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The midwife’s grip tightened around the soon-to-be-mother’s hand. Natural childbirth requires a certain amount of grit, and more importantly, support. Midwives understand the power of a hands-on approach during such intense labor and delivery. The midwife smiled as the woman squeezed back, welcoming the guidance. The joy of bringing life into the world never ceases to amaze.

It is becoming increasingly common for women to seek out alternative methods to deliver their baby. Many expecting mothers are turning to midwifery practices in hopes of having a natural childbirth.

Oakland Macomb OB/GYN provides women with physician and midwife collaboration.  Many of our low risk patients meet a midwife at their first OB appointment and are hooked.  Midwives work specializes in normal pregnancy and vaginal births. They work with expecting mothers to educate them on reproductive health and provide superior prenatal care.  Additionally, midwives provide ongoing support through labor and delivery to ensure both maternal and newborn safety. Overall, a midwife offers an intimate, hands-on approach with one on one support to their pregnant patients. 

The midwives at Oakland Macomb have all reached the highest echelon of midwifery training.  They are Certified Nurse Midwives. Having achieved their RN degree, worked on a maternal unit and then completed a formalized midwifery program. As a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM), they turn to their clinical experience and educational background to provide a “high touch, low tech” approach to childbirth.

Our low risk patients decide if they would like to be managed by a physician or a midwife.  It is fascinating to see the wide geographic draw our unique midwife offering has. It is not uncommon to have patients drive 2 hours to see Kathy Figurski CNM or any of the Midwives.  The close relationship that the midwives form with their patients is unequaled in modern medicine. 

So what is the role of the doctor in the patients desiring a midwife birthing experience?  One of our physicians is on call and backing up the midwives if the situation calls for additional intervention.  There are times when a collaboration or meeting between the midwife, physician and patient is done to discuss the best way forward.  According to the American College of Nurse Midwives, maternal and newborn health care is most effective when doctors and midwives work together.

Having a strong line of communication between the two parties is important when it comes to the patient’s maternal health. When doctors and midwives have a strong working relationship, their goals are united, and they can lean on each other’s strengths to ensure a safe childbirth.

There is a lot to consider when looking into a midwifery health care services.. The support women receive, both physically and emotionally, while working with midwives is often unmatched. For low-risk pregnancies, natural childbirth through the care of midwives is a viable option.

These tight bonds do not end after delivery.  Certified Nurse Midwives are specifically trained and continue to provide well-woman care throughout their patients lives.  They do yearly physicals, pap smears, breast exams, order mammograms and colonoscopies. They are experts in contraception and provide initial evaluations of many gynecologic issues such as recurrent infections, abnormal bleeding and infertility.  

Consider the benefits of a Certified Nurse Midwife experience for your next pregnancy or women’s health concern.  For more information, contact Oakland Macomb OB/GYN for an appointment and a formal introduction.

The post A Midwife and Physician Collaboration appeared first on Oakland Macomb OBGYN.

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We all know the marvelous Buffie Severns, M.S.N., C.N.M., her warm smile, and skilled, compassionate, caring way, but did you also know that she is a marathon-running super grandma who has lived all over the world and was a sergeant in the U.S. army?? Buffie generously agreed to share more details of her interesting life with us over this Independence Day weekend.

Buffie cherishes her time with her patients and their families.

Tell us about your path to becoming a certified nurse midwife.

My journey to becoming a midwife was a long one…I started out as an Army Medic and finally ended up here in Michigan, as a certified nurse midwife. Many of my family members served in the military including my grandfather, dad, uncle, myself, my husband and now our oldest son. As part of a military family, it was not a huge surprise that I joined the Army when I was 19 years old. 

Graduation from 91C school (LPN) in 1994

I served in Germany, Desert Storm, and in Texas. I became a Licensed Practical Nurse in the Army, and worked as a pediatric nurse at the end of my military career. After I separated from the Army, I was blessed to follow my husband through his career. We were stationed in some amazing places such as Germany and South Korea. My family and I were fortunate to learn many different cultures and meet some amazing people.  

Because I grew up an Army brat, I moved every two to three years for my entire life, until my husband retired a few years ago. We have now planted roots here in south-east Michigan; where we have resided for the past seven years!

Returning to school was not easy because we moved so often. Since computers were not popular yet and internet was not a thing, I attended 11 different colleges before finally graduating from Wayne State with my Master’s in Nursing Science in 2014. 

Although my journey was long, I consider it an amazing blessing because I was able to try many different types of nursing. After earning my RN, I worked in a county hospital in Kansas, caring for medical/surgical patients, emergency room patients, and even obstetrics patients.  In West Virginia, I worked on a rehab unit (hips and knees) for a bit, and then transferred to labor and delivery. In Korea, I had the privilege of working with soldiers and military families and found my passion in prenatal education. She became a certified childbirth educator and instructed classes in Kansas, West Virginia, and South Korea. She is also a certified physical fitness instructor-trainer for the U.S. Army Pregnancy Physical Training Program.

What made you want to be a certified nurse midwife?

I became a CNM because I felt unsupported during the delivery of my first child and I do not want any woman to experience what I went through. I am passionate about educating and encouraging women to be involved in the decision-making process; creating a birth story they will treasure for a life time.  

What is your favorite part about being a CNM at Oakland Macomb OBGYN?

I love working in women’s health and being a part of the Oakland Macomb OBGYN team since 2015 has been a perfect fit for me. Our staff is a family. From the front desk, to the physicians, and everyone in between… we truly care for each other and for those we serve. We have the privilege of caring for some fantastic women. It is such an honor to be a part of their health care team, as they enter the different stages of their lives; from adolescence through menopause. 

Outside of work, what do you do for fun? 

When I am not at work, I am with my family. We have a ton of fun hanging out together. When our youngest comes home from college, we like to spend time on the lake or hanging at the house watching movies. When we have vacation time, we travel to wherever our oldest son and his family are stationed. We can’t get enough of our two grandbabies! 

Grandma and Grandpa loving on their grand babies!

My hobbies are crafting and running. My favorite craft is scrapbooking. It is so fun to reminisce, turning photographs into art.

As for running; that is “my time” to turn my music up and get away from the stress and chaos of the day. 

Buffie runs for fun and relaxation now, but she has competed in many races, including
two Veterans Day marathons in San Antonio, Texas.

What can’t this wonderful lady do? Thank you for being you, Buffie, for serving your country and your Oakland Macomb OBGYN patients! We are so glad you’re part of our team!

sz, pa-c

The post America’s Favorite Midwife! appeared first on Oakland Macomb OBGYN.

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Breast cancer claims countless lives every year. It is one of the most prevalent forms of cancers detected amongst women of all demographics. Fortunately, breast cancer is becoming easier to prevent through proactive measures. Mammograms, a common breast cancer screening method, are critical to the health care of women. As technology evolves, so too does mammography. With the introduction of 3D mammograms, doctors are able to determine cancer risks early, providing cutting-edge breast imaging. For many, 3D mammograms are becoming the preferred method of mammography.

A screening mammogram is a common procedure used for breast cancer screening. X-rays are administered to examine the woman’s breasts for early signs of cancer that may not be felt during routine physical examinations. The standard 2D mammogram can reveal small forms of cancer early, leading to quicker treatments and reduced death rates.

3D mammography offers a revolutionary method for breast cancer screening. Often referred to as Digital Breast Tomosynthesis, 3D mammography produces a three-dimensional image of the breast made up of a series of standard 2D images. The 3D images produced by this mammography method provide doctors with a detailed and accurate representation of the breast, allowing them to screen for cancer with greater accuracy and act accordingly should there be any cancers detected.

With a 3D mammogram, there tends to be a reduced need for further follow ups. 3D mammography produces such accurate imaging, doctors can quickly determine if the patient exhibits any cancer risk. Knowing if there are any risks with a high degree of certainty means fewer follow ups, and may eliminate any unnecessary biopsy procedures.

The differences between a 3D Mammogram and 2D Mammogram

There are many advantages to 3D mammography over traditional screening mammography. While 2D digital mammography techniques are a viable option for many women, the additional imaging produced in a 3D mammogram could lead to quicker response times and better forms of treatment. Clinical trials and research show the impact 3D mammograms have on determining cancer risk.

The 3D mammogram may detect cancer that standard 2D images are unable to pick up. This is made possible by capturing a more thorough image of the breast. While 2D digital mammography includes a top to bottom image, as well as a side to side image of the breast, 3D mammography is comprised of multiple images that make it possible to investigate any possible abnormality.

In addition to finding cancer that traditional screening mammograms may miss, 3D mammograms reduce the occurence of a false positive. False positives occur when the results incorrectly show signs of cancer risk. In standard 2D screening mammography, it is more likely for something to appear abnormal. Any abnormalities require follow up treatments, as well as potential procedures, such as a biopsy.

The overlap tissue in breasts could signal a false positive. Overlap tissue occurs when the tissue in the upper breast overlaps the tissue in the lower breast during compression. The compressed tissue may look abnormal in a 2D mammogram, whereas a Digital Breast Tomosynthesis makes it clear that tissue is overlapped.

Additionally, the overlapped tissue could conceal smaller cancers. If this happens, the cancer could go undiagnosed. Again, a 3D mammogram offers a more reliable reading of the tissue that leads to better assessment of any growths hidden within the tissue.

Perhaps those who would benefit most from a 3D mammogram are women with dense breasts. Dense breast tissue typically results from a higher than average amount of fibroglandular tissue. This is a fairly common occurrence amongst the female population. Because dense breast tissue could potentially mask signs of breast cancer, radiologists often request additional imaging.

Many doctors will recommend that women with dense breasts seek a 3D mammography as opposed to the standard 2D digital mammography. The 3D mammogram presents a fuller picture of the breast tissue, including areas of higher density that may be difficult to examine in a traditional screening mammogram.

Is a 3D Mammogram right for you?

3D mammograms are a preferred method of breast cancer screening, however, there are a few minor notes women should understand before deciding on 3D mammography. While the procedure is safe in every regard, it does expose women to low levels of radiation. This is because many times both a 3D mammogram and a 2D mammogram are administered. However, as technology continues to change, many modern machines capture both 3D and 2D mammograms simultaneously, effectively reducing the exposure levels of radiation.

It is also important to note that although 3D mammography produces the most accurate image of the breast tissue, there is still a possibility that small forms of cancer could be overlooked. This is why it is important to work with your doctor and make sure you are consistently taking the preventative measures and following routine exams.

Breast cancer presents a serious risk to women. It is a traumatic experience for those suffering from it, as well as their family and friends. Thankfully, there are exceptional preventative techniques that can help reduce the risk of breast cancer. One of the most accurate measures is the 3D mammogram. 3D mammography produces breast imaging that provide unmatched breast cancer screening with the woman’s health care in mind. Through 3D mammography, doctors can see through dense breast tissue to best catch cancer in its earliest stage. More and more, 3D mammograms are gaining favor over 2D mammograms in determining cancer risk. Please consult with your doctor to understand how a 3D mammogram can help you.

The post Should I “Upgrade” to Digital or 3D? A Mammography Guide appeared first on Oakland Macomb Obstetrics & Gynecology, P.C..

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While she is newer to the Oakland Macomb OBGYN family, she is a veteran gynecologist with 20 years experience! A Michigan gal, this provider completed her education at U of M and Wayne State, and her residency at the DMC/Sinai Hospital. She specializes in gynecology, so you’ll find her in our offices, providing clinical care and performing in-office procedures.

Figured it out? Here are some more clues about her.

1. She loves to sing and is a trained vocalist! Her favorite musical is Miss Saigon, so if you hear a few bars of Broadway coming from an exam room, you’ve found her!

2. She and her family love to travel together and she would literally go to the edge of the world for/with them!

3. She has a large, beautiful family, whom she adores. Her husband, Tim, has a passion for medical missionary work in Africa, her three sons are studying business, engineering, and pre-med, and her daughter is a swimmer and the family’s most trusted dog cuddler.

4. Their two fur babies are a Brittany Spaniel and Mini Golden Doodle, named Belle and Biscuit!

5. Traveling is one of her favorite things to do and her best trips to date have been to Rome and Niagara Falls. They also adored their time at the Grand Canyon.

Have you guessed it? Paging Dr. Page!! (She says she’s never heard that pun before)

Dr. Page is taking new patients, so call today and get on her schedule! You’ll find her knowledgeable, kind, and thorough, and who knows, she just might sing for you, if you ask her nicely.

Dr. Page’s full bio here.

The post Pop Quiz: Who Is the Singing Gynecologist? appeared first on Oakland Macomb Obstetrics & Gynecology, P.C..

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You probably already know this wonderful smile. Zomusa is a medical receptionist extraordinaire, at the Rochester Hills office, and has been been part of the Oakland Macomb OBGYN family for the past eight years. She currently works in our call center, assisting patients in finding answers to their questions and connecting them to the Oakland Macomb OBGYN departments they need.

She is a naturally caring, service-minded person. She says, “I have always considered myself to be a people-person. Being compassionate and empathetic is something that is deeply rooted in me and stems from diverse experiences that I have come across. The medical field has always been a part of my path through friends and family, so the desire to want to help comes naturally and I do enjoy making a difference in people’s lives. Prior to working in the medical field, I lead a youth ministry, and worked in South Africa as a massage therapist in a spa resort in the middle of the bush.”

Zomusa spent most of her childhood and young adulthood in a small-town, rural area in KwaZulu-Natal along the coast of the Indian Ocean, in South Africa. She lived there with her family, who are deeply involved in the Zulu community as missionaries. She says of her home in South Africa, that it is “known for its geographical beauty, wildlife, colorful culture, and music.”

Fun fact: Most of the music for ‘The Lion King’ originated from this region!


Zomusa also describes a philosophy that is the heart of the Zulu culture. “Ubuntu is a Zulu philosophy that translates into the meaning, “I am because we are.” This is the relationship we strive to have towards others.”

Outside of work, Zomusa keeps active by, “Enjoying the hip and happening scene in the Detroit area; in particular, art, culture, music, and the Latin Dance community.” She also enjoys exploring outside in nature, especially when going for a good run!

It’s not often that she’s able to get back to South Africa, but, in 2017, the practice helped sponsor her as a missionary, where she “served the medical needs of locals is South Africa alongside Dr. Stark and a wonderful medical team!”

When asked what it’s like to live so far from her childhood home, she says, “Living this far away has its ups and downs, but my Oakland Macomb OBGYN family has been by my side though it all, and grateful to be part of an amazing team!”

We surely are grateful to have Zomusa on our team and family. She is an incredible person and we’re thankful to know her and work with her every day!

The post Thankful Thursday: Today, We Are Thankful for Zomusa! appeared first on Oakland Macomb Obstetrics & Gynecology, P.C..

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The core components of a urinary system are kidneys, bladder, ureters, and urethra. An incident of infection in any of these components is commonly referred to as the Urinary Tract Infection (UTI). The chronicity of such infections in a few cases can make them either unresponsive against the treatment or cause recurrence of the medical condition in the patients. The infection is usually considered minor if it is confined to the bladder. Once it starts to affect the kidneys, however, it becomes more threatening and hospitalization is recommended in such circumstances for a thorough treatment plan to be followed.

Symptoms Of Urinary Tract Infection

A few of the common symptoms which are most frequently associated with a UTI are as follows:

  • Change in the color of urine. It gets darker or bloody.
  • Frequent episodes of pain in the region below the ribs or closer to the lower back.
  • A need to urinate more frequently than usual.
  • Bladder pain.
  • A complaint of burning sensation at the time of urinating.

While such an infection is not bound by gender, age, or ethnicity, the incidence of UTI recurrence has been found to be significantly higher in women. If you have had an incident of Urinary Tract Infection, it is imperative that you take precautions to prevent its recurrence. The following simple tips and strategies are known to help a great deal in minimizing the risk of UTI recurrence in women.

Tips To Prevent Urinary Tract Infection Recurrence In Women
  • Delaying urination once the urinary reflex has been activated can have health implications. For the women who are susceptible to UTI recurrence, however, it is especially essential to urinate as frequently as possible. You can make it a habit of increasing your daily water consumption to reduce the intervals between urination. With excess water and frequent urination, it is convenient for your body to cleanse itself of the unnecessary bacteria.
  • Bladder irritation is to be prevented at all costs. Therefore, alcoholic drinks, as well as coffee or even the juices made out of citrus fruits, are strictly prohibited. If you are fond of drinks, cranberry juice should be your choice.
  • Upon urinating, it is imperative to clean yourself properly from the front all the way to back. The susceptible women should avoid pants with tight fitting and even the undergarments should be worn that are made out of cotton with reasonable breathing space.
  • All sexual intercourses should proceed with appropriate lubrication. It is recommended for the women to urinate right after the intercourse as well. Moreover, the use of birth control such as spermicides or diaphragms are to circumvent during the course of susceptibility for UTI recurrence.
  • Last but not the least, opting for regular checkups and tests, and keeping your urinary system thoroughly monitored can also help in prevention of the UTI recurrence.

Remember that medication is also available not only for the treatment of the Urinary Tract Infection but also for its prevention. The prolonged use of such prophylactic antibiotics, however, can have a range of side effects and associated drawbacks. Therefore, the use of medication MUST only proceed with the doctor’s prescription.

The post How to prevent recurrence of a urinary tract infection? appeared first on Oakland Macomb Obstetrics & Gynecology, P.C..

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Dr. Yoon recently went to Dubai, in the UAE, to lecture at an international OBGYN conference! He and his wife enjoyed experiencing this fascinating part of the world, and he provided great information to other medical providers that he’d like to also share with us here!

They got to see the ‘Burj Khalifa,’ which is the tallest building in the world, with more than 150 floors!

The topic they asked him to speak on is weight gain during pregnancy. We know, we know, not the most pleasurable conversation, but it is really important, since both not gaining enough weight, and gaining too much weight can have negative consequences. We aim to help patients be deliberate with nutrition and exercise to promote safe deliveries and health in mom and baby. Your pre-pregnancy weight/BMI will help you and your provider determine how much weight you should aim to gain during pregnancy, but Dr. Yoon stresses that we aim to focus on healthy pregnancies more than the absolute numbers.

 

In the U.S., it is estimated that 47% of patients gain more weight during pregnancy than is recommended.


We understand that focusing on diet and exercise during pregnancy is HARD. First of all, pregnancy is often no walk in the park. The discomfort, the nausea, the food aversions, and the whole long list of challenges that come with pregnancy make eating right and staying fit a real challenge. Also, women are often working full-time and managing the house, the other children, going to school, and tackling all kinds of other tasks while growing a fetus! It’s a lot! We are here to help you do the best that you can so that you can have the best outcome possible. 

Here’s where the pounds go during pregnancy :

Example for the 18.5 – 24.9 range BMI 

Diet during pregnancy- the perception is that we’re “eating for two” when pregnant, but in reality, we need an additional 300-450 calories/day (which is about 1/2 of a sandwich). If you add 1 extra serving of each of the food groups daily, you’ll be there. Your body and your growing baby need these additional calories to develop in all the right ways!


Exercise during pregnancy
– unless there are complications in the pregnancy and your provider has specific concerns, usually we recommend continuing your normal exercise regime.  If you are a runner, for example, it’s OK to continue running, we just wouldn’t recommend that you start running, or any other intense physical activity you weren’t doing prior to pregnancy. Sometimes modifications are required, and it’s always a good idea to ask. In general, we encourage moderate aerobic exercise for about 150 minutes/week, staying hydrated, and listening to your body.  Obviously, rest if you have discomfort and notify your provider if you notice any cramping or spotting.  We definitely do NOT recommend weight loss during pregnancy.

Why are we so focused on how much weight we gain during pregnancy? There are short-term and long-term consequences of gaining more weight than recommended during pregnancy

During the pregnancy and delivery:

  • Higher risk for pregnancy-related hypertension
  • More likely to experience shoulder dystocia during delivery
  • More likely to have cesarean section deliveries
  • Babies are more likely to have fetal macrosomia (meaning they will be large for their gestational age, which often comes with hypoglycemia, which is difficulty maintaining normal blood sugar after birth).

After pregnancy, postpartum weight retention

  • At 6 months, 50% have retained more than 10lbs and 25% retain more than 20 lbs
  • This has a cumulative affect on future pregnancies
  • Sometimes this additional weight can have negative effects on a woman’s health in general

We appreciate Dr. Yoon sharing his insights with us, and we look forward to seeing where his next teaching adventure takes him!

As always, specific questions and concerns about your pregnancy or health, or diet, exercise, and weight gain, you should as your provider at your next visit. We look forward to working together as a team to help you and your baby be the healthiest you can be! Also, don’t forget that we offer prenatal yoga at our Troy campus every Tuesday (7pm-8pm) and Saturday (11am-12pm) for only $10, (contact Kim Marasco, postpartum nurse and licensed yoga instructor, KimMarasco@comcast.net for more info) and that Beaumont offers a whole host of pregnancy/breastfeeding/child birth/breast feeding classes that can help during pregnancy!

The post Dr. Yoon Went to Dubai and Spoke at an International Women’s Health Conference! Today, He’s Sharing His Knowledge with Us! appeared first on Oakland Macomb OBGYN.

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We all know that menopause is the time of life when the ovaries stop making estrogen, which causes menstruation (periods) and reproduction to both come to an end. What ELSE does menopause do to you? How does it all work? Today, we sit down with Dr. Amy Heeringa, certified North American Menopause Society Practitioner, and our resident expert in all things menopause.

So, let’s say you’re in your forties and you know menopause is coming, what should you know?

The transition through menopause (not unlike other phases of life) varies widely person-to-person. Even the age when you start menopause, like the onset of menses (first period) earlier in life, or when menstruation returns after giving birth, is different for each person. The average age to start menopause is 51, but it can start much earlier or not come until the late 50s. If it occurs before age of 40, it is considered ovarian insufficiency. The timing of menopause somewhat correlates to family history, or when your relatives went through menopause, and also your general health and other conditions. If you’re wondering if you’re nearing menopause, come in for exam and possible laboratory evaluation.

Menopausal symptoms also range. Some women have very difficult times and others sail through it.

A quote I like to use is:

“Menopause is like white water rafting. Some women go straight

down the river, some bounce of each bank and all the rocks.”

It’s important to remember that if you are postmenopausal (meaning you haven’t had vaginal bleeding for a full 12 months) and then you start to bleed, you need to make an appointment to be seen right away, as this could indicate a serious health condition or even cancer.

What are the common issues women share about their menopause experience?

The most common experiences are vaginal dryness, hot flashes, mood changes, weight instability, sleep disturbances, irregular bleeding, libido (sex drive) changes, and discomfort with intercourse. Unfortunately, many of these complaints are embarrassing to patients,  so they are often reluctant to bring them up with their providers. We don’t want you to feel embarrassed or isolated. These are extremely common, and manageable! We’re working hard to make these topics less taboo, so women feel empowered to discuss them, and we can better help. Also, any irregular bleeding or discomfort with intercourse, although common around the time of menopause, needs to be evaluated and ruled out as something more concerning (like uterine cancer). When in doubt, make an appointment and come see me. You are not alone. 


Mood changes: Because of all the hormonal changes related to menopause, it is also a very common time for mood changes, and often patients don’t know where to go for help with this. A GYN experienced in menopause is a great place to start. The good news is, if we choose to use pharmacological agents to help,  there are those that can improve mood AND vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes, vaginal dryness, etc). 


The decline of libido is a very real issue that can significantly impact your life and your relationship, and it’s one of the most common concerns patient have. Again, unfortunately, patients are often embarrassed to bring it up with their primary care providers, so it may go unrecognized and unmanaged. Come see us! Low libido is common and complex, and often multifactorial, in women. It’s frustrating that there are 26 FDA drugs approved for male sexual dysfunction and 1 for female….(and it’s for premenopausal women and comes with lots of restrictions). This reflects how complex this issue is, so we need to approach it from multiple angles. The first thing we always do is rule out physical conditions that might be contributing to vaginal dryness or vaginal/vulvar pain, with a thorough conversation and exam in the office, then we discuss possible solutions. You’re not alone! So many women are having these hard conversations every day with their providers, and are glad they did!


Do you recommend any specific vaginal lubricants for postmenopausal women?

Lubricant will become a part of your sex life, if it isn’t already, and that’s OK! There are great products on the market. We have samples in the office for you to try!


Are there any simple things people can do that might help with their menopause symptoms?

Traditional teaching tells us to dress in layers so you can remove clothes during hot flashes, avoid hot, caffeinated beverages, and get regular sleep and exercise. These are a great place to start, but sometimes women need more than lifestyle modifications to get good control of their symptoms.


Do you recommend hormone replacement therapy to your postmenopausal patients? 

There are a broad range of treatments for menopause symptom control, including hormonal and non-hormonal options. The need for and use of hormones varies by how severe the menopause symptoms are, and the patient’s personal, medical, and family history. It is a very individualized approach, and safety and quality of life are the priorities. We always extensively discuss the risks and benefits of all treatment options before beginning any treatment, and follow closely during treatment.


Where would you recommend people look for more information about menopause?

North American Menopause Society is a great resource, with tons of helpful info. There you can also find providers who specialize in menopause, like myself. Also, there is a lot of handy information on menopause at the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology’s site. 

Thanks so much for talking menopause with us today, Dr. Heeringa!

sz, pa-c

The post Let’s Talk Menopause, with Dr. Amy Heeringa appeared first on Oakland Macomb OBGYN.

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From the University of Michigan School of Nursing: “DNP student Jessica Fladger was selected by a faculty review committee for the Medvec Nursing Innovation Award! Fladger, a midwife and graduate of our BSN program, is focused on improving care in low-resource communities in the U.S. and abroad. She’s working with UMSN’s Dr. Jody Lori to explore the benefits of group-based, culturally-appropriate antenatal care education that builds upon the strength of community groups.”

We’re SO excited for Jessica, and inspired by her passion and relentless hard work, both in her clinical practice, and in her doctorate of nursing practice studies at U of M. We sat down with her to find out more.

What exactly is the Medic Nursing Innovation Award? Can you tell us more about your research?

Jessica: The Medvec Nursing Innovation Award is a scholarship that’s provided to a nursing student working on innovative evidence based interventions. My DNP work has always been focused on group prenatal care. I started my project with Dr. Lori, and I’m still a part of her research team, but my focus has shifted from global work to local work. I’m getting ready to begin work with the “Beyond Bars Collabortive”, a group of providers working to improve the quality of prenatal care women in prison receive. They hope to implement group prenatal care at a local facility.

What would you hope to do with this research, long-term:

Jessica: Long-term I would love to increase access to group prenatal care for populations of women at risk for adverse prenatal outcomes. It’s been shown to decrease the risk of preterm birth, and low birth weight infants, and it’s a great way to build community during pregnancy. I feel that a lot of women feel as if they’re the only ones experiencing certain issues during pregnancy, so the fact that having a support group during pregnancy influences health outcomes speaks to the magnitude of the village that is required to bring babies into the world safely.

How are you managing work, school, and life? (It should be noted that she did this interview following a 24 hour shift!)

Jessica: Balancing life and work and school is tough! This is my first time working and being a student at the same time and the transition wasn’t easy. But it takes a lot of discipline and dedication, and I’m looking forward to crossing the finish line in 2020.

We know you’ve been back and forth this year to Georgia visiting your sister. It always looks so warm and sunny,  and no one is wearing a parka in your pictures. We’re so glad you live in Michigan and  are part of our team, serving our patients, but it’s nine degrees here right now….remind us all why we choose Michigan?

Jessica: Michigan is where I was born and raised. I feel happiest and most comfortable here. Even when I travel I can’t wait to get back home. Downtown Detroit is thriving with new and amazing small business. One of my new favorites is the Ten Nail Bar! I still have lots to explore in Michigan- up north specifically. I’ve never been and I hear it’s wonderful, so one day I’ll take a trip there!

Thank you, Jessica, for talking to us and for doing all that you do! Congratulations on this recognition. We are certain you and your work will have great impact on women and babies all over the world!
sz, pa-c

The post Winner of the University of Michigan’s Medvec Nursing Innovation Award appeared first on Oakland Macomb OBGYN.

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