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We are delighted to introduce our fifth and final inspiring interviewee, Shenali, for our series ‘God-Colours’. Shenali has such a heart for seeing Jesus move in the lives of those around her, and a real attitude of kindness towards those she’s ministering to. I pray we would be encouraged by how God has moved in her life and by her advice for living out faith.

Shenali's Story (God Colours: Everyday Faith from Everyday Girls) - YouTube

It was such a privilege to hear Shenali talk about what faith lived out looks like for her. Seeing the value of the church in her life - and how that is key to establishing a community which fills us up to send us out - is so powerful.

“What defines my faith is really seeing God’s character demonstrated outwardly in the way we live our lives”

Shenali really clearly speaks of some key traits which help us to outwardly demonstrate our faith:

1.   Integrity – “having unwavering discipline on our moral principles and values in Christ”.

I think whatever age we are and whatever we do day to day, holding integrity close can really show our faith to those around us. The idea that living out our faith requires discipline is also a helpful reminder that we need to train ourselves to stand firm in our values.

2.   Generosity – “We need to be generous in our living”

Shenali helpfully points out that at different stages of our lives, we might have different capacities to be generous in different areas. Often we associate generosity with finances, but our time and skills can also be areas in which we can be generous.

For me, I have recently been challenged that generosity won’t always be recognised or acknowledged, but that Jesus is interested in the heart behind it. I’m reminded of the Widow’s Offering in Mark 12:41-44, where the Widow gives all she has: even though she puts in less money, she has actually put in more.

3.     Kindness – “Kindness cannot be faked, kindness has to come from the heart”

For Shenali, kindness is another marker of living out our faith. I love the observation that kindness has to be from the heart, and it has to be authentic. If we need to learn what kindness looks like we can look at the way Jesus lived his life, reaching out to the poor and the marginalised. Kindness is contagious as well. I think of my commute home on the tube when I sometimes see someone asking for money for a hostel along the carriages. Faces look down and people shake their heads. But if one kind person reaches for their purse, it can spark others to follow. It can sometimes take one act of kindness to lead to a chain reaction.

“Sometimes God has so much more in store for us than we can ever imagine”

Another lesson we learn from Shenali’s experiences of living out her faith is how to show our faith in the workplace. The wisdom Shenali shares is that it is often of greater value to first invest in our colleagues, friends and family, to show a willingness to understand them and build trust. When we know them better and we have heard their stories and their experiences, then conversations and opportunities might be more likely to happen.

“If we seek God first, through the peace that He gives us, we can be assured that we are on the right track”

Shenali speaks of how God has the very best in store for us and doesn’t want us to settle. She uses a brilliant metaphor of us having to walk along what might look like a difficult road to get to the corner, in order to peer around and see what lies ahead. I’m encouraged that when we don’t know where we should be going, we can humble ourselves and give those conversations to God. Something Shenali models so visibly is the simple questions we can ask God – ‘Where are you leading me?’ ‘What should I do Lord?’. In those requests and conversations, we can find peace and we show that we trust in our Creator.

Shenali

Having been born in Sri Lanka, raised in rural Australia, then completing university in Melbourne, Shenali has valued diversity of thought and culture from a young age. She is interested in community impact and supporting the mission of the church and its leaders. Shenali is a Civil Engineer, resides in London, and attends Holy Trinity Clapham.

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We are delighted to introduce our fourth inspiring interviewee, Frankie, for our series ‘God-Colours’. Frankie has recently finished University and speaks of her experiences of living out her faith as a student. Her zest for life and utter passion to for friendship is such an example of faith lived out. 

It has been so empowering to hear from Frankie about how she has lived out her faith at University and I have no doubt when she enters into the world of work, her faith will continue to shine. 

“I think my faith is defined by choosing to follow Jesus no matter what”

Frankie really captures the difficult yet simple call for us to follow Jesus “no matter what”. This is a real challenge and at times we can be tempted to listen to the world but when we choose to follow Jesus, we are trusting in His ways. We don’t have to guess what it looks like to live a life for Christ because we have His life as a perfect example.  

“When you’re making a decision, it’s about always consulting Jesus first”

We learn from Frankie that following Jesus no matter what looks like being in daily conversation and relationship with Him. I love the idea that when we make a decision, we should instinctively consult Jesus first. It reminds me in some ways of when I was younger and I would want to invite a friend round to my house after school. I would plot with my friend how we would orchestrate the conversation after school to convince my mum they could come over. However my mum would always have the final say so consulting her was the most important part of that decision! In a similar way, when we make a decision, the opinion which matters the most is God’s. This reminder to communicate with Jesus first is invaluable for discerning how we act and what choices we make and when we are doing it daily, in the small things, it prepares us for when we are making bigger decisions. It sets a precedent for intimacy and reliance on Him in all we do.

“I think for me a key part of my faith is fellowship”

Something else which strikes me about the way Frankie lives out her faith is the significant role fellowship plays in her life. She highlights that a key part of sustaining our faith is to have fellowship with other Christians. This might look different for different people but it could look like having a group of friends or family members who will pray for you, give you advice or hold you accountable. It is these relationships, which are often formed at church or Christian Union, which can help develop and encourage us in our walks of faith.

 

 “Take a break from studying and go and take a prayer walk”

University is often incredibly busy, especially during exams. Frankie explains that for her, taking a break from studying and going on a prayer walk along the canal was a restful way to deepen her faith and fix her eyes on Jesus in the midst of busyness. She describes praying over the people she walks past without knowing their situations. I think this is really powerful as it shows that the compassion and love God has for His people can be extended through us if we seek to see people as God sees them. We also hear that a way to be a light to friends, even if they don’t know we are doing it, is to have open ears. This looks like loving your friends exactly as they are and regardless of their situations. God can do miraculous things when we commit to listening and praying for our friends- it’s the most loving and powerful thing we can offer them.

 

“Be authentic about the way you act”

“Choosing to live out your life in the way that Jesus would want you to”

 “Faith lived out means being who Jesus wants you to be”

“When I think of Jesus, I just think of joy”

Frankie

Frankie is 21 years young and has just finished University. Originally from Tamworth (just outside of Birmingham), she went to University in Chester and will be staying in the North West for the foreseeable future. She loves to dance, spend time with friends, go on long walks and eat pizza.

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Intro…

Hello

Hello

Hell Lucy

Lucy…

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We are delighted to introduce our third inspiring interviewee, Flo, who speaks of how she lives out her faith at school and beyond. We pray Flo’s desire to see her friends come to know Jesus and her approach to living distinctively builds you up and encourages you today.

Flo blog - YouTube
“I would probably just say Jesus defines my faith”

Having grown up in a Christian family, with three older sisters, Flo encourages us to ensure that our relationship with Jesus is personal and that we take ownership of our faith rather than living it out through others.

Flo has been hugely encouraged and inspired by witnessing the faithfulness of God working in her sisters’ lives, and now it seems that, from hearing about the work she now does with children in her church group, she is now quite possibly for many of them, the person they look up to. I wonder who you might be inspiring? Who looks up to you? I pray that we would be distinctive so that our friends and family, whether believers or not, might be inspired and encouraged by the way we actively live out our faith.



Flo also reminds us that, though we might be challenged by people:

“God is so big, He doesn’t need you to defend Him”

“Having Jesus in my life means that although I am still stressed about my exams at school, I can just take a deep breath and know that there’s a plan for me and I will be okay”

Flo highlights her favourite Bible verse (1 Peter 5:7)

“Cast all your anxiety on Him because He cares for you”

It has acted as a reminder for her during revision for exams that God has a plan for us and is right there by our side through the difficult times.

Flo reminds us that we have a God who is in control and uses all circumstances and situations even when we cannot imagine how He could. We have the responsibility to live for Him and be distinctive but we cannot place the whole burden on ourselves; God can and will use other people in someone’s journey.

“Faith lived out means applying what you have learn on a Sunday to the rest of your week”

“Being a light for Jesus looks likes not being afraid to BE like Jesus as He was distinctive“

Flo

Flo is a 17 year old currently in Year 12 and lives in north London studying Psychology, Biology and History. She loves her church youth group, school Christian Union, theatre group and Parkrun (although parkrun is more endured than loved!) She is often found chatting or drinking hot chocolate which she is an expert at making.

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We are delighted to introduce our second inspiring interviewee, Siri, for our series ‘God-Colours’.

Siri shares with us her experience of living in different places around the world, the hospitality modelled by her parents, the challenges and privileges of living out her faith as a teacher and what navigating through life with God looks like for her. We totally admire her honesty of the highs and lows of journeying with God and pray her example of living out faith inspires others!

Siri blog - YouTube

It has been so refreshing to hear from Siri about what faith lived out looks like for her. In her role as a teacher, it strikes me that the little ways she can encourage her students in the classroom and colleagues in the staff room will be having a far deeper impact than she could imagine. It is a really important reminder from Siri that at the heart of living distinctively is Jesus.

“It goes back to the person of Jesus.. and striving to be like Him”

It is also inspiring to hear her reminder that God calls us to be a blessing. 

“Bless—that’s your job, to bless” 1 Peter 3:9

As Siri points out “Sometimes it’s to our detriment but actually it’s a simple command – just do things that bless other people!” 

This can be a real challenge when we think about hospitality and generosity as it can be tiring and sometimes, let’s be honest, we won’t necessarily see a return. But isn’t that the whole point? We instead do it to bring glory to God and to pour out love onto HIs people, so whether we see a return or not does not matter. Siri speaks to the heart of the matter by reminding us that everything we have is a gift from God – our money, our homes and that the hospitality modelled by her parents in their travels has been to have an open home and hold lightly to what we have as this ultimately is God’s.

The call to be distinctive on the Sabbath is another challenge which I take away from listening to Siri. Particularly amidst exams, it can be so tempting to sacrifice time which should be spent with God to study a bit harder or perfect that essay but Siri demonstrates that if we take the Sabbath as community and hold each other to account, it can be a life-giving way to honour God and gain perspective. 

“You are saying to God, ‘I give up the control I have over my work, my results, how well this essay is going to go. You’re in charge of this.. you have to be in charge of this because I can’t control everything in my life’”

“A really easy way to be distinctive is just to be yourself and if you are being yourself then you’re being who God made you to be” 

“Living out faith shouldn’t need to be different on a Monday from a Sunday”

“I wouldn’t call myself a missionary but I think that every single day, going into work, that’s my mission field and the place where I’m sharing my faith and light”

Siri

Having grown up moving all over the world, Siri has been based in the North East for the past five years. She currently works as a French teacher, trying to instil a love and value of language and culture in her students. Living in community and doing life well with God and others is a key feature of Siri’s life. So is trying to perfect her simultaneous porridge making and shower taking. 

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We are thrilled to introduce our first inspiring interviewee, Naomi, for our brand-new series ‘God-Colours’. Naomi discusses what faith lived out looks like in her job, where she works in finance within the retail sector.  

Naomi: God Colours - YouTube

It has been such a blessing to hear from Naomi about what faith lived out looks like.

I am particularly inspired with Naomi’s honesty about gossip – she speaks of how to be distinctive in situations when it can be hard not to get involved with gossip. She challenges us to be culture-changers, bring out the positives and explain why people might be acting a certain way which is a huge way we can be a light in the environments around us. I wonder if we could take the challenge of speaking into situations where gossip is going on with grace and a Christ-like compassion, even if it goes against what others expect.

How are you a culture-changer?”How can you stay you but also be a part of the culture at work?”

She also speaks to the passions that God places on our hearts and it is so inspiring to hear that she has been able to follow her passion in fashion to glorify God.

“You might be the only Christian that someone knows – what an awesome challenge but also an awesome responsibility”“God needs us to go there because we all deserve to hear the Good News”

I love that Naomi also reminds us that thankfulness is such an important part of our prayer life – an opportunity to thank God for all He has done for us and to trust in His faithfulness by thanking Him for all He has brought us through.

Prayer doesn’t have to look like the traditional eyes closed, hands together, it’s actually a conversation”

“Faith lived out for me means living authentically

Naomi

Naomi grew up on the sunny south coast. Having graduated from university of East Anglia. She has been living and working in London for the past 6 years in Finance within in the retail sector. When she’s not dancing to Beyoncé or belting out musical numbers in her bedroom. She loves encouraging others to be the fearless men and women of God they were created to be.

MORE ABOUT GOD COLOURS

I truly believe that their honesty and practical advice will inspire and empower our More Precious community so I urge you to share the videos and pray into how you can be a light in this world, shining your God-colours for all to see. Look out for them dropping in your inbox or social media feeds over the weeks to come!

Whether we are encouraged to open up our house more to others, model generosity or even just feel more empowered to share with colleagues that we went to church at the weekend, I hope this series casts a light on the beautiful variety of ways we can share our faith and live it out. Emma x

Emma Scrivener, Series Lead

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“Let me tell you why you are here. You’re here to be salt-seasoning that brings out the God-flavours of this earth. If you lose your saltiness, how will people taste godliness? You’ve lost your usefulness and will end up in the garbage.Here’s another way to put it: You’re here to be light, bringing out the God-colours in the world. God is not a secret to be kept. We’re going public with this, as public as a city on a hill. If I make you light-bearers, you don’t think I’m going to hide you under a bucket, do you? I’m putting you on a light stand. Now that I’ve put you there on a hilltop, on a light stand—shine! Keep open house; be generous with your lives. By opening up to others, you’ll prompt people to open up with God, this generous Father in heaven.’ Matthew 5:13-16, The Message


We’re delighted to welcome you to God Colours - a series designed to help us explore what ‘bringing out the God-colours in the world’ looks like. How can we be a witness to our friends at school or in the workplace? What does faith lived out actually look like? This series delves into the lives of people from a variety of circumstances, asking the question: what does being a Christian look like in the everyday?

Matthew 5:13-16 shows us that we are not only called to be light, but we are called to reflect who God is to those around us.

All too often we can get caught up in the busyness each day brings, but our prayer is that this series will help prompt us to pause and listen to the simple wisdom brought to us by girls from all walks of life to talk about what it looks like to live out their faith in every sphere of their lives – whether they are on the bus to school, in the middle of an important business meeting, or on on the phone to their granny while walking their dog!

At the heart of Matthew 5 is a call to live distinctively.

This is certainly not an uncommon theme in the Bible - but sometimes when I read the challenge, I question how I could apply it to my day-to-day life. For me, the real challenge of this passage is the focus on the personal impact I can have on the lives around me.

‘Let me tell you why you are here…If you lose your saltiness, how will people taste godliness?... You’re here to be light’

All too often it might seem easy enough to let those who seem more gifted at evangelising to take a lead on the sharing-Jesus-front but actually we are all equipped to demonstrate godliness to others.

I also love the phrase ‘God is not a secret to be kept’ but I wondered how often I really answered questions earnestly about ‘what I got up to at the weekend’ and times when I was more likely to try and keep my faith on the down-low. Yet we cannot feel downhearted at times like that but should be encouraged to lean further into God, praying for boldness and courage to share wholeheartedly the joy we find in Jesus, taking small steps of faith to feel more empowered to share our faith with others.

For this series, we’ve interviewed a number of girls and asked them to share their testimonies and the way they share their faith in their everyday lives. When I had the privilege of chatting to the girls who kindly offered to share their stories, I was really struck by the authenticity and joy that they all radiated when talking about their faith.

I truly believe that their honesty and practical advice will inspire and empower our More Precious community and I urge you to share the videos and pray into how you can be a light in this world, shining your God-colours for all to see. So look out for them dropping into your inbox or social media feeds over the weeks to come!

Whether we are encouraged to open up our house more to others, model generosity or even just feel more empowered to share with colleagues that we went to church at the weekend, I hope this series casts a light on the beautiful variety of ways we can share our faith and live it out.

Emma Scrivener X

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This week, we’ve looked at some of the ways addictions can spiral and snare us in the unforgiving cycle of itching that bite. When it comes to these psychological and spiritual addictions, it actually helps to understand how physical addictions work.

When a person takes a ‘hit’ of whatever substance it is, the receptors for that substance in our brain becomes a little bit desensitised. They’ve had it before and, frankly, the hit doesn’t bring the same excitement and satisfaction it once did. So the next time, we have a bit more. And it feels just like it did the first time when we had only a little. Eventually, you’re putting 10x the amount into your body, just to get a fraction of the satisfaction you felt at the start. At some point along the way, the money runs out. Or the supply gets cut. Or your body can’t handle the amount needed to feel it anymore. No matter what we’re addicted to, there is never enough in the end.

Often we draw a dividing line between people who have obvious addictions, and people who don’t. But we all have desires we can’t shake. We’re all addicted to something.

The dividing line runs down each of our hearts: there’s a bit that wants to change and let it go, and a bit that can’t seem to cope without it.

The story of the rebellious son in Luke 15:11-32 describes two very different addicts. Take a minute to read the story now if you haven’t before.

The younger son is the obvious addict. He’s addicted to pleasure. To rebellion and partying. What once was a Friday night binge, becomes a daily occurrence as he leaves home and commits to the wild life. If you know the story, you’ll remember that eventually he ends up sat in a pig sty eating scraps because the money ran out and his mates weren’t true friends. So his addiction is harmful to himself, but he also hurt his father when he walked out. We find out later that his father felt his youngest son had died. He grieved every moment he was gone.

The lesser-known addict in this story is the older brother. This guy is just as hooked on his ‘must haves’ and patterns of living. From the outside he is obedient, productive and respectable, but his addiction is revealed when the little brother returns. After a lifetime of being bound by self-righteous tradition, he is furious when his rebellious brother receives a welcome home without earning it. He even tells his Dad that he has been “slaving for you” all these years, while his brother went off partying. The older brother was enslaved to works and earning the inheritance his father would give.

Both sons wanted their father’s stuff without having to have a relationship with him. They both wanted the gifts and not the giver, they just tried to get it differently.

So what will help the two brothers - one addicted to rebellion and the other to rules? Both found out that their addiction could not satisfy. Both ended up in their father’s face, confused as to how they had ended up so wretched after seeking something so promising. So what does Dad do? He extends to them the only substance that never runs out. Grace.

When it comes to grace, the more you get, the more you want. And the more you want, the more you get. The more we are accepted and welcomed in by the Father, the more we move towards Him and the more we experience that acceptance and welcome. Grace enables us to admit that we’ve been serving a misguided addiction and frees us to become utterly dependent on the only thing that can deliver.

Can you remember the moment you began to understand Jesus’ love for the first time? In that moment, you just want more. You hope you’ll never feel less amazed than you do right now, and you pray you’ll only become more and more enthralled by his love. When you taste what Jesus has to offer, you need and want more, and there is always more to give.

Take a moment now to pray and admit the addict in you. Ask God to draw you in closer, and ask the Spirit to reveal to you the substance which you serve. Experience his forgiveness, which will enable you to see others as God sees them, and help you to become part of a community addicted to grace.

This article is based on a talk given by Steve Midgley which can be watched in full here: https://www.biblicalcounselling.org.uk/video/addicted-to-grace/

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This week, we’ll be talking about some painful and difficult circumstances, and I pray that you can’t relate to what is said. But if you can, then know that this is a place of love. The articles may raise some uncomfortable questions for you, and we encourage you to speak to a trusted friend or church leader about these. We will also recommend some helpful resources to think about all the topics further.

I imagine that a lot of you reading will identify with this topic. It’s one of the more accepted idols in our churches. Wanting to control your life, your salvation, your sinful nature…we can all relate to some element of wishing we could micromanage a situation. The other end of this spectrum can express itself in a well-known mental health condition, known as OCD. We’ll be talking about the less severe and more common end of the spectrum, but the biblical principles here can hopefully be applied to someone who finds themselves nearer the other end.

As mental health labels go, OCD is actually quite helpful in describing the problem. Alisdair Groves, a faculty member at CCEF, explains this well by highlighting that:
Obsessive indicates “I have a thought that won’t go. I’m obsessing about this concept and I can’t stop.”
Compulsive indicates “I want this thought out. I’ll do whatever it takes however many times it takes to get this obsession to stop.”
Disorder indicates “This is a problem. This is impacting my life and I’m experiencing distress.” Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.


DISCLAIMER: Perhaps with this description, you feel a little pang of concern about using the term OCD flippantly when you line the TV remotes up, or switch the volume to an even number. OCD can be a debilitating and highly distressing problem, and one which is so much more than colour-coordinating your revision notes.

So in what ways are we on this spectrum? We probably wish we had more control over our lives, more knowledge about our future, and we’re probably more comfortable addressing imperfection in the world, and our actions, than we are the imperfection deep in our hearts.

But we are covenantal creatures, whose every thought has relevance to our Creator. The Bible does urge us to be self-controlled, not giving into our own evil desires, but what we’re talking about here is wanting to be fully in control of our own lives, trying to snatch the rule of our lives from God. So what does our desire for control, whether minor or clinical, say about our relationship to God?

My frame was not hidden from you, when I was made in the secret place, when I was woven together in the depths of the earth.
Your eyes saw my unformed body; all the days ordained for me were written in your book, before one of them came to be. Ps 139:15-16

 God is in control. When we have that random thought of ‘What would happen if I just punched this person I’m talking to? What if this train seat is contaminated with a deadly disease? What if I let out the evil inside me?’... God is in control. When we are overwhelmed by a need to address our thoughts, we have given our thoughts a power and significance they do not deserve. God is the only person you can trust to address your thoughts. When we grow in trust of our God who is in control, we don’t need to avoid the situation. Neither do we need to distract ourselves from the thought. Perhaps you pray when you feel out of control of a situation and you say to God “get me out of here.”

Think about what it would mean for you to pray instead: “meet me here”. When the fear rises up, and the compulsion to run or to distract or to cleanse arises, speak to your Maker:

Search me, God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts.
See if there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting. Psalm 139:23-24

In a world of ‘what ifs’ that could happen at any moment, God is our only certainty. When all we can see is chaos and failure, we have a God who meets us there and brings blessing:

 “He who did not spare his own Son, but gave him up for us all—how will he not also, along with him, graciously give us all things?”
Rom 8:32

 This article was based on a two-part podcast conducted between Alisdair Groves and Mike Emlet, both faculty members of CCEF. You can listen to the podcast here: https://www.ccef.org/podcast/ocd-mike-emlet-part-1/

 

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This week, we’ll be talking about some painful and difficult circumstances, and I pray that you can’t relate to what is said. But if you can, then know that this is a place of love. The articles may raise some uncomfortable questions for you, and we encourage you to speak to a trusted friend or church leader about these. We will also recommend some helpful resources to think about all the topics further.

I love a good shower. The feeling of the water pounding the back of my neck, or the moment it gets through my hair and the heat trickles down over my scalp. At the end of a hard day or a week when I feel like I can’t do anything anymore, I shower. For me, it feels like washing off the difficulty of the day and becoming fresh and ready again. Perhaps you have a sort of ritual, like my shower, that enables you to keep your head above water when you feel overwhelmed by life. Perhaps, for you, it’s an hour doing your make-up or going out for a run.

Research suggests that 13-17% of teenagers and young adults use self-harm[1] as their ritual. That may come as a shock, I hope it does. This definition of self-harm by a biblical  counsellor may help us to think about why it is so common:

Self-harm is the act of deliberately causing oneself physical pain or injury in order to address some kind of emotional need and bring relief – usually in ways that are hidden, always in ways that impact faith.

Pause for a moment: we cannot say that a person who has hurt themselves ever, is an addict to self-harm. So why talk about it this week? Well, because the addiction here is not to self-harm itself, but to the sense of escape it gives from the stresses of life. Just as I’m not addicted to showers, but the feeling that a good shower gives me. My showers achieve refreshment and energy and a sense of putting the week, with all its stresses, behind me. Perhaps you use Netflix or Instagram or sport or alcohol… all of these are coping strategies, just like self-harm, that promise relief from the stresses of life, but in the end accomplish little or make it worse.

So what makes a girl turn to self-harm rather than exercise or eating? Perhaps it’s guilt and feeling that harming herself enacts a just punishment. Perhaps it’s numbness and feeling pain is better than feeling nothing at all. Perhaps she was bullied growing up. Perhaps she’s seen celebrities talking about self-harm online. Perhaps she’s heard the world’s message that “you are perfect, amazing, strong, blameless and beautiful” and just couldn’t see herself in that mirror. She can see herself in the mirror of “you are useless, pathetic, disgusting, and worthless”.

How can she survive? Self-harm gives her a sense of relief that she is dealing with how disgusting and bad she is on the inside. It enables her to cope for one more day, until the relief runs out and she’s back in her bedroom the next day feeling worse than before.

Where is God?

God is holding up another mirror. We know it as the Bible and it tells us a different message: “You are loved, adopted, cherished, alive, and growing.” In Ephesians 1-2, God’s speaks forgiveness for the guilty, good works for the useless, and salvation for the worthless.

This struggling girl is addicted to survival. She just wants to cope and stay alive. What does God offer?

“I came that they may have life and have it abundantly” (John 10:10 ESV)

She can look into the mirror of scripture and see a beautiful bride, cleansed and flawless, without stain or scar from the pains of her history. She can take hold of the strength given to her, without having to search in vain for strength within, and live out the life she has been blessed with. Life to the fullest, and life without limits.

She has a long road ahead, and she will need many who love her by her side, but she doesn’t need to settle for survival anymore. She can be addicted to the life given by the Spirit, through Christ’s blood, that is given abundantly and never runs out.

Some links to check out if you want to know more:

https://www.10ofthose.com/uk/products/5540/self-injury 

https://www.ccef.org/going-blood/

https://www.biblicalcounselling.org.uk/video/2015-audio/ - (scroll down to the self-harm seminar) 

https://www.biblicalcounselling.org.uk/suffering/the-mystery-of-self-harm/

[1] Swannell, S, et al. (2014). Prevalence of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Nonclinical Samples: Systematic Review, Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression. Suicide & life-threatening behavior. 44. 10.1111/sltb.12070.

 

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