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I was back to cycling class after an absence and looking forward to a great class. Yes I know the teacher, know what I have to do, can follow instructions, modify but…… this time it was different. I love the instructor, she is clear, keeps a good pace of information etc, but today for some unknown reason I JUST COULD NOT FOLLOW HER. Somehow my brain was hearing only half of the instructions and I found myself getting frustrated. Funny thing though, when I noted this internal struggle (half way through the class) it was a bit like getting a shock, and then the internal monologue began - you know the one, inducing feelings of shame, diversionary tactics and the promptings of just give up… I kind of enjoy feeling focused and in charge and this was totally the opposite. Before I share how I got myself out of this state I just want to take a minute to discuss students because I think that this state happens to humans more than we perhaps recognize.
It seems to me that our students might have shades of this sort of experience on a daily basis. I mean, heck I am old have the developed brain structures etc, I would hope I am better at this sort of thing than a 11 year old. One day they “get it” how to do school and the next “not so much”. That is just for a neurotypical child, teen, young adult - but my guess is that the challenge for someone with non mainstream functioning such as ADHD, depression, anxiety, sensory process, autism, trauma, PTSD, etc it might be like this constantly. Add to the non staticness of the human condition and those Zones of Proximal Development (Vygotsky) are changing perhaps by the hour if not by the minute. How does this student’s teacher, let alone a child, find the target zone? Rogers was onto something with that “theory of unconditional positive regard” for sure. That acceptance by others is like a long hug for the soul, but sometimes there must be actions for the self which assist in producing the same impact - calming techniques. Some call it mindfulness, some call it meditation, some prayer, some contemplation, some movement, some being, but whatever it is that creation of equanimity or non attachment to whatever experience really does help calm our human nervous system down (D. Seigal).
There are lots of therapies out there, and no, we as school counselors do not get to practice “therapy” but we do provide therapeutic interventions daily for our students. We assist to co-regulate, we give them a writing assignment, we teach them non fidgeting skills, we empathize (ala Rogers), we challenge faulty thinking, and we align just to name a few of our “tricks”. The funny thing though is that even we forget to do these things ourselves, I know I did in my class. When I was able to recognize my internal state and create curiosity around it, I felt myself release, regain the equanimity within myself, recapture my focus, and participate more successfully in the moment. The process is
all skills based, not a hidden gift or talent, but something that can be learned over time, just like riding a bike or tying shoes. Is it easy? No not in the least. Is it simple - usually but unlike seeing a nicely tied shoe, it is difficult to see one’s own progress unless we are reflective. Most of our kids just don’t have that self reflection built into their habits yet - they are young, growing and changing so it really should not be expected. However, there are lots of things WE can do to help. We help by modeling the behaviors for them, they see it they are more likely to do it. We share with their adults - teachers, families, community members what they can do to assist the child/student, we give our skills away in whatever forum that we can.
I encourage each of you to step outside of your own comfort zone and find a place to share your talents of regulatory practice. Give it some thought over the summer - reflect and then decide what you might do to create a broader sense of calm on your own campus. Refocused...
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New Mexico School Counselor Association by Elesha Fetrow, Nmsca President - 1M ago
OK, like many of you I am sure, I had the crud this last month. No voice, lack of energy and a malais that sort of took hold for two weeks. I hope it does not return. I am slowly getting back into the swing of things - but there just is no “slow” in a busy school, so the slow has been in my personal life. I gave up lots of things for a bit including my “beloved” spin classes. I have returned and I hate it more than ever. I am constantly having to make concessions when directions are given. I must adjust, go with plan B,C,D and E. Sometimes the instructor gives other options to choose from, but other times the instructor seems angry as I am doing “my own thing”. Really they don’t know I have been sick and am still recouping my strength? Yesh makes me not want to attend until I can “perform” at my old or at least their level of expectation but ….. If I don’t I never will get there. Once again it made me wonder about my students..
As a school counselor we are often charged with attendance issues, testing anxiety, behaviors, underachievement - the list is large and long and sometimes we do not make a ton of headway. We flop - especially when we take the head on approach as my spin instructor above who is not giving choices - because my perception is that she has hard and strong expectations. She meets resistance and so do we. So enters my controlled chaos theory. What if yes we state the expectations and then choice? What if we given choice to scaffold the expectations? That is in essence what a BIP is supposed to do but a) I don’t have ALL of my students on a BIP that would be way too unrealistic and too much paperwork for words. However, what if we discussed options with students? What if for poor attendance as an example, rather than having a BIP or a attendance contract we gave those as options, but we also discussed others as well. Share information about the impact of poor attendance? Help them chart their attendance successes? Check in each week to see if there is an outside stressor? Discuss with their families what might help have them attend? Offer an attendance group? (This is one I got from another counselor and just offering this option to parents really seems to motivate all). Send home reminders to parents for students - or to students if they are old enough or if you are incorporating google classroom.
I was recently reminded that our students do not complete their self regulatory circuit until around age 26 - way after most of us think, however we expect them to do all of the above without exception. I have a pretty good regulatory circuit at this point in my life so I can handle the instructor that does not give options but I don’t think I could have when I was a student in a public education setting. I also know that if I were a student today I would need lots more assistance just given the changed world than I got way back then when dirt was new….. So consider, what are you putting out when you are in a classroom? Do you give options? Do you have a set agenda or program that is more important than your students and their ability to regulate? Hmmmmm…Remember to set up the relevance, set up the “container”, and set up the by-in and invite choices, yet realize that sometimes the individual is just not into it that day., and that is OK...
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New Mexico School Counselor Association by Elesha Fetrow, Nmsca President - 1M ago
I am not sure why…. But this year I am constantly making comparisons to my workout and my students in my mind. Maybe because the workouts are hard for me and so many of my students express how hard school is for them… Or maybe I am diverting during my workout and not being mindful of my own process (sounds like the kids too), or maybe it is just my time to really sink into what I am experiencing and having those “wow” moments. In any case this is where I am.
A couple of weeks ago I was once again arguing with my cycling bike trying to work up a sweat, provide myself with a bit of stress relief and honestly some calorie relief as well (dang holidays and dessert). Pretty much I am waiting for the class to begin feeling sort of sorry for myself (can anyone imagine a child sitting in first period doing the same?) when I notice this person sitting on a bike and the instructor is helping get the bike set up while they are sitting on it….then they are helping the person get their shoes clipped in… just wow and I notice that this individual has really limited mobility… I am getting more impressed by the minute… and then the class begins. I do my thing, the class does theirs, and I sometimes catch myself watching this other person (have I mentioned that I can be lot like a middle school student lately?). They are not going as fast as the rest of the class, but they are going through water and sweating like crazy. They stay the entire class and clearly are working out at a level FOR THEM that I personally cannot achieve. I am stunned by their commitment and work ethic, but if they were being graded on the output along with the rest of the class I think the grade would be low and I bet that is how the bike assessed them as well.
Observing just made me think of our kids. Our kids compare themselves a ton - particularly starting around 4th grade - it becomes a developmental thing that for some of us never goes away and for some of us becomes a huge barrier towards our own progress. Some students enter the classroom and see some high performing students and think “I will never succeed in class like they do” and just give up all together. Others fortify themselves most days and give it a go but not really consider how they might improve their own outcomes (I wasn’t on that day). And others like my spin example really do give it their all in the moment and work really hard.
The point is that we all show up differently most days just like our students. We as adults attempt not to compare ourselves to others because we know that our personnel space and factors are vastly different than everyone else's, hard but we do try to stay here. Kids just don’t have this built in yet. Too easily they align with their own “failures” and do not see how much harder they may have had to work in order to earn that C than another student. I am sure many of you have had the “talk” about not even turning in work - yes I have had a student tell me that they haven’t turned it in because “what if I get a bad grade on it?” Gosh nothing gets lower than a zero - but a zero is not reflective of their effort, but rather of their action - whole different thing.
So for me I am going to be more vigilantly looking for the student that has high work ethic and low output - it is these students that really are going to take over the world once they find their mojo. Since showing up for themselves is REALLY the most important thing - for school or even an exercise class.
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For many of us school counselors holiday break is a ladder being handed down to us from the bottom of a cavernous hole we were unaware had an opening, beckoning us to come out and reintegrate with society. I have already discovered as a new counselor how crucial it is to use these holiday breaks as a chance to recharge and gain a new perspective on life and be ready to go full throttle when we return in January. However, maybe it is in our personalities, but if you are anything like me or other school counselors I know, you see this as a chance to catch up and bring work home. I would be a hypocrite if I said don't take work home! Yet, I have been realizing that as long as we keep appropriate boundaries between work and our personal lives we do not burn out as fast. Maybe it is because I am still learning as a new middle school counselor, but the second I show up I am running and dealing with the adventures that only school counselors and educators can truly relate to. I have not yet found that sweet spot in completing lessons and planning primarily at school, I have received a lot of good ideas from counselors across the city to combat the stress that comes from bringing work home and I have gotten much better at it.
One piece of advice I follow from a retired school counselor is to listen to what we teach our students, take a breather when you get home, go exercise or do an activity that will calm your mind and focus on you. I know my personality has always been on the over achieving end, this can be a curse and a blessing, for instance, when I was in retail for almost nine years I learned very quickly the more you give the more they take. This is similar to the school system, yet it is all a matter of perspective, I do not want to burn out but I do realize that if I put time, effort, and quality into what I prepare, the students are the ones who benefit. I have always heard work in general is a give and take, but as school counselors we are lucky. There is no possible way to quantify our potential take away and impact on our students. I have received letters from students that I may have met with once or twice and what they saw as the most beneficial was simply me being present and listening to them, as a matter of fact I was scratching my head and looking at my logs as to when I saw this student. I figured out what meant so musch to this student was the fact I brought out kick balls, footballs, and more out at lucnch and took the time to play with several students. I know much of this comes as no shock to the veteran counselors out there, but it should serve as a reminder that just by showing up to work at the top of our game and being who we are will make an impact beyond what we can calculate. When we inevitably hear the negativity at our places of work or personal lives, I believe that the impact we unconsciously have in our positions will be a positive source for individuals that we never realized. One positive I have gained from school counseling as opposed to the other jobs I have held, is that I truly believe I am impacting students every single day, even those I rarely meet. I am also very thankful we have the same days off as our students and I know every single one of us earned a well deserved break!
Enjoy your holidays, try and not work too hard, and please hold your loved ones close and cherish every new memory. It is these memories and experiences that make us the wonderful caring individuals we are, as well as effective school counselors.
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New Mexico School Counselor Association by Elesha Fetrow, Nmsca President - 1M ago
Ok, I am still thinking about how my spin classes relate to how kids learn (darn and adults), I just can’t seem to shake it. So I will apologize in advance, but I will come back to this thought in a moment.
This last round of pondering comes as I am attempting to improve my own skills in the classroom. My school has purchased the gift of using an online platform for curriculum this year for counselors The lessons are short and sweet, but man there are 26 of them - so wondering how am I ever going to get them done, along with the other required push ins that I do as a middle school counselor? Needless to say I am giving this a ton of consideration and attempting to get creative. I mean I am not trained to teach per se. I don’t have a teaching license. Then a random remark by the owner of an agency that I “lightly” also work for, really hit home. He said have fun tonight “teaching in group”. I got ruffled by that and explained, "I don’t teach in group, I share, I expose, I learn, we practice, we discuss, and we play.” He responded, “but isn’t that the essence of great teaching?” and he walked off just leaving me to consider his words. Yep - gosh he is good.
So I began to watch teachers - everywhere. Yes at my school is an obvious place, but this brings me back to my spin class. I have had a number of spin instructors over the course of the last couple of weeks. It must be a busy time for them as well. Anyway, sometimes I am motivated to work really hard in the class and other times I feel myself digging in my heels and chanting unkind expletives in my head towards the instructor - such as “shut up already” ya that is one of the kinder ones. I KNOW the unkind language I am using towards another but with myself is not helping me to perform better in any way yet I do it - especially with this one instructor. She just will not.. shut.. up… She does the classic ways to motivate, “keep going”, “don’t give up”, wahahahahahahaha the entire time. She is a good instructor, knows her stuff, but really is not tapping into that motivation that is key for me. Another instructor just tells us something like “make sure you have enough weight on the fly wheel” but not for what. For speed, climbing? No clue. I get a good workout - most of the time unless I am in slide mode, I have to be committed and at the end of the day sometimes I am just not… I need the help.
Both of the above examples were missing some of the key elements. The first is doing a great job of the the first elements, share, expose but that is about it, there is no real value placed on individual creativity, no play. If she sees someone slowing down she just yells to keep going LOUDER. The second instructor, does not do a good job of the first part - the pre-teach, but if I am into being creative she allows for lots of that to be experienced in the room, but I also might just coast. Hmmm.
And then there is this one instructor. She does not yell into the mike with platitudes like “good job”, she is specific with the comments. Not to a single person but o
n the level of work she is seeing in the room. She pre instructs what will be done during the next drill, she tells us what she is expecting to see “I am looking for everyone to get comfortably uncomfortable” and then she does it with us, explaining the shift points, ensuring all are engaged, and that we are all sweating at capacity. She shares that if there is a particular part of the drill that a participant does not wish to participate in, that is their call, their workout and then she watches. After class she works the room to ensure she connects with each participant (or most of them) giving specific feedback in the areas that they did well, so they KNOW very clearly her expectations when they return. Needless to say her classes are always full.
I have set a goal for myself to remember the motivational features of the third spin instructor when I am in the classroom this year. I don’t want kids to tune out, I want them to have time to process, to digest and use what I have to share in creative ways. I want to ensure that I am doing all of the steps, and then to leave time at the end to connect giving specific feedback so that the expectations when I return are clear. Mostly I want to do the things that are likely for my students to get “a good workout” and take credit for their own learning. Most importantly - we all need to have fun.
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New Mexico School Counselor Association by Freida Trujillo, Nmsca Ethics Chair - 1M ago
2016 ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors
The ASCA Ethical Standards have changed drastically, but they most definitely are a better guide for our ethical practice as school counselors. School counselors from across the country have contributed to the changes based on our practice and experience in working with students in the schools. NMSCA had an Ethics Committee and that Committee contributed to the changes that took place in the Standards.
I know that it is so hard to get to our e-mails on a daily basis because our student’s needs are so great, and it only seems to be getting worse and worse. We are expected to do more with less… less time and less money. But we still have a responsibility to our students to serve their needs as best we can. Our ethics can help guide us in this difficult work. This blog, along with the resource links is intended to help break down the changes section by section. Please make sure that you have downloaded your copy of your 2016 ASCA Ethical Standards for Counselors and you have it handy for reference in your office.
Take note that there are several sections and a Glossary of Terms that have been added to the Standards. The sections added are (1) A.3 Comprehensive Data-Informed Program; (2) Bullying, Harassment and Child Abuse; (3) Virtual/Distance School Counseling; (4) School Counselor Administrators/Supervisors; and (4) School Counseling Intern Site Supervisors. Other sections have been renamed, combined or eliminated.
As many of you may know, Carolyn Stone will be back here in New Mexico on November 3, 2017. As you read this ethics blog and the two documents linked, you may have some ethical dilemmas you want to bring up. If it’s urgent, I will help you walk through it using section F. Ethical Decision Making. If you want me to bring it up to Dr. Stone for her to address in her presentation, let me know and I will work with her to see if that is possible. Email me at nmscaethics@gmail.com.
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New Mexico School Counselor Association by Clarissa Sandoval, Nmsca Treasurer - 1M ago
When thinking about Middle School I think about hormones, relationships, changing classes, and thinking about the “who am I” question. Having been a middle school counselor for a few years now, I believe it is much more in depth than it used to be. Since we as adults are not growing up now like our middle schoolers, how do we truly understand?
Over the past few years I find myself thinking I could not be in middle school in this time period. Why? The ever famous smart phone.
While it provides our students with an opportunity to learn anything within a few seconds, it can also hurt others within a few seconds with the social media access. Teens are so attached to their phones that their whole world becomes what others are saying or doing. What is a counselor to do when issues are coming up from phone use after-school?
The sad part is all the after-school phone use can lead to in school trouble. I have had many issues that start on the phone after school, but it also leads to a ton of students having school time issues. Here are some simple thoughts:
Mediate between the studentsHave the students block each other (on snap chat, etc.…) in front of youTeach lessons from http://www.netsmartz.org/SocialMediaInvolve your administration and/ or resource officerAsk another counselor what they might doAlways involve parents
Parents don’t always know that their teen is engaged in social media or how it affects them. The best thing to teach kids is resiliency. It is hard as a middle schooler to understand it doesn’t matter what other people say about you, but you can teach them skills to lessen the stress that comes from others opinions.
There is always someone that is going to say something bad about you, it’s how you take it that affects you.
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New Mexico School Counselor Association by Elesha Fetrow, Website Chair - 1M ago
Like many things growing focus and concentration is a challenge. Sometimes we may even think that we have this as a skill or not, we are born with an abundance or we were not. This as you know is a trap of thinking and it is one that many of our students fall into on a regular basis, heck it is a trap that I myself as an adult must be ever on the lookout for in all areas of life. It is that trap that begins with the sneaking feeling, the whispers of “I can’t” that creep into one’s mind when presented with a challenge. It is that whisper that stops forward momentum in it’s tracks and asks the metaphysical hands to be thrown into the air with “I am out!” sort of attitude. We have all seen it, likely experienced it ourselves, and our students, our families, our coworkers live it on a daily basis - yet most still “show up” in really healthy ways for themselves, the question is how?
Over the past year I have been ruminating almost, on this concept in my own life, I decided that I would attempt to build my muscle of “presence and focus” with intention to my own self care. Yep over the course of the year, I have experienced lots of “epic fail” moments and some growing successes. Let me explain. I have had a love/hate relationship my entire life with exercise. I love how it makes me feel, but HATE to do it (spend time, get sweaty, hang out, etc - the list is really large). So last summer, I began to take spin classes (again). I figured I could take it twice a week over the summer and then with luck maybe go once a week during the school year. Did it, hated it. However, towards the end of the summer I began to actively work at getting my mind to slow, to hang with my muscles, to control my breathe and a funny thing began to happen - I began to hate it less. Rather than the once a week attendance, I consistently went 2-3 times each week (success). What I found is that when my body was that active my mind began to be curious about what was being experienced. I went from believing that I would fall off of my bike at any minutes (you laugh but it is a really worry for many), to noting that my breathe was becoming labored, closing my eyes and regulating the rhythmic movements of my own air. I was practicing stressing myself out, and then actively calming myself in the midst of the episode. That was the key - practice and it is a skill that can be strengthened and cultivated in all of us - particularly our students.
I see the implications of my lesson for myself, in many facets of the learning environment for my students. My own sweet spot is with middle school students, and the restless, pushing inquisitive, risk taking humans that they are exploring within themselves is a beautiful thing to behold. It becomes a problem though when it gets away from them (like me and every other human), the difference is that they believe that “crisis” is being watched by every person on the planet. The number of times that I have been told that “everyone knows” about….. Is too high to count. So I remind them to start with a small change, one that might miss the observations of “everyone”, and report back on their success. Maybe it is showing up for one class twice a week and bringing all of the class supplies, maybe it is sitting at a different table at lunch once a week, or taking a different route to class and noting what other students are doing. The options are as varied as the students. Most report back a positive experience, so I encourage them to add another success. I remind them that they might hate it in general, it may be difficult overall, but let’s give it a valid time frame to determine if there are positive changes occurring for them.
Yes they backslide, yes they fail, we look for something else and try again - building resilience. This sort of resilience cannot be truly measured, it cannot even be witnessed. It is an internal struggle that comes with the process of hope but with a booster shot. It is the systematic approach of evaluating outcomes, of experimenting with internal processes, and allowing success to be laid down deeply into the soul. Gosh it takes practice and commitment to understand that you are not going to “fall off the bike” - and even if you do, an option is still to get back on.
Happy wishes for successful exploring this summer, rest, recharge and bring something new (even if it is a rested you) back to school with you - oh and let us know how you have done, share your successes (and epic fails) so we can engage in that social learning thing taught to us by Bandura.
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New Mexico School Counselor Association by Lynne Antoun, Nmsca Elementary Vo - 1M ago
As elementary school counselors, we are often the only counselor in the building. It can be isolating and lonely at times. That is why joining professional organizations such as NMSCA and ASCA are so important for elementary school counselors. We need time to learn something new, regroup and be with other counselors who are also passionate about their profession! Look for upcoming professional development opportunities so you can connect with others. If you are in a small district, please reach out to neighboring schools and districts to get together and collaborate with one another.
I want to share a few of my favorite resources with you.
I like how realistic Trudy Ludwig's stories are. Trudy teaches assertiveness skills in her books along with other strategies for dealing with a bully. Children also learn that not everyone is nice. They don’t have to be friends with someone if they’re disrespectful and rude.I have used several of Trudy’s book along with the Steps to Respect curriculum in my classroom guidance lessons.Check out her website: http://www.trudyludwig.com/
Meet Marissa Rex, an awesome elementary counselor from Ohio! I have totally borrowed lessons from her website including the Lego Introduction Power Point to do at the beginning of the school year! It was a
fun lesson and it helped me set up my program for the whole year! She has classroom guidance lessons, small group lessons, school-wide programs and more. She is a true School Counselor Superhero!
If you need to justify a comprehensive guidance program to your principal and/or staff, check out the video on the Classy Counselor website: http://classycounselor.weebly.com/classroom.html
Aylssa has some other great resources on her website as well. Check it out!
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New Mexico School Counselor Association by Stephanie Ly President Aft Nm - 1M ago
Re-Cap for Wednesday Bills HB 340: Education Strategic Planning Task Force – Reps. Small & Garcia Richard This bill would create a education strategic planning task force which would be responsible for creating a 20-year visionary plan for education in New Mexico, from early education through higher education. AFT NM supports this legislation, as it requires the task force to be comprised of stakeholders and practitioners in public education. This bill passed in House Education Committee this morning. HB 108/a: Transfer of College Credits – Rep. Garcia Richard This bill directs the Higher Education Department to develop core curriculum, which will form the basis for a liberal arts degree. It also mandates that courses within this set of guidelines shall be transferrable between institutions. AFT NM supported this legislation once amendments were made to better protect concerns related to academic freedom for educators at institutions of higher education in New Mexico. Higher Education Secretary, Barbara Damron, worked extremely hard to address the concerns of faculty members prior to the bill’s passage, and we would like to thank her for her commitment to academic freedom for our educators. c/SB 134: Computer Science for School Graduation – Rep. Sariñana/Sen. Candelaria This bill amends high school graduation and New Mexico diploma of excellence requirements to allow the substitution of one unit of computer science for one year of either mathematics or science. AFT NM supports this legislation as it better prepares students for entering technical career fields or areas of study in higher education. c/SB 124 passed the House Education Committee this morning. SB 32: K-3 Plus Eligibility – Sen. Kernan
This bill would expand eligibility to allow non-K-3 Plus schools which feed into existing or eligible K-3 Plus schools to apply for the K-3 Plus program. AFT NM supports this legislation as it increases the potential number of students who will be able to take part in this important program.
Preview of Upcoming Bills (New Bills)
SB 403: Student Literacy & Interventions – Sen. Kernan
This bill was originally drafted to be similar to Governor Martinez’s 3rd grade flunking bill, however Sen. Kernan later withdrew that original bill and made significant changes to it. Currently, this bill is drafted to focus on interventions for struggling readers in early grade levels. AFT NM has not developed a position on this bill, as we have not evaluated the final draft. We will keep you informed on SB 403 as it becomes publically available. SB 470: School Assessments & Teacher Evaluations – Sen. Sapien This bill would allow districts and charter schools to use short-cycle assessments instead of end-of-course exams to measure student mastery of a given subject area. Additionally, this bill would alter certain aspects of educators’ evaluations. AFT NM opposes this legislation because it while it provides for flexibility on testing, the evaluation language is too vague, and could allow for the continued use of value-added modeling as part of an educator’s evaluation. HB 344: Lottery Scholarship Full & Need-Based – Rep. Sariñana/Roybal Caballero/Ch. Trujillo This bill would alter the requirements to receive the New Mexico Lottery Scholarship and would also set award amounts for recipients. The bill’s aim is to extend the solvency of the lottery fund, while maximizing the number of students attending higher education institutions, and increasing awards based on performance. AFT NM supports this legislation as a way to extend the life of the Lottery Scholarship and provide a pathway for more students to attend institutions of higher education.
2nd/3rd Hearing of Bills HB 265: Educational Assistant Probation Period – SUPPORT SB 38: Brain Injury Training for Student Athletes – SUPPORT c/HB 163: School Grade Test Scores & Unexcused Absences – SUPPORT SB 34: Teacher & Principal Evaluation System – SUPPORT c/SB 313: Charter School Facilities & Leases – SUPPORT SB 381: Alternative School Transportation – SUPPORT HB 130/a: School Program Units for School Employers – SUPPORT SB 200: Certified School Employee Program Units – SUPPORT HB 354: Expand School Aged Person Definition – SUPPORT HB 301/a: Support for Transferring Students – SUPPORT
Bills Passing Full House/Senate: HB 47: Extend School Bus Replacement Cycle – OPPOSE HB 75: Limit School Use of Restraint & Seclusion – SUPPORT HB 191: Oil & Gas School Tax to Stabilization Reserve – OPPOSE SB 241: School Visual Arts & Physical Ed Standards – SUPPORT
Other Bills We Are Watching (“Rolled” Bills)
HB 114: Reading Improvement Plans & Intervention – OPPOSE SJR 11: Elected & Appointed Board of Education, CA – OPPOSE SJR 14: School Fund for Longer School Days & Year – SUPPORT HB 298: School District Reorganization Act – OPPOSE HB 108/a: Transfer of College Credits – OPPOSE SB 344: Income Tax Rates & Pre-K Funding – SUPPORT c/SB 323: Early Kindergarten Enrollment – SUPPORT fl/SB 62: School Rating Grade Point System – SUPPORT HB 125/a: Teacher & Principal Evaluation System – SUPPORT
Please watch for future e-mails updating you about important bills and issues facing our State, and in the meantime, follow AFT NM on Facebook and Twitter.
In Solidarity,
Stephanie Ly
President, AFT NM
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