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It could happen at a park, a grocery store or right in your own home. You are sitting there minding your own business when suddenly, someone near by becomes injured or ill or suffers from some other serious medical condition. A knowledge of First Aid can be valuable in keeping the condition from worsening and it can even save a life.

If you are caring for a cancer patient, you should be familiar with the basics of First Aid Training for Cancer. Here is an outline of what you will need to know.

Emotional First Aid for Cancer Patients:

When we think of First Aid, we usually think of it in terms of how it relates to physical well-being. But it can relate to mental wellbeing as well.

Cancer patients often suffer from depression and anxiety. In order to deal with these emotions, it is important to familiarize yourself with relaxation techniques. Remember, anxiety and depression can increase feelings of pain, so it is best to keep patients as calm as possible.

Anxiety can also lead to chest pains and hyperventilation. It is important to become familiar with the mechanisms, morbidity and management of chest pain in a panic disorder and breathing techniques used in hyperventilation.

Depression is also common in cancer patients and can cause some to become suicidal. It is a good idea to become familiar with the signs and symptoms that can lead to suicide and open a dialogue to prevent it from occurring.

Physical First Aid for Cancer Patients:

Physical symptoms can arise due to the cancer itself as well as the treatment used for cancer like chemotherapy. A common side effect of chemotherapy is a low white blood cell count that can put patients at risk for infection. Those caring for a cancer patient must be familiar with methods to keep infection under control including monitoring temperature and keeping facilities sanitary.

Cancer patients are also at high risk for bleeding and bruising due to their low platelet count. Caregivers should be aware of First Aid for cancer necessary to prevent control bleeding and bruising. Excessive blood loss can lead to hypovolemic shock and other serious conditions.

Dehydration is also a common cancer symptom. Primary care givers should be familiar with methods of first aid for cancer that can prevent and control dehydration and treat symptoms like diarrhea if they occur.

Chemotherapy is a toxin that can damage cancer cells, but it can also damage healthy cells in the body.

It can damage heart cells leading to cardiac toxicity and several heart conditions including arrhythmias, chest pain, cardiomyopathy and more. First aid training for cancer should include a knowledge of how to provide CPR in these situations. Caregivers should also be aware of the patient’s wishes when it comes to whether or not to resuscitate.

If you are caring for a cancer patient, it is necessary to take First Aid Classes and obtain a First Aid Certification to ensure you are familiar with all aspects of First Aid Training for Cancer. This way you will be able to provide care no matter what circumstances may arise.

To sum up, here are some key takeaways:
  • Cancer patients can experience both emotional and physical symptoms that can require First Aid.
  • Emotional symptoms can include depression and anxiety and can result in physical symptoms as well.
  • Physical symptoms of cancer can include dehydration, infection, bleeding bruising and heart conditions.
  • Caregivers should take First Aid Classes and get a First Aid Certification to prove they are skilled in First Aid Training for Cancer.

Good luck becoming certified in this important field of care.

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Check this video and learn the common ways to prevent from Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure:

How To Prevent Blood Borne Pathogens Exposure? - YouTube

Click here to learn more about the Bloodborne Pathogens Certification courses.
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Mandy needed a job. She loved working with children, and she knew that CPR training would be valuable in helping her land the position of her dreams. But with so little cash flow, she was reluctant to add the cost of taking CPR classes to her list of expenses. 

Many of us have been in situations similar to Mandy’s. If you are looking for CPR training to help you move forward in your career field, you may be wondering, how much does a CPR class cost? Well, read on to find out.

Types of CPR Classes

If you are thinking of taking a CPR class, the first thing you need to look about the type of training you looking for. In general, these are many types of CPR training classes offered by institutions. Some of those are:

Adult CPR: This is the simplest form of CPR and it can be learned in less than an hour. It covers basic techniques for adults, teens and children, eight years and older. It is good for those who want a general knowledge of CPR or care for an elderly adult. Automated external defibrillator (AED), training can also be included in the CPR learning course.

Pediatric CPR Classes: These are recommended for those that care for young children under the age of eight. Because young children are more delicate, the special technique needed while performing the CPR. You should be sure not to tilt the child’s head too far back and use only one hand or even just your fingers when performing chest compression.

CPR & First Aid Training: Some CPR classes will include first aid training and certification. If you choose to take this type of course, in addition to CPR, you will learn how to handle victim during the casualty, trauma or bleeding, burns and can even assist a choking person. AED training is often included as well.

Basic Life Support Classes for Health Care Providers: These CPR classes are required for all emergency medical personnel. They course covers the training of AED or common ventilation devices. If you are planning for a career in the medical field, these classes are a must.

How Much Do CPR Classes Cost?

Costs of CPR classes can vary according to the type of training classes you take and the price set by the organization offering the training. A basic adult course can start at around $20 while courses for children will be slightly higher, sometimes around $25. A course for medical professionals may be closer to $60.

However, if you are looking to save even more money, you may want to think about online CPR classes. This is a convenient way to get a CPR certification from the comfort of your own home. Those who take online CPR classes will also have the advantage of learning CPR while going at workplace.

Once you complete your online CPR classes, most institutions send online CPR certification which you can print directly from your computer. Many will also follow up by sending you a hard copy through the mail.

Key Takeaways

So, to recap, if you are looking for a CPR class and wondering how much they will cost, here are some things to keep in mind.

  • Consider what type of course you want to take. Basic courses for adults, courses for children, courses for medical professionals, CPR with AED and CPR & First Aid Training are all options you can choose from.
  • The price of your class will vary depending on the type of course you are taking and the service provider you are using.
  • Online CPR classes are generally less expensive than in person classes.
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It is always a good idea to be prepared in case of an emergency. Having a good understanding of how to perform CPR and BLS can be invaluable knowledge when it comes to saving a life.

Many of us are familiar with the basic concepts of CPRbut may not be as familiar with BLS. This article will explore both procedures so that you are familiar with the difference between BLS and CPR and have a better understanding of what each entail.

What is CPR?

CPR, or Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, is performed on people whose hearts have stopped beating. It is a good way to keep a person alive while waiting for medical emergency teams to arrive.

To perform CPR, one must compress the chest while blowing air into the mouth to keep the heart beating and to keep blood flowing through the body. This increases the person’s chance of survival and minimizes the risk of brain damage that can be a result of a loss of oxygen.

CPR is used in events when a person stops breathing. It is effective in dealing with cardiac or respiratory emergencies like a drowning or drug overdose. It can also be used to open airways in choking victims when the Heimlich maneuver is not helping.

CPR can be administered to infants, children and adults. However, for children and infants, a different protocol is involved. This is because children are less likely to need CPR for cardiac incidents and more likely to need it for respiratory failure or poisoning. Also, because children’s bodies are more fragile chest compressions should be performed by using the fingers rather than the palm of the hand.

What is BLS?

BLS, or Basic Life Support, is a more advanced life saving procedure. It is administered by public safety professionals, first responders, healthcare providers, paramedics and qualified bystanders. It is given to someone with a life-threatening illness or injury and can improve their chances of survival until they get to a hospital. It is typically used on someone in cardiac arrest or respiratory distress.

BLS involves three main components. These include an initial assessment, airway maintenance, and breathing and CPR.

BLS Certification and CPR Certification

In order to perform CPR or BLS safely and efficiently, it is important to take classes to get a certification. A CPR certification will be a good first step to getting your BLS certification. A BLS certification includes CPR trainingbut it is more intensive and complex.

Like CPR training, becoming BLS certified involves learning how to maintain an open airway and ensuring blood and oxygen keeps circulating through the body. However, there are more in-depth practices involved. Here you will also learn how to administer oxygen, the team approach to CPR and advanced airway management techniques.

CPR is a great thing to learn if you work with children or are a football coach or lifeguard. However, if you are looking for a career in the medical industry, BLS certification is advised and may even be necessary.

CPR and BLS are both valuable skills to learn. However, not many of us have time to attend classes. Online CPR certification and online BLS certification are great alternatives for those of us who lead busy lifestyles.

Online certification will allow you to learn life saving techniques at your own pace and at the location of your choice. Because the material is online, it can be reviewed as needed. It is a great way to learn these valuable skills while working around your hectic schedule.

CPR & BLS Re-certification

It is important to keep your knowledge of CPR and BLS fresh in your mind, especially if you are not in a profession where you need to practice these skills every day. That is why the American Red Cross requires a re-certification course be taken on a regular basis.

CPR certificates are valid for one year before a re-certification is needed and BLS certificates are valid for two years. Both CPR and BLS certification renewal is available online. In fact, most online courses will send out reminders to let you know when renewal is due as an added convenience.

So, to summarize the difference between BLS and CPR, BLS involves a more extensive curriculum of training that includes CPR but also goes beyond it. While CPR is recommended for those whoselife-saving skills could come in handy in their profession, BLS is more suited, and often required for those who work in the medical field specifically.

In any case, these are both valuable skills to learn and something everyone can benefit from knowing. We encourage you to find out more about these procedures and who knows, maybe one day you could end up saving a life.

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Below infographics shows the basic steps while performing the CPR on a child:

Learn more about online CPR training & certification courses at http://www.mycprcertificationonline.com/.
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Learn the different types of heart diseases common in men and women and the importance of CPR.

Different Types of Heart Diseases - CPR Select - YouTube

CPR Select offers quick, easy and affordable online cpr training and certification courses in the United States.
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The below graphical representation shows the symptoms and first aid tips for hypothermia:

Learn more about basic first aid training and certification courses at CPR Select.

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Check out the types of jobs that require CPR certification:

Jobs That Require CPR Certification - YouTube

To learn more about the CPR training and certification course, see http://www.mycprcertificationonline.com.
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The following graphical representation shows some of the best tips to keep your heart healthy in 2019.

Click here to learn more about quick, easy and affordable online CPR training and certification classes.

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A vital component of CPR is Rescue breathing, and may be part of your upcoming CPR certification or CPR course. Rescue breathing, however, can be daunting to some. Commonly known as “mouth-to-mouth resuscitation”, it has typically been part of every CPR class. It requires class participants to go mouth-to mouth on a victim of cardiac arrest, and breathe into their mouth while ensuring a clear airway. Most current guidelines recommend that rescuers perform two rescue breaths for every 30 corresponding compressions.

In cardiac arrest, a victim’s heart can stop beating and they may stop breathing. By utilizing rescue breathing, air immediately can be send into the victim which can keep them alive while waiting on first respondents to arrive.

There have been an updates to research as recent as 2010 which questioned the effectiveness of rescue breathing- particularly in situations where a mere bystander is delivering the CPR. It was found that rescue breathing by the layperson didn’t increase or improve the victim’s chance of survival. The bystanders simply feel uncomfortable putting their mouths on a stranger’s mouth to deliver the rescue breaths. Professionals have been trained to do this with a barrier mask, and naturally most bystanders coming upon an emergency situation do not have such masks on their person as protection. There have also been confidence issues-the bystanders not feeling confident administering CPR, and when they perform it, it was in many cases not done correctly.

The result of these findings have meant that CPR training programs nowadays are increasingly teaching a “hands-only” approach to CPR that is not only easier to perform, but doesn’t require the previously taught technique of rescue breathing. These new training programs for CPR teach that rescuers only have to push hard and fast in the center of the chest delivering compressions, to the tune of a song with the right kind of beat “Staying Alive” until emergency help arrives. This CPR technique is much more easily embraced by students taking CPR certification classes, and can mean the difference between survival and death.

Unknown Periods of Cardiac Arrest- If a victim didn’t fall to the ground in front of you and you discover them already in a state of cardiac arrest with no idea how long they’ve been in this state, they likely need the rescue breathing. The likelihood of blood being more depleted of oxygen increases the survival chances of patient suffering from the cardiac arrest.

Why is Rescue Breathing still taught in CPR Certification?

Rescue breathing is still a part of more detailed or comprehensive CPR training classes, particularly those directed at healthcare professionals. There is a valid reason for this; the rescue breaths are still the ideal mode of treatment for professionals to administer, even if bystanders are uncomfortable. In a hospital setting, this is still the treatment administered for cardiac arrest victims. There are also specific instances where hands-only CPR is essential- situations like respiratory failure (drowning, choking, severe asthma attacks, drug OD, and other trauma). Again, the blood will be low in oxygen and only using hands-only CPR would be pushing blood severely lacking oxygen around the patient’s body.

Knowing the difference between rescue-breathing and hands-on chest compression is an essential part of any CPR training and CPR certification- be sure to understand which technique needs to be part of your upcoming classes.

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