Loading...

Follow Neurensics on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Neurensics by Deborah - 7M ago

Houd jij van plannen en ben je op zoek naar een flexibele bijbaan naast je studie? Neurensics is expert in het uitvoeren van neuromarketing onderzoek. Om deze studies in te plannen en in goede banen te leiden zijn we op zoek naar een enthousiaste student!

Wat ga je doen?
Je houdt je voornamelijk bezig met het inplannen van onderzoeken. Bij Neurensics voeren we regelmatig onderzoeken uit, voornamelijk fMRI onderzoek. Je zult je o.a. bezighouden met het werven en inplannen van participanten. Daarnaast geeft Neurensics meerdere keren per jaar presentaties waarin klanten een update krijgen van de laatste ontwikkelingen. Ook hier kun je jouw steentje bijdragen door deze evenementen te organiseren.

Wie zoeken wij?
We zijn op zoek naar een student (HBO/WO) die van aanpakken houdt en ook goed kan samenwerken. Je bent nauwkeurig en houdt goed het overzicht over de planning. Daarnaast heb je naast je studie nog een aantal uren over die je graag opvult met een flexibele bijbaan.

Wat bieden wij?
We bieden een flexibele bijbaan voor ca. 8 uur in de week (€12 per uur). Én je kunt je planning skills verder ontwikkelen binnen een leuke en leerzame omgeving.

Interesse?
Stuur uiterlijk vrijdag 14 december een korte motivatie en je CV naar info@neurensics.com.

The post Vacature Student appeared first on Neurensics.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Neurensics is a neuromarketing company. We help clients by giving insights in the subconscious consumer brain.  We use various techniques to tap into the consumer brain. We use fMRI, EEG, eyetracking, and implicit behavioral testing.

We are currently building a tool portfolio around branding. Branding has become more and more important in this globalising world. We want to help companies in deciding how to create a brand, how to position a brand, how to select and use sensitive contextual moments and how to make the brand top of mind.

For this endeavour, we are looking for 3 interns in the second semester (February onwards). You will closely work together in a scrum team, but each have an exciting individual project. Apart from the 3 projects explained in detail below, you will get the chance to be a part of running fMRI projects we do for clients.

Project 1. Brand Drivers
Neurensics helps its customers by determining which associations a consumer needs to have with a brand to have a positive buying intention or loyalty. For example, a brand could be highly associated with the concepts ‘empathy’ or ‘strength’ in consumers with a high loyalty. Marketing creative build their campaigns using these associations. Although this works very well, we would very much benefit if we could use the same framework of associations in all our studies. In this project, you will build such a framework. You will study the associations people have with many brands they love and hate. You will explore if we can cluster these associations around lower-level psychological needs, such as pleasure, pain, hope, fear, and social acceptance. And you will study whether we can speak of ‘brand personalities’: people who are looking to fulfil more or less the same needs all of the time, in all the products they buy.

For this project we are looking for a Dutch-speaking student with a strong feeling for language, preferably with knowledge of personality research and individual differences.

Techniques used: desk research, questionnaire research, Implicit behavioural testing, unsupervised machine learning.

Project 2. Brand Cues
A lot of the marketing efforts around brands aim at assigning cuesto brands. For example, when you see George Clooney, you think about Nespresso. This example shows the power of brand cues. However, how to pick the right cues? For a large part, this is just taking a leap of faith. Could we use tools to decide what are the good cues for a brand? In this study you will try to develop a tool that quantifies the ‘natural match’ of a cue with a brand. To do so, you will compile a dataset of brand cues and design a sequential priming task to quantify the fitness of the relationship between cue, brand, and driver.

For this project we are looking for a student with a strong feeling for psychometric testing. A background in cognitive psychology and reaction time research is a pre.

Techniques used: desk researh, questionnaire research, Implicit behavioural testing, supervised machine learning.

Project 3. Brand Triggers
A Brand trigger is a contextual state in space, time or psychological state that makes you think of a brand category. For example, just walking outside a bar at night might spontaneously trigger a craving for a frikandel. A famous other example is the ‘4 uur cup-a-soup’ campaign, build around the daily returning fatigued state just before the working day ends. Snickers has claimed this feeling even more strongly: the moment of being low-energy at any time of day. With this strategy they have managed to be the top-selling chocolate bar around the world.

Brands are trying very hard to claim these contextual cues, because they can be so powerful. To do so, they need to map and define the triggers of the category. The problem is, is that it is very hard to ask people what made them want to buy the frikandel once they bought it.

In this project, you will develop a free association tool. You will make a collection of iconic images that are representative of states. These images will form the basis of a new free-association paradigm where people choose images with brands and motivate why the chose these images. For a number of categories and brands, you will investigate what the triggers are by analysing picture choices and the contents and emotional tone of the motivations.

For this study we are looking for a creative student. . You might have a background in communication or social psychology. More importantly, you love images, imagery and qualitative research. You have strong affinity with visual communication. You love to explore patterns in what people say and how they say it.

Techniques used: desk research, questionnaire research, Implicit behavioural testing, text analysis.

Interested? Reach out to Andries van der Leij. Please send a CV, motivation letter and grade list to: andries@neurensics.com

The post Neurensics Internship Program 2018 appeared first on Neurensics.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

For some people, the rich and sweet smell of morning coffee puts them in pleasant spirits as the day begins. This smell can give them a feeling of waking up and being energized (Seo, Hirano, Shibato, Rakwal, Hwang & Masuo, 2008). According to the Sense of Smell Institute, the average human being is able to recognize approximately 10,000 different smells. Furthermore, 75% of emotions are generated by smell (Bell & Bell, 2007). Hence, there are many different smells that can be responsible for a big part of our emotions. Smell plays an important role in our daily lives by influencing our mood through eliciting emotions. Mood influences decision-making; therefore, smells can affect our purchases. In order to understand how smells influence our consuming behaviour, it is important to know how smells are perceived.

Smells can be perceived as a result of molecules entering the nose and stimulating odour receptors on the olfactory mucosa, which is a dime-sized region located on top of the nasal cavity just below the olfactory bulb. The olfactory receptors are located in the mucosa, and these receptors are sensitive to smells. Each type of olfactory receptor is sensitive to a narrow range of smells. Each smell causes a different pattern of firing across the olfactory receptor neurons. (Goldstein & Brockmole, 2014). There are a couple of brain areas involved in the activation pattern of smells. Starting in the olfactory mucosa, the olfactory information travels to the olfactory bulb, next to the piriform cortex, which is the primary olfactory area. The secondary olfactory area is the orbitofrontal cortex. From this area the information travels to the amygdala. The amygdala gives feedback to all three areas (Goldstein & Brockmole, 2014). Exposure to a highly aversive smell produces strong increases in both the amygdala and in the left orbitofrontal cortex. Exposure to less aversive smells produces increases in the orbitofrontal cortex, but not in the amygdala. These findings show that the human amygdala participates in the hedonic or emotional processing of olfactory stimuli (Zald & Pardo, 1997).

Research confirms that our sense of smell is the strongest sense in relation to memory, finding that we are a 100 times more likely to remember something that we smell than something that we see, hear, or touch (Vlahos, 2007). Memories for a certain smell are formed by the strengthening of neural connections due to repeated exposure to this smell. Coffee seems to be a strong smell, especially for people who did not sleep very well (Seo et al., 2008). Coffee smell contains a hundred different chemical components. After a number of exposures to coffee, which causes the same activation pattern to occur over and over, neural connections will form. The neurons become associated with one another. Once this occurs, a pattern of activations has been created that represents this coffee smell. Every time someone smells coffee, these neural connections become stronger due to more memories, which are linked to this smell (Goldstein & Brockmole, 2014).

Smells can unlock memories that had not been thought for years. This is called the Proust effect: the elicitation of memories through olfaction. An explanation for these memories linked to smells is that there are connections from structures involved in olfaction to the hippocampus, which is involved in storing memories. A study compared participants, who were triggered by olfactory and visual cues that were connected to a personally meaningful memory, with participants that had a control cue presented in olfactory and visual form. Functional MRI analyses indicated significantly greater activation in the amygdala and hippocampal regions during recall to the personally significant smell than any other cue (Herz, Eliassen, Beland & Souza, 2004). Smells can trigger emotional memories through the connections between olfactory structures and the amygdala, and hippocampus. As a consequence, marketers can influence people through their memories and emotions by the sense of smells (Solomon, 2014).

Over the last few years, marketers become more aware of the potential usefulness of smell as a sense. Companies invest money in odour marketing because distinctive, carefully considered smells will help amplify the attraction of customers. The goal is to create memorable brands throughout smells (Dowdey, 2008). Marketers’ interest in using smells relies on two physiological conditions that impact associative learning and emotional processing. Emotional processing is established via the direct connection between the olfactory bulb and the limbic system. Second, perceiving smell is one of our most deeply rooted senses. Therefore, the olfactory system functions as a chemical alert system. When someone senses a smell, the odour receptors produce an immediate, instinctive reaction (Zaltman, 2003). For this reason, the sense of smell is interesting for marketers because of its potential to create uncensored reactions to marketing stimuli. People often consume out of emotions and instinct rather than rational thoughts (Grunert, 2016). Thus, if marketers can elicit emotions and memories through smells, they can influence consumer behaviour.

The neurological substrates of olfaction are geared for associative learning and emotional processing. Associative learning happens when marketers link a smell with an unconditioned stimulus, for example a certain product or brand. This unconditioned stimulus elicits the desired response, for example positive associations with the stimulus. Eventually, this positive association will prompt a conditioned response from consumers, which could be buying the product (Herz, 2002).  When people are in a positive mood when they see a certain product or brand they will associate their mood with the product, which will create positive associations. Marketers can create this positive mood by using certain smells in the store (Solomon, 2014). When consumers are visiting a store for a couple of times, they will be exposed to this specific smell, which causes the neuronal activation pattern to occur over and over. This repeated exposure forms strong neural connections. Every time an individual is exposed to this specific smell, new memories – experiences with the store – will be connected to this smell. When marketers create a specific smell for a store, only the sense of this smell is needed to get the consumers in a direct positive, and familiar mood, which will increase the amount of purchases (Johnson, 2013). A good example of this is the Dutch company ‘Scotch & Soda’. Walk into one of their stores and you will immediately be captivated by the pleasant recognizable smell.

The use of a general smell as part of the retail environment is called an ambient smell. Researchers found that in a warm- (vs. cool-) scented and thus perceptually more (vs. less) socially dense environment, people experience a greater (vs. lesser) need for power, which manifests in increased preference for and purchase of premium products and brands (Madzharov, Block & Morrin, 2015). A vanilla smell diffused into a women’s clothing store, and a spicy, honey smell into a men’s clothing store almost doubled sales. When the smells were reversed, sales fell even to levels below the amount when no smell was infused (Tischler, 2005). Clean smells like citrus-scented influence people to behave in morally acts. Episodic memories of a pie out of the oven or a steaming cup of coffee creates feelings of nostalgia and warmth (Solomon, 2014). One study found that the smell of fresh cinnamon buns induced sexual arousal in men, which increases purchases (Solomon, 2014). Major Asian shopping malls used Johnson & Johnson baby powder in clothing stores, and cherry fragrance in eating areas, which increased sales to pregnant women and increased the time spent in these malls by mothers and newborns (Solomon, 2014). In general, smells can entice shoppers to linger in a store via eliciting positive moods and memories, which translates to a higher purchased amount (Johnson, 2013). However, marketers have to be careful with using ambient smells in stores because consumers can also dislike the smell. Therefore, using smells for commercial goals requires specific market research.

Smells are powerful in eliciting emotions and memories, ranging from positive moods to nostalgia to moral behaviour. The sensation of certain smells influences our perception of a product. If this tool can be successfully implemented, marketers can create a strong positive association in the mind of consumers between the smell and the product.

Enjoy the sense of the rich and sweet smell of your cup of coffee!

The post How to influence consumer behaviour appeared first on Neurensics.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Dirk Zomerdijk liet zijn oog vallen op een gaaf project bij Neurensics. Een project met veel data, het bouwen van modellen en programmeren. Door de opgedane kennis tijdens zijn minor programmeren, durfde Dirk deze uitdaging aan. Met groot succes, want vanaf nu is het mogelijk elke seconde van een reclame te zien wat iemand zijn gevoel daarbij is.

Wat voor project hebben we het over?
Het begon met een hele grote bak hersendata. Niet letterlijk gelukkig! Mensen worden in een fMRI scanner gelegd. Hierin liggende kijken ze naar reclames. Tijdens het kijken verzamelen wij hun hersendata.

De uitdaging was: hoe bouwen we een model dat uit de hersendata een valentietijdslijn kan genereren? Valentie is een term uit de psychologie en wordt gebruikt om onderscheid te maken tussen positieve gevoelens van toenadering en negatieve gevoelens van vermijding. Valentie is niet perse goed of slecht, maar denk meer aan het wel of niet fijn vinden van iets wat je ziet of hoort.

Wij hebben valentie uitgewerkt als temporele maat, een tijdsmaat. Het model levert elke seconde output. Als je de output achter elkaar zet, krijg je een lijn. Zo kun je precies bepalen wat mensen voelen op bepaalde punten in een reclame. 

Hoe werkt het model?
Het model heeft geleerd te herkennen welke hersenpatronen bij een fijn of niet fijn gevoel horen. Er wordt naar het hele brein gekeken en er wordt rekening gehouden met bepaalde interacties tussen verschillende hersengebieden. Om precies te zijn; het gaat om 167 hersengebieden. We hebben met onze enorme database een model getraind dat kan voorspellen wat de valentie van filmpjes is. De geïdentificeerde breinpatronen gebruiken we nu om nieuwe filmpjes en reclames die wij van klanten krijgen tegen af te zetten. Zo kunnen we bepalen hoe valentie verloopt in dit materiaal.

Op de horizontale zie je de seconden en op de verticale as de valentie. Die schaalt van erg fijn tot niet fijn.

Hoe werd dit voorheen gedaan?
Dit werd voorheen nog niet op deze manier gedaan. We keken toen naar het gemiddelde van de reclame. Dit is veel specifieker. 

Wat zijn de voordelen van deze ontwikkeling?
Je stopt als bedrijf elementen in je reclame om je een bepaald gevoel op te wekken. Denk aan een feel good momentje of een familie momentje tijdens een kerst commercial. Je kan dus vanaf nu zien of het beoogde effect bereikt wordt of bijvoorbeeld wordt gemaskeerd door andere momenten ervoor of erna. 

Er wordt nu niet meer gekeken naar het gemiddelde van de reclame, maar er is informatie beschikbaar over elk stukje, elke seconde. Je kan zien welke elementen invloed hebben op de flow van de ervaring van de valentie gedurende het kijken van een reclame. Hierdoor kan je zien waar de knelpunten zitten in een reclame. Het kan zijn er er een negatief stukje niet thuis hoort in de reclame, waardoor het eruit geknipt kan worden. Dit bespaart natuurlijk weer geld.

Febreze reclame: dit is een duidelijk voorbeeld. De reclame vertelt eerst over vieze luchtjes, waarbij je ziet dat de lijn naar beneden gaat. Mensen vinden het waarschijnlijk vies. Je wil ook dat mensen zich niet fijn voelen op dat moment. Het fijne gevoel komt op het moment dat jij jouw product laat zien met de oplossing. Daar zie de je lijn omhoog gaan. 

The post Elke seconde zien wat men echt vindt van jouw reclame appeared first on Neurensics.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Neurensics by Sanne Schmetz - 7M ago

Merkenstudie Neurensics
Anoek Holthuijsen en Victor Bakker van Neurensics onderzoeken met hun project de ‘conditioneer-potentie van merken’. Hierbij stellen zij de vraag: ‘Zijn merklogo’s zo te conditioneren dat de consument het merk positiever of juist negatiever beoordeelt?’ Ze meten of het werkt en hoe dit zich manifesteert in het brein. Dus, hoe krachtig is een merk nu en hoe bouwt dit zich op? Is het een kwestie van merken gewoon heel vaak laten zien of moet je daarnaast ook positieve associaties aan een merk koppelen?

Hoe werkt dit onderzoek?
Wij laten een nieuw merk zien met daarnaast een plaatje dat positief beoordeeld is door de participant. Denk aan een mooie vrouw of lekker eten. Wij kijken wat voor effect het herhaaldelijk presenteren van merken gepaard met positieve, negatieve of neutrale plaatjes heeft op de beoordeling van het merk.

Denk bijvoorbeeld aan een merk als BMW. Toen zij jaren geleden wilden uitbreiden, zijn zij gestart met MINI. Wat voor effect zou het op de koper van een MINI hebben als zij weten dat dit bij BMW hoort? Positief, negatief of misschien neutraal? Wanneer iemand een negatieve ervaring heeft met BMW kan dit een negatief effect hebben op MINI.

Hoe zijn jullie bij dit idee komen?
Voor bedrijven is een logo natuurlijk heel belangrijk, het roept meteen associaties op. De waarde van deze associaties kunnen enorm groot zijn. Wij vinden het heel interessant hoe je dit kan laden. Daarnaast kwam Drs. Andries van der Leij, Head of Research and Development bij Neurensics, met een heel interessant onderzoek over apen, logo’s en hun reactie hierop. De onderzoekers van dit onderzoek wilden kijken of ze bestaande logo’s ook bij apen konden conditioneren. Daarbij werden mannetjes apen getest. Zij werden geconditioneerd met o.a. het achterwerk van vrouwtjes apen. Vervolgens mochten ze uit de verschillend geconditioneerde logo’s kiezen. Wat denk je? De apen kozen voor logo’s die met de achterwerken van vrouwtjes apen óf hoge-status mannetjes apen waren geconditioneerd. Sociale status en aantrekkelijkheid is dus bij apen al heel belangrijk. Als dit al zo goed werkt met apen, hoe werkt dit dan met mensen? Dat gaan we onderzoeken.

Hoe hebben jullie dit getest?
We zijn begonnen met de vraag; wat vinden mensen nu aantrekkelijk en wat niet? Denk aan hedonistisch eten wat er heel goed uit ziet en prachtig op de foto is gezet tegenover een foto van insecten op een broodje. Dit geldt ook voor vrouwen in bikini’s. We hebben gekeken naar wat mensen als mooi, neutraal en niet mooi beoordelen.

Metingen zijn uitgevoerd met EEG en met fMRI. Met de EEG kijken we door middel van een voor- en nameting hoe associaties tegenover het logo onbewust veranderd zijn. Met de fMRI meten we hoe de verandering zich representeert in het brein.

Vervolg onderzoek?
Spannend! We moeten de data nog analyseren, laten we daarmee beginnen. Verder hebben we nu gekeken naar niet-bestaande logo’s, maar het is natuurlijk ook interessant om te zien hoe sterk bestaande merken verder geladen kunnen worden; wat is hun potentie? Daarnaast hebben we nu alleen gekeken naar positief, neutraal en negatief, maar aan zo’n logo hangen natuurlijk nog vele andere begrippen. Denk aan een ‘niche’ binnen positief; betrouwbaar, professionaliteit etc. Hier zouden we ook nog dieper op in kunnen gaan.

The post Hoe werken merken in het brein? appeared first on Neurensics.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview