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Written by: Caroline Meyer

What is circumcision? 

This is a surgical procedure which is performed on boys and men. The foreskin covering the end of the penis is surgically removed. This is a double layer of skin and mucous membranes which is designed to protect the glans (head) of the penis from irritation and dryness. There are many arguments for and against circumcision.  

Circumcision reasons 

Sometimes circumcision may be required due to injury or infection but usually this is a voluntary procedure. Parents may choose to circumcise their baby boy so that he looks like his father and other family members. Others base their decision around cultural or religious traditions and requirements. Many parents choose circumcision as it is believed to be healthier and more hygienic and may possibly reduce risk of illness and disease later in life. 

For other parents they believe the child should have the right to make the decision themselves later in life. While others believe that the risk of complications outweigh the benefits for their child. For all parents, this should be a considered choice as it is a lifetime decision for their son. 

What do the experts say? 

The CDC (US Centre for Disease Control) says that parents should be given all the information required to make an informed choice. The recommendation is that the health benefits of circumcision outweigh the risks and that every parent should be able to make this choice for their child. Circumcision may reduce the risk of urinary tract infections, some STDs and even penile cancers. Circumcision can also reduce the risk of HIV infection by up to 60% when having sex with an infected female partner. There is no reduction in risk for male to male HIV transmission though. There is also no reduced risk of passing HIV on to a female partner if infected. There is a reduced risk of up to 45% of contracting genital herpes. The risk of infections such as bacterial vaginosis, HPV and trichomoniasis are lower in female partners of circumcised men. Most of these benefits can be attributed to the foreskin being at risk of tears during sex which allows for germs to enter the body easier. The foreskin also traps viruses and bacteria and allows them to flourish in a moist environment. 

Risks of circumcision 

Swelling and minor bleeding are the most common issues experienced. Other issues include the foreskin that remains sticking to the glans while healing. This is easily remedied in most cases. There is also a risk of scar tissue around the penis causing problems with sexual function, urination and hygiene. This may require further surgery to correct. As with most surgery, there is risk of infection. This is usually treatable with antibiotics and is generally mild. Severe complications can include sepsis, bleeding that persists and requires stiches to stem, partial amputation of the penis or removal of too much skin which can affect function and appearance. The penis may also not heal properly leading to shortening of the penis or scarring which could cause the penis to be shaped oddly or cause discomfort when erect. Most complications however are minor and quite rare with only around 1 in 500 circumcisions resulting in complications of any kind. If too much skin is left behind, it can also result in a second circumcision needing to be done once baby is 6 months old and this would be done under general anaesthesia. 

It is up to you as a parent to balance up the benefits and risks and make an informed decision on behalf of your baby boy. Discuss the matter with your doctor and other relevant persons before deciding. Some countries are calling for a ban on the practise claiming it violates the rights of children but for the most part, medical organisations still leave the decision up to the parents of the child.  

The post IS BABY CIRCUMCISION UNETHICAL?     appeared first on My Child Magazine.

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Written by: Caroline Meyer

Baby led weaning is not a new concept, but it has found its way into the mainstream conversation on feeding little ones a lot more over the past few years. In basic terms it means that you no longer feed your baby pureed food with a spoon when teaching them to start eating solids. Your baby eats the same foods that you do. 

What are the pros of baby led weaning? 

Babies are allowed to explore colours, textures, flavours and smells of a variety of foods. They develop eye-hand coordination getting the food to their mouths as well as playing with it. They improve dexterity, chewing skills and should hopefully be less picky eaters. They also learn to stop eating when they feel full, teaching self-regulation. They are not being force fed food. There are also benefits involved financially as you don’t have to buy little jars of food or fancy cereals. You can give baby the same food the rest of the family is eating for dinner, just in smaller portions. 

What are the cons of baby led weaning? 

There is a risk of your baby not getting all the nutrition they need. You have to ensure you prepare healthy options and include all food groups, so baby gets all the vitamins and minerals their growing bodies need. You also must make sure that baby is eating enough. Regular checks are needed to make sure baby is thriving. There is a minor risk of choking with pieces of food that are too large. Never leave baby unattended while eating. 

Tips for baby led weaning 

Don’t start too early. Your baby must be sitting properly in a highchair without being propped. They must be able to make chewing motions and be able to move food around in their mouths. They need to have good neck strength and be able to feed themselves. This could be any time between 6 and 9 months. Wait until your baby can chew well before starting the process. 

Don’t stop breastfeeding or giving formula. Your baby will still need this nutrition until they are 10 months to a year old. So, although you are giving them solids, you can’t actually wean until a later stage. 

Stay close. You can’t just put the food down in front of baby and walk away. You need to supervise and socialise with your child. It is even better if the whole family eats together. This also teaches baby about eating and eventually how to use utensils etc. 

Start with the basics. Softer foods such as cooked pasta, steamed vegetables, ripe fruit, shredded meat, flaked fish and puffed cereals are good starter foods. They give a bit of a range in colour, texture, flavours and so forth. Make sure you choose healthy options with high nutritional value. 

Keep the food small enough. Foods should be large enough for baby to be able to pick it up, but small enough to prevent choking if they try to swallow the whole piece without chewing. Stay away from raisins, grapes, hot dogs, raw vegetables, sticky foods such as peanut butter and popcorn that can be a choking hazard. Avoid foods that need utensils while baby is little. You can introduce spoons and other cutlery later. Choose foods that are fine warm or cold. Don’t give baby food that is too hot. Stay away from spicy food or food that is salted while they are small. 

Know there will be mess. Babies will pick up the food, throw it around, squish it, smear it and probably drop most on the floor that doesn’t end up in his hair. Place a plastic cloth or bag under the highchair to catch most of it. If you don’t have large bibs, try a kid’s art smock to reduce mess on the baby.  

The post BABY LED WEANING – GOOD OR BAD?      appeared first on My Child Magazine.

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Check out these great Fashion options that your kids are sure to love!

The post JULY 2019: FASHION appeared first on My Child Magazine.

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Toy Reviews to Help you Pick the Perfect Gift! 

The post JULY 2019: TOY REVIEWS appeared first on My Child Magazine.

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Q: After your devastating miscarriage, we are so happy for you and would love to congratulate you and the family on the birth of your son Elio! How has it been being a mum to a newborn again? 

A: Thank you. I didn’t think such joy was possible, nor did I anticipate the amount of urine I would get in my face. I’ve only ever operated tiny female genitals; this is a whole new world. But he’s obscenely cute, so all is forgiven. 

Q: Have your daughters taken on their big sister roles well?  

Oh God, yes. They’ve turned me into a creepy, well-intentioned stalker; every time I see one of them playing with him, bouncing him up and down or singing him a made-up song while he dribbles with delight, I stand silently and stare at them lovingly for as long as I can until they notice me. 

Q: Are you wanting anymore kids after Elio or is the shop shut so to speak?  

A: I have a 19-week old baby who sleeps only when he deems it appropriate. Now is not the time for me to answer that question! 

Q: What’s one thing you’ve forgotten is hard to do with an almost 5 mth old baby?  

A: Go to the toilet. Shower. Maintain an acceptable level of personal hygiene. Leave the house.  
 

Q: Even with a new baby in your life, you’ve decided to do a show. Can you please tell us about your show and what was your inspiration?  

A: It’s called ‘Rage and Rainbows’, which is a perfect summation of my personality, really. The seed for this show started at the school pick-up. I was asking other mums how they were, and even though they’d say they were fine, I was sensing… something. So I’d ask again, and the truth would come out. They weren’t fine. And the other women in my life weren’t fine either. There’s an undercurrent of rage for a lot of women right now. An anger that we’re finally letting ourselves feel, sparked by all sorts of things – current events, violence against women, glass ceilings, gender pay gaps, and closer-to-home; unfair division of domestic chores and child care, ridiculous expectations, being told to ‘smile more’… And then I see women struggling to express their anger. We swallow it, spend it, eat it, drink it, bottle it up (until suddenly, there’s a stabbing at the PTA meeting…). 

This show is about letting that anger out. It’s an unleashing, understanding, and ultimately joyful unloading of the rage. It has all original songs that I wrote with our glorious Eurovision star Kate Miller-Heidke, and there will be 12 classically trained dancing vaginas. You heard me.  

Q: Most new mum’s find it hard to get out of their PJ’s with a newborn let alone plan and prepare for a national tour. How did you do it?  

A: I did it in my PJ’s. Please don’t think that I’m some holier-than-thou inspirational example. Half this tour was organised before I went on maternity leave, and the rest of it has been pulled together with baby vomit on my shoulder. There have been days where I have been too exhausted/emotional/sore/distracted to do anything, and days where I’ve been on a roll. There’s also a team of people who help put the tour together, so I can’t take all the credit. I’m the boss of them, and the baby is the boss of me. So everyone just does what they can. 

Trust me: nobody has their shit together. Don’t ever think other mums are achieving more than you are. 

Q: We assume (which we know could make an ass out of us) that you have been rehearsing for a while. Can you tell us how long you took off after the arrival of Elio before you went back to work?  

A: I started putting this show together towards the end of last year, and most pieces of the puzzle were in place before the baby was due. I think there’s too much of a focus on when women go back to work after birth. To be honest, I was answering emails in the hospital, because that’s me. But I still have a few days every week of just spending time with my baby. There’s no right or wrong answer for going back to work, and my husband has never been asked the same question.  

Q: What are you most excited to share with the audience about your show?  

A: The dancing vaginas. They were very expensive. Never underestimate the cost of an express-posted vulva from New York. 

Q: Do you have any so called diva demands when on the road? What are they?  

A: I don’t call them diva demands, I call them Polite Requests Of The Venues That Have Hired Me To Perform And Specifically Asked If I Require Anything Backstage! 

But also: not really. I ask for a shot of scotch, and a bit of salami. What more could I possibly need?! 

Q: Will you be taking Elio on the road with you?  

A: Yes. But my Dad is in the band, and my Mum is coming on the road too, so it’s a family event. 

Q: We can’t imagine you have any spare time, however what’s your favourite thing to do when you get some time to yourself? 

A: Sleep. 

Q: Tell us some funny facts about yourself?  

A: I love candles. I collect owls. I don’t like following recipes. I have enough leopard print clothes to do an exclusive leopard print laundry load. I have three dogs. My favourite movie is Steel Magnolias.  I legitimately think they should bring Alf back, and I think the Punky Brewster reboot is a terrible idea. I’m really good at centering picture frames without using a spirit level, and guessing what the time is without seeing a clock. 

Q: Do you have a celebrity crush? Who and why?  

A: I like The Rock. I think we’d be good buddies. Our connection would be instant and deep. 

Q: What would you change your name to?  

A: Beyonce Knowles. For obvious reasons. 

Q: What’s your biggest pet peeve?  

A: When my husband doesn’t clean the kitchen as he goes when he cooks. 

The post Q&A WITH EM RUSCIANO appeared first on My Child Magazine.

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Written by: By Sheree Hoddinett 

Time. Where has it gone? The days turn into weeks and then months and before you know it, years have flown by. Especially with little kids. It all starts with breastfeeding, changing nappies, lack of sleep to start with and that was just the newborn days, which are long behind me! Now I’m dealing with school books, sight words, readers, uniforms and playground fun. And that’s just beginning of the school days, there are many, many years still ahead of me. I often think ahead to full time school life with both my girls in the classroom. It’s really not that far away. It’ll mean double the lunches, double the uniforms and double the “fun”, oh yay! Haha!  

It’s funny how there are days where you wish for time to speed up because you’re waiting for a special event or a visitor or something exciting or kids are driving you mental and you’re hanging out for their bedtime, woohoo!! But as they get older and lose some more of their baby looks or ways and you can’t help but wish for time to scale back just a teeny bit. I look at my girls and see how much they have grown and what they now accomplish and miss them as babies. I definitely don’t want to deal with all the other “fun” that comes with it of course. But they do grow up so quickly and you don’t realise until things don’t happen anymore, just how fast time does go. It feels a little bit more precious when you realise it and then the kids drive you crazy, yet again, and you think “yeah I’m good”, haha! 

I thought I wanted more kids. But I think now I’m very settled in dealing with the growing up stages and all the changes associated with that. Like crazy attitude for one. Why does a 5-year-old have so much sass, defiance and stubbornness??! Some might say she takes after her mother but I’m not taking the full blame on this one (stubbornness anyone??!!). But seriously, I thought I had years until I’d be copping some serious attitude. Boy (or should I say girl) was I wrong! I get the independence or wanting it anyway because she cracks it if something doesn’t work out for her. But the huffing and puffing, eye rolling, foot stomping, hands on hips and back chatting, they can be next level. Although the best revenge for me is putting a menacing look on my face and taking one step towards her because she drops to the ground so fast thinking she’s up for a smack, when I’m not going to do anything at all. Ahhhhh the joys of parenting, if only every situation resolved that easily. Well, it lasts for about 5 seconds and we’re back to where we started. Ever think “why do I bother?” 

They listen to me about maybe 70% of the time, which is not too bad. The other 30% I wonder what planet they’re on. Except if they hear something they want or that will benefit them and suddenly we’re best friends again. But I think that goes for kids of all ages, the percentages probably change significantly the older they get! Don’t worry I’m under no illusion that my kids aren’t going to give me grief as they get older, I’m prepared for the idea. Whether I’m prepared for what comes my way or gets thrown my way, remains to be seen, but that freight train is unstoppable! I know we can’t tar all kids with the same brush, but more often than not growing up tends to follow a certain pattern, just with varying degrees of uncertainty per child. 

But whatever they put me through (everything under the sun), I’m still glad they are mine and that they chose me to be their mum. Just don’t ask me to say that after a bad day/night/month or year perhaps! I’ll take their random hugs and acts of kindness anytime because let’s face it, there is nothing better than their little arms wrapping you up and saying “I love you Mummy” or “I’m sorry” or better yet “It’s okay, I’m here Mummy”. Well played master manipulator…I mean kiddo, you get me every time! 

Join me on my “lovely” journey of parenting two cheeky monkeys via my own blog at www.shereekim.com. It might be boring (at times) but it’s never dull, that much I can tell you! 

By Kylie Kaden (BSSc. Hons.) 

The post PAVING THE WAY  appeared first on My Child Magazine.

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Written by: Kylie Kaden

If you think skipping the dishes will make time for more action between the sheets, think again! Scrubbing at baked-on lasagne may seem like the ultimate romance-killer, but not pulling your weight around the house can lead to sacrificing more than you bargained for.  

We probably don’t need research to tell us that if you’re both working outside the home, doing your share on the domestic front will strengthen your relationship.  But linking it to more sex? Most would agree that watching your partner pull the hair from the shower drain or scrub the highchair free of pumpkin mash isn’t exactly a turn on.  A recent study into how chores shape the dynamics of marriage (Council of Contemporary Families, 2018) has found exactly that. Couples who share the housework enjoy a key benefit beyond a sparkling floor; more action in the boudoir.   

THE LINK BETWEEN SEX AND CHORES  
  • Part of the reason scouring those pots together improves your sex life might simply be putting you in close quarters, providing an opportunity to vent your day’s frustrations. Similarly, doing the shopping together gives you a chance to plan your week’s meals – considering each other’s needs and making decisions collaboratively, which are the building blocks to a solid relationship.  
  • Mopping the floor is no aphrodisiac, but housework might be a proxy for a general willingness to invest time in shared interests, a symbol of commitment to the relationship – a deeper bond. And there’s definitely a certain romance in working on the same task – to build a life together.   
  • It can be said that a clean, orderly home makes it easier to unwind, which can lead to more quality time together. But being pedantic about the state of the house can have the opposite effect –cutting off intimacy and reducing quality time. 
HAVE OUR EXPECTATIONS CHANGED?  

The gender revolution has shaped the way we arrange our lives. In earlier decades, couples who shared the chores reported less satisfying sex lives. The culture at the time (think ‘Mad Men’, with wives serving dinner in full hair and makeup the moment their husband arrives home) was the norm, and it seems, deviation from this expectation wreaked havoc in the bedroom. By the nineties (which also saw a hike in men’s contribution to the housework), the reverse was true, with couples who shared the domestic chores equally reporting more satisfying relationships. By the naughties, the division of housework in contributing to the relationship quality had even more impact.  

It seems our attitudes on who does what, and how much, are highly influenced by what is ‘expected’ of our generation. These attitudes impact on our view of our partners and their attractiveness. Today (despite still doing less around the house on average than their wives) men contribute twice the amount of housework than their fathers did, and triple the amount of child care and enjoy better marriages because of it (Social Forces, 2012). In fact, Stephanie Coontz, author of “Marriage, a History,” states having a partner who does their share around the house has become a bigger factor in women’s marital satisfaction than a man’s wage, or shared religious beliefs. (So, is this research suggesting little girls, nowadays, should dream of a man who can do the night feed over a knight in shining armour?) 

WHAT IS EQUAL CONTRIBUTION TO YOU?  

But it’s not quite that simple. It seems that when it comes to the division of labour, it was each partner’s perspective of fairness that mattered, and translated to more sex. When each partner felt the distribution of tasks was fair, both reported better sex (Journal of Marriage and Family, 2016).  For the record, sex frequency increased when men did 35-65% of the chores, but who’s counting? (We are, apparently!)  

Marriage, as with life, ebbs and flows through changes in circumstance that impact on our ability to contribute to the household chores.  Exhaustion from caring for young children and elderly parents, busy times at work, and even illness impact on our ability to chip in. So, it may not be a case of equal division of labour, but a fair division.  Discussing your expectations, particularly at time of change (new babies, new jobs) and how you hope to be supported is critical in ensuring neither party gets that ripped off feeling – which can’t be great foreplay for anyone.   

 
NOT ALL HOUSEWORK IS CREATED EQUAL 

It seems that particular tasks have a bigger impact on the relationship quality, with dishes and shopping coming up trumps. A message to men: the sexiest thing you can do is get your hands busy in the sink.  

Parent’s note: Interestingly, it was also found that increased time parenting had the reverse impact on a couple’s intimate relationship – so it seems too much time with the kids can reduce your energy for romance.  (So, if more love is your aim stick to the dishes?).  

Further tip: Research on this topic is unclear, however for some, sticking to traditional tasks led to greater sexual satisfaction. Therefore, blokes – mowing the lawn or changing the oil may just be what the doctor ordered to improve your love life.  

So, the jury is in – sharing is caring. As parents, you’re also modelling behaviours and teaching your kids what to expect, and what respectful relationships look and feel like.   

IS PUTTING THE DESIRE BACK IN YOUR MARRIAGE THAT SIMPLE?  

Of course, there are no guarantees that merely taking on a few chores will instantly solve all love life dilemmas.  Correlations in research don’t necessarily establish causation, and there will be marriages where no amount of sink scrubbing will make a woman find her husband more attractive – even if she does feel closer and happier with him. So, what could this link be based on?  

Other research suggests all this ‘friend zone’ egalitarian, respect business breeds benign indifference more than sexual heat. They argue that no one person can adequately fulfil the role of best friend, co-parent and passionate lover but some couples are happy to sacrifice heat in the bedroom for a solid marriage.  

So, while there are no promises pulling your weight in the laundry will make you irresistible between the sheets, it’s bound to make your marriage, and your wife, happier. And it certainly won’t hurt your chances. Happy wife, happy life?                                        

By Kylie Kaden (BSSc. Hons.)   www.kyliekaden.com.au

The post IS SHARING THE CHORES REALLY AN APHRODISIAC?   appeared first on My Child Magazine.

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Written by: Caroline Meyer

Potty training doesn’t have to be a time for headbutting with your child. This is a big step towards your little one being able to do things for themselves. They can gain confidence as they start the steps leading from being babies to being children with their own ideas and personalities. While every child is different, there are a few tried and tested ways to help make the experience easier for both parents and toddlers. 

Stay focussed 

Potty training will be demanding of your time and attention. You will need to be quite observant to get an idea of when your child needs to go. You will need to limit your distractions and be ready to take them to the bathroom at any point. You can also try taking them with you and having them sit on the potty when you go. You may be lucky and establish a routine early on. Just know that the more you multi-task in the early stages of potty training, the longer it is going to take. When you notice or even think they may be ready to go, tell them you are taking them to the potty, and then do so. Don’t ask if they want to go as the answer will more than likely be “No”.  

Offer a challenge 

You can race them to the bathroom. You can offer choices between the small potty or the toilet (big potty). If you are using the bathroom together, challenge them to do what they need to before you finish. Judge what works for you and your little one so they learn to hold it until they get to the potty and so that going to the bathroom does not become an unpleasant situation for everyone involved. You want to develop a good attitude about using the potty instead of it being a battle of wills. 

Remove the anxiety 

Sitting on the potty can be stressful for a little one. The anxiety may also result in them being unable to release. Allow them to sing songs, blow bubbles or even just chat to you. This will often cause them to relax enough to allow the sphincters to release.  

Don’t offer alternatives 

If you offer your toddler a diaper for pooping and use the potty for urination only, they will not learn to stop using diapers until they are quite a bit older. If they are able to know the feeling and ask for a diaper, they can use the potty instead. Offering alternatives will only make things more difficult and take a lot longer. Using a diaper for pooping is a bad habit that needs to be broken as soon as possible if you have already been doing this. 

Rewards not bribes 

You should not be bribing your little ones to use the potty.  You can however, offer rewards. Have a star or sticker chart and a clear jar containing a small reward such as a little toy or something they enjoy. Show them that they need to get a certain number of stickers to reach the reward level and give the reward only once the row of stars is filled up. Keep this to a reasonable number of stars per reward (around 5 to 10) so that they don’t become despondent. For some little ones, the sticker is a reward itself. Try and avoid using sweets and sugary treats as a reward as far as possible.  

Teaching toilet paper 

You will have to assist with toilet paper use for quite some time until they learn to wipe well on their own. Measure the toilet paper use right from the start, even when you are doing the wiping so they can learn. Draw or mark the toilet paper at 4 or 5 blocks, show them how to tear it off and let them do it. This will help prevent a toilet blocked with paper or unspooled toilet paper all over the bathroom.  

A stool for the big toilet 

If your little one is using the big toilet (with a toddler seat) instead of a potty, you will need to equip them with a stool. They will use the stool to help them get up on to the seat. If they need to poop, they can also use the stool to brace against. It also relieves some of the feeling of falling off and is more comfortable. 

Teach good hygiene 

Teach your toddler about flushing and washing up afterwards. If they are using a potty, you need to empty it into the toilet. You can let your toddler flush afterwards. If they are using the big toilet, you can allow them to flush once they are done as well. Let them move the stool to the basin so they can wash up. Make it fun so they want to wash their hands after they go. Sing a song, use fun soaps or handwash and let them wash their hands themselves. If they cannot reach the water, get an extender or make your own. If it is fun and not uncomfortable, it is more likely they will wash their hands than if it becomes a chore. 

Don’t rush it 

Potty training can take a week of constant monitoring and sometimes even longer for the habits to set in. Don’t get frustrated and don’t try and rush it. Just keep at it and it will eventually kick in. Once they get it, it all becomes worthwhile. 

Make it more fun 

Using the toilet can be made more fun by allowing the toddler to sit backwards, facing the toilet seat and allowing them to draw and colour on the seat with washable markers. You can check the markers for wash-ability on the seat first. Sitting backwards actually reduces accidental sprays and makes doing their business more fun. Wash the seat after they are done so it is ready for next time. You can also provide a book to read while on the potty. This will also help keep them focussed on the task at hand instead of popping off the potty to do other things. 

Out of the home 

While you are potty training, you may not be at home all the time. If the child goes to a caregiver for some time during the day, explain that you are potty training and allow them to continue where you left off. It is best to start on a weekend, so the child has at least 2 days of potty training before they go to someone else. You can take a travel seat with you for use at public toilets or friends’ homes or a portable potty with disposable bags to use in places where a toilet may not immediately be available. Try and keep the training unbroken over a period of 5 to 7 days to get the habits set in place. 

Don’t start too early. You toddler needs to be able to recognise the feeling of needing to use the bathroom and should be able to indicate to you in some way that they need to go. If you start too soon, this can lead to frustration and stress for both of you. Once the habits are in place, you can finally say goodbye to the diapers and your toddler can wear big girl or boy underwear instead. 

The post POTTY TRAINING TIPS  appeared first on My Child Magazine.

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Gummy vitamins may seem like an ideal choice when it comes to supplements to improve health. They taste good and children actually like to eat them. They look like candy and you will probably not have to coerce your child to eat one. 

While this may seem great on the surface, the truth is, compared to a normal chewable children’s vitamin supplement, gummies fall short of the mark. In general gummies contain far fewer vitamins and minerals and often the quantity of vitamins is also lower than the chewable vitamins. Due to the way gummies get the vitamins in to your child’s body, the vitamins have to be limited. Most gummies also do not include iron, which is often a mineral that kids are lacking. Most gummies also contain sugar which is not something kids generally need more of. Look for brands with no sugar added if possible.  

Gummies also tend to stick to the teeth, so it is recommended that you get your kid to brush their teeth after eating gummies. With the gummies looking and tasting like candy, kids may also be tempted in to eating more than they should. Gummies have to be closely monitored and kept in child-safe bottles, away from little hands. Treat the gummies in the same way you would medication. Overdosing on vitamins is not good for a child and can cause problems like kidney stones. Check the vitamins in the gummy before purchase, as it may not even contain the vitamins you are targeting. 

The best way to get all the vitamins and minerals into a child’s body is to ensure a balanced, healthy diet. Offer foods from all food groups, especially vegetables. Variety is key as it will help your child find foods they love and enjoy while getting the nutrients they require.  Most children don’t need vitamin supplements. It is only children that are very picky and won’t eat foods from certain groups that may be at risk of a deficiency of some kind. If a child does not eat foods from a specific food group for longer than 2 weeks, you may want to consult your doctor to check for a deficiency. If a supplement is not necessary, there is no need to give your child one, in any form. 

If you do decide to use a supplement due to a lack of specific vitamins and minerals in your child’s diet, read through the small print before purchase. Generally, chewable tablets trump gummies in many ways. You should also try and purchase vitamin supplements that do not contain added preservatives, artificial flavours and dyes. Values should not be higher than 100% of daily allowances. Don’t be fooled by fancy claims or interesting packaging. Do your research before buying vitamin supplements for your child. 

Reduce the need for supplements by having the whole family eat healthy, nutritious meals together. Dietary restrictions such as an intolerance for dairy or veganism may reduce the availability of some of the vitamins and minerals obtained from certain food groups. In cases such as these, you may want to supplement with a chewable or gummy vitamin for your child. It is up to you to screen the product adequately to ensure it contains the mineral or vitamin your child may be lacking and not have added extras that are harmful or of no benefit at all. 

Even for picky eaters, you can look at making smoothies, shakes, soups and other meals that can hide some of the foodstuffs they may not enjoy as much or find alternatives that offer the same nutritional value, that they may enjoy instead. There are so many options out there as well as many cookbooks on the internet today offering ways to prepare foods so that even picky eaters may want to give them a try.

The post ARE GUMMY VITAMINS GOOD FOR MY CHILD?  appeared first on My Child Magazine.

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