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Orienteering in Ireland by Communications Officer - 4d ago

Orienteering fixtures are a little thin on the ground at the moment as most of our seasoned orienteers who plan and organise the events week after week (Thank you volunteers!) are off on their orienteering travels around the world.

The Slovenian Bubo Cup followed by the OO cup take place this week as well as many other events across the world. If you’re considering your first orienteering trip abroad, do ask your club mates for some advice. It’s a great way to spend a holiday and a wonderful way to find parts of the world other tourists haven’t ventured before!

The calendar of world orienteering events can be found here.

Sun 21 Kilbarry Wood Cork Cork Mid-Summer League / Family Day / No. 3 Bishopstown
Tues 23 Farran Forest Park Cork CorkO Summer League / No. 11 Cork
Date Sunday, 21/7/2019
Venue Kilbarry Wood
Address Currabeha; Fermoy, Co. Cork
Event Format Cork Mid-Summer League / Family Day / No. 3
Club Website Bishopstown Orienteering Club
Start Times 10:30-13:00
Signposted From N72 Fermoy / Tallowbridge Road
Contact 021 4546194 / boc@orienteering.ie
Grid reference W 883 977
Date Tuesday, 23/7/2019
Venue Farran Forest Park
Address Farran, Co. Cork
Event Format CorkO Summer League / No. 11
Club Website Cork Orienteering Club
Start Times 17:30-19:00
Signposted From N22 Cork / Macroom Road
Contact 086 3062054 / corko@orienteering.ie
Grid reference W 477 714

See Facebook and twitter feeds for any last minute changes to events

FB :@Irish.orienteering    Twitter: @orienteering.IRE  Instagram: OrienteeringIreland

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Orienteering in Ireland by Communications Officer - 2w ago

The senior members of the Junior Squad have made their way to Denmark for the Junior World Orienteering Championships where they will compete against teams from across the World. This is where you will see the rising stars of the orienteering world make their debut.

The schedule of events can be found here, with competitions starting on Saturday 6th July with the Long Distance.

The Irish orienteering community wishes them well as they don their Irish jerseys.

Some of the team members have kindly shared some of their orienteering memories, likes and dislikes with us before they head into the terrain.

Clodagh Moran – 3ROC/UCDO ( Three Rock, University College Dublin Orienteering Club) What is your first Orienteering memory?

I don’t remember much from the early days of Mum dragging me around but remember one of my first courses alone being the off-string course at the Scottish 6 Day and I struggled to finish it.

What is your favourite terrain

Technical forest but I do love a good open mountain.

What do you think is your best distance/discipline?

Long I think; my brain doesn’t work quickly enough for the others.

Read more about Clodagh..

Emily Sørensen –  AJAX/ Tintookies/ Spurposting What is your first Orienteering memory?

Dragging my whole family around on like a w10s course at an urban event and feeling the absolute best because I was nailing every control – it was the only I was better than my brother at so I decided it was the sport for me.

What is your favourite terrain

I’m pretty terrible at it but I love a good granite map or just some nice Flinders Ranges spur-gully.

What do you think is your best distance/discipline?

My best results usually come from Longs or Sprints so either of those I suppose.

Read more about Emily…

Éadaoin McCavana – GEN/UCDO (Great Eastern Navigators/ University College Dublin Orienteers)
What is your first Orienteering memory?

Well my first course alone was in Phoenix park I begged mom to let me go alone. Turns out she and my older sister, Aoife walked around and kept me in eye sight the whole time!

What is your favourite terrain

A nice forest doesn’t go amiss. Very runnable and white is the dream.

What do you think is your best distance/discipline?

Don’t think I’ve a best but really enjoy middles and also keen on sprints

Ciara Silby   (UCDO/WATO)
Emer Perkins   (BOC)M20 Ruairi Long   (UCDO/Ajax)
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Orienteering in Ireland by Communications Officer - 3w ago

Our team of juniors travelled to Belarus on Tuesday for some pre race training ahead of the European Youth Orienteering Championships which start on Friday 28th June. You can follow the races on the live results page here.

It would be wonderful if we could offer our support through social media as they race this weekend.

We asked our juniors to answer a few questions so we can introduce them to the wider orienteering community.

I hope that our young up and coming juniors take note of the humble beginnings of these orienteers, having begun their orienteering on Permanent orienteering courses and parks. Ten years or less further along they are now representing Ireland at the European Championships. So keep on orienteering whenever and wherever you can.. you never know where it might take you!

Please click on the profile picture to find out more!

Eoghan Whelan- Wato What is your first Orienteering memory?

My first memory is The JK 2014, I was 11 and I had never been to a big competition before, it was foggy and I didn’t have a compass, or know how to use one!

What is your favourite terrain?

I like open mountain, like Mahon Falls.

What do you think is your best distance/discipline?

Middle distance.

Read more….

Cliodhna Donaghy- GEN What is your first Orienteering memory?

My first memory is doing a permanent course in Lough Key Forest Park, falling, and being told that it would hurt less if I didn’t cry and kept going…

What is your favourite terrain?

I like forest best because it’s fast running (usually) and there’s more to go on than just contours and boulders.

What do you think is your best distance/discipline?

I love the speed of a sprint event, but I also enjoy the challenge of long distance.

Read more…..

 Liam Cotter –  Bishopstown Orienteering Club  (BOC) What is your first Orienteering memory?

Doing a yellow course in Mondeligo Woods with my mother way back in 2009.

What is your favourite terrain?

I enjoy fast, runnable forest much like the JK Long terrain this year.

What do you think is your best distance/discipline?

Long Distance, but Sprint events come close. I simply haven’t done enough sprint events to see.

Read more….

Darragh Hoare –  Bishopstown Orienteering Club (BOC) What is your first Orienteering memory?

Running around Corkagh Park in Dublin with all my cousins back in 2013. We did an entry on the day course at the Leinster Inter-Club Championships.

What is your favourite terrain?

Definitely has to be open mountain, although I do like anything really technical.

What do you think is your best distance/discipline?

When everything goes right, long distance.

Read more….

We hope to add some more profiles as they become available so please check back!

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We are delighted to announce the following juniors have been selected to represent Ireland in the coming months. Wishing them all the best.

Many thanks to the selectors and the team leaders who will be escorting them to the competitions this summer.

European Youth Orienteering Championships (Belarus) 27th-30th June M16
Cuan Riordan  ( 3 Roc)
Eoghan Whelan  ( WATO)
Liam Cotter      ( BOC)
M18
Andrew Elwood     ( LVO)
Darragh Hoare    (BOC)
W16
Meadow McCauley   (LVO)
W18
Aoife O’Sullivan   ( BOC)
Cliodhna Donaghy  (GEN)
Junior World Orienteering Championships (Denmark) 6th -12th July W20
Ciara Silby   (UCDO/WATO)
Clodagh Moran   (UCDO/3Roc)
Eadaoin Mc Cavana  (UCDO/GEN)
Emer Perkins   (BOC)
Emily Sorensen (Ajax/Tintookies Orienteers)
M20
Ruairi Long   (UCDO/Ajax)
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Orienteering in Ireland by Communications Officer - 1M ago

Well done to all those hardy orienteers who braved the downpours to come to CNOC’s Urban Orienteering event in Newbridge on June 4th. They were well rewarded with courses that challenged  mental agility as you sped around areas kindly opened up for us on a once off basis by 3 schools, the Patrician monastery and the Parish church. Michael Malone, our organiser, was instrumental in allowing access to these areas.

Niamh O’ Boyle was the planner who lulled orienteers on the long course into a false sense of security on the opening controls & then presented this dilemma from control 6 to 7:

Have a browse and see if you spot the ‘trap’?  Some very experienced orienteers got caught here!

Lots of route choice challenges were presented and attention to detail was vital – you could very well find yourself on the wrong side of a corner and have to retrace your steps

How would you have run the leg to 14 which ‘hit you’ when the map was flipped for part 2 of the course? Control 14 to 15 also worth your respect.

Prizes for the fastest split from controls 10 to 11 on the long course goes to Killian Brennan (1:13), CNOC and Cliodhna Donaghty (1:26), GEN.  Next week’s event starts at the Defence Forces Sports Ground on the Curragh.

Many thanks to Bernie O’Boyle for giving us the opportunity to analyse the route choice, all be it from the comfort of our armchairs! The routegadget should prove interesting! 

We look forward to the next CNOC summer league event next Tuesday 11th June at the Curragh.

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Orienteering in Ireland by Communications Officer - 1M ago
Have you planned your event yet?

Following on from World Orienteering Week, Heritage week provides another wonderful opportunity to highlight our sport to families and the wider public within the framework laid out by National Heritage Week.

Every year a few clubs organise events for Heritage week, this year 17th to 25th August, the week before the primary schools return. The Heritage week website allows users to search for activities nearby under a

range of categories family event to tour, talk or exhibition and be active outdoors! The Heritage Week booklet is also available for free nationwide, distributed in libraries and public spaces, but requires registration of the event before Friday August 7th. There is no deadline for online registration.

Each year Heritage week has a theme, this year it’s Past Times, why not create a theme for your family friendly orienteering course, or go retro and ask your runners to bring their red pens and draw their course on the map like old times?! Dig out your 70’s nylons and dress up for the event too!

In years gone by Eileen of CNOC has developed courses for the younger members involving a tree course, having controls on some of the specimen trees around the lakes of Naas. Andrew of WATO hosts his heritage week event annually in the JFK Arboretum linking with their week of themed events. There are some wonderful ideas on the Heritage Week website which could be developed for orienteering too.

Heritage week ideas leaflet. Here are some of the ideas that I found which could be adapted to orienteering.

35 -Create a self-guided history or nature trail on paper

41 -Identify trees on a walking tour.

46 Bring a group for a guided running tour.

48 Create a heritage trail around your local area. Maybe a temporary trail during Heritage Week will inspire your community to build a permanent one in the future!

85 Create a selfie scavenger hunt. Prepare a list of photos participants must take within a certain time limit e.g. a Georgian building, an oak tree etc.

Remember to entice a newcomer to orienteering will require plenty of notice, so get your event registered now and avail of some free publicity. Don’t forget to post your event on your facebook page at the same time so it appears on local newsfeeds early, this way it may pop up a few times over the summer and the viewer might look further the second or third time. It’s always good to update or add snippets of information as the event comes nearer, that way FB knows it’s an active event and an active page.

Seasoned orienteers may drop everything at less than a weeks notice to travel to an event, but newcomers will require a drip drip approach… so please get planning and tell everyone, now!

Already got your event organised?  Then don’t forget to registere at the link here.

https://www.heritageweek.ie/register-an-event/organise-an-event

Feel free to give your feedback or ask for assistance in promotion of your event to comms@orienteering.ie, working together to promote Orienteering.

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From a Swedes perspective…

 As the Irish Senior Squad Trainer, an ambitious Nordic skier and adventurous runner, I decided to run IOC 2019 very early. I knew I wouldn’t be able to do any orienteering in preparation, but I predicted that Nordic ski training, in combination with mental preparations and a strong psychological mind-set would make me powerful enough.

When I studied the maps before the races, the terrain didn’t seem to be very interesting really. A lot of open areas, not very detailed terrain and relatively easy orienteering. But I was so wrong. The sprint forced me to rethink my orienteering expectations. I was taken by surprise. How could they even made a sprint course that hard in such simple area? After I finished the sprint which were ran in a beautiful area and held both  technical difficulties and amazing views, I immediately started to prepare for the middle distance. I prepared in a different way than I had done before. I gave the map more respect, the terrain more deference and expected the course setter to fool me again. That might have been what caused me to run one of my best races for many years. When running the middle had I a great feeling. I wasn’t afraid of the course but I didn’t either disrespect it either. I ran with it. I was open minded about route choices on every leg, I ran fast where the map told me to and I went slowly in all other places. I didn’t make any mistakes. A clean race with high speed. A lovely course which held all the difficulties you may ( or may not) expect. Running into the finish with a majestic view and sharing public. Amazing!

Regarding the classic distance the next day, it was expected to be won in around 100min, but since my shape was good I didn’t mind the distance. I ran it harder than both the sprint and the middle. Enjoyable at its maximum, slow tricky forest combined with superfast running grass areas. How could you not love such a course? Demanding with a lot of good route choices. I didn’t make the 100min, but no shame on the course setter, without mistakes sub 100min would have been possible.

Last day was a relay, once again the terrain changed and this time the race was held in a smaller area which invited to high speed through the whole course. Lots of tracks ant paths, fast forest and deadly green areas.

Four days of running, four days with amazing organisation and demanding courses. After a weekend like this, you have a great possibility to evaluate your own results, your strengths and maybe more interesting also your weaknesses. When the races were so different from each other, both in length and technical level. I am sure you can evaluate your own strengths and weaknesses. Where you performing best on the relay and sprint? In the end of the long distance? In the forest in the middle? This is only possible when the variation is as high as it was on this weekend. Keep that up, I love it!

Overall and summarized a weekend including a short sprint, a fun middle, a long classic and a fast relay. Four days of fun. Exhausting of course, but that’s why I loved it. Since I came home have I been talking a lot to others about it. Not just because it was an amazing event, but that I can see a change. It was seven years since I first stepped off the plane at Dublin Airport, and I have been running a lot of training sessions and competitions in Ireland since that day. During these seven years I have seen the progress in Irish orienteering moving forward a lot. Today the standard of an event is high, professional and highly serious. Just as it should me in a championship.

I look forward to going over again soon, but when I fly over for the eighth time? I haven’t decided yet, but it´s probably going to be sooner or later. I can’t be without you guys more than a few months. I am deeply and honestly thankful for the IOC 2019 organisation. It was a pleasure to be a part of it and I have been telling everyone at home that you NEED to come visit Ireland. An Island having the absolutely best atmosphere for having a great time and always making you feeling heart-warming welcome. Thank you!

Anton Hallor

  • 7th Place Sprint M21E
  • 2nd Place Middle M21E
  • 1st Place Long Distance M21E

Many thanks to Anton for giving us an insight into his IOC 2019 , we look forward to next years IOC2020 to be held in Kerry and West Cork. More information coming soon….

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Orienteering in Ireland by Communications Officer - 2M ago

Last year, in a quest to find some warm weather orienteering, CNOC ventured to CRES Island in Croatia for the annual Easter4 event. Never having taken part in a sprint-o in an olive grove before (which looked a little like the small stone walled fields on Inisheer), we had such fun that we decided that this was it – we were going to repeat the experiment in 2019. 10 CNOC members signed up for the trip.

Day 1 took place in the small fishing village of Izola on Slovenia’s short Adriatic western coastline.

The sprint took place in the old town – a warren of narrow alleys offering shade from the 20 0 evening sun. Start and finish was in a small park by the sea, the cooling waters attracted in some of CNOC’s hardier ‘younger’ members.

Days 2 and 3 brought us to Hrusica and Podgrad for Middle and Long Distance events- on some of Slovenia’s Karst limestone area near its Southern border with Croatia.  The maps here were as intricate as I’ve ever seen, apart maybe from WOC in France in 2011. The landscape was forested with almost no undergrowth. Depressions were the dominant feature with lots of rock underfoot in parts of the map. Woe betide anyone who went astray on this ground – almost impossible to distinguish one depression from another as I found out to my cost!

Day 4’s event was on Risnik,  near Divaca,-another area of Karst near Slovenia’s Sjockan caves- a UNESCO world heritage site cave system.

Some of the depressions here were enormous, but in general the running was faster with more open areas.

All 4 days were beautifully sunny with temperatures averaging 190.  There were 455 competitiors, so traffic was light, without any queues into or out of the events. The maps were of superb quality and entry fees were a modest €50 for 4 days! The organisers were very pleasant and offered change of start times if needed, without any fuss. All in all, a fantastic event – we added a few extra days to allow us to relax in our beautiful surroundings and even squeezed in a quick visit to Venice.

https://www.easter4.com/

Results on http://www.orienteeringonline.net/Results.aspx?CompetitionID=4095

Bernie O’Boyle- Cnoc Orienteers

Have you taken a trip to an orienteering event abroad and would like to share your experience?

Please contact us on comms@orienteering.ie

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