-6 product page on the Olympus website.

A range of accessories are available to customize the Olympus Tough TG-6 for a variety of situations and uses.

Check out the Olympus Tough TG-6 at B&H!

###

OLYMPUS TOUGH TG-6® RUGGED COMPACT DIGITAL CAMERA

Perfect for Outdoor Shooting with Tough Performance, Macro Functions and a Newly Developed Circular Fisheye Converter

CENTER VALLEY, Pa., May 22, 2019 – Olympus expands rugged and underwater shooting capabilities with the new Olympus Tough TG-6, a compact digital camera with reliable Tough performance for shooting anytime and anywhere. It features a blazing fast, wide-angle f/2.01 lens, back-lit high-speed CMOS sensor and powerful TruePic VIII image processor, providing the ability to capture stills and video with brilliant color and stunning detail. The Tough TG-6 is waterproof to a depth of 50 feet (15m)2, dustproof3, shockproof to 7 feet (2.4m)4, crushproof to 100 kgf5, freezeproof to 14ºF (-10°C)6, and features a dual-pane protective glass construction for superb anti-fogging performance. Its Variable Macro System goes beyond the limits of the eye with ultra-close-up shooting up to 1cm from the front of the lens7. Full-featured underwater shooting modes and a new fisheye converter lens that supports circular fisheye photography are available for the Tough TG-6, along with a full lineup of other accessories for expanded shooting possibilities, making this truly the strongest field camera available.

1 At the wide-angle end of 25mm (35mm equivalent) 2 Waterproof performance is JIS/IEC protection class 8 (IPX8) equivalent. All measurements are according to Olympus testing conditions, and do not guarantee protection from damage or malfunction under all conditions. 3 Dustproof performance is JIS/IEC protection class 6 (IP6X) equivalent. All measurements are according to Olympus testing conditions, and do not guarantee protection from damage or malfunction under all conditions. 4 Compliant with MIL-STD810F. This model cleared drop tests under Olympus in-house testing conditions; however, Olympus does not guarantee protection from damage or malfunction under all conditions. Olympus in-house shockproof testing conditions: Drop height: 2.1 m, Drop surface: Plywood (lauan laminate), Drop orientation: 26 directions for each surface, each side, and each corner. Drop test was performed once for each direction. 5 Kilogram force (kgf) is the unit for measuring force exerted on an object. All measurements are according to Olympus testing conditions, and do not guarantee protection from damage or malfunction under all conditions. 6 The number of recordable still images is reduced at low temperatures. 7 Super Macro setting required.

Tough Performance for Shooting Anytime

Sealing throughout the entire camera body and double-lock construction on the camera battery cover are designed to provide waterproof performance to a depth of 50 feet for underwater shooting and excellent dustproof capabilities for use in dirty and dusty locations. Its floating construction protects the inside of the camera, clearing drop tests up to seven feet, and the reinforced body withstands loads up to 100 kgf. The Tough TG-6 is also freezeproof down to 14ºF, and the nitrogen-filled, hermetically sealed dual-pane protective glass construction prevents condensation and fogging for reliable shooting even in locations with severe temperature fluctuations.

High-Quality Images

The Olympus Tough TG-6 is equipped with a high resolution, high-speed f/2.0 zoom lens and a high-speed back-lit CMOS image sensor, offering excellent high-sensitivity performance and allowing you to capture bright, richly detailed images in low-light settings, ideal for shooting fast moving subjects. Anti-reflective (AR) coating incorporated in the image sensor’s sealing glass minimizes ghosting and flares. The TruePic VIII image processor, found in the award-winning Olympus OM-D E-M1X®  professional model, is featured on this model, reducing noise levels and improving resolution in low contrast areas. RAW data can be recorded and then edited in post-production using the Olympus Workspace image editing software. 

Variable Macro System

Conquer macro photography and creatively capture intricate detail using any of the four shooting modes, opening a new world of macro shooting. This close-up shooting performance allows high-quality image capture of the microscopic world that the human eye cannot see. A closest focusing distance of 1cm is possible for close-up shots even in Program and Aperture modes for more flexible photography.

The LED Light Guide, LG-1 (sold separately) uses the LED on the front of the camera to evenly illuminate the subject while the image is being taken. The LG-1 also assists with composing the image, acting as a constant light source to illuminate the subject.

The Flash Diffuser FD-1 (sold separately) uses the in-camera flash to illuminate the subject, offering a significant increase in the amount of light. This increase in light allows for usage of lower ISO settings and faster shutter speeds, as well as an increased working distance. The FD-1 can also be utilized under water.

Microscope Mode

With Microscope Mode, users can capture high-quality, detailed images of tiny subjects that are difficult to see with the naked eye, such as the antennae and feet of insects, the veins of a leaf on a tree, snowflakes, etc. A maximum shooting magnification of 7×8 is possible when the optical zoom is set to the telephoto end and the subject is 1 cm away from the front of the lens, delivering magnified shots similar to using a microscope.

8 35mm equivalent. 9 Use of a tripod is recommended. Processing may take longer than usual.

Microscope Control Mode

Switch display magnification ratios with the press of a single button similar to switching microscope objective lenses for observing and photographing subjects at 1x, 2x, and 4x. When the subject is 1 cm from the front of the lens while using this mode, the image on the rear LCD monitor can zoom in up to 44.4x.

Focus Stacking Mode9

Focus stacking mode captures multiple shots while automatically shifting the focus from the foreground to the background. Only the areas in focus are extracted and merged, resulting in a full pixel photo with a deep depth of focus. This is particularly effective for macro shooting when shots have a shallow depth of field and a narrow range of focus. Between 3 and 10 shots can be set on the Tough TG-6 so users can fine tune settings for different subjects and precision in their finished image.

Focus Bracketing Mode

With a single shot, this function captures up to 30 images while shifting the focus from the foreground to the background. Three levels of focal shift and number of shots can be selected to perfectly match the subject and shooting conditions. This feature is convenient for instantly setting the focal position when shooting flower petals or the wings of insects, etc.

Dive Deep Into Underwater Photography

To expand the possibilities of underwater shooting ever further, the Tough TG-6 is equipped with five underwater shooting modes optimized for various situations, allowing the user to capture sharp, colorful underwater photos at all depths. The popular Underwater White Balance mode now offers three options, providing appropriate color adjustment for deep water shooting. The new Fisheye Converter FCON-T02 (sold separately), for circular fisheye photography is now available, offering a versatile lineup of accessories to further expand shooting creativity.

Five Underwater Modes

  • Underwater Wide: Optimized for shooting in dim underwater conditions and capable of shooting in deeper water.
  • Underwater Snapshot: Records subjects using the natural lighting in pools and other shallow water for natural-looking photos.
  • Underwater Macro: Perfect for close-up shots of small subjects such as little fish.
  • Underwater Microscope: Captures even smaller subjects up to 1 cm from the front of the lens.
  • Underwater HDR: Dramatically recreates the scene without losing details in dark areas.

Three Underwater White Balance Modes

  • Underwater Shallow: Recommended for use in water depths up to approximately 10 feet deep to improve the red tones that tend to occur in shallow water.
  • Underwater Mid-Range: Optimally tunes the color for general use in water from 10-50 feet deep.
  • Underwater Deep: For use with the new Underwater Case PT-059 (sold separately) in water deeper than 50 feet, particularly for improving the blue tones in photos.

Fisheye Converter, FCON-T02

The new Fisheye Converter FCON-T02 (sold separately) delivers both circular fisheye photography and diagonal fisheye photography via zooming control. It can function even underwater for zoomed-in shots. The Converter Adapter CLA-T01 (sold separately) is required to attach this lens. FCON-T02 is only compatible with the Tough TG-6.

Advanced Video Functions

The Olympus Tough TG-6 is equipped with Ultra HD 4K Movie, ideal for recording beautiful scenery in amazing detail. Full HD 120fps High-Speed Movie is also included to capture high quality split-second moments with playback in stunning slow motion.

Field Sensor System

The Olympus Tough TG-6 is equipped with a Field Sensor System, using tracking information obtained from various sensors in the camera to record data, including the GPS11, manometer, temperature sensor, and compass. Data can then be synced to photos and video and viewed in the free Olympus Image Track (OI.Track) smartphone app. Simply press the INFO button, even when the camera is off, to display data.

Pro Capture Mode

Never miss a shot! Pro Capture Mode shoots sequentially at 10 frames-per-second (fps) for 0.5 seconds before the shutter button is pressed fully, making it perfect for capturing shots where timing may be difficult, such as an insect in flight or a drop of liquid splashing.

High Definition LCD monitor

The new rear LCD monitor now features a 1.04 million-pixel high-definition resolution for improved visibility. The brightness and color saturation are optimally tuned for use outdoors.

Date Imprint

It is now possible to embed the date and time of capture into still images for convenience and reference later. Users can turn this feature on and off to best fit their needs.

Lens Barrier, LB-T01

The new lens barrier LB-T0112 protects the lens surface from scratches and dirt. The barrier opens and closes easily for smooth operation, even while wearing gloves.

Silicone Jacket, CSCH-127

This accessory protects the surface of the camera body from scratches. It also provides a solid grip on the camera when shooting during winter sports and water sports. LED Light Guide LG-1 and Flash Diffuser FD-1 can function with the silicone jacket attached to the camera.

Underwater Case, PT-05913

Designed exclusively for the Tough TG-6, this case can function down to a depth of 148 feet. The camera control dial is operable even when the camera is stored in the case for easy exposure compensation control underwater. Two external flash units for underwater photography (UFL-3) are compatible for multi-unit flash photography in a compact system.

Lithium Ion Battery Charger, UC-92

This new, compact battery charger can fully charge the Lithium Ion Battery LI-92B using a USB port in approximately 2 hours.

Pricing and Availability

The Olympus Tough TG-6 will be available in red and black beginning in late June 2019, with suggested retail prices of $449.99 USD and $579.99 CAD.

Accessory Pricing

PT-059 Underwater Housing: $299.99 USD; $329.99 CAD
Lens Barrier LB-T01: $49.99 USD; $59.99 CAD
Flash Diffuser FD-1: $51.99 USD; $64.99 CAD
LED Light Guide LG-1: $40.99 USD; $40.99 CAD
Circular Fisheye Converter FCON-T02 & Adapter CLA-T01 Tough Pack Kit: $224.99 USD; $292.99 CAD
Fisheye Converter FCON-T01 & Adapter CLA-T01 Tough Pack Kit: $139.98 USD; $139.98 CAD
Teleconverter TCON-T01 & Adapter CLA-T01 Tough Pack Kit: $129.98 USD; $129.98 CAD
CLA-T01 Adapter: $19.99 USD; $19.99 CAD
Lens Cap LC-40.5 (fits on CLA-T01 Adapter): $7.49 USD; $9.99 CAD
Lens Filter PRF-D40.5 PRO: $51.99 USD; $51.99 CAD

10 White balance can also be changed manually. 11 GPS: Global Positioning System. To use GPS Assist data, information must be updated via the internet. A PC or smartphone with an internet connection is required. GPS Assist Data must be updated every 2 weeks. Depending on the country/region of use, different laws and regulations may be applicable regarding the use of the GPS function. Be sure to follow local laws and regulations. Be sure to turn off the GPS function in places where its use is forbidden or restricted, such as inside airplanes. The camera is not equipped with a navigation function. GPS is a positioning measurement system that uses signals received from orbiting satellites. For better reception, avoid locations where signals can be blocked or reflected. Use the camera in as open location as possible where the sky is clearly visible. It may not be possible to obtain positioning information, or positioning information may be incorrect in the following locations: Indoors, underground or underwater, in forests, near tall buildings, near high-voltage lines, inside tunnels, near magnets, metal, or electronic appliances, near mobile phones that operate in the 1.5 GHz band. 12 Cannot be used together with Silicone Jacket CSCH-127. 13 The Field Sensor System will not operate properly when the camera is stored in the underwater case. Make sure to set the Log Lever to the off position when using the case. Use together with silica gel for best results.

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The post The Olympus Tough TG-6 Is The Ultimate “Rugged” Pocket Camera appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Photo By Lace Andersen

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “After The Flood” by Lace Andersen.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Lace Andersen appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Photo By Bob Larson

Congratulations to Bob Larson for winning the recent Spring Showers Assignment with the image, “Wicked Beauty.”

“Originally shooting with a telephoto zoom to catch the rainbow up close, I took a moment to look up and away from the viewfinder and immediately switched out to a wide angle as the rainbow became the secondary feature to those clouds,” Larson explains of this image taken at Watson Lake in Prescott, Arizona.

Canon T2i, Sigma 10-20mm, 1/800 sec., f/10, ISO 100.

See more of Bob Larson’s photography at boblarsonphotography.zenfolio.com and follow him on Facebook and Instagram.

The post Spring Showers Assignment Winner Bob Larson appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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Photo By Hank Miller

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Peacock Wing” by Hank Miller. Location: West Palm Beach, Florida.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Hank Miller appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

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