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In an ideal world, you would always comparison shop every product or service. But in the real world, that takes time and effort. Is is worth the bother? To estimate the potential benefit of shopping around, Priceonomics analyzed homeowner’s insurance premiums across 12 states (for a similar level of coverage).

They ranked each state by taking the difference between quotes in the 25th and 75th percentiles.

We found that the difference between the premiums was substantial, and shopping around can lead to dramatic changes in pricing. Of all the states we looked at, Texas had the biggest discrepancy in prices — there was a $2,182 range in insurance prices between a 25th and 75th percentile quote. Even at the low end, in New Hampshire the price ranges between quotes at these percentiles was $363 per year.

The article does a deeper analysis for California and Texas:

It’s night and day between California and Texas. Texas is one of the most expensive states to get home insurance in the country, owing partly to the frequency of catastrophic weather events and partly due to higher insurer expenses. Not only does zip code 78521 in Brownsville have a 25th percentile of premium greater than San Francisco’s 75th percentile, but it’s 75th percentile is more than double that!

Basically, you should shop around everywhere as you could save hundreds per year at a minimum. But you should really shop around in Texas. You know, unless you don’t want to save potentially $2,000 a year.




Homeowner’s Insurance: How Much Can You Save By Comparison Shopping? from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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The Barron’s magazine cover article* this week is a profile of Jack Bogle, founder of Vanguard. It covers a lot of things that Bogle fans may already know (origin story, dislike of ETFs), but there were several bits that were new to me. I look forward to reading his last book that includes an “anecdote-rich history of Vanguard” and personal reflections.

(*Barron’s has a paywall, but usually allows limited access to Google search visitors. Try searching “Jack Bogle’s Battle” in a private window.)

Here’s a chart of how Vanguard has changed since 1974:

The article brings up the argument that index funds are becoming too popular and now bad for the world. I don’t worry about this at all. If inefficiencies become easy to take advantage of, things will naturally swing back. The loudest complainers always seem to be high-fee managers who are getting paid less lavishly for their services:

His favorite punching bag remains the mutual-fund industry. He likes to point out that closet indexing is pervasive with actively managed funds, and that traditional funds haven’t passed along economies of scale until pressured by Vanguard’s fees. There have been few casualties yet among asset managers, even as active stock funds suffered outflows nine of the past 10 years. And the industry has surely improved: Investor outcomes are better, costs are lower, information is better, thanks in part to Bogle.

Says Bogle, paraphrasing Martin Luther King Jr., “the arc of fiduciary duty is long, but moving in the right direction.” Bogle intends to see that it keeps doing so. “I have no corporate power,” he continues. “But I believe I still have more ethical and intellectual power. And that is good enough for me.”

Bogle is one of those rare authentic voices who say what they think and don’t care if others agree (even the rich and powerful). The adjective “cantankerous” is used – I hope to be called that eventually!




Jack Bogle Profile & Vanguard Historical Chart in Barron’s Magazine from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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Chase has freshened up their line-up of small business credit cards. The new Ink Business Unlimited Card is offering a $500 cash bonus after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months after account opening. The special feature of this card is a flat, unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase. Here are the details:

  • $500 bonus cash back after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening.
  • Flat 1.5% cash back on all purchases with no limit. Simple.
  • 0% introductory APR for 12 months on purchases and balance transfers.
  • Employee cards at no additional cost.
  • No annual fee.

Ultimate Rewards points. The cash sign-up bonus actually comes in the form of Ultimate Rewards points at 1 point = 1 cent in cash. 50,000 points = $500 cash. If you have one of the other annual fee cards that offer a boost in value like the Ink Business Preferred, Sapphire Preferred, or Sapphire Reserve, you can transfer your points between Ultimate Rewards accounts and redeem using that other card’s 25% travel bonus. This can increase the value of your points.

You could think of this card as the small business version of the Chase Freedom Unlimited card.

Prefer airline and/or hotel points? If you transfer over your Ultimate Rewards points to the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card (or Ink Plus business card), then you can use that card to transfer into hotel and/or airline miles. If you value those miles/points at more than 1 cent per point, then your 1.5X rewards from this card can be significantly higher. Examples:

– You could earn 1.5 United miles per dollar spent.
– You could earn 1.5 Hyatt points per dollar spent.
– You could earn 1.5 British Airways Avios per dollar spent.
– You could earn 1.5 Southwest Rapid Rewards points per dollar spent.

For example, if you placed a perceived value of 1.5 cents on each United mile or Southwest Rapid Rewards point, then you’d receive 2.25 cents of perceived value per dollar spent with this card. Your actual numbers will depend on your own specific redemption choices.

Many people aren’t aware of the fact that they can apply for business credit cards, even if they are not a corporation or LLC. The business type is called a sole proprietorship, and these days many people are full-time or part-time consultants, freelancers, eBay/Amazon/Etsy sellers, or other one-person business owners. This is the simplest business entity, but it is fully legit and recognized by the IRS. On a business credit card application, you should use your own legal name as the business name, and your Social Security Number as the Tax ID.

Note that Chase has an unofficial rule that they will automatically deny approval on new credit cards if you have 5 or more new credit cards from any issuer on your credit report within the past 2 years (aka the 5/24 rule). This rule is designed to discourage folks that apply for high numbers of sign-up bonuses. This rule applies on a per-person basis, so in our household one applies to Chase while the other applies at other card issuers.

Bottom line. This Chase small business card has a large sign-up bonus and flat 1.5% cash back with no annual fee. If you have certain other Chase credit cards, you can transfer Ultimate Rewards points over to those cards and increase your value. Be sure to compare with other Chase small business cards – Ink Business Preferred and Ink Business Cash.




Chase Ink Business Unlimited Card Review: $500 Cash Bonus, 1.5% Flat Cash Back, No Annual Fee from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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Chase has freshened up their line-up of small business credit cards. The Ink Business Preferred Card is offering a 80,000 point bonus after you spend $5,000 on purchases in the first 3 months after account opening. This flavor is their “premium travel card” with 3X points on travel purchases and the ability to redeem points at a 25% premium through their travel portal. This feature makes 80,000 points worth $1,000 towards travel when redeemed through Chase Ultimate Rewards. Here are the details:

  • 80,000 bonus points after you spend $5,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening.
  • Points are worth 25% more when you redeem for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards.
  • 3X points per $1 on the first $150,000 spent on travel, shipping purchases, internet/cable/phone services, and advertising purchases with social media sites and search engines.
  • 1 point per $1 on all other purchases with no limit.
  • No foreign transaction fees.
  • Employee cards at no additional cost.
  • Primary rental car coverage when renting for business purposes.
  • $95 annual fee.

Ultimate Rewards points. This card offers a 25% bonus on travel redemptions made through the Ultimate Rewards travel website. 80,000 Ultimate Rewards = $1,000 in travel. Similar to Expedia or Travelocity, you can book flights on most major airlines and hotel chains. This makes it much more flexible to spend your points. You can even buy something more expensive and pay the difference.

If you have other Chase cards that earn Ultimate Rewards points like the Ink Business Cash or Ink Business Unlimited, you can transfer points into this card account and take advantage of the 25% premium. However, if you happen to have the Chase Sapphire Reserve, you could transfer your points out to grab the better 50% premium.

You could think of this card as the small business version of the Chase Sapphire Preferred card.

Prefer airline and/or hotel points? This card also allows you to transfer Ultimate Rewards points into hotel and/or airline miles. Transfer to United Airlines, British Airways, Singapore Airlines, Korean Air, Southwest, Hyatt Hotels, IHG Hotels, and Marriott Hotels at a ratio of 1 Ultimate Rewards point = 1 mile/hotel point. Miles redemption continue to offer great value for savvy travelers, especially for last-minute travel and business class seats.

Many people aren’t aware of the fact that they can apply for business credit cards, even if they are not a corporation or LLC. The business type is called a sole proprietorship, and these days many people are full-time or part-time consultants, freelancers, eBay/Amazon/Etsy sellers, or other one-person business owners. This is the simplest business entity, but it is fully legit and recognized by the IRS. On a business credit card application, you should use your own legal name as the business name, and your Social Security Number as the Tax ID.

Note that Chase has an unofficial rule that they will automatically deny approval on new credit cards if you have 5 or more new credit cards from any issuer on your credit report within the past 2 years (aka the 5/24 rule). This rule is designed to discourage folks that apply for high numbers of sign-up bonuses. This rule applies on a per-person basis, so in our household one applies to Chase while the other applies at other card issuers.

Bottom line. This Chase small business card has a large sign-up bonus and premium travel features with a $95 annual fee. You can transfer Ultimate Rewards points from other Chase cards to increase your value. Be sure to compare with other Chase small business cards – Ink Business Unlimited and Ink Business Cash.




Chase Ink Business Preferred Card Review: 80,000 Point Bonus, Travel Rewards from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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I’m turning 40 years old this summer. This number has always been a psychological marker for me. I’ve always wanted to be financially secure and have started a family by age 40. According to this Atlantic article by Daniel Pink*, I’m far from the only one. Consider marathons:

Four people in four different professions living in four different parts of the world, all united by the common quest to run 26.2 miles. But something else links these runners and legions of other first-time marathoners. Red Hong Yi ran her first marathon when she was 29 years old. Jeremy Medding ran his when he was 39. Cindy Bishop ran her first marathon at age 49, Andy Morozovsky at age 59.

All four of them were what the social psychologists Adam Alter and Hal Hershfield call “nine-enders,” people in the last year of a life decade. They each pushed themselves to do something at ages 29, 39, 49, and 59 that they didn’t do, didn’t even consider, at ages 28, 38, 48, and 58—and didn’t do again when they turned 30, 40, 50, or 60.

The article contains several other insights that definitely applied to me. According to Alter and Hershfield:

“People are more apt to evaluate their lives as a chronological decade ends than they are at other times,” Alter and Hershfield explain. “Nine-enders are particularly preoccupied with aging and meaningfulness, which is linked to a rise in behaviors that suggest a search for or crisis of meaning.”

According to psychologist Clark Hull:

At the beginning of a pursuit, we’re generally more motivated by how far we’ve progressed; at the end, we’re generally more energized by trying to close the small gap that remains.

You could tell yourself that being 29 is no different than being 28 or 30, or you can just use this behavioral quirk to reach your goals. I’ve been working on “closing the gap” in terms of getting all my financial affairs in order. Here are all the things that I’ve been working on as a 39-year-old:

  • Created a system to simulate a monthly “paycheck” so that things run smoothly and the bill gets paid even if I am not around to micromanage things (like I usually do). Dividends and interest flow to the emergency fund/cash buffer (savings account), which then automatically transfers a set amount each month to our day-to-day checking account.
  • Beefed up our cash buffer. As part of the above-mentioned system, I increased our cash hoard to two years of expenses in FDIC-insured savings accounts and CDs. The idea is that this buffer “bucket” feeds the checking account, but also gets replenished by income and interest from our portfolio. As larger upfront expenses like a home repair or used car purchase comes up, the buffer can take a hit. The dividends come in quarterly spurts. The buffer allows us to handle shocks without disruption.
  • Re-examined term life insurance. We are currently 10 years into a 30-year term policy with a level premium. We technically don’t need to replace any lost income anymore, so we considered canceling this policy. However, we decided that if something were to happen to one of us, we would still need to pay someone to replace childcare duties for three children. I don’t know how other single parents do it, but I know that I’d need help!
  • Moved some missing assets into revocable living trusts for estate planning purposes. When we created this trust, we were mostly concerned about having a plan in place to take care of the children in case something happened to both of us. After you create a trust, you must manually move/retitle all your various brokerage accounts into it, and the paperwork can be a pain.
  • Consolidated accounts. I still have a penchant for collecting new financial accounts, but I’ve also closed a bunch this year. Our grandparents used to hide money in jars around the house. I like to buy shares of Berkshire (BRK) and put them in brokerage accounts (often involving a bonus, and BRK gives off no dividends to worry about at tax time). I started over a decade ago with Sharebuilder (now Capital One Investing) and most recently got $5 worth from Stash.
  • Bought a used 2015 Toyota minivan so that we have a reliable family vehicle for the next 10 years. I love sliding doors. I hate the inconvenience of a car breakdown.
  • Started and put some money into a 529 plan for each kid. The amount isn’t enough to cover four years of college, we’ll just have to see how much it can grow as compared to tuition. I read somewhere that you should plan to save 1/3rd, fund 1/3rd from annual income, and leave the last 1/3rd for scholarships, grants, or student loans.

Everything on this list was being putting off because it was unpleasant. Most either dealt with the prospect of early death/severe disability, or annoying paperwork. The prospect of turning 40 got me over the hump. Next decade: Marathon at age 49?

* The article is actually an excerpt from his new book When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing.




Motivation: Take Advantage Of Being 29, 39, 49, or 59 Years Old from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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Cashing in your frequent flier miles for a free flight can be hit or miss, especially around a holiday. Which airlines are the most generous with making seats available? Each year, IdeaWorks tries to run a fair comparison of all the major airlines to keep them honest. This WSJ article discusses the results:

During March, IdeaWorks made more than 7,000 trip searches among 25 airlines, looking for two seats at the basic “saver” award level—25,000 miles for a domestic U.S. round-trip, for example—on 14 specific travel dates June through October. Each airline’s 10 busiest long routes and 10 busiest medium-length routes, both domestic and international, are queried to get the fullest picture of award availability.

Most improved goes to American, which admitted that they significantly increased their overall seat availability, especially to Hawaii and Europe. Worst decline goes to Alaska, which says it didn’t change the amount of seats released, so perhaps there is simply more competition and usage of the program. Note that the survey focuses on economy tickets (not business or first class).

Southwest and JetBlue remain on top at close to 100% availability, but that is a bit misleading since both of their points are revenue-linked with no blackout dates. For example, 25,000 Southwest points will buy you basically any “Wanna Get Away” ticket that costs up to about $340. So the results are really just saying that Southwest’s busiest routes almost always have a flight that costs under ~$340. Southwest doesn’t fly to Europe at all, but they do have plans for Hawaii soon (which I look forward to, but will probably hurt their numbers).




Frequent Flier Miles: Which Airlines Are Easiest To Redeem Economy Awards? from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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How to Retire Happy, Wild, and Free by Ernie Zelinski continues to offer smart observations on retirement. For example, when people are working, their idea of leisure is often passive: watching TV, listening to music, shopping, or eating at restaurants. However, in retirement, they need to replace all the intangibles besides money that working provided.

The Academy of Leisure Sciences has 8 criteria for finding a good leisure activity in retirement:

  1. You have a genuine interest in it.
  2. It is challenging.
  3. There is some sense of accomplishment associated with completing only a portion of it.
  4. It has many aspects to it so that it doesn’t become boring.
  5. It helps you develop some skill.
  6. You can get so immersed in it that you lose the sense of time.
  7. It provides you with a sense of self-development.
  8. It doesn’t cost too much.

Did you know even know the Academy of Leisure Sciences existed? Another new tidbit from this book.

My observation is that these are also same characteristics of a good job. Think of your own job and read it again:

  1. You have a genuine interest in it.
  2. It is challenging.
  3. There is some sense of accomplishment associated with completing only a portion of it.
  4. It has many aspects to it so that it doesn’t become boring.
  5. It helps you develop some skill.
  6. You can get so immersed in it that you lose the sense of time.
  7. It provides you with a sense of self-development.
  8. It pays enough to support your lifestyle.

Of course, this brings you to why saving up money to reach financial freedom is a worthy pursuit. The list of things that satisfies the top 8 leisure criteria should be pretty long. It might take a few tries to find something that fits, but you could play any sport, learn to cook, speak a new language, and so on.

However, adding the criteria that it has to pay you makes the list much shorter, perhaps non-existent. Compare picking up cycling for personal enjoyment vs. getting paid as a professional cyclist. Learning how to smoke some decent backyard BBQ vs. getting paid as a professional caterer. Start to speak a new language vs. becoming an (adequately-paid) French teacher. I’m sure some lucky people out there really do have a perfect job where they are getting paid for something that they would “do for free”. However, most of us don’t, so that’s where financial freedom comes in to remove that money requirement.




Why Pursue Financial Freedom: Fulfilling Retirement Activity vs. Ideal Job from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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Google is offering eBay customers who spend $150+ in eligible items a free Google Home Mini ($49 retail). Eligible items exclude items from the Coins & Paper Money, Gift Cards & Coupons, and Real Estate categories. Expires 5/20/18 or while supplies last.

How to redeem your Coupon:

Include a Google Home Mini worth $49.00 direct from Google in your cart.
Shop for $150+ in Eligible Items. (See below for exclusions).
Enter the Coupon code in the redemption code field: PFREEMINI
Check out by 11:59 PM PST on May 20, 2018
Free Google Home Mini to arrive within 10 (ten) business days.

Not a bad deal if you were already considering such a purchase, or if something $150+ you wanted was a similar price on eBay. An alternative idea is to buy $150 worth of US Postal Service Forever Stamps.

Remember, you can also stack with cashback shopping portals like eBates ($5 new customer bonus), Mr. Rebates ($5 bonus), and TopCashBack ($5 right now, but varies).




eBay: Spend $150+, Get Free Google Home Mini ($49 Value) from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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Personal Umbrella Insurance is additional liability insurance, designed to pay out when your existing auto and homeowner’s/renter’s insurance policies are exhausted. For example, you may only have $300,000 in liability coverage on your car insurance. If you are in a car accident and found liable for $1,000,000, you would be on the hook for $700,000 yourself unless you had an adequate umbrella insurance policy. Here is a diagram explaining this from MSN Money:

In addition, an umbrella policy can also fill in the gaps by providing coverage for other incidents like liability for rental properties or being sued for slander or libel. Imagine working and saving for decades, only to have all of it taken away with one incident.

Real-world examples of $300,000+ liability claims. Every time I read about one of these scenarios, I think of them as a reason to keep paying for my umbrella insurance policy.

Do you drive a car? In a sever car accident, medical costs alone can exceed $100,000 per person easily. Now imagine if there were 2, 4, or even 6 people in the car. Here is one example from a NY Times article on umbrella policies:

One of Mr. Cox’s clients crashed into the rear of a car on a slick highway. A woman and a child were critically injured. After two years of litigation, his client settled the lawsuit for more than $5 million. The client had $15 million in umbrella coverage. The policy paid for the settlement and all legal costs. “Without the umbrella,” Mr. Cox said, “they would have been completely wiped out.”

Are you ever a parent chaperone? A high school field trip led to a $700,000 verdict for negligence:

Lauren Crossan, of Randolph, N.J., had traveled to Hawaii in 2004 with Susanne Sadler, Sadler’s daughter, and another New Jersey cheerleader to perform in the halftime show of the Hula Bowl. Within hours of her arrival at the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort, Crossan was seen drinking alcohol. Her body was found the next day on the hotel grounds.

An arbitrator determined last month that Sadler was partially responsible for Crossan’s death and ordered her to pay $690,000 to Crossan’s parents and her estate.

Do you have a dog? This Reuters article discusses the increasing number of dog-related claims. Here are two examples that didn’t even involve a bite:

State Farm public affairs specialist Heather Paul’s dog ran out through her open gate and scared an elderly neighbor, who fell off the curb and broke her ankle. The lady filed an insurance claim with Paul’s carrier, but the standard liability coverage of $100,000 was not enough for her bone reconstruction. Luckily, Paul had an additional umbrella policy, which kicked in and covered the rest.

A California woman went through a two-year lawsuit after her dog got loose and knocked over a postal worker. The dog did not bite anyone, but the worker claimed damages greater than the homeowner’s policy covered. […] This owner said she had no umbrella policy, and now she cannot get one. Her homeowner’s premium has skyrocketed.

More scenarios:

  • You leave a negative Yelp review about a company and the business sues you for defamation. Look what can happen with a mediocre 3-star Yelp review.
  • A man was asked to cut down a tree from his own yard. He refused, and later a hurricane blew the tree down and injured someone in the neighboring house.
  • Your child gets in a fight at school, and injures another student.
  • You have a pool, and a visitor hurts themselves.
  • A handyman or contractor hurts themselves on your property.

Have the insurance company lawyers be on your side. Forget even getting a large jury verdict against you. If someone simply sues you for a frivolous reason, you’ll have to pay for a lawyer to defend yourself. With an adequate umbrella policy, the money at risk will be the insurance companies instead of your own. That means the big corporate lawyers will be on your side, and your defense costs will be covered as part of the umbrella policy.

The premiums are relatively affordable. It cost us about $250 a year for $1 million in coverage for the both of us, including 2 cars and a house. That’s basically $10 per month per person. However, we did have to raise the liability limits of our auto and homeowner’s policies slightly to $500,000 each. So if you are only carrying the bare minimum required by law, your actual additional costs may be higher. If your net worth is higher, then you’d want to buy higher limits, but it should still be affordable on a relative basis.

It’s often easy to add to your existing policy. It was really simple to get as well; we had an umbrella policy added to our existing policies with just one phone call. We already had our homeowner’s and auto insurance at the same company. We didn’t have to fill out a long application or go through a credit check. If the cost is a shock, consider contacting an independent insurance broker and shopping around. You may find a better deal and get a multi-line discount.

But the low cost also means you may have to look out for your own interests. Something that involves a big commission like universal life insurance is more likely to generate interest from your insurance agent. On the other hand, selling you an umbrella policy results in a tiny commission. When I asked about it initially, all I got was a “yeah, I suppose that might be a good idea…” and they never followed-up. You need to take action on your own behalf.

One less thing to worry about. Peace of mind. Some people believe that you may be a bigger target for lawsuits if someone finds out you have a $1 million umbrella policy. Here’s how I look at it. If I really wanted to premeditate a lawsuit against someone, I’d pick someone who is worth a lot more than $1M. More like $10 million and up. In a big metro area like mine, multi-millionaires are a dime a dozen. Even if I was frivolously sued, again the whole point is that I’m still covered. To me, this argument is like saying you shouldn’t earn more money because someone will sue you for it.

Now, if you have a low or negative net worth, then perhaps there would be less incentive in getting such coverage. I certainly had no idea what umbrella insurance was in college. I would imagine lawyers are less likely to go after a big amount if you are “judgment-proof”. However, consider that your net worth may change quickly in the future, and if you did have an incident it may affect your future insurability.

Bottom line. Umbrella insurance gets to the core of the purpose of insurance. You pay money to share the risk with others and protect you and your family from a catastrophic event that could ruin your lives. In other words, you pay the premiums with the hope that you will never have to make a claim on it.




Here Are 11 Reasons We Have An Umbrella Liability Insurance Policy from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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The Business Platinum Card® from American Express OPEN is the premium AmEx business card with a variety of perks, including the best airline lounge access program (American Express now has their own Centurion lounges too). Right now, they are running a limited-time offer of up to 100,000 Membership Rewards points. Offer ends 8/8/18. Here are the details:

  • 100,000 Membership Rewards Points Welcome Bonus. Earn 50,000 Membership Rewards points after you spend $10,000 & an extra 50,000 points after you spend an additional $15,000 all on qualifying purchases within your first 3 months of Card Membership. Offer ends 8/8/18.
  • 5X points on flights and prepaid hotels on amextravel.com.
  • 1.5X points per dollar on each eligible purchase of $5,000 or more. Up to 1 million additional points per year.
  • 1 point per dollar on all other purchases.
  • $200 Airline Fee Credit. Up to $200 a calendar year in baggage fees and more at one airline.
  • $100 Fee Credit for Global Entry or TSA PreCheck.
  • Free Unlimited Boingo WiFi access + 10 Free Gogo inflight internet passes annually.
  • $450 annual fee.

American Express Global Lounge Collection. Some other travel cards give you Priority Pass Select, which is nice but not as inclusive as this card’s list of partners. Domestically, you get Delta Skyclub access (Individual Skyclub membership costs $495 from Delta) as well as the new Centurion Lounge network built specifically for American Express cardholders.

  • The Centurion® Lounge
  • The International American Express Lounges
  • Delta SkyClub®
  • Priority Pass Select
  • Airspace Lounge
  • Escape Lounges

Other benefits:

  • 35% Airline Bonus: Use Membership Rewards® Pay with Points for all or part of a flight with your selected qualifying airline, and you can get 35% of the points back, up to 500,000 bonus points per calendar year.
  • 35% points back on all First and Business class flights, with all airlines available through American Express Travel.
  • Automatic Starwood Preferred Guest (Marriott) Gold status.
  • Automatic Hilton Honors Gold status.
  • No Foreign Transaction Fees.

Note the following language: “Welcome bonus offer not available to applicants who have or have had this product.”

35% Airline Bonus details. Let’s say your selected airline is Delta, and you want to buy a couple economy Delta tickets for $1,000 using their Pay with Points features. This means that $1,000 ticket booked through AmEx Travel will only cost you 65,000 Membership Rewards points net (100,000 points and then 35,000 point rebated back). This improves the 1 cent per point value to 1.54 cents per point value. This means that 100,000 Membership Rewards points can be worth $1,540 in airfare on your selected airline.

Transfer partners. You can transfer Membership Rewards points to 16 airline and 3 hotel partners including Delta, British Airways, Hawaiian, JetBlue, Air Canada, Hilton, Starwood Preferred Guest, and Choice Hotels. If you’re good at snagging award tickets, you can get even better value this way.

Overall, this small business card is meant for big spenders that travel regularly and value convenience and comfort. Spending $25,000 within 3 months is a relatively high spending hurdle. (Given the 5X bonus category, it would be perfect if you needed to book some business flights/hotels soon.) If you can swing that, then this card can offer a lot of value in a year. In addition to the 100,000 membership rewards points (see above for value), the $450 annual fee can be offset by the $200 annual credit towards airline fees and the $100 Global Entry credit. I think the biggest value factor is the wide lounge access which includes more domestic lounges than Priority Pass Select alone.

Bottom line. The Business Platinum Card from American Express card tries to make your air travel more pleasant by addressing things like baggage fees, economy plus upgrade fees, TSA PreCheck security lines, Global Entry customs lines, inflight WiFi, free snacks and drinks at airline lounges, etc. Right now, they have a limited-time 100,000 point welcome offer if you meet the qualifying spending requirements for new cardholders.




The Business Platinum Card from American Express: 100,000 Point Limited-Time Offer from My Money Blog.

© MyMoneyBlog.com, 2018.

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