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For 18 years, the Kmart in McMurray, Pennsylvania, was like home for Joshua Englert.

He was 16 years old when he first started helping shoppers at the discount retailer's location near Pittsburgh. But last Sunday, the store's BlueLight went dark and the last sale was made.

To thank shoppers and the staff, Englert, now a store manager, dialed into the intercom one last time and delivered an emotional goodbye.

"I wanted to take this opportunity not to sell you 40-cent plaid skirts or 5-cent panties, but to instead thank you for supporting a lifetime of memories," Englert said as he choked up.

"I am the man I am today because of the people I have met here at Kmart," he added.

Englert recorded the message on his smartphone and posted the video to facebook. The reaction was huge with the video garnering more than 100,000 views and 1,000 reactions as of Saturday.

"I did not think I was going to be choked up like that," Englert told NBC News in an interview Saturday.

"I always use the intercom to announce specials and make sales announcement and I’m sort of known for adding some fun to them, so I thought on the last day the associates would appreciate me saying something sentimental. I didn’t know what I was going to say five minutes before I said it," Englert said.

Kmart has battled tectonic changes in the retail landscape over the past two decades. Once the second-largest discount retailer, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in 2002 and merged with Sears in 2004. The tumult resulted in the shedding of stores like Englert's location.

A second bankruptcy filing this month means even more Kmart and Sears stores are being shuttered.

Englert said while the community is sad to see their local store close, they "understand the business of it all."

As for Englert, he's started looking for a new job, but the people he bonded with at Store #4770 will always have a special place in his heart.

"We were definitely a family," he said. "Those relationships, that’s all what keeps us together is each other."


Photo Credit: Joshua Englert
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A Michigan photographer is asking for the collective power of the internet to help him find a couple of whom he took a stunning picture in what he believes was the moment they got engaged at Yosemite National Park. 

Matthew Dippel tweeted the photo, saying he took it at Taft Point at Yosemite on Oct. 6. "Twitter help, idk who these two are but I hope this finds him," he wrote. 

The image is jaw-droppingly incredible, capturing the moment the man gets down on one knee and takes the woman's hand. They're standing on a cliff, nothing around them except the park's magestic mountains. 

The tweet has had more than 192,000 likes and 86,000 retweets since it was posted Wednesday afternoon. As of early Friday, Dippel still had not found the couple, according to an updated post below the photo. 

Dippel, who was on a road trip and hike adventure with his pal at the time he captured the moment, told NBC's Grand Rapids affiliate WOOD-TV that he posted similar messages on Facebook and Instagram to no avail. 

"Honestly I'd like to give them just a big print of the photo because it's such an incredible moment,” he told WOOD-TV.



Photo Credit: Matthew Dippel
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.
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In 1943, America was fighting in World War II. That same year, Dorothy and Darrell Bush of Camp Springs, Maryland, became husband and wife. News4's Derrick Ward reports they are still going strong. 

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A man who was changing his tire on the Beltway early Saturday morning was struck and killed by a driver suspected of being under the influence, police say.

Samuel Brown, of Clinton, Maryland, died at the scene of the crash, police say. He was 51.

An SUV struck Clinton as he changed a tire on his Jeep Cherokee on the Outer Loop of the Beltway near St. Barnabas Road in Oxon Hill, Maryland. Passing drivers called police about 2 a.m.

Aejah Brown, 23, of Clinton, was driving the car but not injured. A passenger in the back seat was also not hurt.

The driver, a 29-year-old man, was not hurt. Police say they saw signs during the investigation that he was under the influence.

Police have not released the driver's name pending possible criminal charges.

Maryland State Police will conduct a detailed crash reconstruction, police said.

Some lanes were closed after the crash.


Photo Credit: News4
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The $1 billion Mega Millions lottery has lots of players dreaming up ways to spend that amount of cash. News4's Shomari Stone explains a few ways you can do it.

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A judge exceeded the sentencing guidelines for a man who beat his wife, tied her up and told her he was going to kill her. That man will spend 40 years in prison. News4's Jackie Bensen reports.

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Much has changed in the art world over the centuries since the world's best-loved operas were written. As the Washington National Opera opens its 62nd season, News4's Barbara Harrison reports the women in the footlights aren't the only ones who make news.

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What do you call the neighborhood east of South Capitol Street and south of Interstate 695? If you’re Whole Foods, it’s apparently South Capitol Hill.

The newest grocery store to open in Southeast D.C., Whole Foods South Capitol Hill is selling itself as more than just a market, offering a bar, prepared food and partnerships with local chefs.

But it’s the branding behind the new store that is shaking up some neighbors, who wonder why Whole Foods is trying to make “South Capitol Hill” happen.

“This store is uniquely designed for the South Capitol Hill shopper” Nick DiMarco, the store’s team leader, said in a statement Wednesday. “From convenient shopping, to delicious dining options and a comfortable atmosphere; we’ve got something for everyone and I can’t wait to welcome our neighbors into their new community store.”

Now open, the market is located at 101 H St. SE, just south of the I-695, sometimes known as the boundary between Capitol Hill and Navy Yard, the more recent label for the neighborhood perched on the northern bank of the Anacostia River.

But there is still disagreement about the Navy Yard name. Bonnie Trein, a spokeswoman for the Capitol Riverfront Business Improvement District, said the name is derived from the adjacent Washington Navy Yard and the D.C. Metro’s Navy Yard station.

“The neighborhood has been referred to as Near Southeast and Near Southeast Waterfront, and Navy Yard became the most prominent,” Trein said.

Given the lack of consensus on a neighborhood name, the BID led a branding survey among community members and property owners in 2007, arriving at Capitol Riverfront as a consensus name to include all 500 acres of land that include the Ballpark District, Navy Yard, Buzzard Point, The Yards and more.

When Whole Foods contacted the Capitol Riverfront BID and mentioned the new store’s name, Trein said she reacted with surprise.

“They actually mentioned the name in an email that was along the lines of South Capitol Hill,” Trein said. “For me, it’s not on South Capitol Street, and this is going to be very confusing.”

Trein said the BID followed up with Whole Foods to point out the confusing name, even offering to explain the geography of the area, but were ignored.

“They said thanks for the clarification, but this is actually being used for internal purposes at the time. We heard nothing more until they came out with the official name,” Trein said. “What we’re not sure if they realize is that the Capitol Riverfront community is growing rapidly.”

Whole Foods did not respond to a request for comment.

The neighborhood has seen an explosion in population and development since the opening of Nationals Park. Trein projected that a total of 14,000 residents will live in the Navy Yard/Capitol Riverfront area by the beginning of 2020. 

Resident Caroline Kenny also was skeptical of the South Capitol Hill branding. 

“I just had never heard of it at all before Whole Foods started using the term leading up to their opening,” she said. “Don’t understand the thought process, because Navy Yard/Capitol Riverfront has been so hot and on the up and up lately, so not sure why they wouldn’t want to associate with the neighborhood.”

“No one likes it. I reject it,” said Navy Yard resident Brittany Shepherd, who thinks this is the latest attempt to rebrand the community.

And local news blogger Dan Silverman, the guy behind Popville.com, seems to agree that the name is out of place.

“I mean if you’re gonna go for it, you might as well go all the way – I’m talking SoCap. SoCap. Sup SoCap? No, God Dang it, I can’t do it. Not even in jest,” Silverman wrote last week.

Twitter seems to agree:

In the minority of voices is Jacqueline Dupree, a neighborhood news blogger and photographer, who dislikes both “Navy Yard” and “Capitol Riverfront.”

"’South Capitol Hill’ hits a soft spot for me because my late husband always wanted the neighborhood south of the freeway to be called ‘South of Capitol Hill,’ which would be shortened to #SoCHill,” Dupree wrote in an email. “To me it’s always still Near Southeast.”



Photo Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.
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A solemn ceremony was held in Culpeper, Virginia, to remember 19 soldiers who died without any friends or family. News4's David Culver reports.

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Montgomery County officials say they are taking extra precautions to protect against hackers during the midterm elections. News4's Chris Gordon reports.

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