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7th poet laureate of Benicia, California

Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano featuring Thomas Stanton - YouTube
  • Thomas Stanton and Nina Serrano

Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano featuring Thomas Stanton, recorded in February of 2019, is my 4th California poet laureate interview on Literary Dialogues. It was fun because Tom defies all the boundaries and so I let the interview go where it would. Eventually it led us down the path of
building community, musicality of poetry, throat singing, and bringing poetry to high school youth and children. You will be surprised when you see how the video culminates in our improvising a sound poem on camera. To set up the improvisation process, we chose just a few words of weaving terminology, and some minimal ground rules for the poem. Improv is a game and a form of play. So I enjoyed it immensely.

The four laureates I have interviewed on this series are from my new home in Solano County. They are Genea Brice, the first poet laureate of Vallejo, D.L. Lang the second poet of Vallejo, Johanna Ely the 6th poet of Benicia a neighboring town.

  • Genea Brice
  • D.L. Lang
  • Johanna Ely

And now Thomas Stanton the 7th poet laureate of Benicia. They are each so different but share the same zeal and dedication to bringing both the reading and writing poetry to the people. I plan to reach out to the rest of the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond in future poet laureate interviews.

It is a glorious thing that the poet laureate movement is blossoming in the midst of the current movement to down size and close down public education. To resist this trend, poetry is opening up public discourse on the community level, town by town.

I believe strongly in the poet laureate movement because it encourages community participation in the arts. When cities appoint poets laureate and sponsor them in schools, libraries and community events, poetry and the arts achieve a greater visibility and legitimacy. The poet laureate movement goes beyond simply sharing their own poetry on civic bandstands on holidays. It makes the art of poetry an important part of daily life by involving the wider community in sharing their own creativity, insights, feelings, and opinions. The movement is spreading as municipalities throughout the state and country appoint new poets laureate.

About Nina Serrano: Nina is a well-known, international prize-winning inspirational author and poet. With a focus on Latino history and culture, she is also a playwright, filmmaker, KPFA talk show host, a former Alameda County Arts Commissioner, and a co-founder of the San Francisco Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Oakland Magazine’s “best local poet” in 2010, she is a former director of the San Francisco Poetry in the Schools program and the Bay Area’s Storytellers in the Schools program. A Latina activist for social justice, women’s rights, and the arts, Nina Serrano at 84 remains vitally engaged in inspiring change and exploring her abundant creativity. For more information go to ninaserrano.comor contact her publisher at estuarypress.com. For more detailed information about Nina see About Nina on her website.

About Estuary Press: Estuary Press is the publisher of Nicaragua Way. It is also the home of the Harvey Richards Media Archive, a repository of photography and video documentaries of various social change and political movements during the 1960s and 1970s. Contact Paul Richards (510) 967 5577, paulrichards@estuarypress.com or visit estuarypress.com for more details.

MEDIA – For photos & interviews: Paul Richards (510) 967 5577; paulrichards@estuarypress.com

ninaserrano.com

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Presented at  the Alice Walker Event, Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart, Part 2

October 18, 2018, KPFA Benefit of Alice Walker reading at the First Congregational Church in Berkeley, California.

Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano presents Nina Serrano Poems - YouTube

Nina Serrano and Alice Walker talking to audience members after the event and readings of Nina Serrano Poems.

Nina Serrano Poems forms Part Two of Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano’s presentation of Alice Walker reading from “Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart” at the First Congregational Church in Berkeley, California. (For Part 1, click here.) The video begins with the reading of my own poems and concludes with more poems from my Heart Suite Trilogy. This blog post is the second part of my three-episode video series of the Alice Walker event. The third and concluding episode, coming next, covers our conversation and audience feedback.

I was excited from the day Bob Baldock invited me to host Alice Walker reading from her new book of poems, Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart (2018, Simon and Schuster, Bilingual Edition) at a live KPFA benefit. When I actually read the book, I went from excited to thrilled. It spoke to all the arrows in my own heart just recently recovered from heart valve replacement surgery.

Bob said it would be a simple format. I am introduced, I introduce Alice Walker, she reads from her new book of poems, for a half hour and I read my own poems for 10 minutes. This would be followed by the two of us speaking together. Yes, I could do that. But, I blanched at the idea of my local poet poems with her world famous poems. But then, I realized they are both poems from our wounded though still beating activist hearts. Yes, I could do that! !Si, se puede!

About Nina Serrano: Nina is a well-known, international prize-winning inspirational author and poet. With a focus on Latino history and culture, she is also a playwright, filmmaker, KPFA talk show host, a former Alameda County Arts Commissioner, and a co-founder of the San Francisco Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Oakland Magazine’s “best local poet” in 2010, she is a former director of the San Francisco Poetry in the Schools program and the Bay Area’s Storytellers in the Schools program. A Latina activist for social justice, women’s rights, and the arts, Nina Serrano at 84 remains vitally engaged in inspiring change and exploring her abundant creativity. For more information go to ninaserrano.com or contact her publisher at estuarypress.com. For more detailed information about Nina see About Nina on her website.

About Estuary Press: Estuary Press is the publisher of Nicaragua Way and other books by Nina Serrano. It is also the home of the Harvey Richards Media Archive, a repository of photography and video documentaries of various social change and political movements during the 1960s and 1970s. Contact Paul Richards (510) 967 5577, paulrichards@estuarypress.com or visit estuarypress.com for more details.

MEDIA – For photos & interviews: Paul Richards (510) 967 5577; paulrichards@estuarypress.com

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“Women I Know” and “I Am So Visible” by Nina Serrano

Women I Know and I Am So Visible from Nina Serrano.

I Am So Visible and Women I Know - YouTube

THE STORY BEHIND “I AM SO VISIBLE”

Performing my poems from Heart Strong celebrating International Women’s Month with Sascha Jacobsen’s Musical Art Quintet made for a euphoric experience. I accompanied Sascha’s Quintet, with guest pianist Cesar Cancion, at Salle Piano in San Francisco on International Women’s Day, March 8, 2014. The sensuality and rich beauty of the Quintet’s music created a magic carpet that carried me away to other realms whose only entrance is through music. The musicians’ skill and passion supported and transported me, giving me freedom to perform it fully.

The event made me remember how “I Am So Visible” was originally written as “I AM INVISIBLE”. That was the on-going lament I periodically made to my late friend, Daniel del Solar, when I was in my fifties. He would wisely reply, “But I can see you.”

Decades later, I reworked the poem for a poetry event at the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts in San Francisco. I turned the poem’s concept on its head, going from “invisible” to “so visible.” Daniel was at the reading–what a loyal friend–to hear that I finally heard his message. The lament version is lost forever in cyber space. I am so glad I made that transformation from feeling invisible to so visible.

Middle aged-women often tell me that the poem gives them strength and hope. It is a strength that came to me through my friendships and adventures in the struggle for self acceptance at each stage of life.

On International Women’s Day, when I was reciting “I Am So Visible,” with the Musical Art Quintet, there was a moment during the reading that the music paused. Surprised, my voice sailed on, empowered to fill in the space where six instruments had sung. When the music returned I was enfolded once again in their celestial sound.

About Nina Serrano: Nina is a well-known, international prize-winning inspirational author and poet. With a focus on Latino history and culture, she is also a playwright, filmmaker, KPFA talk show host, a former Alameda County Arts Commissioner, and a co-founder of the San Francisco Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Oakland Magazine’s “best local poet” in 2010, she is a former director of the San Francisco Poetry in the Schools program and the Bay Area’s Storytellers in the Schools program. A Latina activist for social justice, women’s rights, and the arts, Nina Serrano at 82 remains vitally engaged in inspiring change and exploring her abundant creativity. For more information go to ninaserrano.com or contact her publisher at estuarypress.com. For more detailed information about Nina see About Nina on her website.

About Estuary Press: Estuary Press is the publisher of Nicaragua Way. It is also the home of the Harvey Richards Media Archive, a repository of photography and video documentaries of various social change and political movements during the 1960s and 1970s. Contact Paul Richards (510) 967 5577, paulrichards@estuarypress.com or visit estuarypress.com for more details.

MEDIA – For photos & interviews: Paul Richards (510) 967 5577; paulrichards@estuarypress.com

 

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Artists Reception at Alley Cat Books, March 23, 2019

Painting by Anthony Holdsworth from Alley Cat Bookshop Gallery Reception March 23, 2109

Not since Frida and Diego have I seen a painting artist couple whose works are such hallmarks of their time and such a deep pleasure to view. The current joint exhibit of Beryl Landau and Anthony Holdsworth on display at the Alley Cat Bookshop Gallery in the back of Alley Cat Bookshop in the heart of San Francisco’s Mission District – does not disappoint. Their cityscapes depict the changing nature of the city itself and even the very street outside the door. In both their works, nature asserts herself midst the cement, asserting her primordial force.

But before you enter the spacious gallery in the back of the bookstore, you must make your way through a world of intriguing book titles and their covers that, even in passing, give rise to questions and curiosities. You are intellectually and emotionally engaged when you enter the exhibition. You confront the two painters, Landau and Holdsworth’s urban visions. They offer views of the urban environment as differently as night and day.

Painting by Beryl Landau from the Alley Cat Bookshop Gallery Reception March 23, 2019

On one wall, Landau depicts the city under bright blue expanses of sky in large acrylic paintings. On the opposite wall, you see Holdsworth’s views of the Mission District, many painted at night illuminated by an LED lamp attached to his easel so he can see his smaller canvas while he paints in oils. Holdsworth is a plein air painter, an open air painter, painting on location.

Landau paints in her nearby home studio often from photographs. She believes strongly that the artist must view what she paints as she paints it. She must confront the reality of what she paints. These two highly developed and experienced painters show two different views of the city. Their combined visual message in this exhibit speaks of dynamic environmental and social change in a metropolitan setting, you might say “gentrification.”

Artist, Beryl Landau, San Francisco Cityscape, acrylic

Beryl Landau’s distinctive blue skies portray construction work crews or sites as the change is happening before her eyes, albeit she is painting in her studio. In Anthony Holdsworth’s on-the-spot lit up night scenes, the changes are happening perhaps in the artist’s heart as he experiences the neighborhood’s rapid change with shops closing and people moving.

This is an exhibit that one can enjoy seeing more than once as there is much to absorb beyond her smooth textures and his thick impastos, the color, or the other elements of shape or light. These two artists, Beryl Landau, and Anthony Holdsworth are giants commenting on their time and place. They are not detached observers. As one who has lived with their works in her home, I can say that these paintings have afforded decades of enjoyment. They wear well, are always pleasing to the eye for residents and guests, and find their place on the walls even when I have changed houses.

Oil Painting by Anthony Holdsworth, San Francisco CA.

The two activist artists, deeply rooted in their environments bring beauty and intelligence to their paintings, each in their own clearly differentiated ways. But they are united in their productiveness, love of painting and the planet.

The gallery is open seven days a week from 10 AM to 8 PM from March 2 to March 31 at Alley Cat Books, 3036 24th St in San Francisco’s Mission District.

You are invited to a special reception from 7 PM to 9 PM on Saturday, March 23rd. A half hour will be set aside in which the artists will talk about their work and answer questions from the audience.

http://www.alleycatbookshop.com/gallery.html 415/824-1761

The post Beryl Landau and Anthony Holdsworth: An Art Review appeared first on .

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Reading from “Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart” KPFA.org Benefit October 18, 2018

October 18, 2018, Berkeley, California. Nina Serrano and Alice Walker at the First Congregational Church KPFA Benefit event.

I am honored to present Alice Walker’s KPFA benefit reading held at the First Congregational Church of Berkeley for Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano in a three episode video series. This first episode (48 minutes) includes Alice Walker’s talk and reading. It also presents Kathryn Horsley’s introduction of me and my introduction of Alice Walker. The second episode (16 minutes) includes my poetry reading which followed Alice Walker’s reading. And the third concluding episode (26 minutes) covers our conversation and audience feedback.

Alice Walker, Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart. Hosted by Nina Serrano - YouTube

I was excited from the day Bob Baldock invited me to host Alice Walker reading from her new book of poems, Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart (2018, Simon and Schuster, Bilingual Edition) at a live KPFA benefit to be held at the First Congregational Church of Berkeley on October 18, 2018. When I actually read the book, I went from excited to thrilled. It spoke to all the arrows in my own heart just recently recovered from heart valve replacement surgery.

Bob said it would be a simple format. I am introduced, I introduce Alice Walker, she reads from her new book of poems, for a half hour and I read my own poems for 10 minutes. This would be followed by the two of us speaking together. Yes, I could do that, though I blanched at the idea of my local poet poems by her world famous poems. But then, I realized they are both poems from our wounded though still beating activist hearts. Yes, I could do that.

Then, I went from from thrilled to scared. How could I possibly write about Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart poems when they already said everything that needed saying? As I reread the poems, I began deeply hearing Alice Walker’s voice. Her Buddhist admonition, to breathe. Yeah, I could do that. I’d been doing it for 84 years, easy. Just in and out.

I stopped striving for the perfect analysis of Alice’s work and life and began remembering the impact she first had on me so many years ago in the 1980’s. That’s when the words for the introduction jumped out of me with the recalled images and flow of events in that earlier, younger time when women, people of color and national liberation struggles were being woke. Back to when there was this bold, young Black woman writer taking all the heat for speaking up. I reheard the angry opinions of local and national black male writers challenging her right to call out violence towards women in the Black community, calling it “divisive.”

Then, I remembered our fleeting meeting on the stage of the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco in 1983 defending the newly victorious Nicaraguan revolution. Now preparing the introductory words for the 2018 event, the words flowed easily. The story I told was not how Alice Walker impacted the whole literary world but just simply me. The night of the reading, Alice Walker sailed on to the stage enthusiastically welcomed by the warm generous, open hearted KPFA listener audience. She’d just deplaned that evening from a demanding book tour. But as she greeted the audience, her spontaneous thoughts flowed from her heart and led quite naturally to reading from her amazing book, Taking The Arrows Out Of The Heart.

To read a transcript of Part 1 of Alice Walker’s remarks at the KPFA Benefit, click here.

I invite you to subscribe to my blog to receive a notice next month and the month after about upcoming episodes two and three of Alice Walker’s October 18th, 2018 presentation in Berkeley, California.

About Nina Serrano: Nina is a well-known, international prize-winning inspirational author and poet. With a focus on Latino history and culture, she is also a playwright, filmmaker, KPFA talk show host, a former Alameda County Arts Commissioner, and a co-founder of the San Francisco Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Oakland Magazine’s “best local poet” in 2010, she is a former director of the San Francisco Poetry in the Schools program and the Bay Area’s Storytellers in the Schools program. A Latina activist for social justice, women’s rights, and the arts, Nina Serrano at 84 remains vitally engaged in inspiring change and exploring her abundant creativity. For more information go to ninaserrano.com or contact her publisher at estuarypress.com. For more detailed information about Nina see About Nina on her website.

About Estuary Press: Estuary Press is the publisher of Nicaragua Way and other books by Nina Serrano. It is also the home of the Harvey Richards Media Archive, a repository of photography and video documentaries of various social change and political movements during the 1960s and 1970s. Contact Paul Richards (510) 967 5577, paulrichards@estuarypress.com or visit estuarypress.com for more details.

MEDIA – For photos & interviews: Paul Richards (510) 967 5577; paulrichards@estuarypress.com

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Dear Phebe, The Dickinson Sisters Go West

Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano featuring Judy Wells - YouTube

Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano interviews Judy Wells about her new book, “Dear Phebe, The Dickinson Sisters Go West,” published by Sugartown Publishing. Judy Wells reads from her new exciting poetic work including the poem that is the preface to the book that chronicles the incident that dramatically links Judy Wells to her ancestors. This includes her distant cousin Emily Dickinson!

If you like laughter, don’t miss this episode where laughter mixes with the painful historic memory that lingers through the generations. For more about this interview go to ninaserrano.com. Enjoy!

About Nina Serrano: Nina is a well-known, international prize-winning inspirational author and poet. With a focus on Latino history and culture, she is also a playwright, filmmaker, KPFA talk show host, a former Alameda County Arts Commissioner, and a co-founder of the San Francisco Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Oakland Magazine’s “best local poet” in 2010, she is a former director of the San Francisco Poetry in the Schools program and the Bay Area’s Storytellers in the Schools program. A Latina activist for social justice, women’s rights, and the arts, Nina Serrano at 84 remains vitally engaged in inspiring change and exploring her abundant creativity. For more information go to ninaserrano.comor contact her publisher at estuarypress.com. For more detailed information about Nina see About Nina on her website.

About Estuary Press: Estuary Press is the publisher of Nicaragua Way. It is also the home of the Harvey Richards Media Archive, a repository of photography and video documentaries of various social change and political movements during the 1960s and 1970s. Contact Paul Richards (510) 967 5577, paulrichards@estuarypress.com or visit estuarypress.com for more details.

MEDIA – For photos & interviews: Paul Richards (510) 967 5577; paulrichards@estuarypress.com

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Tell Me the Number Before Infinity by Dena and Becky Taylor

Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano featuring Dena and Becky Taylor - YouTube

Nina Serrano with Dena And Becky Taylor discussing Tell Me the Number Before Infinity.

Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano welcomes the mother and daughter writing duo Dena and Becky Taylor to our show. Their book Tell Me The Number Before Infinity gives us an up close and personal view of raising a disabled child to adulthood as well as the viewpoint of the child as she comes of age. Tell Me the Number before Infinity, The Story of a Girl with a Quirky Mind, an Eccentric Family, and Oh Yes, a Disability is a memoir. The 60 chapters are ordered chronologically to tell a compelling and human story. Dena Taylor writes of her daughter Becky’s birth in 1972, and discovering Becky’s exceptional gift for mathematics and depth of thought even at the age of four.

TELL ME THE NUMBER BEFORE INFINITY is a hero’s journey with Becky Taylor at the forefront of the pivotal 1975 Federal Individuals with Disabilities Act, mainstreaming disabled children into the public schools. The 1997 the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) entered the national consciousness when it mandated that a significant percentage of all public construction include disability accommodations.

As our society ages many of us find our selves disabled in different ways and benefiting from this legislation which provided amenities like ramps, raised toilets, automatic doors and easy wheelchair availability at airports. Disability laws are complaint-driven insuring that as long as disability and other civil rights activists raise their voices, society will move forward for better accommodations.

Becky Taylor, who  was born with cerebral palsy, has been a long time spokesperson and promoter of the disability movement in civic and community organizations. She is also a freelance computer consultant. Dena Taylor, a writer and editor, has published six books: Women of the 14th Moon, Sexual Harassment of Women, Red Flower Rethinking Menstruation, Disabled Mothers, and Feminist Parenting.

Like all good literature, Tell Me the Number Before Infinity by Dena and Becky Taylor brings the interior life into focus. Both write poetry. Their poetic sensibilities illuminate this important book. Watch the video for the full interview.

About Nina Serrano: Nina is a well-known, international prize-winning inspirational author and poet. With a focus on Latino history and culture, she is also a playwright, filmmaker, KPFA talk show host, a former Alameda County Arts Commissioner, and a co-founder of the San Francisco Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Oakland Magazine’s “best local poet” in 2010, she is a former director of the San Francisco Poetry in the Schools program and the Bay Area’s Storytellers in the Schools program. A Latina activist for social justice, women’s rights, and the arts, Nina Serrano at 84 remains vitally engaged in inspiring change and exploring her abundant creativity. For more information go to ninaserrano.comor contact her publisher at estuarypress.com. For more detailed information about Nina see About Nina on her website.

About Estuary Press: Estuary Press is the publisher of Nicaragua Way and other books by Nina Serrano. It is also the home of the Harvey Richards Media Archive, a repository of photography and video documentaries of various social change and political movements during the 1960s and 1970s. Contact Paul Richards (510) 967 5577, paulrichards@estuarypress.com or visit estuarypress.com for more details.

MEDIA – For photos & interviews: Paul Richards (510) 967 5577; paulrichards@estuarypress.com.

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Video interview with Nina Serrano and Paul Richards The Story of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg

Forty Years in the Making - YouTube

Julieta Kusnir interviewing Nina Serrano and Paul Richards about Forty Years in the Making.

Julieta Kusnir interviews Nina Serrano and Paul Richards about the publication of their play The Story of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg in book and ebook form by Estuary Press. The play was originally written and performed in 1976 about the famous atomic spy case of the 1950s, which sent Ethel and Julius Rosenberg to the electric chair. Now, forty years later, the play, a courtroom and prison drama, is now experiences a revival with new 21st century performances in Texas and Toronto, Canada, which prompted the publication.

The new volume includes the original 1976 script by Nina Serrano, Paul Richards and Judith Binder; and the 2016 revised script by Jacob Justice, of Bryan, Texas. The book’s publication is occasioned the authors’ excitement over the Canadian production taking place in Toronto in November, 2018, produced by the Jewish Community Theatre company, Teatron, at the Toronto Center for the Arts.

In the video interview, the authors invite school theater departments, community and professional theater companies to consider producing the play. It has become shockingly clear that the Rosenberg’s story is more relevant than ever. The book is easily available on Amazon.com.

“The shame, if we die, will dishonor this generation, and pervade history until future Americans recapture the heritage of truth, justice and equality before the law.”

Ethel and Julius Rosenberg

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A Story That Will Not Die! “In short we did not get a fair trial and we were framed.”Julius Rosenberg Toronto Play and Book Announcement

Every Autumn, they say the veil between the living and the dead becomes permeable. Ghosts rekindle the collective memory demanding vindication to have their story truthfully retold and their place in the sun reclaimed. In North America, we celebrate this as Halloween, All Soul’s Day or Day of the Dead.

In this context, I will fly to Toronto, Canada to witness the second 21st Century production of The Story of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg taking place on November 8 -17, 2018,  at Toronto Center for the Arts Studio Theater produced by the Toronto Jewish Theatre.

The Story of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg is a play written in 1976 by Nina Serrano, Paul Richards and Judith Binder. We originally wrote and produced it in the San Francisco Bay Area, toured it to local colleges and performed it on local media KPFA-fm and KQED-tv.

The story is about betrayal, a brother’s betrayal of his sister and his brother-in-law. It is a play set in the eye of the anti-communist hurricane known to history as the McCarthy era. A play about a couple with two young children caught up in the scape-goating hysteria of a new world war, the Cold War. It is a play that follows a young couple to their deaths, clinging to their love for each other and their children, and the only truth that matters, their truth. A truth they are willing to die for, even if it means making their two small boys into orphans. It is a play about a trial that mesmerized people around the world, watching in horror as the heartless American state puts them in the electric chair and throws the switch sending them into eternity and infamy.

A Tragic Play in the Tradition of Euripides

Following the age-old format of theatrical tragedy, we created the plot. The Rosenbergs had to die for the sake of the American empire’s war to destroy its socialist rival, the Soviet Union. Ethel and Julius were sacrificed to the anti-communist Gods in the same way the Iphigenia, in Euripides’ tragic play, was sacrificed to the ancient gods for the sake of the patriarchal Greek State on its way to the legendary Trojan War. Only the Rosenbergs, unlike the Iphigenia, did not go quietly. They protested the injustice and proclaimed their innocence to the very end, as did their supporters worldwide.

Ethel and Julius Rosenberg were an American Jewish leftist couple caught up in the famous “atomic spies case” of the conformist 1950’s. Ethel Rosenberg’s brother, David Greenglass, was a pawn and victim of the anti-communist inquisition in full force in the late 1940s. He was accused of stealing materials from the Los Alamos Labs in the 1940s where he worked in New Mexico. When the Soviets exploded their first atom bomb in 1949, the charges against Greenglass escalated into stealing atomic secrets and giving them to the anti-capitalist enemy, the former Soviet Union. To escape the death sentence and save his wife and children, Greenglass falsely implicated his sister and brother-in-law, the Rosenbergs.  Even though, as we all know today, there were no atomic secrets. The US government conjured up fake science hidden behind secret classified documents. This “evidence”  that no one has ever seen, sent the Rosenbergs to the electric chair, leaving behind their two small boys orphaned in 1953. As a reward, David Greenglass received a reduced sentence of 10 years and his wife remained free to raise their children.

Now, decades later, new productions of the play are taking place, first, in 2016, in Bryan, Texas, and upcoming in November 2018, in Toronto, Canada. We invite theater companies everywhere to produce the play. Contact us for more information.

Book Announcement

To celebrate this renewed interest in The Story of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, Estuary Press is publishing the play in paperback book and ebook formats. This new book includes the original 1976 version, and the updated 2016 version by Jacob Justice of Bryan, Texas. The original version is most suited to community theatre as it requires only a small cast. The Jacob Justice version is suited to a school production as it has a large cast and more physical action. The ebook version allows for easy downloads of paperless scripts on the actor’s cellphones.

The play tells the Rosenberg’s story almost entirely from the transcript of their trial and from their letters. It was performed on stages, on television and radio in the late 1970’s. Nina Serrano played Ethel Rosenberg. Paul Richards played David Greenglass and Judith Binder directed and narrated the play.

The Story of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Book Cover. Cover Art by Beryl Landau.

Estuary Press’ new volume, includes Nina Serrano’s introductions to both versions of the play telling the story of the play’s origins and its 21st-century revival. The new publication offers school drama departments and other theatre organizations access to a play for our times that combines great drama with history and themes relevant and important to everyone.

“The shame, if we die, will dishonor this generation, and pervade history until future Americans recapture the heritage of truth, justice and equality before the law.”

Ethel and Julius Rosenberg

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People’s Poet Laureate of Vallejo CA

Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano featuring DL Lang - YouTube

DL Lang and Nina Serrano on Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano featuring DL Lang. June, 2018, Vallejo, California.

DL Lang known to friends as “Diana” is a welcoming and accessible poet who invites Vallejo poets to write and perform for this diverse and beautiful community. DL is one of the most active California laureates leading Vallejo community and library poetry functions and writing for its civic and public events.  Her own poetic work is easy to embrace, understand, and feel. She writes from her love of this place, nestled between two nourishing rivers and the glorious Bay.

Following in the pioneering footsteps of the awesome 1st poet laureate of Vallejo, Ginea Brice, DL continues to lead local poets into community happenings that widen the conversation. Poetry injects hope, lyricism, and spirituality into the universe. Its impact aims at the mind and heart where direct action is born. DL Lang helps carry the banner for social change to create the loving world we want with liberty, justice, housing, safety, food, education, healthcare, and poetry for all.

Her most recent achievement as of this writing is the publication of her new book of poems, The Cafe of Dreams. She has also just  completed editing an anthology of poems by Vallejo poets and some others. This Book, Verses, Voices & Visions, will be celebrated this coming  March 2019, at the Vallejo’s John F. Kennedy Library.

Nina Serrano interviews DL Lang, Vallejo’s Poet Laureate, on Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano on June 8, 2018. DL Lang reads from her own works, discusses her eleven volumes of poetry and shares her love of Vallejo, California.

About Nina Serrano: Nina is a well-known, international prize-winning inspirational author and poet. With a focus on Latino history and culture, she is also a playwright, filmmaker, KPFA talk show host, a former Alameda County Arts Commissioner, and a co-founder of the San Francisco Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Oakland Magazine’s “best local poet” in 2010, she is a former director of the San Francisco Poetry in the Schools program and the Bay Area’s Storytellers in the Schools program. A Latina activist for social justice, women’s rights, and the arts, Nina Serrano at 84 remains vitally engaged in inspiring change and exploring her abundant creativity. For more information go to ninaserrano.com or contact her publisher at estuarypress.com. For more detailed information about Nina see About Nina on her website.

About Estuary Press: Estuary Press is the publisher of Nicaragua Way. It is also the home of the Harvey Richards Media Archive, a repository of photography and video documentaries of various social change and political movements during the 1960s and 1970s. Contact Paul Richards (510) 967 5577, paulrichards@estuarypress.com or visit estuarypress.com for more details.

MEDIA – For photos & interviews: Paul Richards (510) 967 5577; paulrichards@estuarypress.com

The post Literary Dialogs with Nina Serrano Featuring DL Lang appeared first on .

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