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Around 39 million Americans experience migraine headaches, according to the Migraine Research Foundation.

If you’re one of these people, you know the sometimes debilitating symptoms they can cause and the toll they take on your quality of life. May 17, 2018 marked a breakthrough in migraine prevention therapy when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Aimovig (erenumab). Since its release over 120,000 patients have been prescribed Aimovig in the U.S.

Well-Being spoke to Christina Treppendahl, FNPBC, AQH, of The Headache Center in Ridgeland about this and other similar drugs, now approved by the FDA for the prevention of migraine headaches. Before getting into the discussion about how this new class of drugs works and what she has observed so far in terms of their effectiveness, Ms.Treppendahl described how clinicians differentiate between drugs designed to treat migraine pain from those designed to prevent the onset of migraine symptoms.

“Treating a headache or migraine attack after the pain starts, is what we call abortive therapy or acute attack therapy,” notes Treppendahl. “Treating the condition of migraine with the intention of not ever having a migraine, is preventive therapy or prophylaxis.”

Until recently, there have been only 3 classes of medications available for migraine prevention (antihypertensives, antidepressants and antiepileptics) and one therapeutic drug indicated for the prevention of chronic migraine (onobotulinumtoxinA – a cosmetic agent). This new class of drugs was developed to specifically target key mediators involved in the pathophysiology of migraine.

How Migraine Prevention Drugs Work

“It’s important to understand how drugs like Aimovig are different from what was available prior to their approval this year,” she continues. “Aimovig is the first monthly self-administered injection available to prevent migraine. This novel class of drugs was designed to decrease the number of monthly migraine days by blocking a targeted neuropeptide (calcitonin gene-related peptide or CGRP). This neuropeptide has been studied for over 30 years by neuroscientists due to the key role it plays in migraine pathophysiology and head pain.”

Two additional medications, Ajovy (fremanezumab) and Emgality (galcanezumab), now have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the prevention of migraine in adults. They are similar in method of delivery (self-administered injections – monthly or quarterly) and employ similar mechanisms of action (blocking the release of CGRP into trigeminovascular system during a migraine attack).

Drug Effectiveness So Far

Since their FDA approval, The Headache Center in Ridgeland, has prescribed this new class of drugs for approximately 700-800 patients, and according to Ms. Treppendahl, they have seen some very dramatic improvements in a large percentage of these patients.

“While we have had a small handful of patients report no improvement, which is to be expected, fortunately, the majority of patients are reporting significant improvements,” she reports. “This has been a real game changer for patients that have ‘tried everything’ for prevention and never had any success.”

During clinical trials for the drugs, many patients were on other preventive medications, or they were overusing attack medications (more than 3 days per week), and they still had a significant positive response compared to the placebo group. Some decreased their monthly migraine or headache days by 50%. Others reported a 75% reduction in headache days and some super-responders (those that reported zero headache days during one month with Aimovig on board).

When discussing prevention, it is important to know what the goal is.

“First, we would like to be able to cut the number of headache days in half,” Ms. Treppendahl explains. “We call this the 50% responder rate. That is the minimally acceptable goal. Of course, we prefer to cut headache days down by 75% or even by 100%. In addition to decreased headache days per month, we look for other things such as a reduction in the severity of attacks, attacks that respond more readily to treatment, decreased use of medications to abort attacks, less days with disability, no missed work or school or social functions and patient satisfaction and report of an improved overall quality of life.”

Other Migraine Therapies and Behavioral Modification

Of course there are a number of other drug therapies and methodologies that are used to treat migraine pain. These range from anti-seizure medications, to antihypertensives or beta blockers, neurotoxin injections such as BotoxTM, antidepressants and neuromodulation devices. There are also specific actions a person can take:

• Trigger avoidance: Managing triggers

– Headache Diary to help identify potential triggers

– Smartphone Apps

• Lifestyle modification: “Prescribed” lifestyle changes

– Good sleep hygiene

– Healthy diet and exercise

• Mind-body therapies have proven efficacy and benefit in migraine mangagement:

– Biofeedback

– Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

– Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Call to Action

In closing, Ms. Treppendahl offered a word of encouragement and a call to action for those who suffer chronic, debilitating migraine pain.

“Don’t wait another day. If you suffer from frequent or severe head, face or neck pain, please seek out a headache specialist to get treatment before the condition progresses and you lose time and years of what could have been, a more productive and rewarding life.”

Christina Treppendahl, FNP-BC, AQH, is Founder and Director of The Headache Center at 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 7205 in Ridgeland. She is a Family Nurse Practitioner with a Master of Science degree in Neonatal Nursing from Vanderbilt University and a Post-Master’s degree in Family Nursing from The W in Columbus, Mississippi. Ms. Treppendahl is currently enrolled in the Master’s of Headache Disorders program abroad at the University of Copenhagen. She is certified in headache medicine by the National Headache Foundation.

Ms. Treppendahl is a national speaker for migraine-specific FDA-approved pharmacologic therapies and has given presentations for the National Headache Foundation and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. She is also Founder and Director of The Headache Center Institute, a non-profit organization promoting patient awareness and provider training. She is currently enrolled in the Master’s of Headache Disorders program abroad at the University of Copenhagen.

In addition to the clinical practice, The Headache Center has a robust research center that enrolls patients in national clinical studies for migraine and cluster treatment.

This article is shared with permission from Well-Being Magazine. It was originally
published in the magazine’s January/February 2019 issue. For more from Well-Being 

The post Migraine Prevention: Game-Changing Medications • Well-Being Magazine appeared first on The Headache Center.

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Mississippi Headache Symposium Faculty member Ian Carroll presented this year on CSF leaks and low-pressure headaches. He spoke about the difficulty in recognizing the condition for its many overlaps with other headache disorders. 

Low (and high) pressure headaches are all too commonly misdiagnosed as chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache or sinusitis. The Headache Center has the most experienced team of headache experts in the state of Mississippi focused on correctly diagnosing and treating patients with chronic daily headaches that are refractory to common treatments.

Please take a moment to read this informative article on low-pressure headaches.

Here are some highlights:

  • Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are treatable, often misdiagnosed, and can cause a neurologic syndrome that may include daily headache, fatigue, nausea, and tinnitus (ringing ears).
  • Although CSF leaks may not be readily apparent on imaging, a suspected CSF leak is important to consider because it is treatable.
  • Patients initially may be diagnosed as having chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, or chronic migraine when a CSF leak is causing their symptoms. It is a tragedy when patients “have a fixable leak and … nothing is done to treat that underlying problem,” Dr. Carroll said.

Whether you, yourself, are suffering from a headache disorder, or you’re trying to learn how to help a loved one who is in pain, understanding the condition is important. See our resource pages to explore a variety of articles and videos designed to provide education about diagnosis and optimal treatment. And remember, we’re here to help.


If you suspect you may be experiencing a headache disorder–whether migraine, low pressure headache, tension-type headache, or facial pain–the best thing you can do for your health is to contact a professional immediately. There is no substitute for evaluation by a qualified headache specialist.

The post CSF Leaks and Low-Pressure Headaches appeared first on The Headache Center.

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The Headache Center by Susan James - 11M ago
JOIN US ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 FOR THE MILES FOR MIGRAINE FUN RUN!
STEP UP WITH US

To Raise Awareness, Fight Stigma, & Build Community

Saturday, October 20

Race begins at 8:00am rain or shine

The Headache Center
Renaissance at Colony Park
1000 Highland Colony Pkwy
Ridgeland, MS 39157

Help Raise Funds to Train and Educate New Headache Specialists! Register, Share, Donate, and Support Online:
RUN
5K Walk or Run
Prizes for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Place
Ages 0-10: FREE
Ages 11-17: $30
Ages 18+: $35
WALK
1 mile Walk
Strollers & Pets Welcome
Ages 0-10: FREE
Ages 11-17: $25
Ages 18+: $30
CHEER
VOLUNTEER
Join & Support Fellow Migraine Advocates from the Sidelines
Packet Pickup
Water Stations
Directions & Aid
Prizes & Goodies
DONATE
SUPPORT
Can’t join us on the 20th? You can still support your team and help raise funds for headache disorder research, awareness, and treatment!
Donate Online
Share on Social Media
Tell Your Friends
facilities and packet pickup

You will be able to pick up your race packets at The Headache Center between 7:30AM and 12:00PM on Friday October 19th, or at registration Saturday morning beginning at 7:00AM. Indoor restroom will be provided at the start/finish line, and there will be water stops along the course. Post race awards will immediately follow top runners finishing in each race category, near the start/finish line. 

designated quiet room

There will be a Designated Quiet Room available at the event, where those suffering from a migraine or headache will be able to lie down in a dark, quiet space. If you are not feeling up to a walk, run, or volunteer assignment on the day of the event PLEASE still plan to join us on this important day of advocacy. Connection with others who understand life with migraine and headache disorders is invaluable, and we want you to be able to experience this community support. Please try to come and be present with other migraine advocates in your community, knowing you will still have a space to retreat and recover.

The Miles for Migraine Fun Run Benefits
THE HEADACHE CENTER INSTITUTE

As a grantmaking and advocacy organization dedicated to improving outcomes for headache sufferers, The Headache Center Institute proudly supports medical professionals, patients, and support networks alike, because we know that every piece of the puzzle is a necessary ingredient for success. Learn more at:

dedicated to improving outcomes for headache sufferers

The Headache Center Institute supports

The Fellowship Program was created to address the critical shortage of qualified practitioners by providing hands-on clinical training to Nurse Practitioners, Neurologists, and other healthcare professionals in the practice of headache specialty.  Students in the program are immersed in a working Headache Specialty clinic, learning from some of the nation’s top experts in Headache Medicine and shadowing a qualified headache specialist on a one-on-one basis. Upon completion of the program students are asked to commit at least 2 years to practicing Headache Medicine, and should be prepared to take the Certification of Additional Qualification (CAQ) in Headache Specialty.

If you’re a licensed healthcare professional who is passionate about headache medicine and seeking to pursue added qualification in headache specialty, OR a clinic owner or private practice provider seeking to hire an NP or PA qualified in headache specialty, THC fellowship program may be a good fit for you.

Visit the Fellowship program or Institute websites today!

Healthcare professionals are invited to join The Headache Center Institute for the Inaugural Mississippi Headache Symposium, October 17-18.

The post Miles for Migraine appeared first on The Headache Center.

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Aimovig™—the first of a new class of drugs designed to treat migraine by blocking CGRP—is now available at The Headache Center! Check out these 5 Fast Facts to learn more about it:
1. yes, it's "that" botox®

BOTOX® is a form of botulinum toxin that is commonly injected for cosmetic purposes, such as reducing wrinkles. The FDA approved its use for the treatment of chronic migraine in 2010, and many patients have reported success with this treatment.

2. BOTOX® prevents migraine attacks before they start

BOTOX® is injected around certain “hot spots” for migraine pain, where it blocks the neurotransmitters that tell muscles to contract and send pain signals to the brain. It is a preventative treatment, and is not effective when treating an ongoing migraine attack.

3. it takes time for botox® to be effective

Patients should not expect immediate results with BOTOX®, though some may experience success with their first treatment. It can take 2 or 3 treatments to begin experiencing relief, and up to 6 months to reach the full benefit.

4. BOTOX® is successful, but temporary

Some patients have reported up to a 50% reduction in migraine attacks with BOTOX®, but the benefit is temporary. Injections must be repeated every 10 weeks to maintain effectiveness. 

5. MOST INSURANCE PLANS cover BOTOX® for chronic migraine

Because BOTOX® is FDA approved for the treatment of Chronic Migraine in adults, it is covered under most insurance plans. However, please note that many plans will require you to have tried two other preventative treatments unsuccessfully before approving BOTOX®. 

The Headache Center in Ridgeland, Mississippi is highly experienced in the administration of BOTOX® for chronic migraine. Are you ready for more headache-free days? Contact us to schedule your appointment today with our headache specialists.

The post 5 Fast Facts about BOTOX® for Chronic Migraine appeared first on The Headache Center.

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AIMOVIG is the first drug ever developed for the prevention of migraine in adults. AIMOVIG is the first FDA-approved CGRP receptor block. AIMOVIG is now available at THE HEADACHE CENTER in Ridgeland, Mississippi. Call to schedule your appointment today: 601-366-0855. AIMOVIG is a monthly subcutaneous injection that can be administered conveniently in the clinic or at home with an autoinjector pen (similar to an epi pen). AIMOVIG is a highly specific drug that blocks the actions of CGRP. It’s safety and efficacy has been demonstrated in clinical trials for 12-18 month in over 2000 subjects.
LEARN MORE
AIMOVIG is well tolerated in patients. It has a very low side effect profile. The most common reactions are pain, itching and redness at the injection site (5-6% in the AIMOVIG group compared to 3% in the control group that got placebo), which typically is mild and resolves within days. Constipation was also noted in 3% of the clinical trial subjects that received higher dosages, compared to the placebo-control group at 1%. The great news is that there are no contraindications and drug-drug interactions have not been documented and are highly unlikely due to the mechanism of action of this drug. AIMOVIG, a migraine prevention drug, gave patients significantly more headache-free days per month when compared to the placebo group in the clinical trials.
AIMOVIG has not been studied in the pediatric population, the elderly, or pregnant and lactating women and thus, should be used with caution in these vulnerable populations. If you are pregnant, nursing or planning to become pregnant, please notify your provider BEFORE starting AIMOVIG. If you have a latex allergy, you should tell your provider before taking AIMOVIG, as the autoinjector pen does contain a rubber need cap which may cause an allergic reaction in individuals that are sensitive to latex.
SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY
The Headache Center in Ridgeland, Mississippi is the first place in Mississippi to offer this revolutionary migraine prevention drug. Are you ready for more headache-free days? For your free trial of AIMOVIG, call to schedule your appointment today with our headache specialists. 601-366-0855.

The post Aimovig™ Is Here: What you need to know appeared first on The Headache Center.

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The Headache Center by Jeremiah Onciu - 1y ago

 

An Oxford MS Neurologist and Headache Specialist are not the same thing!

It is a common misconception that neurologists = headache specialists, and it is true that headache disorders in general are neurological conditions. In fact, many headache specialists are neurologists. But the two are actually separate titles and areas of specialty, and when it comes to treatment of Headache Disorders it can often be an important distinction to make.

WHAT IS A NEUROLOGIST?

We have a tremendous respect for general neurologists in Oxford MS, who must have a large breadth of knowledge about a wide spectrum of neurological diseases. A neurologist is trained on every neurological disorder and treats a wide variety of concerns—such as movement disorders, dementia, seizures and some very rare disorders—in addition to headaches. Some neurologists do rounds on both clinic patients and on hospital patients during the course of a day.

However, most neurologists are not headache specialists and do not have added training in headache medicine. (See linked sources below from the American Headache Society.) A general neurologist that does not specialize in headache medicine may not have the training and up-to-date knowledge to offer the best care for headache patients.

Additionally, they may not have the time: the number one reason for a referral to a neurologist is for the chief complaint of “headache,” and there is often a 3-6 month wait to see a general neurologist for a headache disorder.

WHAT IS A HEADACHE SPECIALIST?

All patients who suffer from headache and facial pain disorders deserve the very best care, and that usually means from a Headache Specialist.

It takes special training and experience to be a Headache Specialist in the same way it takes special training to be an Epileptologist (a seizure specialist, which is a subspecialty of neurology) or an Endocrinologist (a subspecialty of internal medicine). A Headache Specialist is board-certified in headache medicine by either the United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties or by the National Headache Foundation.

Headaches specialists come from many different backgrounds, including internal medicine, family medicine, pain management, emergency medicine, pediatrics, psychologists, basic research scientists, clinical research coordinators, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, dentists, and pharmacists, to name a few.

Our training in headache medicine is extensive and ongoing, and far exceeds the training in headache medicine by most neurologists. Many past presidents of the American Headache Society and the National Headache Foundation are NOT neurologists.

WHAT DOES A HEADACHE SPECIALIST DO?

As Headache Specialists, we only treat Headache Disorders.

We follow migraine-specific treatments or evidence-based treatment guidelines published by the American Headache Society and the American Academy of Neurology, and we avoid prescribing harmful and dangerous narcotics, opioids, barbiturates and benzodiazepines.

We also addresses the comorbidities typically associated with primary and secondary Headache Disorders, such as anxiety & depression, sleep disorders, obesity, hypertension, allergies, and many others.

CAN A HEADACHE SPECIALIST HELP ME?

50% of all Headache Disorder patients are misdiagnosed.

Most of our patients at The Headache Center have seen some other medical professional—a general practitioner, an internal medicine specialist, a general neurologist, pain management, an ENT doctor, and ER provider, an eye doctor and/or a dentist—before they came to see us. They end up at The Headache Center because no other medical professional has been able to help them.

Headache problems usually stem from a complex medical disorder that requires years of dedicated training, expertise, and compassion. If you are not satisfied with your care, you deserve to be seen by a headache specialist. Do not give up hope!

Get more information by reading about the training of The Headache Center Founder and Director, Christina Treppendahl, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, AQH.

Visit our Reviews and Real Client Stories pages to hear honest testimonials from patients treated by the Headache Specialists at The Headache Center.

Neurologist in Oxford Ms vs. Headache Specialist Article Reference Links:

References:

Square One: Headache Education for the Medical Student
American Academic Headache Specialists in Neurology: Practice Characteristics and Culture
– Medscape: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/50848

Jackson MS Neurologist vs. Headache Specialist Article

Neurologist Oxford MS vs. Headache Specialist - YouTube

The post Neurologist Oxford MS appeared first on The Headache Center.

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The Headache Center by Jeremiah Onciu - 1y ago

 

A Southaven MS Neurologist and Headache Specialist are not the same thing!

It is a common misconception that neurologists = headache specialists, and it is true that headache disorders in general are neurological conditions. In fact, many headache specialists are neurologists. But the two are actually separate titles and areas of specialty, and when it comes to treatment of Headache Disorders it can often be an important distinction to make.

WHAT IS A NEUROLOGIST?

We have a tremendous respect for general neurologists in Southaven MS, who must have a large breadth of knowledge about a wide spectrum of neurological diseases. A neurologist is trained on every neurological disorder and treats a wide variety of concerns—such as movement disorders, dementia, seizures and some very rare disorders—in addition to headaches. Some neurologists do rounds on both clinic patients and on hospital patients during the course of a day.

However, most neurologists are not headache specialists and do not have added training in headache medicine. (See linked sources below from the American Headache Society.) A general neurologist that does not specialize in headache medicine may not have the training and up-to-date knowledge to offer the best care for headache patients.

Additionally, they may not have the time: the number one reason for a referral to a neurologist is for the chief complaint of “headache,” and there is often a 3-6 month wait to see a general neurologist for a headache disorder.

WHAT IS A HEADACHE SPECIALIST?

All patients who suffer from headache and facial pain disorders deserve the very best care, and that usually means from a Headache Specialist.

It takes special training and experience to be a Headache Specialist in the same way it takes special training to be an Epileptologist (a seizure specialist, which is a subspecialty of neurology) or an Endocrinologist (a subspecialty of internal medicine). A Headache Specialist is board-certified in headache medicine by either the United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties or by the National Headache Foundation.

Headaches specialists come from many different backgrounds, including internal medicine, family medicine, pain management, emergency medicine, pediatrics, psychologists, basic research scientists, clinical research coordinators, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, dentists, and pharmacists, to name a few.

Our training in headache medicine is extensive and ongoing, and far exceeds the training in headache medicine by most neurologists. Many past presidents of the American Headache Society and the National Headache Foundation are NOT neurologists.

WHAT DOES A HEADACHE SPECIALIST DO?

As Headache Specialists, we only treat Headache Disorders.

We follow migraine-specific treatments or evidence-based treatment guidelines published by the American Headache Society and the American Academy of Neurology, and we avoid prescribing harmful and dangerous narcotics, opioids, barbiturates and benzodiazepines.

We also addresses the comorbidities typically associated with primary and secondary Headache Disorders, such as anxiety & depression, sleep disorders, obesity, hypertension, allergies, and many others.

CAN A HEADACHE SPECIALIST HELP ME?

50% of all Headache Disorder patients are misdiagnosed.

Most of our patients at The Headache Center have seen some other medical professional—a general practitioner, an internal medicine specialist, a general neurologist, pain management, an ENT doctor, and ER provider, an eye doctor and/or a dentist—before they came to see us. They end up at The Headache Center because no other medical professional has been able to help them.

Headache problems usually stem from a complex medical disorder that requires years of dedicated training, expertise, and compassion. If you are not satisfied with your care, you deserve to be seen by a headache specialist. Do not give up hope!

Get more information by reading about the training of The Headache Center Founder and Director, Christina Treppendahl, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, AQH.

Visit our Reviews and Real Client Stories pages to hear honest testimonials from patients treated by the Headache Specialists at The Headache Center.

Neurologist in Southaven Ms vs. Headache Specialist Article Reference Links:

References:

Square One: Headache Education for the Medical Student
American Academic Headache Specialists in Neurology: Practice Characteristics and Culture
– Medscape: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/50848

Neurology Jackson MS vs. Headache Specialist Article

For more on Neurology in Oxford MS click here

Neurologist Southaven MS vs. Headache Specialist - YouTube

The post Neurologist Southaven MS appeared first on The Headache Center.

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The Headache Center by Jeremiah Onciu - 1y ago

 

A Hattiesburg MS Neurologist and Headache Specialist are not the same thing!

It is a common misconception that neurologists = headache specialists, and it is true that headache disorders in general are neurological conditions. In fact, many headache specialists are neurologists. But the two are actually separate titles and areas of specialty, and when it comes to treatment of Headache Disorders it can often be an important distinction to make.

WHAT IS A NEUROLOGIST?

We have a tremendous respect for general neurologists in Hattiesburg MS, who must have a large breadth of knowledge about a wide spectrum of neurological diseases. A neurologist is trained on every neurological disorder and treats a wide variety of concerns—such as movement disorders, dementia, seizures and some very rare disorders—in addition to headaches. Some neurologists do rounds on both clinic patients and on hospital patients during the course of a day.

However, most neurologists are not headache specialists and do not have added training in headache medicine. (See linked sources below from the American Headache Society.) A general neurologist that does not specialize in headache medicine may not have the training and up-to-date knowledge to offer the best care for headache patients.

Additionally, they may not have the time: the number one reason for a referral to a neurologist is for the chief complaint of “headache,” and there is often a 3-6 month wait to see a general neurologist for a headache disorder.

WHAT IS A HEADACHE SPECIALIST?

All patients who suffer from headache and facial pain disorders deserve the very best care, and that usually means from a Headache Specialist.

It takes special training and experience to be a Headache Specialist in the same way it takes special training to be an Epileptologist (a seizure specialist, which is a subspecialty of neurology) or an Endocrinologist (a subspecialty of internal medicine). A Headache Specialist is board-certified in headache medicine by either the United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties or by the National Headache Foundation.

Headaches specialists come from many different backgrounds, including internal medicine, family medicine, pain management, emergency medicine, pediatrics, psychologists, basic research scientists, clinical research coordinators, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, dentists, and pharmacists, to name a few.

Our training in headache medicine is extensive and ongoing, and far exceeds the training in headache medicine by most neurologists. Many past presidents of the American Headache Society and the National Headache Foundation are NOT neurologists.

WHAT DOES A HEADACHE SPECIALIST DO?

As Headache Specialists, we only treat Headache Disorders.

We follow migraine-specific treatments or evidence-based treatment guidelines published by the American Headache Society and the American Academy of Neurology, and we avoid prescribing harmful and dangerous narcotics, opioids, barbiturates and benzodiazepines.

We also addresses the comorbidities typically associated with primary and secondary Headache Disorders, such as anxiety & depression, sleep disorders, obesity, hypertension, allergies, and many others.

CAN A HEADACHE SPECIALIST HELP ME?

50% of all Headache Disorder patients are misdiagnosed.

Most of our patients at The Headache Center have seen some other medical professional—a general practitioner, an internal medicine specialist, a general neurologist, pain management, an ENT doctor, and ER provider, an eye doctor and/or a dentist—before they came to see us. They end up at The Headache Center because no other medical professional has been able to help them.

Headache problems usually stem from a complex medical disorder that requires years of dedicated training, expertise, and compassion. If you are not satisfied with your care, you deserve to be seen by a headache specialist. Do not give up hope!

Get more information by reading about the training of The Headache Center Founder and Director, Christina Treppendahl, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, AQH.

Visit our Reviews and Real Client Stories pages to hear honest testimonials from patients treated by the Headache Specialists at The Headache Center.

Neurologist in Hattiesburg Ms vs. Headache Specialist Article Reference Links:

References:

Square One: Headache Education for the Medical Student
American Academic Headache Specialists in Neurology: Practice Characteristics and Culture
– Medscape: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/50848

Neurology Jackson MS Article

Neurology Southaven Article

Neurologist Hattiesburg MS vs. Headache Specialist - YouTube

The post Neurologist Hattiesburg MS appeared first on The Headache Center.

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