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Dangle potted succulents in 70s neon macramé plant hangers — ideal for brightening up indoor spaces or prettifying the front porch. Learn how to make your own with our easy step-by-step tutorial.

You will need:
• Wooden pole ring (28mm)
• Neon pink yarn
• Tape measure
• Scissors
• Plant pot
Buy here

Step 1
Cut four pieces of neon pink yarn measuring 2m each. Fold them in half and take the folded end through the pole ring. Next take the other end through the yarn loop and pull tightly. You now have eight strands of yarn.

Step 2
Separate the strands into four sections, with two strands per section. Tie one section into a knot about 35cm (13¾”) down from the pole ring. Repeat with the other three sections.

Step 3
Now pair off the left strand from one section with the right strand from the next section. Tie these strands together 10cm (4”) below the previous knot. Repeat with the other three sections.

Step 4
Repeat step 3 one more time, leaving 8cm (3⅛”) distance between the knots.

Step 5
Tie all the strands together at the base of where the plant pot will be. Cut off the excess yarn to get an even tassel. Then carefully place the plant pot inside the holder and hang it up on a hook.

Made this project? Show us on InstagramTwitterPinterest and Facebook

The post How to make a macramé plant hanger appeared first on Mollie Makes.

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There’s something kinda magic about our latest competition.

We’ve teamed up with Wool and the Gang to give away five of their new Kinda Magic Socks Kits. Gone are the days when you had to do your own colourwork — the yarn in the kits is self-patterning and creates a bold leopard print. The kit is designed for advanced knitters and each one contains everything you need to knit up your magical leopard print socks:

  • 1 x ball of self-patterning yarn
  • 1 x sock pattern
  • 1 x knitter’s sewing needle
  • 1 x set 2.75mm double-pointed knitting needles
  • 1 x set 2.5mm double-pointed knitting needles
  • 1 x set 2.25mm double-pointed knitting needles

We’re giving away one kit to five lucky winners. Choose from five colourways: Pink Paws, Candy Claws, Feline Good Green, Purfect Purple, or the classic tan leopard print, Cool Cat.

Pink Paws

Candy Claws

Feline Good green

Purfect Purple

Cool Cat Cooper

All you have to do is enter the competition before 11.55pm GMT on Wednesday 21st February and let us know which kit you fancy. Purrfect!

The post Win 1 of 5 Wool and the Gang Kinda Magic Socks kits in our competition appeared first on Mollie Makes.

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The post 2018 reader survey appeared first on Mollie Makes.

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Craft experts share their tips and tricks to help you host your own successful craft workshop.

You have the skills and you want to share them, but working out how to host your own craft workshop can be daunting. From what to charge to first-time teaching nerves, we’ve gathered together workshop experts to talk you through everything you need to do to host a successful (and fun!) workshop.

Related articles What to teach

When deciding on a workshop, make sure it’s a skill you know inside out, whether that’s making a macramé wall hanging or planting a terrarium. Take account of whether you can complete your project in one session and if attendees will need longer to get the best results.

“It can be pretty intimidating when you first stand up in front of a group of strangers and do a demonstration,” explains Zoe Bateman of Too Cute To Quit.

“Try it out on a group of friends first to get a feel for how long it takes to teach someone who has never tried it before. Doing a test run will also help highlight any difficulties, and help you to create a lesson plan to ensure you stay on track.”

Jane Gois of Tea and Crafting agrees, “Sometimes keeping it simple is best. As crafters we want to show students everything they can do, but sometimes you can overwhelm a student if you give them too much to remember in one go.”

Location, location, location

The location of your workshop is really important. A venue that already runs workshops will have most of the kit you need, but if it’s somewhere not traditionally used, check it out first to make sure there’s enough space, tables and chairs. “If it’s in a pub or coffee shop make sure it’s not too noisy,” says Jane.

“Lighting is so important when doing crafts — visit the venue in advance so you can see what the lighting is like or if you will need to bring some of your own.”

Also consider transport, parking and disabled access. If you have your own workspace you may want to think about hosting it there for a more creative atmosphere. Jane says, “I went to a craft workshop in Portugal a few years ago, which was based in the tutor’s house that overlooked the sea. It was so incredibly relaxing and made for a perfect workshop.”

What to charge

Once you’ve picked your craft and your location, you need to work out how much to charge for it. Take a look at what similar workshops cost as a starting point, but there’s a lot more to consider.

“Start with your day rate and break it down into hours, then work out the number of hours you will spend teaching, sourcing the materials, planning and prepping, as well as travelling time,” says homeware designer and workshop tutor Zeena Shah.

Jane adds, “Take into account how many people you’ll to make it financially viable, but if you feel the price is too high look at the costs and see if anything can be reduced.”

Make up a sample before the workshop to decide how much material each attendee will need, which you’ll also need to factor into the cost. “Whatever you think you’ll need, be sure to have plenty of extras because the last thing you want is to run out of something mid-workshop,” says Zoe.

“Remember you don’t always have to have enough tools for each person — if it’s something they don’t use often during a workshop (e.g. scissors during a crochet workshop) then one between two people is totally fine.”

You’ll also need to choose a system to take bookings, like Bookwhen, Eventbrite or Billetto. Have a think about what will suit your workshop best.

Spread the word

So you’ve sorted the big stuff! Now you need to let everyone know about your workshop.

“There’s nothing worse that rushing it and ending up not selling any tickets as it’s too short notice. I’d suggest planning at least three months ahead,” says Zeena.

If you already have a mailing list make the most of it, and post on social media too. “You have to be much more targeted in your promotion for a workshop, as most attendees will come from nearby,” says Zoe.

“Although online advertising is still extremely important, ‘real life’ marketing is crucial too. Put up posters or leave leaflets in local businesses and hand out flyers at stations. Although you may get a few guests who will travel from further afield, most of your business — particularly repeat attendees — will be from locals.”

Zeena agrees, saying “Hit up all of your friends and ask them to share a beautiful visual of the workshop. Planning events up to six months in advance gives you plenty of time to get your workshop featured in publications and on websites.”

Avoid the pitfalls

The key thing to remember is to be prepared. Check your supplies and pack them up the day before and don’t forget to leave plenty of time to travel to the venue and set up.

When it comes to first time nerves, Zoe suggests a quick chat is the best way to stay calm. “I try to chat to the guests as they arrive so that they don’t feel like total strangers when it’s time to talk in front of them,” she says.

“I also bring my bag of emergency supplies, which includes things like sticky tape, scissors, pens and pencils, wet wipes and string, which ensure that I can deal with most issues that may arise.

“From scalpel injuries to misbehaving toddlers, I’ve had it all, but 99% of attendees are lovely. Usually the most difficult part of a workshop is getting people to leave on time because they don’t want to stop!”

Jane also advises making sure your class know what to expect from the day. “If it’s very technical let them know that at the beginning,” she says. “Always have something up your sleeve for any attendees who finish earlier than expected – this can be as simple as teaching them a more advanced technique or just embellishing an item they have made.”

Give a little extra

Everyone loves getting something extra for their money, which is especially true at a workshop. “I like to give attendees something to take away with them to ensure they can continue with what they’ve learned,” says Zoe.

“Sometimes it’s just providing full instructions and a supply list, so they can easily order everything they need, but wherever possible I try to give them the tools and materials they will need to repeat what they’ve learned in the workshop.”

Zeena also likes to give her guests a little extra so they book again. “I always set their place setting with their name and giving postcards out is simple way to share your details afterwards,” she says. “Your attendees are your best marketing tool, so make sure they have an experience to remember and they’ll tell all their friends.”

First image © Zeena Shah, second and third images © Tea and Crafting, fourth image 4 by Keila Hötzel on Unsplash, fifth image © Zeena Shah, sixth image © Tea and Crafting and seventh image © Zoe Bateman.

The post How to host a craft workshop appeared first on Mollie Makes.

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Crocheters and colour lovers, this one’s for you! The delightful Pollevie is taking over our Instagram and Pinterest accounts for our latest Mollie Takeover.

Expect an explosion of colour when Ellen Deckers, the face behind Pollevie, takes over the reins from Thursday 15th – Sunday 18th February. Crochet wiz Ellen’s going to be serving up lots of yarn goodness, a CAL, a discount code and bucketfuls of inspo, all the way from the Netherlands.

Mollie Takeovers are up-to-the-minute tours of our guest’s home, craft space and creative mind. We can’t wait for Pollevie’s to begin! See you over on Insta and Pinterest. x

All images © Pollevie

The post Mollie Makes Takeover guest: Pollevie appeared first on Mollie Makes.

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Got your copy of Mollie Makes 88 in New Zealand, Germany, Sweden, or Coles in Australia? Create our sweet floral wreath from Delia Randall.

Step 1

Remove each pre-cut piece from the felt. To make the poppy, take a small dark pink petal. Overlap the centre flap onto the right flap, then place the left flap on top to create a cupped base. Sew using two strands of matching thread.

Step 2

Repeat Step 1 with the remaining dark pink petals – there should be three small, three medium and four large.

Step 3

Tie a knot halfway along the green rectangle, then thread both ends through the slit in the green centre piece.

Step 4

Stitch the base of the petals around the base of the centre piece, starting with the smallest and working out to the largest. Overlap as you go to get an even shape, and avoid stitching the green rectangle as this will attach the flower to the hoop.

Step 5

Sew two green leaves to the base of the flower to finish.

Step 6

To make the peony, repeat Steps 1-2 with the pale pink petals, and Step 3 with the pale pink rectangle. Repeat Steps 4-5 to attach the petals and leaves.

Step 7

To make the anemone, repeat Steps 1-2 with the peach petals, then tie a knot halfway along the thinnest dark pink rectangle. Fold it in half along the length, then wrap the dark pink filament strip around the knot as shown, positioning the top of the knot just below the top of the snipped filaments. Sew using matching thread.

Step 8

Attach the petals around the base of the centre filament as per Step 4, then add the leaves as per Step 5.

Step 9

To attach the flowers to the hoop, overlap the ends of each felt rectangle around the hoop and trim any excess felt. Using matching thread, sew the ends together, as close to the hoop as possible. You can use a dab of glue to secure them further.

Step 10

Tie the length of ribbon to the top of the hoop to hang.

The post How to make a felt floral wreath appeared first on Mollie Makes.

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Mollie Makes by Hannah Carr - 1w ago

Up your loungewear game in The New Craft House’s cosy-glam swan pyjamas.

There’s nothing better than coming home on a chilly winter evening and changing straight into a slouchy jumper, woolly socks and your favourite pjs. This pair will let everyone know you’re officially off-duty, and ready to curl up on the sofa for the night.

We’ve used Bonnie Christine’s Hello Ollie fabric in Swanlings Bevy Peach, designed for Art Gallery Fabrics, as we’re seriously crushing on all things swan-related. But, this straightforward pattern would work just as well with brushed cotton for a classic pyjama feel.

You’ll need
  • Light to medium-weight woven fabric, 2.5m (2½yrds)
  • Matching sewing thread
  • Elastic, 1m (1yrd), 0.5cm (¼”) wide
  • Ribbon, 60cm (23 5/8“), 1.5cm (5/8“) wide
  • Paper for templates
  • Tailor’s chalk
Sizes

(UK) 8-10, 10-12, 12-14. You can amend the template to create other sizes.

Notes

Use a seam allowance of 1.5cm (5/8“), clipping the curves where necessary so the seam allowances lie flat, and making sure to press your seams open throughout.

How to make the pjs

Step one

Using this template, trace out your pattern pieces in 8-10, 10-12 or 12-14 onto pattern paper or greaseproof paper. For other sizes you can amend the template.

Step two

Fold your fabric in half lengthways with wrong sides (WS) facing, then pin your pattern pieces to the fabric, matching the grain line on the pattern to the straight grain of your fabric. Cut around your pattern pieces carefully and mark all notches. Mark the buttonholes and pocket markers using tailor’s chalk. If you’re using a directional fabric, make sure you cut the pattern pieces in the right direction.

Step three

Using your buttonhole foot, make a buttonhole on both of your front leg pieces at the markings, ensuring it’s wide enough to fit your elastic through.

Step four

Fold the top of your pocket piece to the WS by 0.5cm (¼”), then again by 1.5cm (5/8“). Press and sew in place. Fold over the remaining three sides of your pocket to the WS, again by 0.5cm (¼”), and press.

Step five

Place your pocket on the right side (RS) back leg piece, matching it up with the pocket markers and with RS up. Pin in place, then top stitch around the two sides and bottom of the pocket, close to the edge.

Step six

Place one front and one back leg with RS together, lining them up along the inner legs with notches matching. Pin and sew along the inner leg seam, then press the seam open. Repeat for the other front and back leg.

Step seven

Place both leg pieces RS together, lining them up around the crotch seam. Pin and sew around the curve. Sew another seam 0.5cm (¼”) down from this line of stitching, and trim off any excess seam allowance above the first line.

Step eight

With RS still together, match the two side seams of your pyjamas. Pin and sew both sides together along the length.

Step nine

Fold over the bottom of your pyjama legs to the WS by 0.5cm (¼”), then again by 1.5cm (5/8“). Press and sew in place.

Step ten

Fold over the waistband of your pyjamas to the WS by 0.5cm (¼”), then again by 2.5cm (1″). Check your buttonholes are positioned in the centre of the band, then press and pin. Sew in place along the bottom of the waistband, then turn the pyjamas RS out.

Step 11

Measure the elastic around your hips where the trousers will sit and mark at a comfortable length. Attach a safety pin to one end of the elastic, then push through one buttonhole all the way around the waistband, being careful not to twist the elastic. Pull out of the same buttonhole, cross the two ends of the elastic over each other so they lie flat, and stitch together at the mark you made earlier. Push the elastic back into the buttonhole so it all sits inside the waistband.

Step 12

Thread your length of ribbon through the buttonholes and tie in a bow to finish.

About The New Craft House

Rosie and Hannah are the duo behind award-winning blog The New Craft House. Friends since childhood, the pair learned to knit together on the school bus. They both love using traditional crafts in modern projects and have recently launched their own range of craft kits. www.thenewcrafthouse.com

Related articles

The Crush Catalogue: Swans

Download a free swan desktop wallpaper

The post How to make pyjama bottoms appeared first on Mollie Makes.

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Not sure how to rock this season’s red trend? Read on for our edit of the best pieces to work the look.

If dates had colours next week’s would be red. With Valentine’s Day (and Galentine’s Day) taking place, the hue is pretty much our theme for seven days. It’s the colour of the moment for the season too, so we’ll be continuing our red obsession into the next few months as well. Equally obsessed? Have a look at what we’ve found for you.

[Clockwise from top]

  1. Proclaim your love loudly with this bright red balloon.
  2. Channel Dorothy with Tatty Devine’s ruby slippers necklace. Toto not included.
  3. Create your own spin on the red trend with a tutorial for a jumper update. Find the instructions from Lana Red in Mollie Makes 88.
  4. Looking for a gift for your other half or a gal pal? Look no further than this cross stitched felt heart hoop from Cotton Clara.
  5. Studio Arhoj has played another blinder with the Pen, a hand-thrown vase that we’re planning to keep our best craft tools in.
  6. Take note… Hopscotch has some pretty fancy patterned notebooks and we want to get our hands on them all.
  7. Not brave enough to dress head-to-toe in red? Us neither. These mini tassel earrings will add a subtle pop of colour to your outfit.

The post Crush Catalogue: Red alert appeared first on Mollie Makes.

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Oops! We forgot to include the hook size for Katie Jones’ crochet cushion pattern in issue 89. We recommend a 3.5mm (UK 9 or US E/4) hook but this could vary depending on your tension. Sorry for the mistake.

The post Correction: Crochet cushion pattern, issue 89 appeared first on Mollie Makes.

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Save 50% when you subscribe to Mollie Makes and receive 13 issues direct to your door for only £2.99 an issue! Subscribe today  for this special introductory offer.

Mollie Makes is a crafty lifestyle magazine bringing you the best of handmade from around the world. Spend the next year with us and enjoy beautiful innovative projects and how-tos, trend reports, gorgeous product pics, plus interviews with the most inspiring creatives. Don’t miss out — subscribe today!

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*North American savings compared to buying 13 full priced issues at $13.99 from the US newsstand. Payment is taken in US$. This offer is for new print subscribers only. You will receive 13 issues in a year. Prices correct at point of print and subject to change. If at any time during the first 60 days you are dissatisfied in any way, please notify us in writing and we will refund you all un-mailed issues. Offer ends: 31st December 2018.

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