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Winding your Child Down for Bedtime [Pediatric Occupational Therapy, Sensory Therapy, Screen Time, Bedtime for Sniffles]

Winding your Child Down for Bedtime | Kinetic Kids, Inc. - YouTube

Sleep is an important occupation in your child’s everyday life. Sleep is more than just the actual snoozing your child may or may not do during the time the sun is down, but also consists of resting and naps, preparing for sleep, and then the actual act of sleeping itself.  These activities put together are a large daily task or occupation that should be put into a routine and habit for your child.  

Ready To Read Additional Awesome-Sauce? Peruse away, Charlotte . . . Peruse away!
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All About Dyscalculia: The Warning Signs [Neuropsychological Assessments, IEP and 504 Plans, Educational Enrichment Services]

 

What is Dyscalculia? | Kinetic Kids, Inc. - YouTube
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What are the warning signs of dysgraphia? [IEP and 504  Plans, Psychological Assessments, Educational Therapy]

What are the Warning Signs of Dysgraphia? | Kinetic Kids, Inc. - YouTube

Just having bad handwriting doesn't mean a person has dysgraphia. Since dysgraphia is a processing disorder, difficulties can change throughout a lifetime. However since writing is a developmental process -children learn the motor skills needed to write, while learning the thinking skills needed to communicate on paper - difficulties can also overlap.

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Ideas To Use At Home

Tip to teach individuals with dysgraphia to overcome some of their difficulties with written expression.

Early Writers:
  • Use paper with raised lines for a sensory guide to staying within the lines.
  • Try different pens and pencils to find one that's most comfortable.
  • Practice writing letters and numbers in the air with big arm movements to improve motor memory of these important shapes. Also practice letters and numbers with smaller hand or finger motions.
  • Encourage proper grip, posture and paper positioning for writing. It's important to reinforce this early as it's difficult for students to unlearn bad habits later on.
  • Use multi-sensory techniques for learning letters, shapes and numbers. For example, speaking through motor sequences, such as "b" is "big stick down, circle away from my body."
  • Introduce a word processor on a computer early; however do not eliminate handwriting for the child. While typing can make it easier to write by alleviating the frustration of forming letters, handwriting is a vital part of a person's ability to function in the world.
  • Be patient and positive, encourage practice and praise effort - becoming a good writer takes time and practice.
Young Students
  • Allow use of print or cursive - whichever is more comfortable.
  • Use large graph paper for math calculation to keep columns and rows organized.
  • Allow extra time for writing assignments.
  • Begin writing assignments creatively with drawing, or speaking ideas into a tape recorder
  • Alternate focus of writing assignments - put the emphasis on some for neatness and spelling, others for grammar or organization of ideas.
  • Explicitly teach different types of writing - expository and personal essays, short stories, poems, etc.
  • Do not judge timed assignments on neatness and spelling.
  • Have students proofread work after a delay - it's easier to see mistakes after a break.
  • Help students create a checklist for editing work - spelling, neatness, grammar, syntax, clear progression of ideas, etc.
  • Encourage use of a spell checker - speaking spell checkers are available for handwritten work
  • Reduce amount of copying; instead, focus on writing original answers and ideas
  • Have student complete tasks in small steps instead of all at once.
  • Find alternative means of assessing knowledge, such as oral reports or visual projects
  • Encourage practice through low-stress opportunities for writing such as letters, a diary, making household lists or keeping track of sports teams.
Teenagers & Adults
  • Provide tape recorders to supplement note taking and to prepare for writing assignments.
  • Create a step-by-step plan that breaks writing assignments into small tasks (see below).
  • When organizing writing projects, create a list of keywords that will be useful.
  • Provide clear, constructive feedback on the quality of work, explaining both the strengths and weaknesses of the project, commenting on the structure as well as the information that is included.
  • Use assistive technology such as voice-activated software if the mechanical aspects of writing remain a major hurdle.
The Dysgraphia Symptom Checker

Educational Recommendations for Common Cognitive & Academic Weaknesses Psycho-educational Assessments Give Both Direction and Purpose!

This guide is based on the work of Mather and Jaffe that which relates cognitive weaknesses to the common accompanying academic weaknesses and makes educational suggestions for those areas of weakness.  psychology

Remember:
  • This 38-page guide just gives an overview.
  • It can be used to simply help enhance mild areas of weakness or as a building block to provide a child with the academic support that he or she needs!
  • A comprehensive analysis, which includes a pediatric psycho-educational evaluation, would be recommended to ensure that the child is receiving the supports that he or she needs.

If you suspect that your child may be having difficulty in school, navigating through social situations, or just needs light support in one or tow areas, a psycho-educational assessment would be helpful in boosting academic performance and confidence!

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Dyslexia:  Will My Child Grow Out of This? [Pediatric Psychology, Orton-Gillingham reading program, Educational Enrichment Services, IEP/504 plans, Educational Specialized Services, Clinical neuropsychology]

Dyslexia: Will My Child Grow Out of This? | Kinetic Kids, Inc. - YouTube

Reading problems tend to be pretty common, so it’s interesting to learn that dyslexia is often missed! Although care must be taken before jumping into an evaluation and diagnosis, reading difficulties may not be temporary (as we often hope they are). Children may not grow out of these struggles, and in fact, these difficulties will continue to persist until something is done! Missing the warning signs can lead from the 5 year-old who can’t quite learn her letters to the 6 year-old who can’t match sounds to letters to the 13 year-old who shies away from reading aloud in class

Here are additional resources that may be of use:
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Sensory Equipment for Home! [Pediatric Occupational Therapy, Sensory Therapy, Pediatric Speech Therapy, Sensory Processing Disorder, SPD, Autism, Special Needs]

Your child may use a variety of sensory equipment at their weekly therapy appointment, at school, or in their community.  Sometimes it can be hard to decide which equipment is most appropriate for home, what is worth purchasing, or what you could do instead of purchasing some of the equipment to allow your child to meet their sensory needs. 

In Need of Additional Awesomesauce? 

Here are some other related blog articles that we've created here at Kinetic Kids that may be of interest to you:

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Shoe Tying Made Easy [Pediatric Occupational Therapy, Pediatric Therapy] 

Shoe tying can be a tricky skill for a child to master.   Most children are able to successfully and independently complete this task by age 5-6. The task itself uses many of your child’s underlying skills such as visual motor and perceptual skills, fine motor, bilateral skills, dexterity, and attention.  It can even take core strength to balance yourself in a position to tie your shoe depending on if you are in an environment to sit in a chair or not.  Practice makes perfect is the best phrase when it comes to shoe tying.

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Recycle Something Simple to Save Money for Therapy At Home! [Pediatric Therapy, Sensory Therapy, Pediatric Occupational Therapy, Pediatric Speech Therapy, Brain Gym Exercises, Brain Gym]

Simple household objects can be recycled within your own home to use as the easiest and money efficient way to work on therapy activities! You just have to get creative! 

In Need of Additional Awesomesauce?  Here are some other related blog articles that we here at Kinetic Kids have created that may be of interest to you: Amazing Therapeutic Ideas to Use at Home! After keeping you hydrated and saving you time; your simple plastic water bottle can serve in many ways as a therapy tool!  Below are 8 different ways to get your creativity flowing on all the ways you can use this as tool.  1.       Fill the bottle with water, glitter, and confetti to serve as a visual sensory strategy for your child when they shake it up!

     

2.       Have your child fill the bottle with as many cotton balls or pom poms as they can fit to improve their fine motor coordination

     

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Life Hacks for your Child’s Morning Routine [Pediatric Occupational Therapy, Pediatric Therapy, Sensory Therapy, Bedwetting, Bedwetting Alarm, Bedwetting Alarms, Pediatric Speech Therapy]Mornings can be quite hectic if your child is unable to complete their morning routine without your constant assistance, guidance, or even directions in order to get out the door on time.  Poor fine motor skills, difficulty with body awareness, decreased balance, and poor attention are just a few reasons why morning routines could be hard for your child to get through on their own.

In Need of Additional Awesomesauce? 

Here are some other related blog articles that we here at Kinetic Kids have created that may be of interest to you:

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Pencil Grasp Strategies [Pediatric Occupational Therapy, Pediatric Therapy, Sensory Therapy, Sensory Gym, Pediatric Speech Therapy, Handwriting in Kids, Fine Motor Development]

If your child has difficulty with handwriting it could be an underlying issue with their fine motor skills.  They could be writing with too much pressure secondary to over-grasping their pencil, or their writing may be light pressure or hard to read on the page secondary to a weak pencil grasp.  It could be harder for them to form letters if they are holding their pencil incorrectly.  Also look out to see if your child has difficulty with other fine motor tasks such as fasteners, manipulating small toys, or opening food packages.

In Need of Additional Awesomesauce? 

Here are some other related blog articles that we've created here at Kinetic Kids that may be of interest to you:

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Is It Bad Behavior or Sensory Processing Disorder? [Pediatric Occupational Therapy, Anxiety, Pediatric Speech Therapy, Pediatric Therapy, Sensory Therapy, Sensory Processing Disorder, SPD, Sensory Integration]
Is It Bad Behavior or SPD? - Pediatric Occupational Therapy | Kinetic Kids, Inc. - YouTube

In Need of Additional Awesomesauce? 

Here are some other related blog articles that we've created here at Kinetic Kids that may be of interest to you:

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