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Hello, and welcome to another episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast, with me Craig Barton.

Now, 12 months ago I did an experimental episode of the show where I asked a whole host of my favourite people one question: “what did you learn this year?”. The episode proved very popular, and the crowd have demanded more. So, never wishing to deprive my public, I have got the band back together again to answer… yes, the exact same question: “what did you learn this year?”. If it ain’t broke…

Before we dive into that, I need to say something very important. I invited 20 females to contribute to this episode, but unfortunately – for a variety of reasons – only 8 have chosen to do so. This is a real shame as it means we have a really male-dominated episode. Female representation is something that Jo Morgan and I have discussed at length, and something I actively try to tackle in the main episodes of the show. I am aware it is a huge issue, and I know that an episode like this does not help. I am not sure what the solution is – I did think hard about scrapping this episode – but I just wanted to make you, my dear listener know, that I am aware of the problem.

Anyway, I really hope that does not diminish your enjoyment of what really is a golden-nugget filled episode of the show, where you will hear from household names and those perhaps not so familiar as they reflect on what they have learned in the last 12 months. We have primary specialists, secondary specialists, maths teachers, English teachers, History teachers, headteachers, Chief Examiners, Scots, Americans. Australians, information designers, Behaviour Tsars, University Challenge winners, and Dylan Wiliam. The range of topics covered is incredible. My hope is that these reflections do for you what they did for me – cause you to pause and reflect, both on things that went well and did not go so well this year, and give you some food for thought and inspiration going forward.

1 Adam Boxer @adamboxer1
2 Alex Quigley
3 Amir Arezoo
4 Andrew Percival
5 Andy Lutwyche
6 Ben Gordon
7 Ben Rooney @benjrooney
8 Berkeley Everett
9 Bobby Segul
10 Chris McDonald @chrismcd53
11 Clare Sealy @ClareSealy
12 Dan Pearcy @DanielPearcy
13 Dan Rodriguez Clark
14 David Wees @davidwees
15 Dylan Wiliam @dylanwiliam
16 Ed Southall
17 Graham Cumming
18 Harry Fletcher-Wood
19 Jamie Thom
20 Jess Prior
21 Jemma Sherwood @jemmaths
22 Jo Morgan @mathsjem
23 Katharine Bribalsingh @Miss_Snuffy
24 Kris Boulton @Kris_Boulton
25 Luke Pearce @lukepearce85
26 Mary Myatt @MaryMyatt
27 Mel Muldowney @Just_Maths
28 Michael Pershan @mpershan
29 Naveen Rizvi @naveenfrizvi
30 Oli Cavigloli @olicav
31 Ollie Lovell @ollie_lovell
32 Paul Rowlandson
33 Richard Tock
34 Rob Eastaway
35 Stuart Welsh @maths180
36 Tim Roach @MrTRoach
37 Tom Bennett
38 Tom Button
39 Tom Francome @TFrancome
40 Tom Sherrington @teacherhead

Thanks so much for listening, and I really hope you enjoy the show!
Craig Barton

I am a maths teacher, currently teaching at Thornleigh Salesian College, Bolton, UK. Here are links to some of my work:
mrbartonnmaths.com
Mr Barton Maths Blog
Twitter: @mrbartonmaths
Diagnostic Questions
Mr Barton Maths Podcast
My book: How I wish I’d taught maths

The post Slice of Advice 2019: What did you learn this year? appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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***

This episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast is kindly sponsored by White Rose Maths.

You can find out more about their schemes of work, supporting materials and CPD offerings here

***

On this episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast I spoke to Tom Sherrington.

Tom is an experienced former Headteacher and teacher who now works as an educational consultant. He has worked in, and led comprehensives, grammar schools and international schools for 30 years, giving him an incredibly wide-range of experiences to draw upon. He is a popular speaker at events such as researchEd, is the creator of the very popular and thought-provoking blog, teacherhead.com, and is the author of one of my favourite education books of recent years, The Learning Rainforest: Great teaching in real classrooms. Regular listeners will know that this is Tom’s second appearance on the show – and if you haven’t already, I’d recommend you check out the first one where we cover the key ideas from The Learning Rainforest.

But Tom is back with a new book, and one that is making waves around the country. Indeed, some schools are buying copies for every single member of their staff. The book is Rosneshine’s Principles in Action, which takes Barak Rosenshine’s Principles of Instruction and showcases what they might look like in the classroom.

Bt we didn’t just stick to discussing the ideas from the book, because when you get chance to speak to someone like Tom, the opportunity to delve into other fascinating areas of education proves irresistible.

So, in a wide ranging conversation, Tom and I discussed the following things, and plenty more besides:

  • What has Tom learned since we last spoke?
  • What has he changed his mind about?
  • What are some of the key features of successful schools that Tom has worked with over the last year?
  • Then we dive into all things Rosenshine:
  • What is Tom’s favourite principle?
  • Which one is the easiest to put into practice right away?
  • Which feels most counter-intuitive?
  • Is there a danger that these principles could be misused in schools?
  • And finally: will we look back one day on these principles in the same way we now look back at learning styles?

I loved this conversation. I always get loads from my conversations with Tom, and I am so pleased I had the opportunity to go deep into this fascinating area of teaching.

On Twitter, Tom is @teacherhead
Tom blogs at teacherhead.com,
Tom’s books are The Learning Rainforest and Rosenshine’s Principles in Action

***

My usual plugs:

  • My book, “How I wish I’d taught maths”, available from all good and evil book stores
  • If you are interested in sponsoring an episode of the show, then drop me a line at mrbartonmaths@gmail.com
  • You can help support the show via my Patreon page at patreon.com/mrbartonmaths
  • I have a new podcast series called Inside Exams, where I go behind the scenes of an awarding body asking the questions you want answers to. You can listen to the shows here: aqa.org.uk/inside-exams-podcasts
  • Jo Morgan and I are running a series of workshops in October 2019 called Marvellous Maths. You can find out the details here.

***

Thanks so much for listening, and I really hope you enjoy the show!
Craig Barton

I am a maths teacher, currently teaching at Thornleigh Salesian College, Bolton, UK. Here are links to some of my work:
mrbartonnmaths.com
Mr Barton Maths Blog
Twitter: @mrbartonmaths
Diagnostic Questions
Mr Barton Maths Podcast

The post Tom Sherrington: Rosenshine’s Principles in Action appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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***

This episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast is proudly sponsored by Boss Maths.

Check out their outstanding website here: bossmaths.com

***

Hello, and welcome to another episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast, with me Craig Barton.

This is another Conference Takeaways podcast, this time from the 2019 MEI Maths Conference in Bath. I am reunited my regular Conference Takeaways co-host Jo Morgan (@mathsjem on Twitter and the creator of the online bible of maths resources, resourceaholic.com) to share our key thoughts and takeaways from the selection of workshops we (or, more accurate in this case, Jo), was lucky to see.

We discuss the following things, and much more besides:

  • We discuss “they best keynote ever”… the night before I am going to give mine
  • How do 10 year olds and 18 year olds approach the same percentage questions?
  • Jo explains why there is a calculator crisis in the country… before showing us some lovely calculator tricks
  • We run the risk of being controversial with a discussion on manipulatives
  • Finally, we discuss writing schemes of work in terms of ordering and workload

I really hope you find this discussion useful, whether you attended the conference or not. Thanks so much for Jo for taking the time to talk to me.

***

My usual plugs:

  • My book, “How I wish I’d taught maths”, available from all good and evil book stores
  • If you are interested in sponsoring an episode of the show, then drop me a line at mrbartonmaths@gmail.com
  • You can help support the show via my Patreon page at patreon.com/mrbartonmaths
  • I have a new podcast series called Inside Exams, where I go behind the scenes of an awarding body asking the questions you want answers to. You can listen to the shows here: aqa.org.uk/inside-exams-podcasts
  • Jo Morgan and I are running a series of workshops in October 2019 called Marvellous Maths. You can find out the details here.

***

Thanks so much for listening, and I really hope you enjoy the show!
Craig Barton

I am a maths teacher, currently teaching at Thornleigh Salesian College, Bolton, UK. Here are links to some of my work:
mrbartonnmaths.com
Mr Barton Maths Blog
Twitter: @mrbartonmaths
Diagnostic Questions
Mr Barton Maths Podcast

The post Conference Takeaways: MEI Maths Conference 2019 appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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***

This episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast is kindly sponsored by The Open University.

You can find out more about their Master of Science degree in Mathematics here or email Maths-MSc@open.ac.uk for more information.

***

On this episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast I spoke to Jonny Griffits.

Jonny is a legend of the maths teaching world. I first became aware of his work in my NQT year when I came across his RISPs activities – standing for Rich Starting Points for A Level Maths. I then had the pleasure of hearing Jonny speak at an early TSM Conference in Oundle, which was hosted by Douglas Butler. And I have been a fan of Jonny’s work ever since. I was then lucky enough to share a drink with him at the 2019 joint ATM / MA Conference, where I quickly realised two things:
RISPs was only scratching the surface of Jonny’s story
I had to get him on the podcast

So, in a wide ranging challenging and fascinating conversation, Michael and I discussed the following things, and plenty more besides:

  • Jonny’s life as a rock star, and how that type of performance is very different to what a teacher needs to do
  • We talk about an old podcast favourite – the SMILE resources – and Jonny’s experience with them
  • I ask Jonny about some of the challenges of teaching in a 6th form college compared to teaching in an 11-16 or 11-18 school?
  • Then we go deep into task design, as I ask Jonny to choose 3 tasks – all of which are available in the show notes – and describe why he likes them and how he would use them. And there are some crackers!
  • We then venture into uncharted territory when we discuss textbook design, and what makes a good exercise
  • Before Jonny ends with some reflections and a wonderful Big 3

Amidst all the incredible insights about task design and pedagogy in general, I think the thing that struck me most about this conversation was when Jonny describes, with incredible honesty and clarity, his early struggles as a teacher and the importance of our state of mind and mental health. On a selfish level, I found this part of the conversation incredibly useful to help me think about some of my own struggles, and I sure other listeners will too. I think this is one of the most important conversations I have had.

On Twitter, Jonny is: @therispguy

Jonny Griffith’s Big 3
1. Mathigon
2. NRICH
3. Mark McCourt’s blog

Links from Jonny:

www.risps.co.uk  – the original risps site. 

www.further-risps.co.uk – the new further risps resources are for sale here.

www.denominator.co.uk – my classroom memoir, featuring past writing for the TES and for Mathematics Teaching. 

https://www.atm.org.uk/Shop/KS5/The-Proving-Ground—an-introduction-to-mathematical-proof-e-book/DNL137  – my The Proving Ground ebook, an introduction to proof.

www.making-statistics-vital.co.uk – my A Level Statistics website.

www.carom-maths.co.uk - my ‘Bridging from A Level to University’ website.

www.jonny-griffiths.net – my website.

And here are the tasks we discussed:

1. Max box – you are given a square sheet of thin metal 1m by 1m. You create a box with no lid by cutting off equal squares of side x from the corners and folding up the sides. What choice of x gives the maximum volume for the box?

 
2. The Fifteen game for two players. You put nine cards numbered from 1 to 9 on a table, and take it in turns to pick a card. The winner is the first person to have exactly three cards in their hand adding to 15.

Possible game A: 1, B: 5, A: 8, B: 6, A: 4, B: 3, A: 9, B: 7, B wins (3,5,7)

3. Can anyone tell the difference between Coke and Pepsi?

 
4. Proving root 2 is irrational (couple of methods).

***

My usual plugs:

  • My book, “How I wish I’d taught maths”, available from all good and evil book stores
  • If you are interested in sponsoring an episode of the show, then drop me a line at mrbartonmaths@gmail.com
  • You can help support the show via my Patreon page at patreon.com/mrbartonmaths
  • I have a new podcast series called Inside Exams, where I go behind the scenes of an awarding body asking the questions you want answers to. You can listen to the shows here: aqa.org.uk/inside-exams-podcasts
  • Jo Morgan and I are running a series of workshops in October 2019 called Marvellous Maths. You can find out the details here.

***

Thanks so much for listening, and I really hope you enjoy the show!
Craig Barton

I am a maths teacher, currently teaching at Thornleigh Salesian College, Bolton, UK. Here are links to some of my work:
mrbartonnmaths.com
Mr Barton Maths Blog
Twitter: @mrbartonmaths
Diagnostic Questions
Mr Barton Maths Podcast

The post Jonny Griffiths: RISPs, problem solving and mental health appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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On this episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast I spoke to Chris McGrane.

Chris is a former Principal Teacher of Maths up in sunny Scotland, and is now the Maths Lead in Scotland for La Salle Education. Now, long-time listeners will have heard Chris’ dulcet tones on a the researchEd Scotland Conference Takeaways podcast last year.

I am a huge fan of Chris. As I have mentioned previously on this podcast, Chris is a brilliant user of Twitter to pull in views on his ideas from a wide-range of practitioners. Like me, he has undergone something of a transformation in his teaching and thinking about learning, but we have gone off in slightly different directions, which hopefully makes for an interesting conversation.

So, in a wide ranging challenging and fascinating conversation, Chris and I discussed the following things, and plenty more besides:

  • Chris describes his favourite failure, and what he learned from the experience
  • Chris gives us an overview into how his approach to teaching has changed and why
  • Then we go deep into task design, with Chris describing how his approach to both creating tasks and choosing tasks to use has changed
  • Chris then takes us through 3 of his favourite tasks, describing why he likes them and how he uses them. And images of these tasks are available in the show notes so you can play along at home
  • We then turn our attention to the importance of classroom talk, and how as teachers we can help our students get better at conversing
    And then it all kicks off as we discuss a few things that we may well disagree on, including atomisation and minimally different problems

I loved this conversation. I find it fascinating to speak to someone who has been teaching roughly the same time as me and who has undergone similar journey in terms of their ignorance of educational research, and yet we have reached slightly different conclusions. And I will be reflecting on these differences in the Takeaway section at the end of this episode.

On Twitter, Chris is: @ChrisMcGrane84
Chris blogs at: chrismcgrane.blogspot.com
His website is: startingpointsmaths.blogspot.com

Chris McGrane’s Big 3
1. Thinking mathematically – John Mason
2. Median by Don Steward
3. STEM website

The tasks we discussed:

From Chris:

From John Mason

From NRICH:

From me

***

My usual plugs:

  • My book, “How I wish I’d taught maths”, available from all good and evil book stores
  • If you are interested in sponsoring an episode of the show, then drop me a line at mrbartonmaths@gmail.com
  • You can help support the show via my Patreon page at patreon.com/mrbartonmaths
  • I have a new podcast series called Inside Exams, where I go behind the scenes of an awarding body asking the questions you want answers to. You can listen to the shows here: aqa.org.uk/inside-exams-podcasts
  • Jo Morgan and I are running a series of workshops in October 2019 called Marvellous Maths. You can find out the details here.

***

Thanks so much for listening, and I really hope you enjoy the show!
Craig Barton

I am a maths teacher, currently teaching at Thornleigh Salesian College, Bolton, UK. Here are links to some of my work:
mrbartonnmaths.com
Mr Barton Maths Blog
Twitter: @mrbartonmaths
Diagnostic Questions
Mr Barton Maths Podcast

The post Chris McGrane: Task design and changing your mind appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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On this episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast I spoke to Michael Pershan.

Michael is a teacher of mathematics in New York. Yes we are going global with this one… although budget restrictions meant I still recorded my end of the conversation in Blackburn. Michael is also one of my all-time favourite bloggers, creating the wonderful Rational Expressions, Math Mistakes and Teaching with Problems. I have been wanting to get Michael on the show for the last couple of years, and I am delighted to report that it was well worth the wait. This is a belter of an episode.

So, in a wide ranging challenging and fascinating conversation, Michael and I discussed the following things, and plenty more besides:

  • Why is changing schools so hard?
  • What role does the expectation of students play?
  • For the remainder of the first half of the conversation, after successfully overcoming our mutual language barrier, Michael describes his process for planning a lesson on subtraction
  • Then the big one – what do Michael’s Example-Problem Pairs look like (spoiler alert: they are different to mine!)
  • How soon into the process of introducing a concept would Michael include an incorrect example?
  • How does Michael provide whole class feedback?
  • Michael argues that many problem solving strategies have descriptive, but not prescriptive validity. What does he mean by this?

I think the second half of this conversation – when we really dive into worked examples – is one of my favourites of all time. I’ll dig into this (and much more) in my Takeaway at the end of the episode, but needless to say it has got me thinking really hard about my own approach.

On Twitter, Michael is: @mpershan
Michael’s website is: michaelpershan.com
He blogs at: Rational Expectations, Math Mistakes and Teaching with Problems

Michael Pershan’s Big 3
1. SERP – Algebra by Example
2. New Visions Math Curriculum – Instructional Routines
3. Art of Problem Solving – Alcumus 

***

My usual plugs:

  • My book, “How I wish I’d taught maths”, available from all good and evil book stores
  • If you are interested in sponsoring an episode of the show, then drop me a line at mrbartonmaths@gmail.com
  • You can help support the show via my Patreon page at patreon.com/mrbartonmaths
  • I have a new podcast series called Inside Exams, where I go behind the scenes of an awarding body asking the questions you want answers to. You can listen to the shows here: aqa.org.uk/inside-exams-podcasts
  • Jo Morgan and I are running a series of workshops in October 2019 called Marvellous Maths. You can find out the details here.

***

Thanks so much for listening, and I really hope you enjoy the show!
Craig Barton

I am a maths teacher, currently teaching at Thornleigh Salesian College, Bolton, UK. Here are links to some of my work:
mrbartonnmaths.com
Mr Barton Maths Blog
Twitter: @mrbartonmaths
Diagnostic Questions
Mr Barton Maths Podcast

The post Michael Pershan: Example-Problem Pairs, problem solving and moving schools appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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***

This episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast is proudly sponsored by LIME.

LIME stands for Leaders Improving Maths Education. It is completely free Maths specific CPD which started in Oldham in 2014 and now has Lime Oldham, Lime Blackburn and LIME Salford
For further information please go to limecpd.co.uk and click on events to find the sessions local to you
Follow us on twitter @LIMEOldham, @LIMEBwD and @limesalford

***

On this episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast I spoke to Mark McCourt.

Mark has done it all, being a former classroom teacher, AST, Head of Department, Senior Leader, Headteacher, Ofsted Inspector, Director of the NCETM, Founder of the Teacher Development Trust, creator of emaths, and now CEO of La Salle Education, which amongst other things give us the wonderful MathsConfs

Now, regular listeners of the show will be aware that this is Mark’s second appearance on the podcast. During the first – back in 2016 – he made quite a few outlandish claims, my personal favourite of which was that he had never marked a book in his life. And having listened back to this conversation, I am pleased to report that he was just getting warmed up.

So, in a wide ranging challenging and fascinating conversation, Mark and I discussed the following things, and plenty more besides:

  • Mark gives us an overview of this history of Mastery, and chastises me for claiming it is being talked about more in the last few years than at any other point in my career. And, dear listeners, you will be pleased to know this is not the only time Mark chastises me in this conversation.
  • Mark introduces the concept of a Learning Episode, and the 4 phases that comprise it
  • We discuss Example-Problem Pairs, Low-Stakes Quizzes and Variation Theory
  • What is bridging, and why am I not convinced by it?
  • Then we play a game of “tell us your thoughts on”, and Mark is in sparkling form as we discuss everything from Starters, to mock exams, to schemes of work.

Mark is one of my favourite educationalists. I always learn something, whether I am listening to him run a workshop, enjoying a beer with him, or reading his tweets. I find hm challenging… mostly in a good way. I loved this conversation, and I hope you will enjoy it too.

On Twitter, Mark is: @EmathsUK
Mark blogs at emaths.co.uk/index.php/blog
His book, Teaching for Mastery is available here

***

My usual plugs:

***

Thanks so much for listening, and I really hope you enjoy the show!
Craig Barton

I am a maths teacher, currently teaching at Thornleigh Salesian College, Bolton, UK. Here are links to some of my work:
mrbartonnmaths.com
Mr Barton Maths Blog
Twitter: @mrbartonmaths
Diagnostic Questions
Mr Barton Maths Podcast

The post Mark McCourt: the return! Teaching for mastery appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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Hello and welcome to another episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast – a show where I interview people from the world of education who interest and inspire me.

Now, something a bit different this time around.

I have been recording a brand new series of podcasts called Inside Exams where I go behind the curtain of the awarding body, AQA, to find out how decisions are made about the GCSE exams our students sit. Each episode, I interview someone from AQA about a specific topic, and then a practising teacher to see what impact these decisions have in the classroom and what lessons the rest of us can learn. Essentially, it is my attempt to become the Louis Thoeroux of education podcasts.

Episodes in Season 1 include controversial questions, catering for SEN students, the role of multiple choice questions, using mark schemes, grade boundaries, and more. And I am delighted to say that I can share the first episode in the series, which is all about the language used in exam questions, with you here.

Now, regular listeners to the Mr Barton Maths Podcast be warned – these episodes are a mere 30 minutes long. Yes, 30 minutes! I have barely finished my introduction by then. But we pack a bunch of good stuff in there.

Anyway, I really hope you enjoy this series. It is called Inside Exams I am dead proud of it, and I learned tonnes.

These are not maths specific shows – indeed, they have me talking to English teachers, Sciences teachers, and all sorts – it was a struggle! So, please tell your non-maths colleagues about the series. nd even if you do not follow AQA in your subject, I think there is plenty in here of interest.

You can subscribe to get all the episodes by searching for Inside Exams wherever you get your podcasts, or following these links:

Inside Exams home page

iTunes

Spotify

Google Podcasts

Stitcher

Thanks so much for listening, and I really hope you enjoy the show!
Craig Barton

I am a maths teacher, currently teaching at Thornleigh Salesian College, Bolton, UK. Here are links to some of my work:

mrbartonnmaths.com
Mr Barton Maths Blog
Twitter: @mrbartonmaths
Diagnostic Questions
Mr Barton Maths Podcast
My book: How I wish I’d taught maths

The post Inside Exams – Episode 1: Language appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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Hello, and welcome to another episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast, with me Craig Barton.

This is another Conference Takeaways podcast, this time from Day 2 of the ATM/MA 2019 Conference in Warwick. I am reunited my regular Conference Takeaways co-host Jo Morgan (@mathsjem on Twitter and the creator of the online bible of maths resources, resourceaholic.com) to share our key thoughts and takeaways from the selection of workshops we were lucky to see.

We discuss the following things, and much more besides:

  • The Primary Maths Competition
  • Visual representations of algebra
  • Mike Askew’s Presidential address
  • Problem solving with NRICH

I really hope you find this discussion useful, whether you attended the conference or not. Thanks so much for Jo for taking the time to talk to me.

Links to the resources discussed in the NRICH session are here
Here are a few photos from the Algebra session:

The post Conference Takeaways: ATM/MA 2019 Conference – Day 2 appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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Hello, and welcome to another episode of the Mr Barton Maths Podcast, with me Craig Barton.

This is another Conference Takeaways podcast, this time from Day 1 of the ATM/MA 2019 Conference in Warwick. I am reunited my regular Conference Takeaways co-host Jo Morgan (@mathsjem on Twitter and the creator of the online bible of maths resources, resourceaholic.com) to share our key thoughts and takeaways from the selection of workshops we were lucky to see.

We discuss the following things, and much more besides:

  • Lesson observations
  • Teaching the same lesson twice
  • Listening to learners
  • Ofsted consultation
  • Maths vocabulary that is no longer used
  • And much, much more!

I really hope you find this discussion useful, whether you attended the conference or not. Thanks so much for Jo for taking the time to talk to me.

The link to Jo’s blog post on the Shell Centre resources is here

The post Conference Takeaways: ATM/MA 2019 Conference – Day 1 appeared first on Mr Barton Maths Blog.

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