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I hope you enjoy this list of the best places to buy beads online!  I usually do my bead and jewelry making supplies shopping online, and so I decided to share with you some of my favorite resources to go along with all my jewelry making tutorials (check out this wire wrap stone to start!). Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links. This post was originally published August 2015 and was updated in 2019 to reflect current favorites.

 

I prefer buying my beads and findings online for a few reasons:

  • It’s more convenient and saves me lots of time
  • I can sift through and decide what I’d like to buy more easily.
  • I can budget more easily and see my subtotals as I shop. How many times have I shopped in-store, only to shocked at the register?!
  • I can get cash back on some of my purchases via Rakuten. This often helps me justify when there are shipping costs, as it often covers all or most of it.
  • You can also search f0r online coupons (Rakuten‘s browser extension is an amazing tool for this!)

These are my personal favorite suggestions, sifted out from among a vast array of retailers. Try each one separately, browse around, and then pick your favorite. I will update this list as my preferences change.
 

Want to learn how to make jewelry out of anything? Get the book!

9 OF THE BEST PLACES TO BUY BEADS ONLINE: 

BeeBeeCraftAffordable rates and a fun selection make BeeBeeCraft a favorite spot to buy beads online. They’re a wonderful resource for stocking up on affordable basics, and their minimum for free shipping is low (for US-stocked items).

8 Seasons Another great resource for inexpensive beads and jewelry making supplies, 8 Seasons is a Chinese supplier – but you don’t need a wholesale account to purchase. In addition to their regular pricing, they have scale discounts if you order in bulk.

Jewelry and FindingsWant options without the overwhelm? This is my favorite stop for fewer distractions, and for good prices for both small and large packages. You can get full spools of cord and large bead packages for amazing wholesale prices. Pay attention to the titles when buying “real” stuff, they have imitation gemstones in the same category as real, but they’re always clearly labeled in the title.

FireMountainGems.com – I use this for my bulk bead shopping, when I want a combination of reliability in quality, and good bulk discounts. My average orders from there are $250+, so these are my stock-up runs. You have to pay shipping and handling no matter what the order size, but they have an affordable flat rate. Their bulk discounts apply over your whole purchase, so you don’t need to buy a lot of a single item.

This is my recommended stop if you are shopping for “real” things as it’s a the most reliable. So get your sterling silver, gemstones, and crystals here.

Annie’s Simply BeadsIf you are still new at jewelry making and want more specific instruction, Annie’s Simply Beads Kit-of-the-month features gorgeous jewelry making projects for you to try. The kits come with the materials you need and will help you explore new techniques. Your first kit comes with basic tools too!

Michaels.com – If you want  a limited, uncomplicated high-quality selection, Michaels is the place to shop! They are also great for smaller quantity packages.

PandaHall.com -If  frequents sales are important to you, PandaHall tends to have regular discounts. They are easy to shop and have a huge variety, but some things do come in larger quantities. 

Amazon.com – I use these for small orders and for items that I need quickly, since they ship free in 1-3 days. If you have Amazon Prime, like I do, many bead items ARE eligible. 

www.CreateForLess.com – are you a general crafter who sometimes does jewelry? Create For Less is the perfect place to shop when you’re doing a whole craft shopping trip, and only need some beads and jewelry making supplies. Shipping is free on orders of $50 or more (subject to change). Check out their clearance section!

Update: Moms & Crafters readers have contributed a huge database of recommendations! Here are some top picks:

  • Etsy – support small businesses! The variety is enormous and quality/dependability varies by seller, so check seller reviews! I started buying from Etsy sellers when I need very specific items that are otherwise hard to find.
  • Beadaholique – they have excellent shipping rates
  • Shipwreck Beads
  • WireJewelry.com
  • Rings & Things
  • Scroll through the comments section for more!

What are your favorite places to buy beads online? Do you have an experiences to share?

The post Places to buy beads online appeared first on Moms and Crafters.

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If you are looking for a DIY friendship bracelet to make, then you are in the right place! These cool macrame (knotted) bracelet ideas range from simple and advanced, and include some beaded options as well.You can also check my tutorials for how to make wire bracelets, or scroll down for these projects. Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links.

Friendship bracelets at the store are pretty basic, and most of them aren’t that unique. Friendship bracelets might seem like something you used to do back in summer camp when you are a kid, but this can be a fun craft to do for or with your kids. Some are even sophisticated enough for grown ups.

It’s an art, and I personally still have fun making a DIY friendship bracelet here and there. Even if you’ve never made a bracelet before, there is still something here for you to make!

 

Knotting friendship bracelets are a branch of Macrame – the art of making textile using knots instead of weaving. So yeah, it’s an art form, totally appropriate for all ages. Ha! See if I’ll stop making ’em just cuz I’m thirty!

I love making my own bracelets and testing new fun patterns and designs. As a kid, I can remember building friendship bracelets with my friends, and even creating them as a teenager. Friendship bracelets don’t just have to have your best friend’s name anymore, now you can make them out of everything from leather to Perler beads!

The following list of awesome DIY friendship bracelet tutorials is divided into 3 categories based on the style of bracelet:

  1. Easy bracelets from string
  2. Intermediate to advanced knotting friendship bracelets
  3. Beads/Specialty

There’s something for everyone in here, so grab your best friend and let’s get started!

Want to learn how to make jewelry out of anything? Get the book! It’s got loads of fun, quirky, and colorful jewelry ideas for teens and teens-at-heart – PLUS more unique twists on friendship bracelets!

Easy Friendship Bracelet String Tutorials:

These DIY Friendship bracelets are perfect for beginners, using simple knotting patterns and string for easy to make style!

1. Jellyfish Friendship Bracelets by Crafting Chicks:

The jellyfish bracelet gets its name because the embroidery floss that’s used hangs down like the tentacles on a jellyfish. This unique bracelet takes a simple braided bracelet and adds a twist at the end.

2. DIY Friendship Bracelet by Living Ideas:

This animal-friendly faux leather bracelet is a great stylish friendship bracelet option for an amazing braided friendship bracelet.

3. DIY Braided Friendship Bracelets by Moms and Crafters:

These DIY braided friendship bracelets are a great way to practice jewelry making for beginners. The skills needed for this craft are pretty basic, and you can make these bracelets for cheap! They use bakers twine for a unique finish, and are finished off with ribbon crimps to make them reusable.

4. Simple DIY Friendship Bracelets by Simplify Create Inspire:

If you are looking for a simple friendship bracelet design, this is the one you want to go with! This is a great cost-effective option for  young girls and boys to make too.

5.  Adorable Loopdedoo Bracelets by Blue Bear Wood:

For this easy bracelet design, you only need three materials. You can have an adorable friendship bracelet in just a few minutes! You will need this specific bracelet-making machine (or maybe you can figure out how to make it without?)

Intermediate to advanced knotting DIY friendship bracelet Ideas

These DIY Friendship bracelets take a little more patience to make, but they’re worth it!

7. 3D Zig Zag Friendship Bracelet by Moms & Crafters:

Use different shades of the same color of embroidery floss to create a magical 3D effect on these advanced zig zag friendship bracelets. I designed this pattern as a young teen and love making it until today! Finish it off with a ribbon crimp and wear it as a fun jewelry accessory.

8. Friendship Bracelets by Purl Solo:

This beautiful Macraméd bracelet will remind you of the ’90s! These old school friendship bracelets are a little more complex but just as fun. They’ll be as complicated as you make them.

9. Friendship Bracelets by Red Ted Art:

If you are an absolute beginner when it comes to macrame, then this is the friendship bracelet for you! This DIY bracelet uses embroidery thread and is easy enough for anyone to make. They’re the patterns that I personally started with!

10. Breezy Friendship Bracelets by Purl Solo:

This knotted friendship bracelet tutorial is easy to do, but still colorful and vibrant. It uses a stitch often used in paracord, and is designed to stack as many as you’d like.

Beads/Specialty

These DIY Friendship bracelets use beads and other materials to really set themselves apart. Your friend will love these styles! 

11. Melted Perler Bead Braided Bracelet by Pink Stripey Socks:

These melted Perler beaded braided bracelets are so unique and fun to make! If you have leftover Perler beads from a previous craft, now is the time to put them to use. The beads create a pretty herringbone design while the process to make them is really simple.

12. Heart Friendship Bracelets by Moms and Crafters:

These heart friendship bracelets are really easy to make! Not only are they adjustable, but they’re a cheap bracelet to put together. You can use cheap wooden beads for hearts – or write names on them, draw paw prints, or do whatever you’d like.

13. LEGO Friendship Bracelets by Kids Activities:

If you have spare LEGO bricks laying around the house, now you can put them to use in this simple and easy bracelet.

14. DIY Braided Essential Oil Diffuser Bracelets by The Soccer Mom Blog:

If you are a fan of essential oils, why not turn them into a fun friendship bracelet? These bracelets use a braided technique, and a touch of essential oils to dd a bit of aromatherapy to your life.

Bonus: This cool blended bracelet can be made with many of the designs above! It’s from my book  How to Make Jewelry Out of Anything and if you loved this list, you’ll love the book too!

You might also like my hair tie bracelet DIY.

Have you ever made friendship bracelets for your friends? Have any of your friends made one for you? Leave a comment and share your favorite DIY friendship bracelet!

The post DIY Friendship Bracelet Tutorials and Patterns appeared first on Moms and Crafters.

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When I was a tween, I created this zig zag friendship bracelet pattern with a 3D effect and it’s time to share! I used to make stacks of DIY friendship bracelets, eventually discovering how they created the  patterns they did, and coming up with my own ideas. You can print the pattern at the bottom of the post. Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links.

As a craft blogger, my job is to come up with ideas. And sometimes these ideas can lead to disappointment when we realize that we’re not the first ones who thought of it…

One of the first ideas I came up with was  this zigzag friendship bracelet pattern. I created it as a young teen, when I wanted to make a 3D effect on a bracelet.

With summer 2019 upon us, I decided it’s about time I share one of my first crafts that I came up with myself – a friendship bracelet that has a zigzag pattern built into it. While the classic zig zag friendship bracelet is actually in the shape of a zigzag, this one offers a 3D zigzag effect instead.

While I was researching which keywords to use in this post, I discovered that the basic pattern of it has been out there already. Oh, well! It’s not that insane of an idea. But it can be hard to see that you’re not the first one sharing something that you know you came up with, in your own bedroom, over fifteen years ago…

 

However, I’m happy to see that no one has yet shared it quite like I invented it. When I made this design, I my goal was, from the start, to draw a 3D ribbon into the bracelet. To that end, I used graduating shades of the same color or analogous colors, with the lightest being the largest zigzag and the darkest sitting in the corner to create an illusion of a zigzag ribbon. It was my early graphic designer mind thinking, and so I created this zig zag friendship bracelet pattern to accomplish that goal.

There’s one string that I call the “joker” that doesn’t show – it’s only knotted around and it’s never actually knotted with. That one can technically be any color but since it might peek out at the beginning and end of your zig zag friendship bracelet, I’d recommend using something that’ll go with the flow (but won’t be confused with the others).

I also use the “joker” for a practical purpose. It’s always the last ribbon that you knot around in both directions. That shows that you’re done the row. You complete the round when everything’s back in the original order. But I’m getting ahead of myself…

You can make this zig zag friendship bracelet in any number of shades. The more shades you use, the more dramatic the 3D effect will be. However, it’s significantly harder to use more. I tested this pattern with up to 8 strands (7 showing). It should work with more as well. I’d recommend starting with 5 strands/4 showing as featured in the step-by-step tutorial, however, I’ll share the rough formula for adding more.

From the start, I faced a huge challenge. Such a significantly larger amount of the light colors are used that it’s hard to gauge.

Back then, I just guesstimated what I needed and now and then I knotted more string to my original and hid it in the back.

Now, I finally sat down, tried a few things, and came up with a basic formula for the length of each string. It’s not totally mathematical but with a bit of trial and error I figured something out that’ll work for most sizes.

A few tips for successfully making a zig zag friendship bracelet:

  • If the last string is too long for you to handle, fold it loosely and gather it, being careful not to pull on it so it knots.
  • You can always add more string! Just tie another one to the end of the string that’s too short and pull tight, leaving a small tail. Make sure it lands in the back of your zig zag friendship bracelet when you get to it. When you’re done making your bracelet, glue the knot and trim it all the way.
  • If you run out of thread and don’t want to add (or if you see you’ll run out) you can do a braided end, or finish it off in some other quicker way.
  • And finally, if you’re just a little short on thread, you can do what I did on one bracelet: finish it off with ribbon crimps and an adjustable clasp.

Choosing colors for this 3D advanced Zig Zag friendship bracelet:

As mentioned above, you need to choose graduating shades of the same color OR analogous colors to get the 3D effect. Analogous colors are next to each other on the color wheel. If you take this approach, I’d recommend choosing a group where one is significantly lighter than the others – such as yellow, yellow orange, orange, red orange, red.

Whatever you do, you can also start with white and end with black.

I used to choose my color schemes by browsing the open-stock DMC threads in A.C. Moore. The quality of those threads were significantly better than the large packs I sometimes buy. Whether you want to spend for better quality or not is up to you, but there is a big difference.

I also loved that I was able to find this ombre effect in very unique shades, something that large packs don’t usually have. I wish I had photos of the zig zag friendship bracelets I made back then…

Regardless, you can definitely get big packs that have good colors for this pattern – they’ll more than do the job.

Want to learn how to make jewelry out of anything? Get the book! It’s got loads of fun, quirky, and colorful jewelry ideas for teens and teens-at-heart – PLUS more unique twists on friendship bracelets!

Supplies needed to complete this friendship bracelet pattern:

Optional finishing supplies for making a zig zag friendship bracelet:

  • Ribbon crimps in the width of your bracelet
  • Flat nose pliers
  • Round nose pliers (or any second pair)
  • Clasp
  • Chain or a few jumprings to connect clasp to
  • Jumprings for attaching ribbon crimp to clasp
Zig Zag friendship bracelet instructions :

1. Choose at least 4 colors to create an ombre/gradient plus your joker color (that won’t show)

2. Cut them to size. The approximate measurements are as follows (toss in an extra inch or two if you know you’ll need every last bit of the full length).

For a 4-color gradient (joker, then darkest to lightest, in inches): 13, 18, 27, 36, 45

For a 7-color gradient: 16, 22, 33, 42, 51, 60, 69, 78.

If you’re really ambitious, you can probably do a few more shades, adding +9 inches for each one, and adding an extra 3-6 inches per color for the earlier shades.

3. Place them in order from shortest to longest – first the joker, then the darkest, and each descending shade until you reach the white or almost white strand.

4. Knot your strands together about 1 inch from the end if you plan to add a clasp, 2 inches if you plan to tie it on your wrist.

5. Optional: tape it down to your surface.

The order of your strands may have shifted slightly so make sure to separate them and place them in order before knotting your first row. By the way, the bracelet is flipped over – in step 3 I did it darkest to lightest, however when I taped it down, I flipped it over so that I worked lightest to darkest. Just an oversight… doesn’t really matter!

6. Start by knotting your lightest strand around the one to its right.

In case you’re not familiar with this kind of knot, here’s a photo:

Pull it up to the top of your bracelet.

7. Knot again around the same thread. This double knot forms a “stitch” on the front of your zig zag friendship bracelet. The entire bracelet pattern is made of these stitches.

8. Continue double knotting the white string around the other strings in the correct order, finishing with the joker.

9. Take your second lightest color, which should now be the leftmost strand. Knot it around the other strings – skipping the lightest color. Here’s a little trick to remember what to do: you never wrap a string..

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There are so many earring studs DIY ideas out there, that it’s time for a dedicated list of unique jewelry making projects! If you prefer a more advanced skill, you can learn how to make wire bracelets, or scroll down for these simple tutorials. Disclosure: this post contains commissioned links.

When we think of stud earrings, sometimes we imagine just a boring gold or silver colored ball. I’m here to tell you there’s so much more to stud earrings! Just add some crafting supplies, and you can make your own stud earrings DIY for any occasion!

Stud earrings are great for adding just a touch to complete your outfit tastefully. You also don’t have to worry about them falling out which is an added bonus.

That said, studs don’t have to be boring! These stud earring DIY ideas will bring your earrings to the next level!

In this post, you’ll find all kinds of awesome earring stud DIY ideas! They are broken down into 3 categories based on style:

  1. Traditional Studs
  2. Moderate Studs
  3. Statement Studs

No matter what style you’re looking for, there’s something for everyone here!

Traditional Earring Studs DIY ideas

These stud earrings DIY tutorials are the style most people think of when they think of studs. Basic round shape, stays close to the earlobe, nothing too crazy! But each one still has a unique twist so that you can make it totally yours.

1. DIY Candy Button Dot Earrings by Happiness is Homemade:

These adorable little candy dots are a fresh take on a classic stud earring! Keep it simple and inexpensive with this colorful stud earrings DIY.

2. DIY Magazine Earrings by Happiness is Creating:

Give those old fashion catalogs new life as jewelry! Remember that one pattern you loved when you saw it on the page? Now you can turn it into a pair of awesome DIY stud earrings.

3. DIY Marble Jade Earrings by A Beautiful Mess:

These quick and easy DIY stud earrings look like beautiful jade stones. With just a little clay, anything is possible!

4. DIY Paper Stud Earrings by JewelryTutorialHQ:

DIY Paper Stud Earrings - Cute & Colorful Upcycled Jewelry Tutorial - YouTube

These DIY stud earrings are the perfect upcycling project. Using any print you can find, you can make adorable studs!

Want to learn how to make jewelry out of anything? Get the book!

 


 
 

Moderate Studs

These stud earrings DIY  ideas stray from the traditional style a little, giving them a unique flair! While they’re still clearly studs, they stand out a little more. But they’re still subdued enough to wear in a professional setting, and if you’re not quite up to going all out with your earring style.

5. Marbled Cubes by Brit+Co:

Marbled clay gives these DIY stud earrings have an icy cool look! The marbled blues and whites really give off an arctic vibe.

6. Druzy Earrings DIY Tutorial by Moms & Crafters:

These stud earrings have an awesome subtle shine, adding some glam to your look without overdoing it. Use glass glitter for structure, Mod Podge Super Gloss for a solid finish and edge it with metallic nail polish.

7. Marbled Stud Earrings by Brit+Co:

These DIY marbles stud earrings are so cute! Using only clay, you can create any look you want with these.

8. Fabric Button Earrings by Purely Katie:

If you have some fabric patterns that you love, but just can’t find a use for, you’re in luck! Using only a few square inches of fabric, you’ll have a new pair of stud earrings!

Statement Studs

Looking to push the limits of stud earring styles? These are the earring studs DIY ideas for you!

9. How to Make Clay Rose Earrings by Moms & Crafters:

Use  super lightweight clay to make these gorgeous statement studs, and then finish them off with watercolor paint. To add that gorgeous glossy look, use Mod Podge Super Gloss. I made a pendant using the tutorial as well!

10. DIY Leather Earrings by Design Mom:

Tiny leather earrings have been quite the trend lately, and these DIY stud earrings fit perfectly! They’re a great solution if you love leather earrings a la Joanna Gaines but want to tone it down a bit.

11. DIY Seashell Earrings by Moms & Crafters:

You go to the beach, you can’t resist those beautiful shells, now what do you do with them? These DIY stud earrings are a great craft for all ages! They’re a bit mermaidesque too… And if you don’t have small shells, you can pick up a pack on the cheap.

12. Glittery Gold Thunderbolt Earrings by A Beautiful Mess:

Give your ears some sparkly flair with this earring studs DIY! These lightning bolts will give your accessories a fabulous sparkle.

13. DIY Dipped Earrings by Moms & Crafters:

These studs are so simple to make, and they match everything! You can color them any way you want to match your wardrobe. Once again, they use lightweight clay so that they’re not heavy. Match them up with bullet clutch earring backs for full support.

14. DIY Alex and Ani Inspired Earrings by Jamie B Hannigan:

These stud earrings are inspired by Alex and Ani, and they look amazing! The glitzy rhinestones will really make you sparkle when you wear them.

Do you wear stud earrings often? Have you tried any earring studs DIY ideas? Which style is your favorite? Let us know in the comments!

The post Earring Studs DIY – 14 Ideas appeared first on Moms and Crafters.

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Learn how to make clay rose earrings with a beautiful watercolor finish in this super simple craft. I love “statement studs” and these roses are so much fun – you won’t want to stop at one pair! Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links. Plaid, Martha Stewart Crafts and Mod Podge products were received from the company free of charge in the hopes I’d share with you.

For a while, I’ve been wanting to make some clay rose earrings, because who doesn’t love roses? I’d already made paper rose studs for my book How to Make Jewelry out of Anything and I thought that a clay version would be so cool!

Because I love the kind of roses that have darker tips (is there an official name for that?!) I wanted to try watercoloring them using soft gel watercolors because they are designed for crafting with on multiple surfaces. I had some from Martha Stewart crafts that Plaid sent me a while ago so I gave them a run!

I actually found that the result was different from what I had planned but I love it just the same.

I first applied watered down paint into all the cracks and then layer by layer darkened the edges.

One of my biggest challenges when designing this craft was keeping it small. To make these, I used Sculpey air dry clay that’s very lightweight and absorbent and I felt would work well for this project.

 

However, even though the clay isn’t heavy, I still didn’t want them to be huge visually. My first rose was way too big so I turned it into a pendant by gluing a flat pad bail to the back.

I finally got it right and found the perfect size. It may take some trial and error but you’ll get it right! The clay is inexpensive and I was well stocked up from making these hair tie bracelets. It’s a fun, easygoing, sit-down craft so I was happy to play around.

Even if you figure out how to make clay rose earrings small and comfortable as I did, you’ll still want to use bullet clutch earring backs with a plastic pad for support.

 

Another big challenge that I faced was fingerprints… When flattening petals you’re putting your prints on them. I rectified a lot of this while painting, but not allowing the paint to pool in the prints, they became less visible. The final finishing coat of Mod Podge helped trick the light into further concealing these.

So while these make a great craft to create for yourself, you’ll have to make sure to be careful with prints if you’re looking for things to make and sell at home.

Back to the top coat that gives it that beautiful glossy sheen. At first, I had planned to use my polymer clay glaze but when I opened it, I found that it had completely hardened!

So I decided to try Mod Podge Super Gloss. And I’m happy my clay glaze hardened because this gave it that final polished touch that makes it look like a beautiful, artistic accessory. You really only need one layer, however if you want to give it an acrylic look I recommend a second layer. It dries totally clear and glossy, and isn’t sticky like the regular glossy Mod Podge.

And now I will share with you how to make clay rose earrings with a step-by-step tutorial.

Want to learn how to make jewelry out of anything? Get the book!

 

What you need to make clay rose earrings: How to make clay rose earrings:

1. Form an oval with a small piece of clay.

2. Curl it into a cone shape, with the top edge slightly curling outward and the bottom overlapping.

3. Create another small oval and attach it over the seam of the first. Join it at the base and curl the edge slightly outward.

4. Repeat with more petals, curling the ends slightly out. Flatten them a bit for more of a rose look, but not too much. If your clay is too thin it’ll be brittle.

5. Continue until you’re satisfied with the size of your earring.

6. Flip your rose on its side and gently pinch the base to make sure everything is well connected. You might want to roll it between your fingers so you don’t mess up the shape of the flower.

7. Use a knife or clay-shaping tool to cut off the point of the base, flattening it. Your petals might get pulled a little and need to be reshaped.

8. Lay your rose flat, reshape it, and adjust your petals as you’d like. Make a second stud. Don’t worry if it’s not a mirror image! The general size and style should be the same, but having a handmade look is part of the fun. Allow them to dry overnight.

9. On a palette, drop some craft watercolors into one section and some water into the next. Create a very thin dilution of your watercolor and keep some full-strength gel on your palette as well.

10. Start painting your roses. Begin with a thin wash and cover your entire clay rose.

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If you’re looking for a fun jewelry making project that won’t break the bank, this fringe earrings DIY tutorial is so much fun! Learn how to make DIY dangle earrings and  then scroll down for these hoop fringe earrings! Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links.

Jewelry making has a reputation for being an expensive hobby. And while your first set of jewelry making tools might cost more than a pack of construction paper, its bad reputation isn’t entirely true.

Case in point: these hoop fringe earrings DIY.

With just a few inches of wire, some inexpensive wire hoops, and a few strands of embroidery thread, you can make beautiful, trendy fringe earrings in any color you’d like.

To make these beaded fringe earrings DIY, you’ll want to make the hoops using wire, or get very thin wire hoops, with an end that can be straightened out.

If you’d like, you can skip the beads and use classic hoop earrings. If you want a spacer between the fringes, but want to use an existing hoop, you can use the same wire-wrapping technique that you’ll be using to secure the fringe in place between the beads too.

Now for the tutorial! It’s written out right below, but if you scroll down to the end of this tutorial, you’ll find a printable “recipe card” version as well. Happy crafting!

 
 

Want to learn how to make jewelry out of anything? Get the book!

 

What you need to make this DIY earrings tutorial: How to make this hoop fringe earrings DIY:

1. Take a hoop earring and use the flat nose pliers to straighten the bent part of the closure.

2. Coil about 0.5 cm of wire where you want your fringe to end using thin wire . Once the coiling is done, thread a bead onto the earring wire and push it all the way to the coil.

3. Take your 3 colors of embroidery thread and make groups of thread with 4 strands of each color. This tutorial uses ten such groupings of thread. How many threads and groups you’ll want will depend on the weight of your thread and the size of your hoops.

4. Take your first thread group and fold it in half. Place the folded end under the hoop earring wire.

5. Hold the loose ends of the thread group from one side of the earring wire, keeping the closed end of the thread group on the other side of the earring wire. Draw the loose ends of the thread group over the earring wire, bringing it through the looped/folded end of the thread group.

6. Pull the loose ends of the thread group all the way through until it’s tight securely in place on the wire hoop.

7. Thread another bead onto the earring hoop and then attach another thread group to the wire like  you did with the previous one.

8. Continue to repeat steps 4 through 7 until you are satisfied with the width of your fringe.

9. Done adding all the threads? Use scissors to carefully trim the bottom open ends of the thread groups. Trim the bottom end into any pattern you like, such as the V shape in this tutorial.

10. Add another end coil, and bend back the end of your hoop.

11. Repeat to make a pair!

Have you tried making your own fringe earrings? Got any tips, ideas, or feedback? Comment below!
Fringe Earrings
Print
Instructions

1. Take a hoop earring and use the flat nose pliers to straighten the bent part of the closure.

2. Coil about 0.5 cm of wire where you want your fringe to end using thin wire . Once the coiling is done, thread a bead onto the earring wire and push it all the way to the coil.

3. Take your 3 colors of embroidery thread and make groups of thread with 4 strands of each color. This tutorial uses ten such groupings of thread. How many threads and groups you'll want will depend on the weight of your thread and the size of your hoops.

4. Take your first thread group and fold it in half. Place the folded end under the hoop earring wire.

5. Hold the loose ends of the thread group from one side of the earring wire, keeping the closed end of the thread group on the other side of the earring wire. Draw the loose ends of the thread group over the earring wire, bringing it through the looped/folded end of the thread group.

6. Pull the loose ends of the thread group all the way through until it's tight securely in place on the wire hoop.

7. Thread another bead onto the earring hoop and then attach another thread group to the wire like you did with the previous one.

8. Continue to repeat steps 4 through 7 until you are satisfied with the thickness of your fringe.

9. Done adding all the threads? Use scissors to carefully trim the bottom open ends of the thread groups. Trim the bottom end into any pattern you like, such as the V shape in this tutorial.

10. Add another end coil, and bend back the end of your hoop.

11. Repeat to make a pair!

© Menucha Citron Ceder
Project Type: Jewelry Making / Category: Crafts
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All it takes is some simple tutorials in a few different styles to teach you how to make wire bracelets. If you want to, you can first check out how to wire wrap a pendant, or scroll down for some cool wire wrapped bracelet ideas, memory wire bracelets, wire bangles, and more! Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links.

If you’ve ever wanted to get started making your very own wire bracelets, you’re in for a treat! Wire bracelets are fairly easy to make, which makes them perfect for crafting at home. That’s why I’ve put together this list of awesome wire bracelets you can craft yourself!

Wire bracelets can be just about any style you can imagine, which means there’s tons of variety out there. The wire bracelet tutorials you’ll find here cover all skill levels, beginner and expert crafters alike. Most of them offer some flexibility, so you can customize them to your look! And the best part – you’ll get a new skill using a very versatile material and you’ll learn how to make wire bracelets.

Below, you’ll instructions on how to make wire bracelets of many different types. The list is subdivided into 4 categories based on their style:

  1. Wire Wrapped Bracelets
  2. Wire Bangle Bracelets
  3. Memory Wire Bracelets
  4. Wire Cuff Bracelets

What are you waiting for? Grab your wire and learn how to make wire bracelets in some beautiful and unique ways!

How to make wire bracelets: Wire Wrapped Bracelets

Wire wrapped bracelets are so fun and stylish! These wire wrapped bracelet DIY tutorials will get you started making wire wrapped bracelets in no time!

 

1. Wire Wrapped Bracelet by Moms and Crafters:

This wire wrapped bracelet steps a little outside the box, bringing you something that’s trendy, and easy to customize! It uses totally freeform wire wrapping on a slider bracelet band for an inexpensive project that’s perfect for beginners.

2. Wire Wrapped Cuff Bracelet by Artzy Creations:

This wire wrap bracelet is so fun to make, and it looks like something you’d find in a store! Wire and beads are all you need for this one. It cleverly takes on the look of wire crochet – but isn’t!

3. DIY Gemstone Wire Wrapped Bracelet by Moms and Crafters:

You can personalize this wire wrapped bracelet by using any gemstone, colorful pearls, or even glass beads! The key to a successful wire bracelet design like this is keeping it balanced.

How to make Wire Bangle Bracelets:

Wire bangle bracelets are the perfect touch of flair for any outfit. These wire bracelets are a bit smaller, making them a more subtle accessory if needed.

4. Simple Beaded Bangles by Moms and Crafters:

Sometimes the simplest things are the prettiest. These simple beaded bangles are elegant and charming, with a classic style. they use inexpensive spacer beads and are fun to stack.

5. DIY Easy Wire Wrapped Bangle by Moms and Crafters:

This DIY wire wrapped bangle is perfect by itself or stacked with others. You can stack it with any other bangle or even with a favorite bracelet. They started out as a mistake but the final look is so much fun!

Bonus: Simple Wire Bracelet DIY by Moms & Crafters:

I made this simple bangle for my sister’s wedding and decided to share the tutorial. It teaches basic hammering techniques – a favorite for learning how to make wire bracelets.

Want to learn how to make jewelry out of anything? Get the book!

How to make Memory Wire Bracelets:

Memory wire bracelets are some of the easiest DIY wire bracelets you’ll ever make. Check out the amazing variety of style you can make with such a simple base!

The spiral of the wire gives a statement cuff look, but the actual process is one you learned to do when you were in preschool.

6. Memory Wire Bracelet DIY by Crafty Little Gnome:

If you have a hodgepodge of spare beads, this wire bracelet is the cutest way to put them to use! You can make this bracelet any color you want to match your favorite outfits.

7. Memory Wire Bracelets by This Southern Girl Can:

This memory wire bracelet goes with anything! With neutral colors and a classic style, you can wear this anywhere.

Jewelry Making For Beginners: How To Make Memory Wire Bracelets - YouTube

8. Memory Wire Bead Bracelets by My Bright Ideas:

I love the golds and browns in this memory wire bracelet! It really gives it a classy tortoiseshell look.

9. Memory Wire Wrap Bracelet by Running With Sisters:

This boho-chic memory wire bracelet is so colorful and stylish! You wouldn’t believe how easy it is to make! By grouping same beads together instead of doing an alternating pattern, you get a much cleaner look.

How to Make Wire Cuff Bracelets

These wire cuff bracelets show just what’s possible with wire bracelets. These may be a little more intricate, but they’re so worth it!

10. Double-Sided Pendant/Bracelet Wire Wrap by OxanaCrafts:

Multi Way Double Sided Pendant/Bracelet Wire Wrap Tutorial - YouTube

This wire bracelet looks like something you’d find on vacation. This could be an amazing handmade gift! The chained portion makes it easier to wear.

11. Savoy Knot Bracelet Wirework by Lily-Tree:

Savoy Knot Bracelet - Wirework Tutorial - YouTube

If you’ve ever wanted a wire bracelet with a Celtic twist, check this out! The way this wire bracelet is tied up, it looks a lot like a Celtic knot.

12. Swirly Wire Bracelets by Guidecentral English:

How To Create Swirly Wire Bracelets - DIY Crafts Tutorial - Guidecentral - YouTube

For such a bracelet that’s so simple to craft, this swirly wire bracelet looks like something a professional would make! Using silver wire for this one really give it that premium feel.

Now that you’ve learned how to make wire bracelets from the tutorials above, it’s time to try your own idea!

Have these tutorials helped you learn how to make wire bracelets? What’s your favorite style of wire bracelet? Leave a comment below and share with us!

The post How to Make Wire Bracelets – wire wrapping, bangles, memory wire & more! appeared first on Moms and Crafters.

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This wire bracelet DIY is a really simple beginner jewelry making project that teaches the basics of working with wire to make the bulk of your pieces. You can check out my post on how to wire wrap a pendant if you prefer those, or scroll down for this tutorial. Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links.

When my sister got married this Fall, I got an inexpensive dress (in the $30 price range to be exact!!)

I decided to dress it up with jewelry. I made myself a beautiful necklace wire wrap and simple DIY beaded earrings. 

At first, I tried to crochet a cuff bracelet from wire, but I had overestimated my wire crochet abilities. Then, I went and made a simple wire bracelet DIY to wear. I also went ahead and redid this wire wrap bracelet tutorial in the correct colors.

In the end, I ditched it all, and stuck with my simple brushed silver bangle (the one you see layered in these photos) but I decided to share the wire bracelet DIY with you anyway – because it’s a fun and simple beginner wire jewelry tutorial.

I had actually made the wire bracelet DIY to layer with the bangle pictured but the opening caught on the bangle that I made and didn’t really work. So I decided to simplify.

This DIY bangle is really simple to make. I used sterling silver wire – you want to stick to a soft metal for this. You can use copper if you’d like to save money while you learn (like I did on this wire wrap stone).

Because I used what I had handy already, I used wires that were a bit thinner than I should have. It’s pretty and delicate, but you’ll want to go up a bit in thickness.

I hammered the main body wire of the wire bracelet DIY – that’s optional but adds a stunning texture. Okay, actually I do it because it’s almost better than therapy. Just kidding but hammering is a fun way to get out all those leftover negative energies from a frustrating day – so enjoy!

If you’re new to hammering metal, you’ll want a hammer with both a ball end and a flat one. The flat one flattens the wire, and hardens it so it holds a specific shape. The ball end is what adds the pretty texture.

You also need a steel bench block. this is the counter pressure that prevents your hammering from just nicking the surface underneath. The natural reaction is for the top softest surface in your “stack” – the wire and anything directly below it – to give. Having a hard barrier in between those layers makes the top layer give.

So a steel block, which is harder than your wire, ensures that your wire gets the texture and not your work desk.

To bend soft metal, you’ll want to work with non-serrated pliers, and when possible, nylon jaw pliers. This avoids nicking your metal. Nylon jaw pliers are best and most gentle, however they can be clumsy to work with.

Want to learn how to make jewelry out of anything? Get the book!

 
What you need to make a wire bracelet DIY:

Tools:

How to make a wire bracelet DIY:

1. Create a wrapped loop at one end of your thinner wire.

2. String your beads on your thinner wire, with spacers, as you’d like them. I made mine take up about 1/3 of the final wire bracelet.

3. Push your beads flush against the first wrapped loop. Create a second wrapped loop tight against your beads, so that your beaded portion looks like this:

 

4. Take your thicker wire, and use round nose pliers to make a loop at the end. I did not solder mine shut. Trim your wire off the spool so that it’s about the size you want the rest of your bracelet to be +8mm for the second loop. For reference, the full size of your bangle should be just wide enough to slide over the widest point of your fist.

5. Placing the first loop off your block, and the rest of your wire on, hammer it using the ball side to add texture.

6. Your wire will respond to the direction you’re hammering it and harden in that shape. So turn your wire over as needed to form a straight line with a beautiful texture. I hammered less/avoided the very tip of the wire where the second loop will be formed.

7. I neglected to photograph the rest of the steps in detail, but you basically just need to gently form your curve of your wire bracelet, create the second loop. Connect this portion to the loops on the beaded portion and tighten them as much as you can using nylon jaw pliers.

This is the final result! I used 20 gauge wire for the wire-only portion which is really too thin as you can see. It doesn’t have as much substance as it should, but it’s still a beautiful wire bracelet DIY.

Using a thicker wire will give you a sturdier, more substantial bracelet. You can also use this tutorial to make simple beaded wire rings.

Have you tried this wire bracelet DIY tutorial? Which kinds of beads did you use on yours? Comment below!

Print the tutorial complete with images below:

Wire Bracelet/Bangle
Print
Instructions

1. Create a wrapped loop at one end of your thinner wire.

2. String your beads on your thinner wire, with spacers, as you'd like them. I made mine take up about 1/3 of the final wire bracelet.

3. Push your beads flush against the first wrapped loop. Create a second wrapped loop tight against your beads, so that your beaded portion looks like this:

 

4. Take your thicker wire, and use round nose pliers to make a loop at the end. I did not solder mine shut. Trim your wire off the spool so that it's about the size you want the rest of your bracelet to be +8mm for the second loop. For reference, the full size of your bangle should be just wide enough to slide over the widest point of your fist.

5. Placing the first loop off your block, and the rest of your wire on, hammer it using the ball side to add texture.

6. Your wire will respond to the direction you're hammering it and harden in that shape. So turn your wire over as needed to form a straight line with a beautiful texture. I hammered less/avoided the very tip of the wire where the second loop will be formed.

7. I neglected to photograph the rest of the steps in detail, but you basically just need to gently form your curve of your wire bracelet, create the second loop. Connect this portion to the loops on the beaded portion and tighten them as much as you can using nylon jaw pliers.

This is the final result! I used 20 gauge wire for the wire-only portion which is really too thin as you can see. It doesn't have as much substance as it should, but it's still a beautiful wire bracelet DIY.

Using a thicker wire will give you a sturdier, more substantial bracelet. You can also use this tutorial to make simple beaded wire rings.

© Menucha Citron Ceder
Project Type: Jewelry Making
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All it takes is a brilliant idea and a cool tutorial to help you learn how to wire wrap a pendant! These 14 ideas will have you set with different styles and techniques. You can also find some really cool ideas for DIY dangle earrings, or scroll down for these wire wrap pendant DIY ideas. Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links.

If you’ve ever seen a piece of wire jewelry in a store and thought “Wow, how do they do that?” you’re in luck! This list is full of awesome looking wire wrap pendants you can make right in your own home!

You can even use these to learn how to wire wrap a pendant from scratch. Some of these will be easier than others based on your crafting experience, but all of them will look amazing.

Learning how to wire wrap a pendnat yourself can seem overwhelming at first, but don’t worry! If your wire wrap pendant comes out a little lopsided or uneven, that’s actually often a positive thing. It adds a lot of personality to the piece!

Below, you’ll find some amazing tutorials on how to wire wrap a pendant! It’s broken down into 3 categories based on the main material:

  1. Stones
  2. Beads
  3. Other

Are you ready to learn how to wire wrap a pendant? Well get your wire ready and start crafting!

  How to Wire Wrap a Pendant using undrilled Stones or Cabochons:

These DIY wire wrap pendants can take ordinary stones and turn them into something extraordinary! 

 

1. Gold Nugget Jewelry by Moms and Crafters:

All of the flair of gold, with none of the cost! These gold nugget pendants will give any outfit some flash! They’re made from… rough stones and gold acrylic paint. Whaaattt?! I get tons of compliments wearing these – no one guesses that they’re literally rocks!

2. Multiple Stone Free Flow Pendant by Wire Wrap School:

Wire Wrap Tutorial #11 - Multiple Stone Free Flow Pendant - YouTube

With intricate wire wraps and smooth flowing curves, this wire wrap pendant looks professionally made. This one will take some patience, but the end result is worth it!

3. Wire Wrap Cabochon:

This beautiful wire wrap cabochon is actually made from a plain glass dome, customized with cheap nail polish! It’s a great beginner project for free-form wire wrapping.

4. Symmetrical Free Flow Pendant by Wire Wrap School:

Wire Wrap Tutorial #9 - Symmetrical Free Flow Pendant - YouTube

Wire wrap necklaces are often asymmetrical, giving them a distinct hand made look. This wire wrap necklace is proof that asymmetrical design is just as stunning!

5. Spiral Cage by Make & Fable:

This cute wire wrap necklace is probably what comes to mind when most people think of wire wrap necklaces. They have a simple elegance to them, and the beautiful stones really give them personality!

6. Wire Wrap Stone:

Here’s another fun tutorial on how to wire wrap a pendant. This one uses an amethyst cabochon and copper wire for stunning contrast.

Want to learn how to make jewelry out of anything? Get the book!

 

How to wire wrap a pendant using beads:

Even using your average crafting beads, you can make beautiful wire wrap pendants! These are so easy to make, and they look outstanding!

7. Branch Necklace by Moms and Crafters:

This wire wrap pendant uses thinner wire to resemble a branch on a tree, with beautiful beaded gemstone leaves! Add as many or as few stones as you want to create different styles!

8. Owl Pendant Necklace by Fantasia Elegance:

These adorable wire wrap pendants are owl faces! This design is great for all ages, and is super simple to make!

How to Make an Owl Pendant Necklace - Wire Wrapping Tutorial Part 1 - YouTube

9. Wire Wrapped Pendants by Moms and Crafters:

This pendant is so simple, so versatile and a great way to start wire wrapping! You can create any style you want just by changing the beads you use. I recommend using 8mm beads like I did.

10. Bird Nest Necklace by Busy Creating Memories:

These wire wrap pendants look like little bird nests with eggs in them! These would make a great gift for a loved one. You can make each egg represent another child, or something else that’s meaningful.

How to wire wrap a pendant using other stuff:

These wire wrap pendants use materials that don’t quite fit into the other categories. With things like freshwater pearls or seashells, you’ll make something truly one of a kind!

 

11. Keepsake/Picture Pendant by Rachel at Wire Guild:

If lockets are too old school for you, give this wire wrap pendant a try. Using just wrapped wire, you can make a beautiful little p[icture frame you can wear anywhere!

Keepsake/ Picture Pendant Wire Pendant Tutorial - YouTube

12. Necklace Wire Wrap by Moms and Crafters:

This wire wrap necklace gets its unique look from shimmering freshwater pearls. These pearls vary in shape and color, making them amazingly versatile! I included this tutorial in this list even though it’s more a necklace than pendant because I simply couldn’t leave it out!

You can see more DIY statement necklace ideas here.

13. Wire Wrapped Nature Pendants by Pink Stripey Socks:

These are truly the definition of beauty in wire wrap pendants! Using just a wire and any piece of nature you can get your hands on, you can make an amazing piece.

14. Resin Crystal Wire Wrapped Pendant by Resin Crafts:

These wire wrapped crystals are not what they seem! These are actually crystals made using resin and a mold, making them far more customizable than natural crystals.

Which of these wire wrap pendants will you make first? Share your favorites either from this list or anywhere else in the comments! Did these help you learn how to wire wrap a pendant?

 
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Learn how to wire wrap stones without holes with this DIY wire wrap stone pendant tutorial! You can try the simpler wire wrap cabochon project that I’ve shared just a week ago, or scroll down to take it a level up! Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links.

A cabochon is an undrilled stone that has a flat back and a smooth (not faceted) front. In this tutorial, I used a beautiful deep purple amethyst stone, with copper wire that creates a stunning contrast against the depth of the stone.

A few notes about wire wrap stone techniques:
  • Tucking wire ends – you’ll find many times that I tell you to “trim and tuck” your ends. You don’t want sharp ends sticking out to scratch your skin or snag your clothing. Use pliers to squish your ends flat against your piece or to tuck them into existing wirework.
  • Coiling – A very simple wire wrapping technique, this is a beautiful way to clean up your wire wrap, and add something to ground it. If you want more of a “messy” look, you can still do this to clean up your work, as it adds a centralized focus even when messy. Or, work on doing it neatly, with a few coils wrapped up against each other.
  • Weaving – Usually you’ll want to weave using a very thin wire, woven around a thicker wire. However, since I wanted my coil to be thick here, I used a thicker wire and let the weave stay open and loose. Just like coiling, it can add a really artsy touch when done slightly messily.

A few notes about which wires to use to wire wrap stone:
  • Hardness – One of the most important features of the wire you use is how soft it’ll be. Softer wires bend more easily, will wrap more neatly, and will be easy to work with. You’ll also find that they mark more easily, which is why I recommend having nylon jaw pliers handy as well as non-serrated chain nose pliers for when the nylon jaw is too clumsy.
  • Material – Natural precious metals (copper, silver, gold, gold-filled) tend to be softer than steel, brass, and other cheaper metals. However, they can be pricey. Copper is a good “starter wire” because it’s quite soft and easy to work with, but it’s still affordable.
  • Gauge – gauge refers to the thickness of a wire. The higher the gauge the thinner the wire. While I’d definitely love to recommend having every gauge from 12-28 on hand for wire wrapping if you’re serious about it, that might be unrealistic for beginners. That’s why instead I’d recommend having 16 gauge, 20 gauge, and 24 gauge handy. 20 gauge is a good in-between thickness for most projects, and is what I used for this wire wrap stone pendant.

In this post, I shared with you a very exact wire wrap stone pendant tutorial. I don’t usually like doing that, however I feel that it’s important for you to follow a tutorial or two to get the gist of how to wire wrap stones without holes, and how to “lock” the stone in while still keeping it pretty.

Feel free to play around, experiment, and do your own thing – because that’s really the point of jewelry making.

While this wire wrap stone tutorial has lots of steps (twenty to be exact) it’s only because it’s so specific – for the reasons I mentioned above. However, you’ll find that you can typically complete it in under half an hour, and the supplies list is really small.

You’ll start wanting to make this for all your DIY gift needs!

 

What you need to make this DIY wire wrap stone pendant: How to wire wrap stones without holes:

1. Line up two lengths of wire. Mine were approximately 18 inches long.

2. Place another wire about 6-8 inches long vertically over them.

3. Coil your vertical wire tightly and neatly a few times around your horizontal wires. Keep in mind that while this isn’t an exact formula, you are now creating the design. So make sure it looks pretty, focus on aesthetics. I’d recommend wrapping 3-6 times.

4. Take your right wire end that you just wrapped and place it over one of the horizontal wires and under the other.

5. Continue weaving the right of the vertical wire over and under the horizontal wires on the right of your coil. Try to do it as neatly and tightly as possible, but do keep in mind that a bit of an imperfect look makes it look a bit like a vine. That works really well with the amethyst stones I used, as well as the earthy copper, however it can also look good in almost any color combination.

6. Finish off the right half of your vertical wire by wrapping it around the horizontal wires three times (again, not an exact science but it has to look good). If needed, trim it close to the coil, and use pliers to make sure any sharp edges aren’t protruding.

7. Repeat the weaving and the final coil on the left side.

8. Curve your wire wrapped section so that it roughly fits the stone along what will be the bottom curve of your wire wrap stone pendant.

9. Bend the left two wires and the right two wires over the stone, curving them gently, so that they cross over each other in an X close to the top of the stone.

10. Remove the stone and cross your wires over each other as pictured. The left two should be inside the right two (or vice versa).

11. Place your stone back inside the wire wrap, so that two wires are in front and two in back (one each from the right and left). It won’t stay in place on its own at this point. Readjust the positioning of the wires as needed. Holding  your stone in place as best as you can, so that you can get the sizing right, wrap the back left wire around the two front wires a couple of times.

12. Repeat with the other back wire. Your back will look something like this. You’ll still need to hold the stone in place. If you’re struggling with that – remove the stone as you complete your wrapping, and only hold it in place while you do a single “positioning” wrap.  

13. Now, take one of your back/wrapped wires, and bring it down the back of the cabochon along the end that makes sense – that it’s facing. Bend it through to the front.

14. If you can, thread them through one of your holes that you created in your weave in steps 5 and 7. This will really help position it well. If you can’t just thread it beneath the woven portion, and bend it into shape as best as you can.

15. Bring it back around the back and around your top wrapped portion a couple of times.

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