Loading...

Follow Nature to Nurture | Breastfeeding Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Figuring out what to eat after birth can be difficult. Your body has just been through a lot and it is important to help it recover. Just like your baby’s body is continually changing and developing with different nutritional needs, so is yours. You’re no longer carrying your baby and therefore, your needs change. It is important to try and get yourself on a regular eating schedule. The first few weeks may be difficult but it is just as important to provide yourself with nutritious foods as it is for your baby. It is important to remember each mom is different and their needs are different. The best way to meet your needs is through mini meals/snacks. It can be hard to have a sit down dinner, let alone eat an entire dinner without having to tend to your baby. Mini meals and snacks can be a way to meet nutritional needs while being time savvy.

Calories
Breastfeeding burns between 300-500 calories a day, if you choose to breastfeed. To assure your milk supply is maintained, you should not drop below 1800 cal a day. The number of calories that you take in also depends on your activity level as you start to become more active, you should increase your calories to assure your body still has enough to supply milk and maintain your energy level.

Foods and Nutrients to Focus On

Whole grains – which can include whole wheat bread, brown rice, quinoa, barley, oatmeal and whole wheat pasta

Fruits – aim for a variety of fruits and eat a variety of colors

Vegetables – aim for a variety of vegetables and colors

Lean proteins – choose chicken, turkey, eggs, fish, lean beef/pork. Protein is important for moms who had a C-section to ensure the wound heals properly

Dairy – this provides you with a source of calcium, which will help maintain strong bones, teeth and healthy heart function. Choose low fat or part skim dairy products

Fats – fats can be good, you want to focus on the healthy fats like omega-3 fats and unsaturated fats that can be found in fish, olive oils and avocados

Iron – plays an important role in making new blood cells and transporting oxygen throughout the body. It is also important to make sure you get enough if you lost a lot of blood during your delivery

Vitamin C – also important for moms who had a C-section because it can help to fight possible infections.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We see these stories often. The ones where someone somewhere told a breastfeeding mom to cover up, that she couldn’t do “that!” in public, that she needed to go somewhere private (like the bathroom – really??). Breastfeeding is such a natural act that you might not realize that there are laws in place to protect breastfeeding moms and babies. You are protected! These laws range in protecting where you can breastfeeding to when and where you can pump. Let’s take a closer look:

Breastfeeding in public:

Breastfeeding laws are determined individually by the state. All states, with the exception of Idaho, have laws in place that protect women who breastfeed in public. Each state has slightly different specifics regarding this topic so let’s take a closer look at Pennsylvania’s laws (if you want to learn more about other states, check them out here: Breastfeeding Laws by state ). In Pennsylvania, a breastfeeding mom has the “permission” to breastfeed in public in any spot the mother and child are legally allowed to be. Public breastfeeding is not subject to criminal laws in Pennsylvania – it is not to be considered indecent exposure, open lewdness, or a nuisance, regardless of whether the nipple is exposed.

Looking at breastfeeding and pumping in the workplace:

Any employer that employs more than 50 people is required to provide “reasonable” breaktime for a breastfeeding/pumping mother for 1 year after birth. The break must include a place to pump that is “free from intrusion” and is NOT a bathroom. The “reasonable” breaktime might not necessarily be compensated; that can vary.

There are many resources on this topic:

https://www.dol.gov/whd/nursingmothers/Sec7rFLSA_btnm.htm
https://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs73.htm
https://www.dol.gov/whd/nursingmothers/faqBTNM.htm
http://www.usbreastfeeding.org/workplace-law

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Sometimes breastfeeding is portrayed as a peaceful and beautiful event. You picture a women, clothed in white, nursing her child with a serene look on her face. Other times, it’s portrayed as a difficult struggle, with pain and heartache. In most cases, it’s a combination of both: a struggle at some points, but completely worth it in the end. There’s an image from La Leche League that we have shared on our Facebook page a few times that simply states, “Don’t Quit on Your Worst Day”. There’s so much truth to that. This month, we thought we would take a moment to rethink some of the common breastfeeding scenarios you might find yourself in.Here are a few situations most women can relate to and the reward that makes all the stress worth it.

The “Stress”
Your mischievous 8 month old decides to use your nipple as a teether

What Gets You Through It
Knowing that breastfeeding could potentially reduce dental and orthodontia costs down the line

The “Stress”
Giving up cheese, yogurt, ice cream…all the joys of dairy due to an allergy

What Gets You Through It
Knowing that breastfeeding reduces the risk of allergies

The “Stress”
Getting a crick in the neck from falling asleep in the rocker while nursing…again

What Gets You Through It
Being able to get some sleep while feeding your baby

The “Stress”
Pulling all-nighters with your newborn who just wants to stare at you all night

What Gets You Through It
Knowing you’ll wish for those quiet moments when you’re dealing with a teenager

The “Stress”
Pumping 1-4 times a day every day while at work

What Gets You Through It
Having 1-2 quiet breaks throughout a busy workday to think about your little one

The “Stress”
Experiencing the resulting engorgement when your little one sleeps through the night for the first time

What Gets You Through It
The hope that there is a repeat.
And the comfort of not having to worry about low supply.

The “Stress”
The feeling of rejection when your little one decides to go through  a nursing strike

What Gets You Through It
Knowing that breastfeeding has created a bond between you and your baby that can’t ever be replaced.

The “Stress”
Cluster feeding: Your little one wants to nurse every ½ hour every night between 6-9pm

What Gets You Through It
Your little one is filling up on your rich breastmilk, allowing for a longer stretch of sleep.

The “Stress”
Reunion nursing: Your little one wants to breastfeed as soon as you both get home from work and daycare while you have a long list of chores to complete

What Gets You Through It
Having a moment to sit down after a busy day and enjoy the quiet time with your baby

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There can be some confusion surrounding tandem nursing. What is it? How does it come about? Tandem nursing is the term for nursing 2 or more siblings. For example, nursing a newborn and a toddler. Tandem nursing is not the term for nursing twins or high order multiples. Natural progression to tandem nursing is pretty simple. Mom is nursing Child A, becomes pregnant, nurses through the pregnancy, and continues nursing Child A while nursing Child B.  Tandem nursing is probably more common than you think. It’s a great way of continuing to bond with your older child while welcoming your new child. Whether you start out with a goal to tandem nurse or it just naturally happens, here are a few tips to help:

  • Balance: In those first few days after your younger baby is born, nurse the younger baby first to ensure he/she is getting the colostrum he/she needs. Once your milk comes in, your supply will respond to the needs of both children and you can nurse on demand without having to follow a certain order to the feedings.
  • Positioning:  As time goes on, you can position the children in whatever way works but with a younger baby, proper positioning can help make sure that newborn’s latch is ideal.  Here are a few positioning ideas: double cradle, with newborn over toddler, double football, a combination of cradle/football, and laid back breastfeeding.  It will probably be easiest to latch your newborn on first before allowing the older child to latch on until you get the hang of positioning.
  • Hygiene: No need to worry about washing the breasts or nipples between feedings! Siblings share everything, even germs! Chances are, your children are going to share germs in lots of different ways and the antibodies in breastmilk will help to prevent illness.
  • Be flexible: you might have visions of both your children nursing quietly together but sometimes, it will be both nursing but the toddler is doing nursing gymnastics and you have to carefully adjust so the newborn isn’t bothered! Or as soon as your younger baby is done with a session, the older one decides to nurse. Things aren’t always ideal but that’s part of life, right? The nursing sessions with them holding hands will more than make up for it.

Tandem nursing is definitely an adjustment at first but it does get better and you will, without a doubt, have moments to treasure!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview